14 Burst results for "George Kuku"

"george kuku" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

07:29 min | 5 months ago

"george kuku" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"I am so curious how you got into the business in an and how you got your start a story there because i dropped out of college after junior year by naturally shoes i at that point was planning on going to law school so i was an economics major and i'm just thinking law school but that things to do when high school had always kinda like native screenwriter. The to want to be doing high school without either wanted to write movie. I wanted to cut trailers. I love taylor's you can still remember watching the trailer for source of her and it just kind of fast. The greatest trailer. The were pretty good but the trailer was awesome and college. My parents are paying for it. And i feel responsibility creeping in so basically Montana financial hardships. I gr- forced to drop out of school. Like i'm from la. So i was in new hampshire at the time to go back home and now trying to find a job and i finally did not find a job i might as well fight to find a job at something i love. I try to make it a a movie job. And i said it's ending up my resume. The difference tedious. I went through the phone book addresses my resume. Critics like you used to do in that day. And i send it out and i started getting rejection letters all kinds of this bread. Thank you for your resume. We have no at the time looking to resume was kind of depressing. And then i got lead for a job through my mother who had a friend of a friend and i went into energy for that job and that was at a company called the last couple. Yeah they were looking for an office assistant. And i went in. I met and then would make me like me. They cut the list of possible. People from i think was sixteen in the beginning that they made it to eight. Those four that means other guy and we were the people who invited to go. Meet laddy for the final interview for him to make a decision go. I have that meeting. And i did pretty well and i come out like nothing about today. I get a letter. Thank you for your time. But we've chosen another candidate. We'll keep your name on file. The person ended the pirates is done. Goldwyn was kind of the features a little bit later in the open blown story. so i'm so frustrated. I got another rejection letter from n. g. and just that cold and i was so frustrated just borrowed the family which is the had drove to. Mgm walking in the main building existed. I'm here to apply job. The guard of sitting front desk any kind of look funny but he said you know let me make a call and he called human resources and the woman came out and said since you were here you can fill out an application. But we haven't august. I did and africa the application they said since you here you might wanna meet with one of us so we can get an interview and put that with your resume and we'll keep it all so i go back and the cubicle with this woman. She's always after the a couple questions that our phone and she said. I'm sorry i gotta say this since you pick up the phone. She talks were a few minutes when she hangs up. He says do you know anything about woodworking. And i said yeah because i taken woodshop and seventh grade and seem to be enough for me. And he said well. Can you start tomorrow. And i'm going to ask what the job was. I didn't just yeah. Okay she's a show up at the back dated. Mvm at seven o'clock tomorrow morning. Your find out what you're gotta do but you gotta need a hammer and work so i go home coming out of job twentieth. Nineteen and i need work in a hammer. Which i don't have so she's taking to the sears and we a hammer and i've been the night in the backyard making my work boots. Look like they've been used. I'm scuffing. I'm putting third on them. And i the next morning at the backlash we all seven other guys that they've hired and we're waiting big backdate to open. It does at seven and a guy leads us onto the lot and we walk we. I think we learned how to punch in and punch in their lead us onto a stage. And i'm blown away for the sound stage for someone a lot for some of the sound stage and i'm staring at a two story suburban house bills on a platform about twelve to fifty feet high above the stage. More right so we walk up the kind of the way to get to the the first floor of the house and they had no idea what we're doing. What i said gesture the job i have a hammer got work boots and they walk through the front door. The first thing. I noticed the second floor is a bit assad is going up. They didn't build out the second story. But we walk past the living room into the kitchen and toback door and there's a swimming pool and you look at the food. Is it used for the light and you go with mud. And there's still we're coughing and movie poltergeist. It allows seen compulsory dies and the job that i'd suggest the basically had clean up this mess. Technically first job in hollywood was cleaning up the mess of mud and coffins on poltergeist with what was because they had really the movie. I did that and it was a great time at mgm. Because sam peckinpah was they're doing second unit on a movie called jinx. George kuku was. They're doing which famous. Let's see billy wilder buddy buddy. He's like the lack of the studio moment and he would walk on the line guys that were like legends. I knew the movie and say hi. Heidi cooper some called But it wasn't really what i wanted to do. And the reason i started with the company story is now. I feel like i can't continue just being a laborer. Pounding nails and sweeping stuff up. I got a call from the ladd. Company say the guys that we hired john goldman. We're promoting him to story editor. Do his job. And i said yes so. I became an office assistant company and that kind of began. This kind of odyssey company was great experience because it was so small. I got to see how everything kind of look you knew the head of distribution. Because he is in that office the head of marketing over here. You know the head of productive. Your guys and allowed. It was really accessible. Jake enter it was just kind of this moment in time. That great more stressful overtime by adding They need a lot of really interesting movies but they were performing well for later like stuff. Once upon a time in america new the clouds with a special project and they want performing. I finally decided it's time to go back to college. Getting finished michael police so you go back to the hand of finished my degree and i'm thinking when i graduate i'm going to go back and get it and work at the company. I know everybody but senior spring. I got a call that companies holding back a bummer graduate. And i basically when i get back to la just to the building just to say hi to everybody. And they're basically passing up the great we used to have choo buildings filled with all kinds of people. Because there's now been reduced to half of a cop. Florida place and i walk through the building. I mention they run into palm this landscape and he's excited to see me. Any always says come with me and grabbed me by the arm. Hey dragged me to production with that. They thought police academy to any introduces me to the production manager and production coordinators. He's gonna be like i. I didn't even come for a job. I was looking for a job. I was trying to rest from being. But you can't say no to a job. So i'd become a pa police academy to which was great fun Vessel too because we started with one director cigna rally. We didn't get along with home lansky so it was replaced. Probably three weeks for the production of that was kind of awkward..

