35 Burst results for "George Mason University"

A highlight from Chris Kuiper: Fidelity Was Early to Bitcoin. Why? It's a Superior Asset That Should Be Evaluated Differently

Coin Stories with Natalie Brunell

05:27 min | Last month

A highlight from Chris Kuiper: Fidelity Was Early to Bitcoin. Why? It's a Superior Asset That Should Be Evaluated Differently

"Now you've got a superior form of money. And then as you study forms of money and network effects, you realize anyone that tries to quote improve upon this, they're going to make a trade off in terms of that decentralization or that security. Hello, and welcome to the Coin Stories podcast, where we get to explore the future of money, business, technology, and Bitcoin's revolutionary promise to boost economic prosperity around the world. I'm Natalie Brunell, and I'm here to learn with you. This podcast is for educational and entertainment purposes only. None of the discussions should constitute as official investment advice, and you should always do your own research. Please make sure you're subscribed to the show and hit that notifications button so you never miss out on any new episodes. This show is made possible and the content is free thanks to partnerships with companies I trust. And I'm very picky about who I choose to partner with. So I hope you take the time to listen to the ad reads throughout the show. Thanks for joining me. And if you're watching this on YouTube and want to see more videos like it, make sure to hit that like button. All right. It's time for the show. Welcome back to Coin Stories. Joining me this week is director of research for Fidelity Digital Assets, Chris Kuiper. They just put out another amazing Bitcoin report. So Chris, I'm really looking forward to talking to you. Thanks for joining me. My pleasure, Natalie. Thanks for having me. I would love to start with just a little bit of your background for those out there who are not familiar with you and what you do. Where are you from and how did you end up at Fidelity Digital Assets? Yeah, sure. So it's been a winding path, but an interesting one how a lot of parallels have all come together to this one. So I graduated undergrad in 09, worst time to graduate with a degree in finance. I wanted to get the capital market, stock market, that sort of thing. That was obviously very tough, but I joined a bank starting in banking as a credit analyst. So same kind of skill set. And then I was able to jump into capital markets a year or two after that, thankfully at a large money manager in Chicago. So most of my background has been on the traditional finance side. So I did CFA, all that kind of traditional finance stuff. And I was analyzing tech companies at this money manager because I have a hobby in technology. I'm not a computer programmer or a builder or anything like that, but I like to tinker. I build my own computers. I like to experiment. And it was through the technology side, some kind of tech magazine or publication or something. That's when I first heard about Bitcoin, it was in 2012. And I distinctly remember thinking, this is interesting from a technology perspective. And in 2013, I bought my first Bitcoin at around $40 or $45. I still have the receipt. And I quickly followed that up and say, unless anyone thinks I'm a Bitcoin billionaire, I bought two or three Bitcoin. And I did all the stupid stuff that everyone does with it. I traded it, I sold it, I lost it, you name it, right? So I'm sure there's only a fraction of one of those left, if anything. But it got me interested, right? The spark was lit and I kept going down the proverbial rabbit hole, learning more and more about Bitcoin. But it was still kind of from the technology standpoint. And so I am ashamed to say maybe, and we'll talk about this with our latest report, that I was in that group of maybe Bitcoin's the first technology, but something else will come along and improve upon it and make it better, right? That unfortunately was me. So the report that you mentioned that we put out, it's kind of personal for me. But I kept going down the traditional finance road. I was loving it, doing research, learning something every day, couldn't be happier. But I also had a real interest in economics. And so an opportunity came up. There's a fellowship at George Mason University. I'm a total econ nerd. I was reading blogs and books and articles from these professors there. And this fellowship came up and I said, I got to throw my hat in the ring. And so I did. I was accepted. And at that point, I was like, well, I can't turn this down, right? To go get a master's at GMU and interface with these professors I had been reading for so long. So that's what brought me from Chicago out to Washington, DC. And I was really fortunate to hear about and then seek out a professor there by the name of Dr. Larry White, who is one of the foremost experts on free banking. And then that's when things really started to click for me, right? The econ side and the tech side on Bitcoin, continuing to do my studies on Bitcoin. All of a sudden, it connected with the econ side of, wow, this could be a potential market -based money that is emerging from the marketplace organically, right? Something that we hadn't really seen, except for some of these free banking episodes and stuff like that. So I continued to follow that path. A lot of people out of that program go on to do policy work. I quickly realized that was not for me, so I went back to finance and I went back to being an equity analyst. And so then I started covering the payment companies. So the Squares, the PayPals, the Visa Mastercards of the world, as well as the financial exchanges. So Nasdaq, CME, all those companies were under my stable of companies that I had to research. And of course, they're starting to do stuff with Bitcoin and crypto by this point. And I just started writing reports on this and also writing an investor's guide to Bitcoin. So a lot of our clients at the job I was at were RIAs, they were interested, their clients were coming to them. And so I started bridging these two worlds together. My traditional finance background with my interest in crypto or Bitcoin specifically.

Natalie Brunell Chris Kuiper Chris Chicago 2012 2013 Larry White Natalie Washington, Dc GMU Fidelity Digital Assets $45 CME Nasdaq 09 Around $40 TWO George Mason University This Week First
Dennis Is Joined by Professor and Israelite Eugene Kontorovich

Dennis Prager Podcasts

02:44 min | 2 months ago

Dennis Is Joined by Professor and Israelite Eugene Kontorovich

"Eugene Kontorovich is the head of the International Law Department at the Kohelet Policy Forum, a Jerusalem think tank, and a professor at George Mason University, Scalia Law School. He has a piece in the Wall Street Journal, The Iran -Gaza War. It's not the Gaza war. It's Iran -Gaza, which is of course true. This is the conflict Tehran wants on Israeli soil through once -removed marauding militias. Professor Kontorovich is in Israel right now. So I take it, Professor, you divide your time between the US and Israel. Is that correct? Yeah, that's right. Thank God I'm in Israel now. I'm so lucky. I'd be horrified if I had to not be here. One of the things about Israel is when there's a war here, Israelis want to come, not leave. It's impossible to get a flight to Israel now. It's all booked, and I was lucky enough to already be here. So when you go to the US, it's in order for you to teach your classes at George Mason University? That's correct. I see. I'm a professor at George Mason. Good. So before we talk about your piece and your take on what is happening, I think it's important, as I did with Michael Oren yesterday, the former Israeli ambassador to the United States, give us a sense of what it is like right now to be living as an Israeli in Israel. He was telling me and my listeners that he was essentially a self -imposed isolation with his family in his apartment in Jerusalem. What have you decided to do? So yeah, there were definitely rockets on Jerusalem in the area that I'm in also yesterday, and we spent some time in the bomb shelters. There have not been rockets today, so we have not been in the bomb shelters. You know, basically you're running in and out of bomb shelters. That's part of life in a war like this, where the enemy purposefully targets civilians as their primary method of war. Right now I'm trying to get outside with my kids as much as possible, you know, take them on play dates and have them get some air, because we know it's gonna get worse before it gets better. Iran is going to try to bring their puppet Hezbollah into the war, creating a two -front war, and of course there's always the possibility of a direct confrontation with Iran. So this in a sense may even be the quiet before the storm.

Eugene Kontorovich Kontorovich International Law Department Israel Michael Oren Yesterday Hezbollah Today Scalia Law School George Mason United States ONE Kohelet Policy Forum Jerusalem Gaza War George Mason University Two -Front War Tehran Israeli
"george mason university" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:05 min | 3 months ago

"george mason university" Discussed on WTOP

"George mason university set an enrollment record this year surpassing 40 000 students and a record 4 500 freshmen the dow rallied 293 points in tuesday session jeff clay ball wtop news most asia pacific markets are higher at this hour if you're just tuning in we got a fresh update from the national hurricane center the hurricane bearing down on southwestern florida is strengthening now it's uh got 110 mile per hour winds getting close to becoming a category three storm and could get even more powerful overnight we'll check in with our steve dresner in tampa coming right up get ready for the nfl season with incredible offers from fan duel america's one number sports book new customers can get five dollars and get 200 in bonus plus all customers who bet five dollars will get 100 off nfl sunday ticket from youtube and youtube tv i love how on fan duel i can combine different profits into a parlay for a story big payout visit fan duel dot com slash big g that's fan duel dot com slash big g must be 21 or older and present in virginia first online real money wager only ten dollar first deposit deposit required bonus issued as non -withdrawable bonus bets that expire seven days after receipt restrictions apply see terms at fanduel .com slash sportsbook gambling problem call one eight hundred gambler nfl sunday ticket offer ends nine eighteen twenty three no refunds terms and embargoes apply a hundred hours off nfl sunday ticket not youtube tv youtube tv base plan required to watch youtube tv redemption requires a google account and current form of payment commercial use excluded subscription renews cancel anytime coming up two keys to the nationals win at toronto sports in ten minutes with frank on wtop go with your gut go with dynamite seventy percent of your dog's immune system is based in the so for overall health good nutrition is vital but how can you be sure your dog is getting getting the nutrition they need diet lacking proper nutrients can present issues like itching, scratching and a weak immune system however

"george mason university" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

05:59 min | 5 months ago

"george mason university" Discussed on WTOP

"The around a hundred dispensaries across the state need and you'll to be 21 bring cash or a debit card bring a good attitude and an open mind and products In Silver Spring, Luke Lucre, WTOP News. Horn Hub is blocking access to its website in for Virginia. users in It says it's making the move as a result of age verification legislation in Virginia that's now in effect. Back in May, Governor Youngkin signed a bill that requires users to verify their 18 through advanced methods to actually use sites like Pornhub. The Republican governor says the legislation is an effort to protect children from being exposed to adult content online, but new information suggests that users in Virginia may already be looking for workarounds avoid to the new law in Pornhub's response. Virginia's seen an increase in Google searches for VPNs. Those virtual are private networks that allow users to get around blocked sites. The porn website is also blocking access to users Mississippi, in where a similar law is in effect. It's 10 -05, days after the Supreme Court ruled that colleges and universities can no longer use affirmative action in their admission process. A group suing a public school system in our region says it plans to take its case to the high court. DOTOP's Scott Gelman tells us it involves a policy elite at an high school in Fairfax County. The case is about the constitutionality of a new admissions policy at Thomas Jefferson School High for Science and Technology. The policy implemented in 2020 removed a standardized test. The new process The Fairfax County Board School says the policy doesn't set racial goals or targets and it's race blind. In the lawsuit, some parents argue it discriminates against Asian Americans. Last year a federal judge struck down the policy but in May a circuit court of appeals in Richmond reversed the ruling. A George Mason University law professor tells the Associated Press that debate over the policy's constitutionality may depend on what can be proven about the county's motivations in implementing it. Mark Elman, WTOP News. And the Fairfax County Public School System tells us it doesn't have a negative action ruling. For the second time in three months a public school employee in Montgomery County ended up in court. 56 year old Todd Watkins who used to run the transportation department for Montgomery County Public Schools was accused of mishandling a contract for new school buses and for failing to properly manage the use of purchase cards in his department. The misconduct in office charge is a misdemeanor. He pleaded guilty on Friday. Prosecutors noted that former assistant director for transportation Charles Ewold stole $320 dollars. Ewold who's 37 and lives in Knoxville Maryland pleaded guilty to a felony theft scheme in the case in May. He'll be sentenced September 6th and faces up to 20 years in prison. who Watkins lives in Jefferson Maryland will be sentenced September 11th and faces probation up to 25 months in jail. Kate Ryan, WTOP News. Today was supposed to be the deadline for the federal government's plan to get all planes in the US retrofitted for new 5G equipment. But many airlines are struggling to update their fleets and that can mean delays and cancellations this holiday weekend. Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg warns planes not outfitted with updated 5G interference equipment could struggle to land in bad weather. While 80 % of have planes been updated many are awaiting retrofitting and supply chain issues are holding things up even further. Planes device have a called a radio altimeter telling them how far they are above the ground when they're about to land. Aviation analyst John Nance chance tells ABC News. The concern is that there is a possibility of a bleed over close enough for this new 5G service says it could cause radar altimeters which are critical to certain types of landings and says they have procedures in place to guide landings even in planes not that are fully updated. Coming up here on WTOP after traffic and weather are you cutting back on eating out these days. Apparently it's happening as the cost of just about everything continues to be high. It's 1008. Get a Precision AC tune up for only $59. Traffic and weather on the 8th we say good morning to Rob Stallworth in the traffic center. Good morning to you and good morning folks and welcome into the midday where the getaway traffic still is in full effect at this point. If you're traveling right now on I -95 in Virginia or South bounty you're on the brakes mainly approaching Garrisonville and merge emerged from the express into the main lanes about a 3 mile back up in the express lanes to continue to merge with the main lanes but then your delays continue past the Sinoport Parkway as you head toward the Rappahannock River in Fredericksburg then further south delays in Fredericksburg headed toward Route 1 Spotsylvania may have a crash northbound on I -95 after 1 in Route Spotsylvania as you head toward Route 3 the Plank Road. Otherwise if you're traveling on the Beltway in Virginia your interloop slowdowns between Tysons and McLean the earlier crash near the Georgetown Pike is clear the travel lanes are open still delays going across the American Legion Bridge traveling in Hybla Valley southbound Route 1 near Arlington Drive that's where we had the report of some brushfire activity in Maryland the Beltway the interloop slowdowns briefly approaching I -95 we had the report of a downed tree along the left side of the roadway outerloop near the ramp to University Boulevard may have one stopped in roadway northbound and southbound on the BW Parkway slowdowns between 197 Devon and Powder Mill Road if you're traveling northbound on the BW Parkway inside the Beltway near DC I -95 and 201 Kenilworth Avenue the right lane we understand is blocked for the work zone delays going toward the Bay Bridge eastbound leaving Route 2 and Ritchie Highway but we do have three lanes east and two lanes west across the Chesapeake Bay if you're thinking about an electric car plug in the fitsmall .com and find your electric ride today check the out Hyundai IONIQ the VW ID4 or the Toyota BZ4X at fitsmall .com that's the Fitzway Rob Stalworth WTOP traffic now your forecast from 7 News first alert meteorologist Jordan Evans severe alert for the weekend because of those shower and thunderstorm chances during the afternoon and evening