Heidi cooper George kuku john goldman second floor tomorrow america Florida new hampshire first floor today second story jinx two story three weeks seven o'clock tomorrow morning next morning sam four Jake Montana
"george kuku" Discussed on Little Gold Men

Little Gold Men

10:30 min | 1 year ago

"george kuku" Discussed on Little Gold Men

"All right so we are thrilled to be joined right now. On the telephone on land line by Wayne Lawson my former boss and mentor and friend current friend the longtime executive literary editor of Vanity Fair. Who Knew Gloria Swanson Very? Well what would you say Wayne your contribution to her memoir sponsor on Swanson was you edited it. I've actually wrote the book. Okay I just want to say it. She was still married to her. Fifth husband William but falling quickly out of love with him so that in the course of this producing this book he lived one under their apartment and she lived at the other. There was a go between who was A young English producer for the BBC. And he's done a show of Swanson sculpture in London and she had fallen in love with him. She was eighty. He was forty and at that point she had said what Max and he said the memoirs so he went out sold a contract. GotTA contract from Random House without an agent and they had a year to produce this book. She said to him originally. It won't work because Bill Bill Duffy and I've tried this before and we just couldn't make it work and he said don't worry with me you'll be able to well. After six months. They had one hundred pages. And so Brian. De Guy's name was called me and said would you read this. We're before we and so I read it and said you can't get this random house You know you start by saying I was born in eighteen. Ninety nine under the sign of Aries You know it's like an Old Lady's book so he said would you tell that to Gloria Gloria and I met. I think this is the wrong way to go. I would do this as a flashback. You know 'cause I'm assuming that's boulevard is the greatest ever made and you know you've got the greatest comeback story of all time. I would do the whole book. Start with Sunset Boulevard and do the whole book is a flashback. At which point she said She said that was not the greatest moment in my life and I said what was and she said I was the first star ever produce starting my own film in Europe and Mary a nobleman and come back with a with a with a noble title and it was Madame. Sasha and in one thousand nine hundred ninety six or four whatever? It was in In France and that's when she married democracy and came back here and she said they gave me a whole train ride Across the United States when I got when we got to Hollywood with ENRIA NI- everybody in Hollywood is at that station and she said what nobody knew that. I'd had an abortion. You know in France. And that's why I was very ill and my everybody wanted to see me so I said well I would start the book there and do it in two flashbacks which we which is what we wound up. Doing you were kind of in the position of Bill Holden with the giant manuscript of the bad sallie Mae Movie. At the beginning there and it was one hundred page dunk and it was obviously what they had also tried to do earlier But once they had this flashback idea it really worked and so what would happen is. Brian would talk to Gloria about the next year then he would go and work with Bill Duffy. Then Bill Duffy would come up with rough of a chapter. And that's what they had a hundred pages when they once it started over again. We had six months and so that meant chapter a week so Brian would come down with me. This very rough chapter my bill duffy and I would completely rewrite it throw away like eighty percent and call and say look if she had an archivist so she had saved everything. I said I need this and this and this and this and this and then Brian we come back a week later. I would read it to him. He would say that's the word she would never use and okay. Let's change it anyway. So we went through the whole book until she kicked Bill Duffy out about two chapters before the book was finished so the last couple of chapters are completely mine And they'll was out of the scene by the end. She was madly in love with with Brian. There's much younger guy. So yes in fact. It was throwing out entirely their thing and completely rewriting everything he gave us. So what were the? What were her top recollections of Sunset Boulevard? Was it a good experience for her. Was she resentful of the fact that people thought it was the most important thing when actually it was this other thing in the twenty s now she actually knew that this has been you know coming back to live with Gloria Swanson so As she tells it to made she didn't talk about the people who had been. You know this has been offered to other people. Before Charles Bracket the produces office started to call her in nineteen forty eight and so they had said come out. We'd like you to do a screen test. And She was absolutely appalled. I mean she said me screen time she'd been the biggest star in Hollywood. I'm very Pickford for twenty years and she but she hadn't made a movie in Ken and it has been a big bomb. Called Father Takes a wife so she knew that that was something potential there she called. George Kuku they want me to take screen test. George what do I do? And he's a take it He said he's too much talent as men and popular men in Hollywood billy wilder and Charles Bracket they had made last week and double indemnity. I mean they had just a string of hits and so she took the screen test and then comes along. Say about the casting this movie. She was told that she would be doing the screen test with a young actor named Montgomery clift and when she got there they said Mr Cliff. I has another a another commitment. In fact agent had said this would be death for you to make a movie as a Gigolo with an older woman impossible so what Gloria said. But we've got another Young men not as young William Holden As you and so they said come in and let's do a second screen a screen test with him and will make you a little older. They put a grey streak in her hair. He was there he was holding thirty one. She was fifty two. She said. Wait a minute. Wait a minute. Wait a minute You'RE GONNA make me look ten years older She said all of a sudden women in New York all stars and I know when they have like this. I'm the right age fifty not older. She's but I can tell you everything about makeup. We can make Mr Holden look ten years. Yes so they did. They cut his hair. They fixed it is. They did everything to make. William Holden look younger and had nothing of a script. At that point they would finance. They would Come up with with new pages of dialogue every day that glory would take and what she had. No idea was that before she had been offered this they had i. You can imagine the kind of film that this would have been billy wilder. They just had a rough idea of an old burlesque queen getting involved with a much younger man and the originally offered the script to Mae West. Who WAS NOT INTERESTED? They then went to marry Pickford since she was married to a much younger man and had been the biggest star along with Gloria in the nineteen twenties in Hollywood. And pickford read it and said it's just not right for me but this would be perfect for either glorious wants or Poland Niagara The added a great silent vamp star So that's how I got offered it. And between the time of Montgomery clift and William Holden. She also did not know that. Billy Wilder and BRAC offered his first to Fred macmurray then apparently to Marlon Brando. This movie could have actually wound up with Marlon Brando and Mae West as a as a hilarious comedy. They never saw it as a dark film lar and they even offered it. Apparently Gene Kelly. Everybody turned it down. They thought the brand was not a big enough star but they finally got with him and he turned out to be the perfect job. Ls Wow and did you say when we talked yesterday that that it was after Gloria Swanson came in built up her role because originally there was supposed to be a bigger part for the Nancy Olson. Roll especially a much bigger part for the for the The lead the man. Joe Gillis Sh and when this film opened they had a long section of him dead in the swimming pool. His body fished out taken to the morgue. His corpse talking and screening audiences hated it. And that's when Billy Wilder said I have to change this thing completely. He cut all of that out. They got people in for like another day of shooting to shorten that opening to what now is and that's when they found they had a huge hit wile well. Let's talk about Eric Von Stroheim. Because you you had some good background on that didn't you? Glory I connected with Eric Von Stroheim. Yeah this is this is Eric. I'm as he is the other key key figure in this film in. One thousand nine hundred seventy seven when she was the queen of Hollywood. That's when she match. Oh candidate this renegade producer and he took to Gloria immediately and said. Look this is insane. Why are you making so much money for for adult soccer and Cecil B Demille you should you know? Let.