"george mason university" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:41 min | 10 months ago

"george mason university" Discussed on WTOP

"Restaurant or go to many other indoor venues, you needed to show proof that you had received the COVID-19 vaccine. But just how effective were those citywide mandates? When indoor vaccination mandates were in place, they were meant to increase vaccine uptake to decrease COVID cases and decrease COVID deaths. But Vitor mello with George Mason university's Mercedes center says compared to cities that didn't implement the mandate and I find that really that is not much to show for it. The study looked at mandates and cities around the country, including D.C. and at that level, the cost of invading this to most people wasn't extremely high. Because it was easy enough to go to a restaurant in Virginia, for instance, he says other research shows that a national mandate in France did have the kind of impact that city leaders were hoping for. John dome in WTO P news. We know prices have gone up for just about everything. And now we're learning that the average American is spending nearly a third of their income on rent. Once you reach that 30% threshold, they use Department of Housing says it becomes difficult to afford other basic necessities like food or transportation. While it's always been expensive to rent in big cities, the pandemic exacerbated the problem across the country. According to a recent report by moody's analytics, COVID migration to the southwest and southeast sent rents skyrocketing there, and wages nationally haven't been keeping up. The report says there are some exceptions in D.C. and suburban Maryland, for instance, wages are rising slightly higher than rents. And when prices in general are starting to cool down across the board. The Biden administration also recently rolled out steps to help ease the burden on renters. Shane is doing, they'll be TLP news

Vitor mello Mercedes center John dome George Mason university Department of Housing D.C. WTO Virginia France moody Biden administration Maryland Shane
"george mason university" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:34 min | 10 months ago

"george mason university" Discussed on WTOP

"Top local stories we're following this hour. Prices have gone up for just about everything as we know, and we're learning that the average American is now spending nearly a third of their income on rent. Once you reach that 30% threshold, they use Department of Housing says it becomes difficult to afford other basic necessities like food or transportation. While it's always been expensive to rent in big cities, the pandemic exacerbated the problem across the country. According to a recent report by moody's analytics, COVID migration to the southwest and southeast sent rents skyrocketing there, and wages nationally haven't been keeping up. The report says there are some exceptions in D.C. and suburban Maryland, for instance, wages are rising slightly higher than rents. And rent prices in general are starting to cool down across the board. The Biden administration also recently rolled out steps to help ease the burden on renters. Shayna stealin, WTO news. When COVID-19 vaccines were starting to become available, many cities, including D.C., rolled out indoor vaccination mandates. It required restaurants, for example, to check for proof of vaccination for customers and staff. Researchers at George Mason university and two other institutions have examined the effectiveness of those mandates in a comparison with cities that did not have them researchers found, there wasn't much proof that the mandates worked. COVID cases nor deaths were affected much and there's little evidence that it improved vaccination rates either. One of the reasons for the lack of success, researchers found it was too easy to travel to another jurisdiction that did not. Have a mandate

Department of Housing Biden administration Shayna stealin D.C. moody Maryland WTO George Mason university
"george mason university" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:38 min | 10 months ago

"george mason university" Discussed on WTOP

"You could go inside a D.C. restaurant? A new study out this morning says when those mandates were in place, including in D.C., you really didn't work. The new study from George Mason university's Mercedes center looked at the impact indoor vaccination requirements had in several cities around the country, including D.C.. COVID cases were not affected, COVID deaths were not affected. And really, there is no evidence that people more vaccinated because of this mandates. At least compared to cities that didn't have the mandates, Vitor mello helped author this study and his theory is that citywide mandates just weren't inconvenient enough. Somebody in D.C. could just go and take the metro to Arlington. Other research found that France's national vaccine mandates did have an impact. If you make difficult enough for people, they're more likely to do what you want to do. John dome in WTO news. Prices have gone up for everything and now the average American is spending nearly a third of their income on rent. Once you reach that 30% threshold, they use Department of Housing says it becomes difficult to afford other basic necessities like food or transportation. While it's always been expensive to rent in big cities, the pandemic exacerbated the problem across the country. According to a recent report by moody's analytics, COVID migration to the southwest and southeast sent rents skyrocketing there, and wages nationally haven't been keeping up. The report says there are some exceptions in D.C. and suburban Maryland, for instance, wages are rising slightly higher than rents. And run prices in general are starting to cool down across the board. The Biden administration also recently rolled out steps to help ease the burden on renters. Shayna stealing, WTO P news

D.C. Vitor mello John dome George Mason university Department of Housing Arlington WTO France moody Biden administration Maryland Shayna
"george mason university" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:19 min | 11 months ago

"george mason university" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"7 on Wall Street. Now 49° in Central Park. Apache fog this morning, it's going to stay cloudy and cooler today with highs in the low 50s. Maybe a shower tonight will get down to the low 40s, and Michael Barr is here now with what else is going on in New York and around the world. Good morning, Michael. Good morning, Nathan. Pope Francis delivered the homily at the funeral mass for former Pope Benedict. In Italian Pope Francis said Benedict may your joy be complete as you hear his voice. Mourners gathered in Saint Peter's square outside the Vatican today where Benedict is being laid to rest. George Mason university professor Helen Alvarez spoke about Benedict's legacy. I think he's a model of humility and modesty. He was definitely a servant of the church. He didn't want to come to Rome. He wanted to stay in Germany and remain a theologian. He didn't want to be head of the office of doctrine, but John Paul two really twisted his arm. And he really did not want to be Pope. He thought, you know, he was not great enough for it. Benedict would be buried in the crypt under St. Peter's Basilica. President Joe Biden says he intends to visit the U.S. Mexico border next week for a firsthand look at conditions as his administration contends with a surge in migration. Biden has already scheduled to travel to Mexico next week to meet with the presidents of Mexico and Canada. He wanted violence, that's what investigators in New York City say about Trevor bickford arrested for allegedly attacking three police officers near Times Square on New Year's Eve. The 19 year old from Maine was arraigned yesterday and charged in the machete attack. It's a war of words between New York City mayor Eric Adams and former mayor Bill de Blasio's administration. Adams is calling on his predecessor to stop his team from criticizing the current administration. I call Bill the other day. I said Bill, what's going on? What's going on? And then the bills comes guy who's probably the roast comms guy in the history of communication. Adams is talking about de Blasio's former spokesperson Bill nihart, who has been increasingly critical of atoms on Twitter. Adams said they had 8 years to do their job once they're gone, their experts

Pope Francis Benedict Michael Barr Saint Peter's square Helen Alvarez office of doctrine St. Peter's Basilica President Joe Biden Central Park Mexico Pope Benedict George Mason university Nathan Trevor bickford Vatican John Paul Michael New York Rome Eric Adams
"george mason university" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