Gloria Gloria Gloria Swanson Bill Bill Duffy William Holden Hollywood billy wilder Brian Bill Holden Eric Von Stroheim Pickford Montgomery clift producer Wayne Lawson Charles Bracket France Random House sallie Mae BBC Max Marlon Brando
"george kuku" Discussed on /Film Daily

/Film Daily

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"george kuku" Discussed on /Film Daily

"Just sort of end like I feel like all movies. They had a real trouble. The scripts are often terrific dialogue is always really good. And I'm always like man, the stories here are just so much better than like, the typical stuff that we see in theaters today, but almost all of these movies from it. I mean, this is a sweeping generalization that I'm sure there's a ton of of you know, exceptions to. But it seems like for this like thirty year period and movie history movies would just like the big climax would happen. And then the movie would just end and in modern films. I feel like the big climax happens. And then there's like five or ten minute sort of come down after that. And then the movie ends and that just these movies used to just basically like slice off all of that. And just bring it straight to a more dramatic end. So that went all the way till till like some of the movies in the eighties to like that was I wonder what? How that progressed? I wonder like what what was the turning point that made that not happen because you know, even with like something like karate kid, and you know, at that tournament with the close up of I think Pat rita's face and like rocky and stuff as well. Yeah. I wonder if anybody's written about this or or has read anything about this, please send it to me because I read very fascinated to read about like the way that movie endings have evolved over the years. But I don't want to interrupt you for too long. Want to triggered something? I want to mention real quick. Yes. Which is that difference between forty second street and to be not to be the thing. I find really interesting if you watch this decade of film is a lot of those great depression comedies lean very heavily on the audience living in the great depression in knowing very, well, what would the characters going into at that time. Which is why King Kong the lead character? Does he take get on a boat to get because it'd be w a job even it means going on a boat with a bunch of random people awfully voyage? Whereas by the time, you get to be you're not to be which is like one of the best comedies ever made. You have literally the backdrop of World War Two where suddenly the you have you have to more plot driven because you'll have the world at stake. Whereas always early comedies are designed for people who want to be distracted starring characters who are trying to survive the same plight. Stay are without the movie actually calling attention to it. So I think there is like it's interesting to see evolution of comedies go from b. Being so light and fluffy. Because they're about characters is desperate as audience to being about characters who are really trying to save the world because the audience felt the same way but during World War Two. Yeah. That's that's a really good point. I had not considered that. I I guess moving on really quick I'll just sort of burn through the rest of these. I I watched Little Women which I'd never seen before. And the version. I watched there's been a ton of film versions of this adaptations of there's a new one in the works, right? Yeah. Louisa may all caught wrote the book, and I think Greta gerwig is directing a new version with sure show Ronin later this year the version that I watched was from nineteen thirty-three, and it starred Katharine Hepburn, and I would say Katherine Hepburn's performance. It's very good in this movie. It's directed by George Kuku who directed a lot of movies that I've been washing over the past few months and really enjoyed like the Philadelphia story. And I think he directed gaslight as well. But this movie is not great. And I don't think it's the story. That's not good. I just think it's the actual version of this film. That is I found it to be lacking a little bit like. Some of the editing..

Katharine Hepburn George Kuku Pat rita King Kong Greta gerwig Louisa Philadelphia forty second thirty year ten minute
"george kuku" Discussed on /Film Daily

/Film Daily

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"george kuku" Discussed on /Film Daily

"I was watching a little bit of behind the scenes stuff and just the production design elements are really impressive for what they did in terms of lighting and all of that stuff there. So yeah, I would definitely definitely recommend this movie. I think if I would've caught it last year, it might have ended up like maybe squeezing into my top fifteen or something. So that is bad time to the El royale. I got it. I think it's available on on a VOD and all that. Now, I I got it through the net. Flicks disc plan. I also watched hotel artists on a plane, and this is the movie that I was catching a lot of flack for basically being like a rip off of the John wick movies at set in a hotel where Jodie Foster plays a nurse who tends to the wounds of assassins in people who are in like a futuristic crime syndicate, basically like their members of this specific hotel, and they're able to come to her to recuperate after a particular injuries. But they gather Jeff Goldblum is in the cast is really good Jodie Foster starting. Sterling K Brown. Jeff Goldblum Brian tire. Henry I think I don't like this movie nearly as much as either of the two John wicks. I don't know if it's a full on rip-off. Definitely there. Tons of similarities feels a little weird in that regard. Drew Pearce his direct Auriol debut that direction is fine. And I mean, he, you know, he's the guy who wrote ironman three what was one of the writers on ironman three. So you know, he has like a certainly a creative streak in him. And it seems like he's he's going just far enough to try to separate this from the John wick stuff that that. I'm not really like rolling, my eyes and giving it too much side. I in terms of that angle. But just like a lot of this movie feels very written. If you know what I'm saying, it, it's sort of like characters speak in ways that that people would never speak in the real world and not in like a super stylized way like in tarintino movie or something. So I found it just to be lackluster. All the way around although I will say sterling K Brown is very good. And I wanted to see him in more leading roles and so few patella who I know primarily is like the metal legged henchmen from the first Kingsman movie. She was also like Star Trek beyond and stuff. But she this was like the first movie where I was like, oh, wow. She actually like could maybe lead movie that would be interested in watching like, she's she's more than just like the the stereotypical female bad ass. You know, the action star kind of thing I feel like she did a little bit of that in this movie as well. But I thought her acting was actually pretty good movie. So let's not forget this as the Potala is also dark universes famous the mummy. So I never saw the money. So he's going to be the lead of that franchise is also one that leaves in climax with mentioned that. Okay. Well, yes. Oh, man. This is a severe booth. Tele heavy podcasts thing in climax. Jacob. No. But she plays. Somebody who lots of bad things happen to she walks like an Egyptian stirring, her dances off. Okay. Sorry. I give up on done. I quit. No. And then two other movies really quickly. I had like a over the past week and a half of have like a an unwitting George Kuku triple feature last week. I talked about gas late, which was really great. And then on the plane. I recently flew back to Florida. I watched the Philadelphia story and the women both of which were directed by George Cooper. And I had no idea that he directed those. But I'll talk about the women I really quickly this movies from nineteen thirty nine. It is a move. It's the first movie I've ever seen ever that does not have any male characters in it at all it stars Norma Shearer. Join crow Joan Crawford and Rosalind Russell. And it's based on a play. And the entire thing is just about like these the sort of like bickering high society women and not a single male actor appears in the entire movie which for nineteen thirty nine. And also it was written by two women. I think. Yeah. Anita loose and Jane Murphy, so for nineteen thirty nine that's like a jaw dropping achievement..

John wick Jodie Foster John wicks Drew Pearce Jeff Goldblum Jeff Goldblum Brian tire George Cooper Norma Shearer Joan Crawford K Brown Jacob tarintino George Kuku Auriol Henry Rosalind Russell Anita loose Florida Philadelphia
"george kuku" Discussed on /Film Daily

/Film Daily

04:03 min | 2 years ago

"george kuku" Discussed on /Film Daily

"Her husband's stole and try to return it to the railroad to clear, the family name, the so her son grows up without this this looming thing of his father having been a criminal over him his whole life. But instead, she ends up teaming up with the guys that she hires to find this gold, and they actually just go out and try to get it for themselves, and she's in on it with them. And it's this really I mean, it's got great send Mottaki and a really really good score with like magnificent seven style females throughout there's like some big explosions and a a really fun twist ending. So it's called the train robbers. I would definitely recommend checking that out if you haven't seen that one. If you're looking for a classic old or a western feels like an old classic. I'm not sure how it's how it's really you know, what it standing is in the western community right now. But and then I also watched memories of murder, which is. One of bunk June hose early movies. I'd never seen this one before it is based on the true story of Korea's first serial murders in the nineteen eighties. And there are some really really disturbing stuff that happens to several women in this movie. So it's probably not for squeamish audience members out there, but it's like about this like buffoonish cop who constantly thinks that he's found the serial killer because he like coerce confessions out of everyone that he comes in contact with basically. And then there's this big city detective who sort of Rolton realizes that like standard operating procedures. Don't apply to catch a criminal. Who is? So, you know, so notorious and is going further than anybody's gone in the country's history. But Bongino, ho, I mean, men that guy he always knows where to put the camera and really like amid all of these super disturbing moments, his bizarre sense of humor really struck me. As like always being on display like there's this. One edit the. The cuts from a body on a slab in a morgue to a hunk of meat being cooked for meal, and it's just like it's so gross. And so bunk Hoult to me. But yeah, the craft of this one is what is what stood out to me the most more than the story, which you know, it's about serial killers, it sort of feels maybe old hat now because we've seen so many of those types of stories before. So plot wise, it's probably not anything you've you've never seen. But I would I would recommend it. And then. Streaming somewhere. Because I haven't seen in years. I'm wanting to revisit where did I watch this on prime washed? So good. I remember being really good. But it's been a while. So thanks a lot on the put it on my list for this week. Yeah. Yeah. And then another one that I would recommend that all of you see if you have not yet is a movie called gaslight from nineteen forty four and this is based on a play. And that's where the term gas lighting comes from which is the the movie like I said, it's a it's an adaptation of this play. And it's about this woman whose husband try spent the entire movie trying to convince her that she is going insane. So you've probably heard the term gas lighting before. And that's where this come from. And it it was nominated for seven Oscars, and it's totally deserving because this movie rules it came out in the mid forties. And who directed George Kuku directed this. He directed like the nineteen fifties version of a star is born the Philadelphia story born yesterday my fair lady. I mean, he was a big name. Name in that era of Hollywood filmmaking. And man this movie is so good Ingrid Bergman plays the woman who is being gas lit Charles Boyer plays. Her husband who was like this. You know, deceiving guy who has also alter alterior motives and Joseph Cotten from who I know from best from the third man is a a detective is trying to figure out what the hell is going on in this thing and Angela lansbury is in this and she was seventeen at the time. And it's her first movie ever. And it blew me away. Just to see a young Angela lansbury because I'd never seen her in anything. You know, what I guess probably earlier than like bed nuts and broomsticks or something..