09:03 min | 1 year ago

"george mason university" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Shares their advancing now by 4.6%, VRV therapeutic shares are plunging after regulators put development of the company's lean gene Ali du Jean editing drug candidate on hold. VRV, Lauren Al by 26%. Again, recapping in NASDAQ just turning higher up less than one tenth of 1% while the S&P up three tenths. I'm Charlie peloton. That is a Bloomberg business flash. This is balance and power with David Weston. In fleischer remains a challenge, it is why it is our number one focus here at The White House. Clearly what is happening in the UK is affecting consumers is affecting businesses. Where the world of politics meets the world of business. We need to unleash American energy to bring down prices so people are going to afford the things their families need. The Republicans have got to get on a forward moving message in terms of not just what we're against. People get that. They want to know what the vision is. How you're going to make it happen. Balance of power with David Westin on Bloomberg radio. One day a point away from midterm elections, Republicans are on offense and Democrats are on defense, while law enforcement goes on high alert to ensure everyone's security. From the Bloomberg Washington bureau, welcome to the second hour balance of power, I'm David Weston. So tomorrow is the midterm election. And we all will be focused on who wins who loses. And when we will know the answer to some of those questions. But in the meantime, questions have security, not just ballot security, but personal security have arisen as increasing instance of violence have popped up most notably, of course, against Paul Pelosi, the husband of the speaker of House. Sega's through exactly what we need to do what we are doing to ensure everyone's security. Welcome now, Andrew mccabe. His professor at George Mason university, mister mccabe served as the deputy director of the FBI and is the author of the threat, how the FBI protects America in the era of terror and Trump. So Mitch mccabe, thank you so much for being with us. Appreciate it. So give us a sense of the challenges now in front of the FBI as they do try to keep us safe from a whole range of possible threats, terror, both domestic and international. Sure, David, so thanks. Thanks for having me here. It's an incredibly diverse array of threats that the FBI has got to keep a very close watch on and try to mitigate any of those things from turning into actual attacks. You know, you start at the very top of the pyramid, the FBI has told us themselves and in the last year or so, that the domestic violent extremists are the most significant threat we face from in terms of counter terrorism issues. And that's a notable turn right from where the FBI's counter terrorism program was for many years under my leadership and others where we considered the most serious threats to be posed to us from foreign to our organization. So that, I think, acknowledges the seriousness of the threat we face from within our own borders. And we don't have to look very far to see how that threat has played out. We know that political issues are strong drivers of extremists, whether those folks are anti anti black anti semitic anti immigrant, just people who harbor deep grievances about the political process and political results in the past. We know those are very common themes right now. We have a number of individuals who are actively running for Congress and other offices and continuing to perpetuate the myths and the falsehoods about the last election. So it is a very it's a roiling and kind of fragile environment right now. People's people are very actively engaged and some of those folks could resort to violence take matters into their own hands. And the way that you saw with the attack on Paul Pelosi, just a week ago. So what can the FBI do? And what does it need to do it? Does it have the resources in your judgment or do we need to rethink it? Well, like any law enforcement organization, the FBI is never has quite the number of resources they would like to have or they think they need to have to cover all the threats that they are looking at. Nevertheless, the most important thing for the FBI right now is to acknowledge this shift in the threat landscape and to pour all of their resources and attention on those top priority threats. I think we saw in the run up to January 6th. That there seems to be and I think this question still hangs out. There's hasn't been answered in any significant way yet, but there are many questions that revolve around this idea of whether or not the FBI was tracking the domestic threats and specifically those threats of violence resulting from discontent with the results of the 2020 election. Whether they were watching those things, even in places like social media space and other open-source venues where active conversations, planning, references to violence on January 6th were taking place, but those warnings don't seem to have been heated or adequately prepared for by the FBI by DHS or by other elements of law enforcement. So that to me is the area where they really need to be doing better work. From someone who has never worked in the FBI, it strikes me that you're sort of damned if you do damned if you don't. If you don't catch the threat in a develops into something, then you're blamed for it. On the other hand, if you really monitor as much as you might, you are invading people's privacy and you're violating perhaps civil civil rights. How do you strike that balance? You're absolutely right to identify that as an incredibly sensitive part of the work. And it is nowhere more sensitive than when we start talking about monitoring domestic extremist groups who by definition are engaged in some level of First Amendment protected political speech. But the line there is drawn at conduct. And when they begin engaging in conduct, that's a threat to the public. We're planning for acts of violence. That's when they've gone beyond First Amendment protections and are doing things that law enforcement needs to try to mitigate. You know, that environment in which you conduct that sort of monitoring, it's not static. The bureau can't keep doing the same things they were doing, you know, when I was there in the late 2015, 2016, 2017 or certainly years before that, those controls, those policies and procedures that restrain what the bureau can do. Have to constantly be reviewed and reviewed with lawmakers and those who are in charge of overseeing the FBI's work to make sure that the puro is leaning far enough forward to mitigate the threats, but not so far forward to have a chilling effect on people's rights to privacy and rights to political speech. There's no easy way to do it, David, but the professionals who are engaged in it every day are usually the best suggestions of how that needs to be done and then of course there's a lot of lawyers at chime in as with everything. Professor, as you know so well, we have elections tomorrow and we don't know how they'll come out, but there's a distinct possibility that Republicans will take a majority in the House. If so, the new chair of the House judiciary committee may well be Jim Jordan from Ohio and there was a report that came out recently from the minority, the Republicans on the House judiciary committee saying that if they get in charge, there's going to be a lot of investigating if the FBI really accusing the FBI because of some reliance, I guess, on whistleblowers of a lot of politicking, a lot of political influence. What do you make of that? What is the risk here with the FBI? Well, oversight is an incredibly important thing. It's an essential piece of keeping the institutions that we rely on to protect our democracy like the FBI, like the Department of Justice. Effectively on their toes and to make sure that they are being held publicly accountable for the work they do for the work they don't do, how they spend their money, that sort of thing. My concern with some of these comments you hear coming from people like representative Jordan and others are they seem to begin from a conclusion of politicization and wrongdoing. And that really to me throws up the red flag that these are politically motivated attacks rather than legitimate efforts at oversight and understanding what the bureau is doing and how they maybe should be doing their job better. So it remains to be seen David. I think embarking on a number of investigations that are essentially tied to political retribution on one level or another. That is going to tie the FBI up in a pretty significant consumption of resources and time as they deal with those investigations. And all of that takes away from the amount of time and effort and focus they can train on the threats that we face. So yes, oversight absolutely needs to be conducted, but it needs to be done in a way that is legitimate and substantive and transparent. Not retaliatory and political. So it remains to be seen how that will go. And then ultimately makes us more safe rather than let's say thank you so much that is professor Andrew mccabe. He is a former deputy director of the FBI. Coming up here, the view on the midterm elections from outside

FBI David Weston Paul Pelosi Ali du Jean Lauren Al Charlie peloton David Westin Bloomberg radio Andrew mccabe mister mccabe Mitch mccabe fleischer George Mason university House judiciary committee Bloomberg Sega White House
Mediaite's Sarah Rumpf Offended by Mark Levin's 'Ranting'

Mark Levin

01:51 min | 1 year ago

Mediaite's Sarah Rumpf Offended by Mark Levin's 'Ranting'

"And it puts some really vicious stupid people to work Now I would not call Sarah rump a vicious stupid person I don't know her All I said is she seemed like a 12 year old Her lack of substance in her writing style she took grave grave not even great grave offense She pointed out I'm a lawyer And she was upset at my ranting And she said of course I didn't provide any substantive information in response to her genius Of course I did it's right there on the video that she attached But she's a slow listener She said you know there's four elements for elements in greenhouse gases really Who knew Sarah I've studied this issue at great length many many years ago When you were 12 years old doctor Edward wegman from page one 32 of liberty and tyranny I wrote that book I thought you should know A professor at the center for computational statistics at George Mason university Chair of the national Academy of Sciences committee on applied theoretical statistics Board member of the American statistical association More than just a lawyer was tasked by congressional committee to lead a group of experts in examining the hockey stick evidence Now this evidence but like getting into great detail you see Sarah broadcasting you have limited time Which is why when you write a stupid essay you have all the time in the world

Sarah Rump Edward Wegman Center For Computational Stati National Academy Of Sciences C Sarah George Mason University American Statistical Associati Congressional Committee Hockey
Navy Ship to Be Named After Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Mark Levin

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Navy Ship to Be Named After Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

"It would be good to know there's going to be a navy ship named after the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg I would think that'll scare the hell out of the enemy wouldn't it mister Medusa Oh my God here comes the Ruth Bader Ginsburg How many things By the government ships or anything have been named after Anton and Scalia His death preceded hers I guess I guess none While George Mason university law school I didn't say that

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Navy Supreme Court Ruth Bader Ginsburg Scalia Anton George Mason University Law Sc
Politico: DOJ Shuts Down China-Focused Anti-Espionage Program

Mark Levin

01:53 min | 1 year ago

Politico: DOJ Shuts Down China-Focused Anti-Espionage Program

"I don't get this This is from Politico which is a reliably left wing site but nonetheless Department of Justice shuts down China focused anti espionage program Now we hit on this the other day but not enough The China initiative is being cast aside largely because of perceptions that it unfairly painted Chinese Americans and U.S. residents of Chinese origin is disloyal A listen to this by grouping cases under the China initiative rubric we help give rise to a harmful perception That the department applies a lowered standard to investigate and prosecute criminal conduct related to that country or that we in some way view people with racial ethnic or familial ties to China differently So this is an attorney general for a national security Matthew Olson For delivery the George Mason university in Virginia But justice's top national security official insisted that the decision amounted to a reframing and recalibration not an abandonment Of muscular law enforcement response to the national security threat posed by the People's Republic of China So let me get this straight Communist China is it's not even a close second is by far number one in terms of stealing our information They massive espionage program in our own country The FBI has said to the greatest threat the CIA has said that the greatest threat everybody knows they're the greatest threat But we should eliminate this initiative which was supported by Democrats and Republicans alike when it was first put in place Because it creates a pejorative about Chinese people

China Matthew Olson Politico Department Of Justice George Mason University U.S. Republic Of China Virginia FBI CIA
"george mason university" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"george mason university" Discussed on Revision Path

"And I learned that quality is actually something that happens when the whole team works together as a unit when everybody helps each other. And so I also, hire people that don't have egos, you know, because we really do critique each other and help each other grow. And ensure that everything that comes out, everything that comes out of our shop has the quality that the customer expects. The client expects. But most important, I learned how to manage. I learned that if you treat your people, like your equal. Like people, you're not their parent. And you shouldn't be. But you treat them like you're equal. And you know, if you're having a problem with someone, just have a conversation and say, hey, what's going on? Is everything okay? How can I help you? You tell me how I can help you. Then you have a team that is that will come to you first, you know? If anything goes wrong, my team just comes to me and say, hey, here's what went down. And then I'm like, okay, so how did you fix it? So we worked through the solutions and we grow people. And I think that that is such a wonderful quality that I loved during the 15 years. I love being able to go to my boss and say, here's how I screwed up. Here's how I think we should fix it. Do you agree? And 9 times out of ten, he did. Oh, yeah, that's a great call. And you know what? It's okay. We all screw up sometimes. And so I managed the same way. And I think it's really important that folks feel folks feel free to grow and to make those mistakes because that's how you get exceptional designers, right? And I have exceptional designers. So I am a very lucky person. I mean, yeah, definitely sounds like, you know, to be able to have that level of openness among the team like that that really takes really, I think, death toll would also very skillful kind of just management and with being an aesthetic as long as you have being able to really learn that in that environment is definitely helped out with what you're doing at hatcher. Absolutely. Absolutely. 100%. Now you also are a design educator. We've had several design educators here on revision path. You're an adjunct professor at George Mason university where you've been since 2008..

hatcher George Mason university
"george mason university" Discussed on TFG Truth

TFG Truth

07:24 min | 2 years ago

"george mason university" Discussed on TFG Truth

"Welcome to TFD truth where each and every week we report facts, expose hypocrisy in espouse common sense, I'm Mike hayflick along with my partner remote this week, Mike spera. And this week we're happy to be joined by Arielle Davidson and on Twitter at political L all right, and that's going to be POL IT. I see AL political ELE. Nearly a 150,000 followers, Ariel is a writer, a researcher. And now I think this is a bit of breaking news Ariel. I'm associate director at George Mason university center for the Middle East and international law. Another little bit of breaking news is that congratulations to Joe Biden and we now have 7% inflation. So those numbers keep going up. The highest inflation rate in 40 or so really cool to announce your new position. But also to pair it up with Joe Biden and Kamala hitting 7% inflation. So this is really cool. This is great. Area, welcome to TFT truth. Thank you so much for having me. I'm super pumped to be here. Yeah, we're so happy you decided to join with us and hopefully this isn't the first time because it just seems like facts being misreported and all sorts of hypocrisy and all sorts of crazy, far, far less than common sense, a seemingly happening every day, every minute. So we feel like we could do this podcast Mike eternally, right? Yeah, I mean, we never have a lack of crap to talk about. Let's put it that way. There's so much. Right now, any portion of the government is just a content factory. So we don't have a tough time finding things to talk about. Yeah, Ariel, we usually will say, who's the best content factory maker, Nancy Pelosi? Is it joy Reid? Is it AOC? AOC I mean, they're all competing to get their material, I guess on a podcast like ours. So we're happy that they do that for us. So before we get to some things that are kind of on the world stage, including in the U.S., just tell us a little bit about yourself. Tell us for our sake, but also for our listeners sake. Absolutely. So I was a writer at the federalist for a good amount of time and before that I worked at the Hoover institution, I was doing economic research there. As well as a TA at Stanford business school. And I actually just recently finished my law degree at Georgetown, so I will be getting my degree in about a month. Thank you. I am incredibly relieved. And as you mentioned, I now am the associate director of the center for Middle East and international law at George Mason university's law school. It's been a long road, but I'm very excited to be here. And I think one of my so I do comment on the Middle East, international law, but as you mentioned, I comment a lot in domestic politics. And, you know, what I've noticed and what I think is really important is that there be kind of younger millennials like myself I'm under 30 who speak about these issues and kind of normalize positions that are sort of considered forbidden within either academia or amongst my age group more generally. And you kind of, when I say the things I say, I give, I hope, at least. I give people the permission to say the things they want to say. I can't tell you how many young college students have messaged me. You know, I'm 29 full disclosure, but I can't tell you how many young college students are straight out of college, have messaged me and said, hey, you know, this is something that I've talked about with my friends, but I've never been able to say openly. And you know, I'm not the arbiter of what's permitted and what's not permitted, but I'm happy to kind of break through the brush and clear a pathway so that people can say things that I think need to be said because increasingly, as you both pointed out, I can Ryan. This is something that Mike and Mike Mike and Mike and I saw an episode myself when I saw this. No problem. Because you guys, as you guys both mentioned, you know, the regime sustains itself by churning out lies. And the most important thing that you might and might can both do is to continue to challenge those lies, continue to give people the permission to say the things that normally the regime tells them they're not allowed to say. And Ariel, if I can pick up on that, so I'm also 29 and a millennial myself. And I'm interested. I'm going off the cuff here. I didn't even think they asked us until right now when you said how heavily involved, you have been in with education. You know, there's a couple things, right? I think kids go to college, they listen to everything they're told. They don't think outside the box because it's kind of like I just got to go get a degree. I got to get there. And then they come out of college, saying everything that was repeated by a college professor without any thought or any, I guess, looking things up on their own, just taking the initiative to do that. Do you see that in your experience education that it truly is a lot of just bad information out there? Or is it only certain professors? Is it certain colleges? I mean, I don't know because I only went to one college and it was a local New York college. So that's why for me, you've been at a lot of major colleges across the country. I have not. Right. You know, it's tough to say, when I was at Stanford, I had the privilege of working with some phenomenal economists. And so I was very spoiled. I can't comment necessarily on the academy of I've experienced because I've had very positive experiences. But what I will say is this is that I've noticed that the movement against CRT and elementary schools and in high schools, it's not super comforting to me in the sense that, okay, great. You don't want your kids indoctrinated at age 6 and 7 or at age 14, 15, but you're not really worried about what's happening in higher Ed. And to me, that's a much bigger issue. Because I think that, yes, it's great to take a stand with elementary school, middle school high school. But what about once they get to college? The indoctrination is going to take place there anyway. And I actually think what I've noticed personally is that the students are much more activist driven than the professors are, which I think is pretty alarming. And I'm going to try to keep this brief, but I'll tell the story to kind of illustrate the connection between students and professors when it comes to activism on college campuses. So after I left middlebury college, the year after I graduated, one of the groups I helped to start over there invited Charles Murray to campus to speak. He's the author of the bell curve, which was controversial when it came out in the 90s and then he also wrote a book and I think in 2011, 2012 called coming apart. And it was an attempt to explain the political divides in our country at the time. And when he came to campus, right before he came to campus, the outrage that faculty members had towards some faculty members was unbelievable. And what they actually did is they organized protests of students. And they set up three different locations across middle grade campus to kind of rile up the students. And then when Charles Murray came, there were also some outside agitators that came as well. And one professor who was supposed to interview him was actually assaulted, and she suffered.

Ariel Mike hayflick Mike spera Arielle Davidson Joe Biden George Mason university center Stanford business school center for Middle East and int Mike Kamala Hoover institution Nancy Pelosi George Mason university Reid Mike Mike Georgetown New York college Twitter Middle East
Pretty Much All of Journalism Now Leans Left, Studies Shows

The Larry Elder Show

02:09 min | 2 years ago

Pretty Much All of Journalism Now Leans Left, Studies Shows

"The media overwhelmingly left wing, I've seen studies showing self described liberals or Democrats outnumber self described Republicans or conservatives 8 to one, 5 to one, ten to one, depending upon the study. I don't believe The New York Times has a single conservative member of its editorial board. I don't believe the LA times to the single member, whose conservative of their editorial board. A growing number of Americans get their primary source of news from the algorithms that have been formed for them from Facebook or for yugo for Google. Yahoo, all left wing. And Biden has a nerve to complain that he's getting negative coverage. Can you imagine how bad the coverage would be if the coverage were truly fair and balanced? There's a book called left turn. We talked about it a little while ago. By professor from George Mason university named Tim gross close. And came out a few years ago. He looked at the top 20 sources of news, almost all of them were left wing. And based upon a study that was done, if the media were truly fair and balanced. The average state would vote the way Texas vote, which is about 8 to ten points in favor of Republican. There are two major newspapers in Washington D.C. The Washington Post in Washington times. Washington times a much smaller, of course, in The Washington Post, but it's one of the rare cities to have two newspapers one left wing and one right wing that are considered to be major newspapers. And so the people that were subscribing to The Washington Post were given free subscriptions to the Washington times, and the people that were subscribed to the Washington time for giving free subscriptions to The Washington Post. And then they looked at voting in those areas to find out whether that made any difference. And it did, the people that were subscribing to the Washington times a conservative newspaper were now voting slightly more left wing. The people who were only reading The Washington Post would now were getting free copies of the Washington times, voted substantially more conservative, meaning if they only knew what was going on, they might very well change

Washington Times The Washington Post Tim Gross Washington D.C. La Times The New York Times George Mason University Biden Yahoo Facebook Google Texas Washington
"george mason university" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"george mason university" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Power a close race in Virginia who raises questions about the Biden effect We talked with dean Mark roselle of George Mason university But first we get a market check from Charlie pellet I thank you very much David Weston stocks higher across the board but first The Walt Disney Company is raising the price of a single admission to its California theme parks on the busiest days by 6 and a half percent all part of the company's shift to a system that ties admission costs to demand that ticket by the way going up to $164 Disney shares that they are higher today on the news Disney up now by 1.64% S&P up 24 up 5 tenths of 1% the dial up 87 up two tenths nez stack up 136 for the NASDAQ composite index again of 9 tenths of 1% Stocks are higher as traders gear for a string of earnings reports from big tech companies this week including Facebook after the bell while keeping in mind inflation concerns and rising COVID-19 risks Facebook shares now up by about one tenth of 1% Ten year old 1.63% spot gold up 7 tenths of 1% 1806 ounce and West Texas intermediate crude up one tenth to 1% 83 84 a barrel As for the earnings backdrop Chris Harvey is head of equity strategy at Wells Fargo securities Once earnings is over we get back to the fundamentals we get back to the macro drivers And for the most part demand is still good And we are seeing stocks moving higher We were just talking about jobs and wages here on balance of power now ExxonMobil is weighing salary increases as it tries to halt employe attrition across its business divisions after sweeping job and benefit cuts according to a recording of the event CEO Darren Woods has told employees that a town hall style meeting that they should be quote encouraged by the ongoing salary review process again that according to a recording ExxonMobil shares their up now by 1.6% Recapping stocks pushing higher with the S&P up by 24 up 5 tenths of 1% I'm Charlie pallette that David Weston is a Bloomberg.

dean Mark roselle David Weston Charlie pellet Walt Disney Company George Mason university Biden Chris Harvey Wells Fargo securities Virginia Facebook West Texas California ExxonMobil CEO Darren Woods
"george mason university" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"george mason university" Discussed on KOMO

"Campus. First lady, in fact, did the virtual ceremony from George Mason University in Virginia just last week. Karen thanks for the update, ABC NEWS White House correspondent Karen Travers Commodities time 6 20 an hour propel insurance money Update. ABC NEWS Wall Street now earlier gains for the major stock indexes evaporated by closing time yesterday, leaving the Dow Jones 267 points lower. Just about 34,000. He s and P 500 gave up. 35 points to NASDAQ composite shed half a percent on the day. The Bitcoin sellout that began a week ago continued yesterday with the digital currency falling 13% to hit 38 5 85 at midday. That was its lowest level since February, 9th the last time that it dropped below $40,000. The Commerce Department says housing starts fell 9.5% in April compared to the month before. Analysts say soaring lumber prices are most likely forcing builders to delay starting on new projects. Supply chain problems. They're still slowing deliveries of all sorts of products and packed ports. Maybe the major issue. Cargo ships are being forced right now to wait for days off shore before they can unload at Port. Generally in ABC News, where poised for some more losses today, the Dow futures are down 377 points that's over 1%, the S and P is down. 1.3% and the NASDAQ Futures are down more than one and three quarters percent right now. Coming up. Next, we'll check traffic and weather. Cuomo.

Karen 377 points Karen Travers 9.5% 13% Virginia April February, 9th 267 points ABC NEWS yesterday last week George Mason University 1.3% today White House P 500 half a percent a week ago Wall Street
No Shrooms on Mars, Just Misinformation

Kottke Ride Home

02:00 min | 2 years ago

No Shrooms on Mars, Just Misinformation

"Yesterday. there was a bit of excitement online about a new paper. Claiming fun guy had been found growing on the surface of mars. The news really made the rounds buoy. Perhaps by reddit co founder. Alexis hannigan tweeting out one of the articles on it and tagging elon. Musk sane quote just think hashtag space shrooms are gonna be intense af and quotes but sadly the whole thing was a bunch of crap. Basically just the latest in a long line of one particular hacks attempts to get his pseudoscience hogwash published in legitimate journals so the claim that was actually published in the journal advances in microbiology and included co-authors from harvard smithsonian center for astrophysics george mason university and other institutions. That should know better. Was that images taken by. Nasr's rovers on mars as well as its reconnaissance. Orbiter high-rise camera show several fungus like organisms. And that they believe the images show fungus because quoting the paper. Fungi thrive in radiation intense environments and quotes and quoting from future ism. The team went so far. As to say that black fungi. Bacteria like specimens also appeared atop the rovers. They didn't stop there. The team also examined photos taken by nasa's high rise and found evidence for amorphous specimens within a crevice that change shape and location than disappeared. It is well established that a variety of terrestrial organisms survive. Mars like conditions. The team concludes given the likelihood earth has been seeding mars with life and life has been repeatedly transferred between worlds. It would be surprising if there was no life on mars. The team argues that these martian life forms would have evolved on an already be adapted to the low temperatures intermittent availability of water. Low amounts of free oxygen and high levels of radiation and quotes.

Alexis Hannigan Harvard Smithsonian Center For Elon Reddit Nasr Nasa
"george mason university" Discussed on 550 KFYI

550 KFYI

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"george mason university" Discussed on 550 KFYI

"Raiser for George Mason University's Center for Psychological Services. In response to the pandemic, the center has been providing free psychological support for essential workers joined the virtual event on Monday, May 3rd at six p.m. to raise funds for this important cause and watch the band shade perform a song from their newest album. Yes, but you already know, register now had go doggy m u dot e d u slash food for thought This message has been made possible by leidos Ellie i d O s com Novak is powering a new generation by providing renewable energy, including solar. Once new solar projects are completed in 2023, no vet will provide enough to power 100,000 homes. Members may also purchase solar panels now through Noveck Solutions. Protecting the environment, providing reliable, safe, affordable electricity because future generations are depending on it. Novak keeping life bright Hi folks. It's Kris Allen, CEO of I Cleanse In the past. You've heard me talk about I cleanse and our UBC disinfection products where the company that's been helping to keep your employees and customers safe during this pandemic. We've done this by using our pad and state of the art UBC disinfection products to disinfect your phones, tablets and other devices around the workplace. Well, today I'm proud to announce our revolutionary new product. We're calling it the I cleanse Swift UV. The Swift UV is faster, more efficient, Operate and kills the coronavirus flew in I'm cold in his little is 15 seconds. It does all this well coming in at our lowest price point ever. And just like our products it's made right here in the U. S. A swift UV is already getting rave reviews. Just listen to what Larry Santilli, CEO of Athena Health Care had to say about it. Chris Allen and his team have developed an amazing tool to complement are expanding infection prevention programs. So don't wait. Go toe I cleanse com to learn more about swift UV again. That's the letter I cleanse dot com. I care. So I cleanse, do you At night, I would hear my mom cry. In her room and she would do it alone. Because now that I know why she isolated herself because she didn't want my siblings tonight to know that She was just a fearful of thus, to hear more stories from home stretch graduates who have transformed their lives. Please join our virtual vent on May 6th at eight. A.m. is that home stretch via Orkut Register, Salesforce.