Angela lansbury George Kuku murder Mottaki Korea Joseph Cotten Bongino Ingrid Bergman Rolton Charles Boyer Hollywood Philadelphia
"george kuku" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

The Daily Zeitgeist

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"george kuku" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

"And we're back and miles. Scientists are working on a way to determine what the most influential film director and actors are and their methodology. Is it confused the hell outta me? But their results seem pretty spot on. Yeah. Because they're using rather than like box office numbers and reviews, which are too subjective. Br trying to use complex networks, so like really analyzing the data and using a film as a node and any connections to other films sort of increases, it's like value to I guess film in general, so like as an influence on other films as yet exactly or referenced. So as these a group of Italian scientists, and they're using a similar methodology that they use to sort of like track the impact of like like scientific studies read, so they're just applying this now two films, and so the as they say, they say we propose an. Turn it method to box office takings reviews for analyzing the success of a film. We have developed an algorithm that uses references between movies as a measure for success in which can also be used evaluate the curve directors actors and actresses by considering their participation in top scoring movies. Okay. So based on that actually, also how Google works that is they were like basically just trying to classify different academic papers on a algorithm IQ network as a graduate project and eventually invented Google, right? Well, see that so much safer, your origin story than Facebook. Right. Mark Zuckerberg was creeping on ladies in his class for it. So when you look at it, first of all, none of these when they when they go to the top twenty films, none of the films were released before or after nineteen seventy seven which and they and they even acknowledged the bias that a it's bias towards western films because they're using a lot of the data that they got from AMD. And so and also that it's definitely more male. Biased. And that it also there's a bias towards older films because they've been around longer and henceforth can have more influence on the movies. We see now. So it's really a better tale of which movies from the sixties and seventies. Where most. Yeah, I mean all the way back to me. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. I think. Yeah. If you look at I think if you went up box office in like with inflation, I think gone with the wind would be the top on with way. But it doesn't even it's not in the top ten. So the top ten from number one to ten is wizard of Oz. Star Wars Episode for psycho, King Kong, two thousand one metropolis citizen Kane birth of a nation, Frankenstein and snow quite that actually makes sense. Yeah. Yeah. Because those are all like you've seen those quoted so frequently throughout your life, right? Whether it's in a looney tunes cartoon, or in another film, right that it's just become like a part of the filming language or cultural. Wallpaper. Yeah. And so, yeah, when they did the same process directors. They found that like the most influence director was the who's the guy who directed gone with the wind, George Kuku or something. Yeah. And then Victor Fleming and Alfred Hitchcock, and then so they're saying like, oh, well, if Kuku of enflamming, they probably got there because of gone with the wind, and then other people that were credited for like the wizard of like, so they basically like hold on. We got to figure this out because this isn't quite the best way to do it for directors. So then they created a different metric for directors and actors, which is a little more interesting. So they did more of what they call a medal ranking system like the Olympic. So you get a gold point for each film that reached the top five percent of influence in the year. It was released a silver who is the five to ten percent, and LeBron's. If it was in the ten to twenty five percent ranking. So with that in mind, the top three directors in order number one goes to Hitchcock's Spielberg than Brian depalma. Yeah. I mean, I like the kind of like movies that people have the post. Shire's up in there in there rooms, right Scarface and the untouchables despite being like it was a hit movie. And it wasn't like that. Well, raid by critics, but you know, that quote from battleship Potemkin of the baby carriage going down the stairs at the train station has been in just everything.

Mark Zuckerberg director Alfred Hitchcock George Kuku Google battleship Potemkin Facebook AMD Brian depalma Victor Fleming Shire Scarface LeBron King Kong Frankenstein Kane enflamming Spielberg twenty five percent five percent
"george kuku" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

The Next Picture Show

02:36 min | 2 years ago

"george kuku" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

"Between the past. Needs someone out of the past. And turned take station of living maybe through the past. But the past is not through with us. Come back to the next pitcher show, a movie of the week podcast devoted to classic film. And the way its shaped our thoughts on a recent release. I'm tasha Robinson here again. With Scott Tobias ups Genevieve kospi last episode, we discussed the classic nineteen fifty four George Kuku version of stars born, which is a remake of nineteen thirty seven film, which was remade again in nineteen seventy six and now has been remade again in two thousand eighteen in each case. The foam was obviously redesigned for specific era. A lot of the details. Stay the same including the overall arc in the central relationship. But the details of performance, and what it takes to be a star change with every decade. And so to the ideas of what it means to compromise yourself for fame. The nineteen fifty four version was reportedly influenced by the real life marriage of Barbara Stanwick to Frank Fay, a famous, but troubled vaudevillian who slipped into obscurity as wife rocketed defame, the Twenty-eight teen version seems equally inspired by the career. It's female lead lady Gaga who talks repeatedly about all the men who told her should never. Make it as a singer giving her face, and especially her nose when our character. Allie finds phantom anyway, she's immediately surrounded by men who want to remake her in a very specific pop star image. But she fights back that plot goes in and out of focus compared to her character's relationship with Bradley Cooper's singer-songwriter lead character who latches onto is a great and shining talent booster fame. Then gets jealous and resentful issue become something he doesn't recognize the Twenty-eight teen version of a star is born deals more directly with viral fandom in the ways artists can bypass gatekeepers if they get lucky and get the right people's attention. But it also seems timely a metoo era when more and more people are paying attention to the ways men can stand in the way of female artists careers or can post them to fame, but possibly with selfish intentions, the twenty teen version of the film arrives at a time. When it's hard to look at this kind of film without hearing the conversation about who holds the keys to fame, and what any relationship between men and women of different power levels. Can mean it gives a familiar story new dimension. Or does it just throw the older versions of? A story into an interesting new light. We'll talk about it after this break. Always knew. Is the first time I worried. Can I ask you first question?.

Gaga Allie tasha Robinson Barbara Stanwick Genevieve kospi Bradley Cooper Scott Tobias Frank Fay George Kuku
"george kuku" Discussed on You Must Remember This

You Must Remember This

10:18 min | 2 years ago

"george kuku" Discussed on You Must Remember This

"Bacteriology. And was well behaved for her first year back at WB and she worked steadily without incident still while Jean Harlow had only gone on to bigger and better things at her major studio after leaving Hughes and was finding herself fifth build on minor films. And her studio was doing nothing to generate material with her in mind, then and did a couple of things that made it look like she was demanding special treatment, which the executives didn't like I she maneuvered to change her contract. So that she would be given only two weeks of unpaid leave per year rather than the four weeks deputies on nearly every other performers contract. Then she tried to get out of traveling to San Francisco to do press for film called G men, then when? The studio cast her in thankless part as James Cagney wife in a movie called ceiling zero and called in sick on day one and spent the day writing a letter to Jack Warner I must insist that you place me in productions of dramatic merit in which my artistry personality intelligence and experience may be displayed. She wrote failure to do. So will be considered a breach of contract on your part? Instead, she was fired from the movie and put on health related suspension. And seems to have been faking sick. Which was a mistake the studio could now use her supposed ill health as an excuse not to give her any work. And there does seem like there was something going on with her always Finn and had dropped so much weight by this point that the studio thought she looked unattractive on camera. They. Got a studio Dr to sign the statement. It is my opinion that in her presence state of health. She could not pursue her duties as a contract player without greatly endangering her health. And there is a strong possibility that she would not be able to complete a picture should you undertake to have her do? So at this time. If an was too sick to work that would make it a lot easier for Warners to cancel her contract, especially if she volunteered to stay home when she was supposed to be on sets when she called in sick for several days on her next film this studio again took her off the job and put her on unpaid suspension in need of her salary to keep the bills paid on her ranch and decided to disobey the orders of her personal doctor and the studio doctor and show up anyway, but she was sent home and accused in private memos of pretending. She was well so that the studio would be forced to pay her. And decided to take the matter to court and had found three doctors who examined her and provide statements that she was healthy enough to work. So her lawyer argued that Warrener's had breached her contract by forcing her onto medical suspension after she filed suit Warners had two of their own doctors examined, and and both claimed she was in fact too ill to work still hoping an would drop the suit in January nineteen thirty six the studio lifted her suspension, her lawyer advised her not to go back to work into the legal matter was settled. So she didn't on Valentine's Day, she appeared in court to testify. She acknowledged that she had been dissatisfied with the roles the studio had offered her and recalled I told Mr. Warner if I was not worth my salary for him to release me. But she. Denied that she was ill and claimed that she had been ready to work for four months. The studio brought in images of an over the years to demonstrate that she had become severely thinner over time despite much testimony from doctors who claimed an was healthy the judge decided in favor of the studio that they had been justified in suspending her on the basis of her health. She was ordered to return to work and plan to appeal and did not return to work. This battle dragged on for over a year during which time and did not work at her home studio for nearly twelve months finally at the end of nineteen thirty six Warrener's agreed to let an walk away from her contract. And would not officially retire for another fifteen years, but the end of her time at Warner Brothers would in hindsight turn out to be the end of her chance to ever become a major star. While other actresses such as Barbara Stanwick were able to successfully freelance before and after World War Two and would spend the next decade and a half working for a variety of studios, but she never really built any momentum. There would be some interesting movies such as cafe hostess in nineteen thirty nine, but then World War Two got underway and an again afraid that letting her husband go to Europe on his own would be the end of their marriage walked away from her Hollywood career when the British Leslie enlisted in order to join him overseas. She worked a bit in British films over the course of the war. But who? Knows what would have happened if she had stayed in Hollywood where the parts for actresses who could play strong, independent women only multiplied during the war. It's especially tempting to wonder what could have been given that the marriage barely outlasted the war in nineteen forty six Leslie and Ann announced they would divorce as soon as she was legally free and married a dancer named eager data when an returned to Los Angeles after the war. She was restless depressed self conscious and nervous, but she had let her stardom slip away. She remained at loose ends for months, then made a few films under contract, the minor studio Republic her highest profile performance around this time came in these star studded moral milligram are the walls of Jericho which starred Coronel wild. As a small town attorney and politician whose life is destroyed slowly by the scheming of sexy Lady Macbeth played by Linda Darnell, and the anchor of his alcoholic wife played by an and only has a handful of scenes in the movie, but she makes the most of them giving a convincing performance as an angry bitter woman who has always felt inferior to both wealthy impossibly beautiful ladies like Dr now and to her husband who for some reason every girl and woman in Kansas wants to bone. After Jericho she had a small, but significant part in the George Kuku directed Lana Turner vehicle a life of her own, but ends film career had begun to tail off. She worked in radio and television and made a couple of efforts on the New York stage. She divorced data and married for a third and final time to nNcholas. Wade an architect designer and Griff daughter together. And Wade tried to start a television production company funded by an this appears to have been a total money pets and spent hundreds of thousands of dollars and never actually produced anything in nineteen fifty seven and filed for divorce from Wade. And in her filing described horrible sounding physical abuse that she said he had inflicted on her throughout their marriage. Meanwhile. She she'd contracted to berkey Laos's and spent much of that year hospitalized when she emerged. She and Wade got back together cancelled their divorce and moved to Hawaii over the course of this marriage and had lost nearly all of her assets. Six years later during a period when the couple was again, separated nNcholas Wade died and wrote a poem reflecting on where she had ended up. I had to reach sixty two to finally become free a career and three marriages two divorces a life of fire and brimstone adventure. Yes, lots of it in many ways. And herself died of cancer for years later in nineteen seventy nine she had entered the hospital under her given name, Anna mckim. So it took a while for word to get out that and for shock of long ago Hollywood fame had passed away. Next week. We will catch up with Hughes in the nineteen forties as he begins to pursue a number of brunette beauties three of whom will be the subjects of the remaining three episodes of this season. Join us then won't you? Thanks