Blocked Suez Canal Exposes Global Supply Chain's Fragility

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

01:56 min | 2 years ago

Blocked Suez Canal Exposes Global Supply Chain's Fragility

"Lead. Today comes to us. Courtesy of the ever given that is a thirteen hundred foot. Long two hundred foot wide containership. One of the biggest of its kind. That is as of this moment. Most embarrassingly stuck jamming up the suez canal. Nobody going north not going south one of the key routes of global trade basically closed we have gotten christine. Mcdaniel on zoomed. Help us understand how this might play out. She's a senior research. Fellow at the mercatus center at george mason university. Thanks so much for coming on. Thank you nice to be here. So i have to tell you the first thing i thought when i saw pictures of this ship turned sideways in the canal. Other than how the heck did that happen was wow. The global supply chain is really really fragile. If this can block a major artery yes. It is fragile. There's lots of moving parts but remember the global shipping industry logistics. They are used to supply shocks demand. Shocks weather related war-related. So you know it's nothing they haven't dealt with before fair enough but if you are a a tanker company looking at this traffic jam in the suez canal. How long are you gonna wait and let your extremely valuable ships. Sit there in the backlog before you go around down the south of africa and angola the long way round right. Well economists especially trade. Economists have spent some time trying to calculate how much time cost and international trade The couple economists demanded that each additional delay of shipping is equivalent to about a half a percent to two percents patera And then of course. This is cascading. Because it's not just the stuff on that particular ship That's that's delayed by that. it's everything else. That's getting delayed because of

Suez Canal Mercatus Center Mcdaniel George Mason University Christine Angola Africa
Indoor Farming With Jackie Roberts Of Appharvest

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

04:40 min | 2 years ago

Indoor Farming With Jackie Roberts Of Appharvest

"Okay. So we've all seen greenhouses interviewed domino olen for example who runs the greenhouse at george mason university in virginia about how her facilities providing food and even spices to the university's food service and see greenhouses with just flowers like it were states and other properties and now we see cannabis plants being grown in greenhouses. But what about greenhouses on a commercial scale and ones that recycle water do not use toxic. Fertilizers or get more out of the acreage than tenting and outdoor farm would right. Well that's what my guest today says there novel. Indoor farm will actually do so. Let's find out how it works. I'd like you to meet jackie. Roberts chief sustainability officer at ap harvest. Jackie has been in the sustainability spaces. I said for probably twenty five years including in the same role chief sustainability officer at the carlisle group which is investment company and as senior director of the environmental defense fund. Or where. I first met her probably about ten years ago. I think it was right. She earned all her degrees from yale. Smart cookie that she is including a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering and to help them manage degrees one from the yale. School of management and the other from the school of the environment without further ado welcomed green captions radio jackie. And thank you for joining us. I'm so excited. Thank you down. It's great to be here. Oh you're welcome. you're welcome. Congratulations on your new role at app harvest. Give us an overview of the indoor farms. How does app harvest actually work. Where they you know. where is it located. I chance in appalachia but give us a little more details. You know kind of what you're growing give us give us the proverbial thirty thousand foot view app harvest. I think is a really unique company in that are core product which is healthy vegetables is combined with a very sustainable climate. Resilient way of growing those vegetables and we're doing it in appalachia where the opportunity for job growth and economic development is really appreciate The the core product is a chemical pesticide free In in our first large greenhouse which you can see a picture of in my background but at sixty acres for those who can't see it Is a growing tomatoes and chemical pesticide free. Gmo free because the way we can grow in a closed system enables us to use biological pest approaches to control pests and disease and also a lot of trained workers and other interventions that can prevent outbreak. So we you know as a mother with three children knowing that what's coming out of our greenhouses is zero. Residue is a real attribute that i value. But how we grow it in your introduction spoke to it is we are very climate resilient in their storms that the that recently hit we had some employees that had trouble getting to work other people had to pitch in. We had one employee show up on their tractor to make sure they could get to work But you know we really did incredibly well in terms of being resilient. We had all the things we needed. We were harvesting on time stuff was getting out to the markets and it was a real testament to this strategy as an important part of the mix of different types of agriculture and When when we're growing We are able to use one hundred percent rainwater. We have a system of irrigation. That is set up where the rainwater is captured on the top of our sixty roofs it stored in a retention pond. And then we bring it into the greenhouse with a little bit of filtration through sand and you'd be late and that water re circulates. We don't ever a released anything into the atmosphere. The nutrients are put into the water and stay in the water until we need to add more. We can measure very precisely. It's a space where a has really enabled us to do very precise measurements and the plants. Exactly what they need. We do Nanotechnology with the water. Because bringing more oxygen into the water enables the plans to absorb the nutrients even better but all of that is is a closed system. And you know when when. I started in chemical engineering. The reason i went into chemical engineering is a wonderful professor. Who said if you care about environmental problems you should study chemical engineering because you learn how system works and where all the pollution comes from and how it's released to the environment

Domino Olen Carlisle Group Environmental Defense Fund Jackie Appalachia George Mason University School Of Management Roberts AP Virginia
What to know about COVID-19 variants' potential spread, impact on vaccines

Morning Edition

04:15 min | 3 years ago

What to know about COVID-19 variants' potential spread, impact on vaccines

"And I'm No well, King. Good morning. Ah, virus that spreads a lot has many chances to mutate and covert 19 is doing both in this country. Researchers in the U. S now say they have found at least seven new variants here now. Other countries, the U. K South Africa and Brazil. They've all reported variants to with some big questions like Are they more dangerous? Still outstanding. MPR's health correspondent Rob Stein has been following This one. Hi, Rob. Good morning. Well, what have you learned about the U. S variance? So the first of these various was spotted by researchers in Louisiana. But it turns out the same kind of mutation looks like it also emerged completely independently at least seven times in this country. No, That's it awful large because it suggests the virus is doing something called convergent evolution. That's when an organism evolved in a way that gives them some kind of superior power. Here's what Jeremy Camille of Louisiana State University says about what the virus is doing. He spotted the mutation. It's infected millions of humans around the world now and it's probably just, you know, getting Into a more intimate relationship with our species. The question is, What is that more intimate relationship mean? Exactly Does it make it spread more easily from one person to another doesn't make it more contagious. Do do. Researchers know the answers to that? Yeah, well, no one knows yet it looks like it's spreading quickly in the places where it's been spotted, but it's not at all clear. That's because of the mutation. No viruses mutate all the time. Sometimes there are big problems, but a lot of times not so much, and there are other mutants that had been previously spotted in this country. Like you know, one that took over in Southern California Scientists are still trying to figure out whether it's more contagious or, you know, just got lucky. Now this newly identified mutation occurred on a key protein that sticks out from the surface of the virus called the spike Protein. It's how the virus infects cells. That's also the target of drugs and vaccines. So any change could be really important. I talked about this with Andrew Peco Shit. The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. We should keep an eye on it. I myself have already passed this on to the people in my laboratory, and we're looking to see if we can find viruses with this mutation because if we can, we're going to bring it into the laboratory and try to study it to see what's actually happening here. Now, you know to be clear. Pecos means he passed on the details about the new various Those colleagues Yes, so they can determine you know whether they're more contagious or not Now, no one thinks there's any reason to panic. You know, far from it, actually. And we already know that there are those other various circulating in this country that we know we should be worried about. And what about the non US variants, some of which were identified before ours. How are they evolve? It Yes. So you know, more than 1100 cases of the one first flag in the UK have been confirmed. At least 40 states and British scientists just released more data than makes them even more worried than ever that, in addition to spreading faster, it may also make people sicker. You know, and the first one spotted in South Africa has not been detected in at least eight states and the one originally seen in Brazil is in at least two states. But the reality is they're probably already way more common than that. The U. S just isn't sequencing the genetic code of the virus enough to really know how widespread they are. And the spot any new variants fast. I talked about this with saucy of pop sq at George Mason University. We're flying blind right now, when it comes to mutations, and how prevalent they might be on the community already, so we really need to ramp it up. The CDC says. It's trying to wrap it up. But the country still has a ways to go. And what about the vaccines that we currently have? Will they help against the new variants? Yes. So the vaccines maybe someone that's effective against some of these various, but so far they seem to work pretty well. But the most important thing is to keep these viruses from spreading as much as we can to prevent any more dangerous ones from occurring. You know, the virus is still spreading like crazy in this country, which makes the U. S essentially a giant Petri dish that could easily produce even

Rob Stein U. Jeremy Camille MPR Andrew Peco Brazil Louisiana State University South Africa Louisiana ROB Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School King Southern California Pecos George Mason University UK United States CDC
"george mason university" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"george mason university" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"For people who already have appointments. If you can't make it, you could get the shot March 2nd. In Prince William County. The vaccine clinic, a Beacon Hall on the Manassas campus of George Mason University, has been canceled. If you had an appointment there, it has been automatically rescheduled for the same time on Tuesday. The Manassas small. No big parades or celebrations on this final weekend of Mardi Gras in New Orleans parades are canceled. The city's bars are closed through fat Tuesday, all in an effort to stop the spread of covert 19. Police say crowds will not be tolerated. Asylum seekers will no longer need to stay in Mexico while they're waiting for their cases to be heard. Fox's Jonathan Hunt, says President Joe Biden's reverse thing that Trump era policy, which have been criticized by pro immigration activists as endangering migrants on defectively, encouraging them to find Maura dangerous ways to cross the Biden administration will begin processing up to 300 asylum seekers a day testing them for covert 19 and if they are negative, allowing them into the United States to await their next hearings. Officials say the process will be carefully managed to prevent a surge of migrants crossing the border. Critics say the policy will encourage more people to cross over the border and overwhelm the U. S. If you want to go to Arlington Cemetery, you won't be able to take a train there for a while. Metro Sherie Lee beginning this weekend through May 23rd. The Arlington Cemetery and Addison Road stations will be closed so that we can reconstruct the platforms and do some additional station improvements. Shuttle Busses will replace trains at those stops WN I'll Sports The Wizard's fell to the Knicks, 109 to 91. The Wizard's played without Bradley. Beal coach Scott Brooks said Bill wasn't injured. Just resting ahead of a busy few weeks. Traffic and weather next Sunday. Start your day with be.