Wade Jack Warner Hollywood Warners Hughes Warrener Jean Harlow James Cagney Warner Brothers San Francisco Jericho Barbara Stanwick Laos Finn Anna mckim Leslie New York Europe attorney
"george kuku" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

05:26 min | 3 years ago

"george kuku" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

"Scottie's client list included Cary Grant Katharine Hepburn Spencer Tracy, George, Kuku Walter Pidgeon, Charles Lawton. Cole porter and many, many more in the nineteen forties Scotty operated a Hollywood gas station with an adjacent camper where he would rain sexual liaisons for his customers or fulfill their desires himself. These were closely held secrets for years until he published his two thousand twelve memoir titled full service. The book rewrites, Hollywood mythology that lasted for decades here is Scotty in the film speaking about Terry grants, same sex relationships before he became an actor, a known Cary Grant was living with ory Kelly in New York, who's a mad or Kelly designer actually got three Oscars for dress. Like a. Came out here and lived here for your and a half together. Then he met Randolph Scott and left ory dropping like operative because he wanted steer clear for fear of. They might think he's gave with someone who is known to be gay. The book full-service caused an uproar that's around the time that Matt began filming with Scotty and interviewing others such as the actor Stephen Fry. Angry at the idea of these beloved Hollywood icons being revealed to have secrets. But actually, all it is Scott is doing is revealing that these people were real. They were actual people, flesh and blood. Mike us. Scotty was turning ninety when his book came out, but he was as sharp as someone thirty years younger, Matt, followed him over two years. Uncovering his past the film supply, substantial evidence that Scotty stories hold up in our conversation. Matt says, his intentions were bigger than simply dredging up old gossip Hollywood's weird. You know, people like to dismiss it as being unimportant and frivolous. It's written off a lot because it has frivolous parts to it, but it's the major story of the twentieth century. I think you know, World War One World War Two in Hollywood, I think might be the top three. So why shouldn't we look at Hollywood through the lens of sexuality? I think we really must. Matt is a longtime writer for Vanity Fair. His previous films are Valentino the last emperor about the Italian fashion designer and citizen Jane battle for the city about the writer activist, Jane Jacobs, Matt spoke about those films on episode forty, five. He has a documentary coming out later this year called studio, fifty four and another do next year about the political operative ROY Cohn Scotty, and the secret history of Hollywood had its world premiere last year. The Toronto film festival and arrives in theaters this summer. The film has dedication to the memory of gore Vidal the prolific novelist essayist and screenwriter who moved in the same circles as Scotty. I asked Matt about his own friendship with the doll. They were introduced in the nineteen nineties by his Vanity. Fair colleague Christopher Hitchens I'd always admired doll. He was my literary hero in many ways, and I had this purchase Vanity Fair where Hitchings also had a perch and the person I always thought should write for Vanity. Fair was Gorby doll and he never really had. I don't think so. I was my goal to get him in the pages Vanity. Fair Hitchens and he knew each other well, so I threw Hitchens contrived to meet him and Christopher was very good at that type of thing. If you asked him literary favor or really any type of favor, he would go out of his way to try to do it for you. He really did it. He was. Thought kind of old fashioned kindness and it sort of backscratching, but it's, it's not really absolutely. You know, he would bring his students two things. One of his students at the new school, Russia, salty. He introduced me and she later became a program at the tunnel film festival because of that. Yeah. So he was one of those connector people. He kind of had a salon going in Washington, but I think it, you know, you, you think all these people is incredibly unapproachable. Hitchings really wasn't. He was very approachable, and he was really happy to do this would turn out to be a massive. Good turn for me. Not only did it fulfill the dream of meeting Gorby Dowell, but then I did get him to write for Vanity Fair, and we became friends. And then I became his literary executor, which is the key to the Scotty Bowers story for me. And when you say. You were admire of Vidal what we're that particular aspects of his career that dream. Oh, strongly. Oh, kind of. Literary outlaw..