Bradley Scott Brooks Prince William County Jonathan Hunt Mexico May 23rd Knicks Tuesday March 2nd 109 91 next Sunday Trump Bill New Orleans Sherie Lee George Mason University Mardi Gras Fox United States
"george mason university" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:41 min | 3 years ago

"george mason university" Discussed on KCRW

"Smaller businesses that maybe better connected. Don't just get to the front of the line, but that the smaller businesses are able to maybe actually have a priority. Cecilia Rose. I just have one other question because I know you have some specialty in this area and we've been doing a lot of reporting women have had to exit the workforce in frankly shocking numbers during this pandemic. What is the advice? I think you or how do you think about providing a path for them to re enter the workforce Solutions that those of us who are not economist may not be familiar with Well, I think one of the most important ways that we get women back into labor market is to get our schools reopened. I think has been under appreciated the role that schools have played and taking care of our Children and allowing women to leave the household and had participated in the labor force outside of the home. And so I think the first job again coming back to the pandemic is to reopen our school safely. S so that our kids can be back in school and so that women can once again participate in the labor market. Cecilia Rouse. Thank you so much for your time. Thank you. It's been a pleasure. Arizona is confirming 9000 new Corona virus infections every day. The search there is among the worst in the nation and hospital leaders say they are stretched to the limit. Member station Cage's in Phoenix, Katherine Davis young reports. December was a record month for covert 19 cases and deaths in Arizona. And this week, the CDC reports Arizona has had about 122 new cases for every 100,000 residents, far above the national average of 68 per 100,000. Saskia Pope. SQ is a George Mason University epidemiologist based in Phoenix. She says Arizona's worsening outbreak is not unexpected. It's watching something unfold that Is very predictable and very heartbreaking, because all you want to do is try and stop it. Most businesses that had been closed during the state's summer surge. We're allowed to begin reopening in August. Since that time, the governor and the State Health Department have not called for any new closures even as caseloads started soaring in late fall. Dr Michael White with Valley Wise Health in Phoenix, says his hospital now has no available ICU beds as a Christmas and New Year's surge is beginning to become a parent. Certainly mitigation in early December would have helped us decrease the burden that we are likely going to see now Governor Doug Ducey has said. Businesses in the state already have plenty of safety guidelines in place. But for weeks, hospital leaders have been calling for the governor to halt indoor dining. Impose a curfew and issue a statewide mask order. I asked for these things every week and I will continue to ask for them. Dr. Marjorie Vessel with banner Health says her hospitals are operating above licensed bed capacity, with patients being held wherever they can fit And with staffing already so limited, she says, it's making banners Vaccine roll out more difficult. Manner operates in six states. But vessel says none of the other locations hospitals are stretched as thin as Arizona's. We need additional mitigation. We need enforcement of those mitigation activities, and we need everybody to do their own part, epidemiologist Saskia Pope, SQ says without major intervention. It's clear where Arizona is headed. We're going to continue to see cases and the hospitals in the public health infrastructure will be overwhelmed. The worst, she says, is almost Certainly yet to come for NPR news. I'm Katherine Davis Young in Phoenix. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. $27 billion budget proposal, and it includes everything from new investment in education to reducing California's carbon footprint, But there's something very different about this year's road map. Our budget understandably represents and reflects the realities of this recession, particularly as it's related to the issues that have been packed ID, low wage workers, small businesses as well as decades long inequalities. The governor is talking about cash payments, grants and tax credits. Unlike other years, he wants to Take unallocated tax revenues and use them as relief aid for businesses and their employees..

Arizona Saskia Pope Phoenix Katherine Davis Dr. Marjorie Vessel Governor Doug Ducey Cecilia Rouse Cecilia Rose State Health Department NPR George Mason University CDC California
"george mason university" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"george mason university" Discussed on WTOP

"The streets of D. C. Not the president will bring you more on that when we learn it is well 6 38. Here's Dave Gill dine in the traffic center okay in the district with the curfew in effect, traffic is very light road closures remain in downtown areas for a central travel 3 95 is open. Exits one and three remain closed along with the 12th Street Tunnel. Third Street Tunnel Open the Senate House exits from the tunnel likely restricted No delays on to 95 crash reported though near Benning Road northeast On the Beltway through Maryland and Virginia. No major delays. But 95 north of Beltway in Maryland, passed to 12. The crash blocks the left side. It's mostly now over on the left shoulder, but look for slow traffic and try to move over to the right if you can on to 70 north bound traffic, unusually heavy and slow into this evening. Long delays from Gaithersburg through German town, Clarksburg. Hi, it's town past 80 or Bana toward Frederick and onto I 70 much more traffic on to 70 heading to points North and west much later in the evening than usual in Virginia, Fairfax County. You're George Mason University. A crash on 1 23 near university Drive. Traffic has affected both ways. One vehicle was on fire. The fire has been extinguished. A bus involved westbound 66 only brief delays there. Centerville 95 South. Volume delays persist between Franconia, Springfield in Woodbridge. Any slowdowns beyond the arc aQuantive 1 23 would only amount to brief delays. Dave Don't nine W T o P travel on the storm team for now. Amelia Draper. What's the latest on our weather? Well for tonight, Shawn. We're looking at skies to clear out a little bit and temperatures to fall into the twenties and thirties.

Third Street Tunnel Dave Gill 12th Street Tunnel Maryland Virginia George Mason University Amelia Draper president Gaithersburg Clarksburg Shawn Bana Franconia Fairfax County Senate House Springfield Frederick Woodbridge
"george mason university" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"george mason university" Discussed on WTOP

"To businesses during the state of emergency, such as the pandemic delegates. Aneka Henson would like legislation focus on social justice. One of her bills focuses on reducing sentences for parents, who are jailed for failure to pay child support. Senator Sarah Alfred wants lawmakers to pass legislation for Focusing on access to the Internet. Almost a dozen and Randall County lawmakers pre filed almost 60 bills. Andrea Cameron w T O P. News the University of Maryland Global campus, now has its first black permanent president, Gregory Fowler, assumes the leadership of the school today. He was hired by the University system of Maryland Board of Regents last month after serving in the leadership in leadership positions at Southern New Hampshire University. Fowler is no stranger to D. C either. He spent nearly four years at the National Endowment for the Humanities and earned a master's degree in English at George Mason University. Um G C was founded more than 70 years ago. Prince George's County police officers in the hospital this morning after being dragged by a runaway car last night. This happened around 9:30 P.m. on Cindy Lane near Central Avenue in the water mill area after the officer pulled that car over the driver has been arrested, and police say they found a handgun during the arrest. Police also know the officer has non life threatening injuries. Still, the common W. T. OBY, the founder of Wikileaks is not going to be extradited to the US for now, anyway, We've got details ahead. It's 9 14 Rich Mackenzie, owner of Metropolitan Bath and Tile. Awesome great investment advice about bathroom remodeling..

Gregory Fowler Aneka Henson University system of Maryland George Mason University Randall County Senator Sarah Alfred Southern New Hampshire Univers University of Maryland Global officer Metropolitan Bath and Tile Prince George Rich Mackenzie Wikileaks Andrea Cameron US National Endowment W. T. OBY
"george mason university" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:45 min | 3 years ago

"george mason university" Discussed on WTOP

"35 degree He's downtown at Metro Center kind of state 11 now former Virginia Democratic governor, Terry McAuliffe said this morning that he has raised more than $6 million as he prepares to run for a second for your term is the Commonwealth's chief executive. McCullough says that more than 9000 people from all 133 of the state's cities and counties have contributed to this campaign. And more than 90% of the donations were for less than 100 bucks for other Democrats and two Republicans have also announced that they're running for governor. No previous candidate for governor has ever raised so much money so early in the process. Now we're five months from the Democratic primary and 10 months from the general election. Virginia's legislative leaders have chosen 62 finalists for the eight citizen seats on the state's new redistricting commission. The Richmond Times Dispatch says most the final has chosen by Democrats come from cities most chosen by Republicans. Are from the States rural areas. Five retired state judges will choose the aid citizen members by the 15th of this month. The commission has its first meeting coming up. On February 1st. And a rental counties. Representatives in Annapolis will hit the ground running when the General Assembly returns to session later this month. W T. O P S Andrea Cameron says the legislators will introduce bills on everything from racial justice to the pen. Dimmick. I'll get Heather Abagnale pre filed two bills focusing on access to mental health delegates. Sandi Bartlett sponsored a bill that would ban law enforcement from interrogating a child under 18 before they've had a chance to talk to an attorney and delicate. Michael Malone pre filed a bill that would take a look at how boundaries of formed in his anti Jerry Meandering bill. Almost 60 bills were found ahead of the first joint session of the year on January 13th. Andrea Cameron w T O P. News the University of Maryland Global campus has its first black president, Gregory Fowler, assumes leadership of that organization. Today. He was hired by the University System of Maryland Board of Regents last month. After serving in leadership positions at Southern New Hampshire University. Fowler is no stranger to DC spent nearly four years of the National Endowment for the Humanities, and he's got a master's degree in English from George Mason University. Um D C was founded more than 70 years ago to serve working adults and members of the military around the world. A Prince George's County police officer is in the hospital this morning after being dragged by a runaway car last night. Now this happened about 9 30 on Cindy Lane near Central Avenue and Walker Mill. After that officer pulled the car over. The driver has been arrested and police found a handgun during the arrest. The officer has non life threatening injuries. Coming up here on w t. O p A while Local school system is suspending small group in person instruction. It's 8 14. Even during challenging.

officer Gregory Fowler Andrea Cameron Terry McAuliffe Virginia McCullough Richmond Times Southern New Hampshire Univers Metro Center Commonwealth University System of Maryland Heather Abagnale Michael Malone George Mason University chief executive Annapolis Sandi Bartlett Walker Mill University of Maryland Global Prince George
A Climate Bomb in the Amazon

Why It Matters

04:54 min | 3 years ago

A Climate Bomb in the Amazon

"We read about fires in the amazon frequently. So how are they started. Are they sorta like the california wildfires or is it something completely different so actually quite different from wildfires in other parts of the world because the rain is wet. This is dr. Tom lovejoy a senior fellow at the united nations foundation and a professor at george mason university in virginia. He's worked in the amazon. Since nineteen sixty five focusing on scientific research conservation and policy whitening strikes. Don't start fires. In the amazon people start fires and to give you a sense once. Somebody is cut down some forest. They have to wait for five days without a drop of rain before it is dry enough to set fire to get rid of all the stuff that's between the firebrand and turning it into some kind of agricultural project. Nine countries share the amazon but roughly sixty percent of it is within brazil's borders which means they have a lot of control over its fate and today across this vast territory. Small groups of people are intentionally setting fires in order to dry out the land for logging and to clear it for agriculture way of clearing land for whatever activity you want to do is very damaging to the soil. So what happens is that if later you want to reforest that particular patch of land it becomes very hard to do because the soil changes as soon as you clear it out because it's now sustaining a different kind of environment which is not rainforest like and then you can't really grow a rainforest back in that sort of setting. This is monica to bowl. A senior fellow at the peterson institute for international economics and a professor at the school of advanced international studies at johns hopkins university. People refer to amazon a lot as the lungs of the world. But that's not really what the ham was on is what the amazon does is that it keeps a lot of greenhouse gases from getting into the atmosphere. So it's not bad. The forest breathes for the world. It's that once. The forest is standing all of those greenhouse gases which are in the soil there kept. They're they're not released into the atmosphere and as soon as you start cutting down the forest. Those greenhouse gases start to go into the atmosphere started to be released. It's sort of like a climate bomb. And as soon as you start cutting down the rain forest. Bob bob is released. So how big is that. Carbon bomb really big. Scientists estimate that the amazon stores sixty to eighty billion tons of carbon or roughly twice the total amount released from fossil fuels in twenty eighteen worldwide. Losing the amazon would accelerate warming with harmful impacts felt around the world. The other issue is these hydrological patterns so when we say that we're referring to the rain cycles and it's not just local. Because given the size of the amazon again it creates a micro micro-climate but a sort of macro climate within the whole of the south american region even affecting a bit of central america as well given that the amazon is so far north. And so what happens. Is that the rain cycle patterns as you cut down the forest. They change and sometimes they change really dramatically to the point where you destroy people's lives because they can no longer grow the crops that they used to grow because the rain cycles are completely different. That has already happened. In many parts of south america that have felt this direct impact and this is only going to get worse if deforestation continues. Hydrology is the study of the movement and distribution of water because the amazon is so large and so wet. It's hydrology has a huge effect. It supplies water to almost every country. In south america and in fact according to nasa deforestation has already been linked to reduce rainfall in the region and then on top of all that you have the issue of amazon tipping point. So you get to a point. Where if you go beyond that point in terms of deforestation. The rainforest is no longer self sustaining. It's going to turn into savannah. Simply because of the ecological dynamics of how rainforests behave and there's a lot of concern that where the amazon is right now is dangerously close to this tipping point

Amazon Tom Lovejoy United Nations Foundation Peterson Institute For Interna School Of Advanced Internation George Mason University Johns Hopkins University Virginia Bob Bob Brazil California Monica South America America Nasa Savannah
For Trump, Conservative Catholics Are The New Evangelicals

Morning Edition

03:47 min | 3 years ago

For Trump, Conservative Catholics Are The New Evangelicals

"The Republican nomination in 2016, he gave special thanks to one faith group Evangelical Christians this year. President Trump has a different favorite. I grew up next to a Catholic church in Queens, New York, and I saw how much incredible work the Catholic Church did for our community. These are amazing people. NPR religion reporter Tom Delton has been looking into what has changed. Trump's new interest in Catholic voters is probably the result of realizing what actually got him elected. It was not the evangelicals, says Mark Rozell of George Mason University. People were quite amazed at the overall impact that the white evangelicals had in the election, but I think what was missed was the critical role of Catholic voters that we barely appealed to them. Trump managed to win the Catholic vote last time. Former Republican congressman Tim Hughes camp is a political advisor to a new group Catholics for Trump. There was less recognition four years ago. I think many were surprised about what happened in Michigan and Wisconsin and Pennsylvania. It was the Catholic vote that won those states for Donald Trump Lesson learned. This year, The Trump campaign is focusing less on the evangelical vote and more on Catholics. This administration has made a concerted effort to reach out to Catholics in a way that we haven't seen in the past. Brian Birches, president of Catholic vote dot or GE, a conservative group, wholeheartedly supporting Trump's reelection. The group's been around for 15 years, but this year is special, Birch says. We've grown every year, but this year we we grew exponentially Catholic vote dot or didn't even endorse anyone in the last presidential election this year. Even with a Catholic candidate on the other side, the group is running ads that leave no doubt where they stand. Joe Biden would force American Catholics

President Trump Donald Trump Catholic Church Joe Biden Mark Rozell George Mason University Tom Delton Political Advisor Brian Birches NPR Queens Reporter GE Birch Michigan New York Wisconsin
Refocusing climate change as a human problem

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

07:06 min | 3 years ago

Refocusing climate change as a human problem

"Been talking about how to adapt to climate change and how technology and the tech industry can help. But here's the part even on tech show where we acknowledged that climate change isn't just about tech solutions or Whiz Bang inventions, and in fact, like the pandemic climate change is a problem that reflects an exposes lots of things about our society Ion Elizabeth Johnson, and Katherine Wilkinson Co edited a book called Can Save Truth Courage and solutions. For the climate crisis, it features poems, essays, and other works of art by women working on climate issues I spoke with them. Both will Told me there's a lot in that subtitle we need to have eyes wide open to what is happening listened to the science we need courage, and then of course we need solutions and not just the solutions that kind the climate rose are really into like evt's and solar panels we definitely need those on just got Tesla. I think that's the TRIFECTA right though truth courage and solutions when people are like well, if not hope then what that's our answer. A when did we find ourselves at a point where we sort of stop talking about climate? As the thing we live from the air, we breathe the rain that falls or doesn't fall. Do you think it's important to like even before we start talking about solutions to recenter the conversation as a human problem? Yeah. Even though we didn't cause this problem, it's in fact one hundred corporations who are responsible for seventy one percent of emissions. There is a wide range of possible futures. And we so deliberately curated this book to show the wide range of ways that people can contribute building the best possible future. So it includes farmers and architects and artists, and journalists, and of course, scientists and policy experts and lawyers, and all of those skills are are needed and very much wanted. How much of this storytelling is also about making the simple economic argument that saving people also saves money. When we talk about the cost benefit analysis of doing various things to address the climate crisis, we usually only focus on the costs as opposed to making sure that we are also thinking about the benefits. And I think that is quite bolstering to me as a marine ecologist by training and thinking about nature based solutions and how protecting and restoring nature actually makes financial sense. 'cause it's cheaper to have mangroves and marshes and sea grasses than seawalls, right for example. So so I, think this book really shows not just some sort of techno Utopian version of the future where we like. Innovate, our way out of everything and instead it talks about the huge array of work that needs doing and the costs of of not doing it and what the world could look like for the better. If we do I feel like this conversation about racial justice, climate, justice, social justice, the importance of involving women in these conversations, how many women are leading solutions all over the world. is still kind of new and still kind of Nathan which is so lame but you're right. Which is pretty lame. But maybe take some explaining you know like what? What is what is this relationship between Racial Justin climate change and why don't people understand that I think we don't understand it because. Don't want to because it's it complicates something that has already really hard right like that's the. That's the push back that I hear most often it's not like I'm a racist and I WANNA, save the planet. It's more like solving climate change is hard enough without bringing in all these other layers. Can we just please focus on climate change now I and we'll deal with Lake police not murdering block people for no reason later. And the answer is no. No, we can't. We have to walk and Chew Gum on this one and there are many reasons for that. One is just it's the right thing to do, and so I hate having to give other reasons. But one of those other reasons is we know from polling by Yell and George Mason University's the people of Color actually are more concerned about the climate crisis. They're more motivated to be a part of the solution and to hold the politicians to higher standards on Climate Policy But how you know how can we expect black people to be focused on climate solutions when? Making, sure they have the basic right to live and breathe. and so this I can't breathe has become a rallying cry across You know across the racial and climate justice groups that it's not just in relation to police brutality but in the ways that communities of color are burdened with more polluted air and where or low where power plants decide to locate themselves, and then you know people who are breathing that dirty air being more at risk for extreme forms of of Covid, and so of course, these things are all connected and wouldn't it be great if we were building the winning team by including the people who were already on board and beyond to help and if we could unburden them from. Our White Supremacist Patriarchy, which is certainly not serving us in terms of really anything. But definitely, it's it's preventing a lot of people from being part of climate solutions because you know they have to dedicate their time and energy and ingenuity towards solving other problems about quality of life and justice and I. I just WanNa add because I think on articulates the. So incredibly well that when we think about climate change as quote unquote the problem I think that's where we start to miss. These intersections and entanglements when we understand actually that climate change is a manifestation of the problem, right? It's emerging of a system that we're getting so much feedback that it's not working. Racial violence is part of that feedback massive wealth inequality as part of that feedback the epidemics of loneliness and meaninglessness are part of that feedback, and also an atmosphere that is kate marvel says is larded with carbon dioxide and is having all of these climatic impacts that's also part of the feedback. But if we're just thinking about climate change as the problem we need to solve. Then our analysis isn't defense about what's actually going on here and thus what it's actually going to take to solve it. Kathryn Wilkinson and Iona Elizabeth Johnson Co edited the Book All. We can save truth courage and solutions for the climate

Trifecta EVT Tesla Elizabeth Johnson Katherine Wilkinson Co George Mason University Chew Gum Kate Marvel Kathryn Wilkinson Covid Iona Elizabeth Johnson Co Nathan Lake
Maryland Panel Tasked With Investigating State's Lynching History

All Things Considered

04:09 min | 3 years ago

Maryland Panel Tasked With Investigating State's Lynching History

"Government backed commission of its kind is about to start investigating a harrowing part of the state's history. The Maryland Lynching Truth and Reconciliation Commission has set out to document the state's 42 known racial lynchings. The panel delivered an interim report to Maryland Governor Larry Hogan earlier this month. Charles Davis Jr is the commission's vice chairman. He joins us now to share the commission's plans and goals for this project. Welcome. Thank you so much for having me so tell us. Where did the idea to create this commission originally come from? Sure, most historical scholarship concerning racial terror lynching is centered in the deep South. And so you have states such as Arkansas, Alabama, Mississippi and the like who get noticed for their history of racial tear. However, it's important for people to understand that lynching took place throughout the United States. I'm in. One of those states that is often overlooked is a state of Maryland. And so we call Maryland the middle ground in many ways, because it represented like most border states, a style that was southern but also had a progressive leaning on. So this oftentimes caused the state to be overlooked in terms of looking at the legacy of racial terror and tell us what are the primary goals of this commission. The commission is tasked with investigating lynchings that took place in the 19th and 20th century in Maryland, and we are centered and focused on salvaging the humanity, first of the victim's arm and then really laying out each case individually and hopefully bring about some semblance of Justice to the family members in the descendants of the deceased victims. Can you talk about a specific case that the commission is investigating? Right now? Sure. Yes, we're looking into the lynching of Matthew Williams, which took place in Salisbury, Maryland, in 1931, and so Matthew Williams was a young labourer who got into a dispute with his employer over discrepancies in his pay Following that his employer was founded. And Williams was actually hospitalized after the employer's son shot him and the lynch mob descended upon the hospital and drug him out of the first floor window. And the lynching commenced. And he was eventually taken to the drug to the courthouse lawn in front of thousands, along with local law enforcement politicians, religious leaders who did nothing. Eventually, as if that wasn't enough. He was eventually burned, and no one was ever held accountable. And no one was ever held accountable. So what does the commission do with a case like this? Today. Your ultimate goal I imagine is trying to figure out exactly what happened to Matthew Williams. Yes, And that is the ultimate goal. And it's important to note that we see the racial terror lynchings of old that took place in Maryland. Directly in relationship to the ongoing racial tear that we're witnessing in the United States. And so that's important to consider when we're looking at this and investigating this today in this fractured America that we're seeing, as relates to race relations on DSO. Yes, The truth is what we're seeking getting to the bottom of it, seeing who indeed was complicity and involved whether it was locals on state government officials because we believed that the descendents are owed this truth. Is the state. I'm in what we hope the citizens of Maryland and decisions of nine states learn from this work that we're undertaking is that truth comes first. And if we have the truth in there could one day possibly be Reconciliation. Charles Davis Jr is the vice chairman of the Maryland Lynching Truth and Reconciliation Commission. And he is an assistant professor of conflict resolution and history at George Mason University. Thank you very much for

Maryland United States Reconciliation Commission Matthew Williams Assistant Professor Vice Chairman Larry Hogan George Mason University Salisbury Arkansas America Mississippi Lynch Alabama
Airlines Are Asking for a Second Bailout. Congress Should Say No.

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:00 min | 3 years ago

Airlines Are Asking for a Second Bailout. Congress Should Say No.

"We begin today with airlines their CEO's and union leaders are begging Congress for an extension to the twenty five, billion dollar industry bailout that was part of the cares act travel demand isn't returning fast enough, and now the industry is warning of a massive wave of layoffs if lawmakers extend funding before October first, but Congress is fighting and. Preoccupied. So where does that leave the airlines and their employees marketplace's Andy Euler reports according to the Trade Group Airlines for America passenger volume is off about sixty five percent from a year ago and airlines are collectively burning through five billion dollars. Each month CEO Nick Kelly says airlines are asking for six months federal help because hopefully by then we will be over the Hump and we will start to have a pickup and travel by next spring. The conditions of the previous bailout protected workers until October First Kalua warns that up to one hundred, thousand airline employees could soon join the ranks of the unemployed and Robert W man, a former airline executive and industry consultant says a second bailout would help the US economy recover faster when the pandemic Wayne's if the industry were to fall into disrepair if it were to fall into. Destructive restructuring during the pandemic, the question would be, what would you have around to help your on the other side? When exactly we get to the other side of the pandemic it's still murky and Federal Nikkei Day Rusia George Mason University says, another twenty five billion dollars is not going to solve the problem. This is justice coning the inevitable as long as the demand doesn't go back up. This is just basically a band-aid patch. She says bankruptcy would be the best option airlines have shown that they can emerge from restructuring healthier, and she says that needs troubled airlines don't pose a major risk to the economy at large. I made Euler

Trade Group Airlines Ceo Nick Kelly Congress CEO Andy Euler Wayne Rusia George Mason University United States Kalua America Robert W Executive Consultant
After 2011 Disaster, Fukushima Embraced Solar Power. The Rest Of Japan Has Not

Environment: NPR

08:06 min | 3 years ago

After 2011 Disaster, Fukushima Embraced Solar Power. The Rest Of Japan Has Not

"Before the earthquake before the NAMI and the nuclear disaster Japan got nearly a third of its energy from nuclear power. But after the Fukushima nuclear disaster in two thousand eleven, the country took all of its nuclear reactors off line, which has led Japan to increasingly rely on fossil fuels and also solar power. NPR's cat ORF continues our series on recovery and Fukushima. She only endo is saying a final goodbye. To the home she once shared with her husband and three kids and for Cosima it's less than a mile from the Daiichi nuclear power plant where three reactors overheated and exploded in two thousand eleven. They left fast only taking what they could carry. Their things left nearly exactly as they were the day everything changed to coffee, Cup sit on the kitchen table her daughter's old school uniform is laid out on a bed a calendar on the wall is still flipped to March two thousand eleven. clueless you the kit ago. Muluzi. Nice. This is sad. She says this House System Nice, but we can't come back. She looks around your moon to Ni life is so different diddle do remind us. To start from nothing even less than. A totally reinvent ourselves after the disaster digging up this. She's here to give the keys to government officials. This house will be bulldozed soon and the land used as part of a storage site for radioactive topsoil scraped from the earth and the massive cleanup effort Tschumi heads upstairs. And takes one last look at the bedroom shoes to share with her husband Hitter Yuki. He died a few years ago suddenly. And then she walks back down to hand over the keys. The thing is pretty unceremonious though in reality she only says, she said goodbye to this part of her life. Disaster when her family piled into a car and drove as far south as they go to the southern tip of Japan on the island of Kyushu. Here, she's a single mom to her bubbly ten-year-old son Cagey who was just a baby when the disaster happened, he doesn't remember Shema at all her other two children are grown and live nearby, and she only has found herself within unlikely job running a small solar farm. On a big hill overlooking the tropical landscape Ma hidden is yet. She never imagined. My life would be like this guy when we first moved here, I was in my late thirties my husband was in his forties unanue issue we were like, okay. Do we get new jobs? So we decided to do this. We saw as investment for the future month on her husband worked at the Nuclear Power Plant for over twenty years and for him, the switch to solar was purposeful. He felt that nuclear power had betrayed him do on didn't He grew up really believing nuclear power was safe and then he lost his home to come see today the energy collected by these panels has allowed her to build a new life. The power is sold to the local utility company and brings in thousands of dollars a month when her husband died suddenly a few years ago she only took over the work and the family placed his grave in the center of the solar panels show me walks over to tall marblestone. Hook. With an inscription that says. Good you send do essentially remember that this family is here because of the Fukushima nuclear disaster in two thousand eleven cocoa use. A message to future generations she explains looking away device. My biggest wish is for renewable energy to take over I mean look at my old home, it's going to be a storage site for nuclear waste. We can't deal with that kind of wasted drivers go. Joey's wish might not come true though her family started their business at the right time. The price was so generous and also delegration was sold loose. So anyone can register. Naida is the executive director of the Institute of Sustainable Energy Policies. In Tokyo, he says in the early years after the disaster Japan pushed renewables to help fill energy gap left after fifty four nuclear reactors were taken off line the. Government offered big incentives, new investors, lots of people like me and her husband jumped on board to build smaller operations. incorporations rushed in to build massive solar and wind farms but also the liberation was more strict compensation dropped. It got increasingly harder for alternative energy producers to connect into the power grid edith says, this was partly due to the big utility companies trying to maintain control and the government allowing. It to happen the sitting kind of a body of to north to Laputa increase anymore, the institutions make a big difference that's Jennifer Sclerosis of George. Mason University she studies energy policy in Japan, and she says, there is technology an interest for renewables in Japan, but the bigger power companies in government need to commit if people in place do not watch to implement policies to empower the economics and the. Technology innovation then it can't happen regardless of how advanced technologies earn regardless of how good the economics look many of the major utilities as well as the Japanese government are still waiting to see if nuclear power can make a comeback and renewables just aren't that reliable yet. So in the meantime, I would assume the defaults going to import gas import coal eater agrees is the most the early sick and Not so optimistic future, but one place in Japan that is optimistic about Renewables Hookah Shema the local government here has set a goal for the entire prefecture. The third largest in Japan to be completely fueled by renewable energy by twenty forty. It's a real turnaround for a place where nuclear power ruled only a decade ago especially in the former exclusion zone near Daiichi, there are solar panels everywhere from small ones on roofs and hillsides to massive mega-farms along highways making use of land available after the disaster some of these panels are run by big developers and others are not. Lake the solar panels on farmer. She get Yuki Corneau's field. He's seventy four years old and this land has been in his family for generations he gestures around it. This is all my land, but it's nonsense. Nonsense because it's relatively useless the wind carried radioactive material here after the disaster and the government has scraped off all the topsoil in decontamination efforts. The farmers here can't really far much anymore. So small local power company came and asked sugar. Yuki if they could rent land for solar panels, he said, yes could you go I was really worried after the nuclear accident how would we get power most of his neighbors also agreed but that means everything is different. Now he says there were Rice patties all around here with tiny frogs that created a kind of soundtrack for his life now it's quiet. He misses the frogs a lot and he says, and he doesn't make nearly the same amount of money as he did farming. But She Yuki says he sees this as a necessary change. He has nine grandkids they all live far away now but they were just in town the other weekend for visit running through the fields. Suze my grandparents farmed here my parents do. But now it's time for Change I've realized it's a new season pitcher. This he says looking out over the solar panels is for future. Generations Khatlon store NPR News Fukushima Japan.

Japan She Yuki Government Daiichi NPR Japanese Government CUP Fukushima Yuki Corneau Shema Tschumi
Big Tech Funds a Think Tank Pushing for Fewer Rules. For Big Tech.

Pivot

05:03 min | 3 years ago

Big Tech Funds a Think Tank Pushing for Fewer Rules. For Big Tech.

"Dig. Tech firms are schmoozing regulators into to not doing their jobs. Thirty four anti-trust officials were wined and nine last year by the global anti-trust into the suit, a part of the Antonin Scalia Law School at George. Mason University in Fairfax Virginia basically don't regulate us. Please enjoy this delicious meal. Global Antitrust Institute is funded mostly entirely by big companies affiliated foundations including Amazon Google qualcomm George Mason I covered it when I was at the Washington, Post they were always doing this kind of thing like putting up, you know. Being very friendly to corporate corporate citizens as I recall during this time when they were just getting started. Trying to attract a bigger level of professor there and so talk about this Mr Academics in terms of these things that get funded at universities, you institute Scott. Galloway Institute of Jabal Thank for example. That's right. like it's it's were. Universities are not immune from the lure of capitalism and a big component of. Your ability to get tenure is to get research funded, and it's difficult if you WANNA know. If. You WanNa. Know the outcome and a conclusion of research. Just find who's paid for it. Yeah, and in the case of most academic research. It's a lot of times it's funded. By nonpartisan sources are the university itself, and so if there is a a lease bad version of peer reviewed research, you're GONNA. Find it typically universities, but these think tanks if they're funded by. Certain And we have him on the left care we fund. We found groups to do research to basically support our know our narrative so i. don't think this is anything unusual. The question is abound power in that is. In addition to this think tank Sarah now more fulltime Amazon. Lobbyists making I would bet somewhere between four hundred eight hundred thousand dollars a year. Then there are sitting US senators now one hundred full time lobbyist from Amazon living in DC, taking all of these nice women and men to to golf into dinner and saying hey, we just a big fan of your leadership. We fight to get involved in your campaign by the way when this whole antitrust off comes up. We assume that you're you're for capitalism. Your four consumer lower consumer prices. And this is the danger, but I don't think these think tanks. We have on both sides nervous now whenever I time talking to one today and I was like Oh, where did you get your money? Like I never thought this like in terms of. The university and I was like I'm going to have to check in case, I'm. Saying something that sounded reasonable, but it was sort of like who's paying your bills and you know there was some controversy around some of this Kobe testing of where these these researchers have, it just feels like a lot of steph feels. Bogus like. It feels bogus when they're doing this and they're trying to influence, but I think many some universities are doing real research. Others are much more pay for play and I think that's that's really when I was a does. You've inspired her synapse farmer talking about this when I was? Five years into my Nyu Kerr invited me to a meeting where they were talking about doing some research about around financial markets and the impact on IPO's and They admitted meeting. And there was someone from the Nasdaq, and they were willing to fund it Funds Research and fund even fund center, and as one of the guys in the meeting Professor Bruce Buchanan who I think's one of the clear blue flame thinking economists in the world you know at the end of the meeting, said a not comfortable with the Nasdaq taking money. Money from the Nasdaq for research around the financial markets, because ultimately we're. GonNa end up saying that that the Nasdaq has the right you know. He just wasn't comfortable with private enterprise being injected into academic research, and then the meeting ended and I was like what the hell are you thinking? We have an opportunity to go great research here. Don't so pedantic. And as I've thought about it I'm wrong and he was right. Yeah, you can't help it. You can't help, but if they're paying for like all the smoking ones so much damage in terms of like smoking wants. We're like cigarettes aren't bad. That went on for a long time and Whatever the whatever the research is, it just seems like if it's cooked, it's cooked then. How do you pay for like the university should presumably just pay. Pay For right and live and die on the quality of the research, but that's sort of naive. I suspect you in the majority of about any sort of fifteen year overdue apology to a Professor Buchanan Vice. Chancellor Ingo Walter felt the same way that this was just. This creates too much opportunity for bias research so anyways. Net Net in it's a sample size of one, but Nyu takes that got role being a neutral arbiter very seriously. and. You have these funding you know. I'm thinking of all the different organizations are they seem like the like their criminal justice stuff Very Friedman! It feels like it's really good research right now, and that's the thing it's like who you have. They should at least be very clear about who's paying for it, so you know and and what they might turf. What what the what reports they might put in the drawer like the government is doing right now,

Amazon Global Antitrust Institute Galloway Institute Of Jabal Antonin Scalia Law School George Mason Mason University NYU Washington Fairfax Virginia United States Funds Research Chancellor Ingo Walter Professor Buchanan Vice Professor Professor Bruce Buchanan Friedman Sarah Kobe
3 Major U.S. Airlines Suspend China Flights Over Coronavirus

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:55 sec | 4 years ago

3 Major U.S. Airlines Suspend China Flights Over Coronavirus

"Meantime the U. S. is advising against everyone traveling to China from the U. S. causing major US airlines to freeze their flights delta United and American Airlines announced that they were suspending all flights between the US and China American says its suspending flights starting today through March twenty seventh delta and United well wait until February sixth to allow time for customers in trying to leave that country United and American both say they will keep fly hi to Hong Kong meanwhile in our area there's a revolving door of possible coronavirus cases the very latest now in DC two people tested negative for the virus but now health officials are keeping an eye on a new possible case in DC in Virginia a George Mason University student has been cleared but there are two other possible cases one in northern Virginia one in central Virginia we're on top of all these developments and we will bring them to you on air and online of course at W. T. O. P.

China United States Hong Kong DC Virginia American Airlines George Mason University W. T. O. P