ROY Cohn Scotty Christopher Hitchens Matt Vanity Fair Hollywood Hitchings Scotty Bowers ory Kelly gore Vidal Randolph Scott Cary Grant Katharine Hepburn S Cole porter Gorby Dowell Oscars Scottie Cary Grant Kuku Walter Pidgeon Toronto Mike us Terry
"george kuku" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"george kuku" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"George kuku in america was and stems what great roles i mean what you know an effect it like for it didn't he really didn't catch on as of being thought of as being one of cinema's great filmmakers until the women's movement until he started getting more of a serious reputation in the seventies and up to that the films were thought of as being merely melodramas and so innings women's stories are always lesser they add in this why this moment right now with lady bird i tanya and some of these other films have it's been so refreshing to me because they say you know girls stories manner women's stories matter lady bird is probably gonna end but are it started last year so if we counted as a twenty seventeen film best gonna be our number one seller for the year really feminist and it's a it's a girl she has boyfriends but her main relationships are with her mother and our best friend and i have waited kind of my whole life and i believe a lot of other people have waited off their wives to see a movie like this a coming of age movie where a woman a girl is the actor the agents not the acted upon and it's refreshing it's it's really refreshing isn't that parked than perfect film by any means but it's it's a huge thing it really is we're gonna take another break and play a preview for next week show lab right throws five i see that some land yeah yeah behold the captains of industry prospective owners of maxine car wash pittsburgh pennsylvania maxi's car wash.

George kuku maxi america maxine pittsburgh pennsylvania
"george kuku" Discussed on Unspooled

Unspooled

09:25 min | 3 years ago

"george kuku" Discussed on Unspooled

"Home. I'm always trying to keep up with what's cool, and that's why I would like to commend everybody the podcast who charted, where every week comedian Howard Kremer brings his funniest friends onto discuss the top five songs and movies of the week. I love who charted have been a handful of times and Howard Kremer is one of my favorite hosts on the air wolf network. He's now joined by a new co host the tasha zero who is equally whole areas you may know so good. She's on another period and she also just did that Netflix special, the honeymoon stand up special. She's on my top five list about that. I'll take it. I mean, she's online to. They'll talk about everything from mumble rap to new country music, Neil young versus Jimmy Buffett, and which movies just seem to loud some of them. I will go with them. Yeah, I agree. There's some movies that are too loud plus each episode, Howard, Natasha, and their special comedian guests will share their hot pics listeners things that they reckon. Over all the garbage on the charts. They have so many great guests on the show. Their backlog is incredibly impressive. But if you wanna just jump in right now, you can listen to episodes with Ben Schwartz John Early and Cape relent and your will sewn. Paul f, Tom gets. Paul has been on the show, you know it's good. To Paul's just got politics, but I knew when you were talking about so listen to charge apple podcast Stitcher or ever you listen to. All right. We're back and I wanna talk to you about something that Walter said about MGM buying the rights of the wizard of us. Did you know that MGM paid seventy five thousand dollars for the rights of the wizard of Oz book which back in that time? Now I always kind of do this thing where we set the stage of what was going on. All right, so seventy five thousand dollars how much they paid to have the rights to make this movie. But the average cost of a house in ninety thirty nine three thousand eight hundred dollars, right? The average wage per year. One thousand seven hundred by two thousand five hundred houses the cost of the script of this and then let alone making the film. I know is not just to get the rights to make it into a film. You could populate Kansas. You could just have an entire town of Kansas and call it Ave. I mean, what I want to go and find out what Frank bomb did with that money. That's I'm guessing he invested in gold because. Isn't that the whole thing that the eleborate road was based on his financial idea that gold is the thing that will take you or you need to go by the way you should have been right now. I mean, you've been writing the pocket with all the commercials going also just again to kind of paint the picture of the time. I know we talked about World War Two, but Hitler invaded Poland. Four days after was premiered sees that I thought of eight, I guess, talk about like stealing the thunder. I mean, this was ninety thirty nine interesting time Amelia Earhart was declared dead after a plane disappeared, two years prior which we now know all the rules that she was found. They made jokes about me going over the rainbow. What didn't you like that seems like old tweet tweet? I feel like if it was a little bit closer than it would have worked out, probably better. I feel like now they're God. We got it declared. I did see a comic from the time where they ju- Hitler as a the evil witch over and then the cowardly lion has basically America being like, we're not so cowardly. You'll see in this time other movies that were kind of popular. Gone with the wind stagecoach of mice and men weathering heights Hunchback of Notre Dame. It's interesting because it really, I think, sticks out like a sore thumb in a weird way. I could see how it wasn't taken very seriously and we, we've kind of found some reviews that people appreciated the movie, but did not give it its due per se. Well, let's let's hear some of these main on this point of what was happening politically wise. The magazine, the daily worker does a political magazine, of course road. It had this criticism of devise. It said the social angle of the picture is comparatively nil, and they regret that MGM neglected this opportunity to satirize dictators. Wow, right. Can you imagine the political spin on this where the wizard himself is like this empty puffing fascist? I mean, would you want the wizard to look like, you know, like like Hitler, you know, have a little mustache by the way. I'm still trying to figure out how the wizards technology worked. I mean, that's the most complex puppet and it doesn't seem like he's doing anything that seems like me when I'm pertain to fake type. There's police, there's levers and it's just a basically a hologram screen. I mean, there's nothing going on, but no, that makes it better that it's not the wizards in the dictator. He's just kind of an empty suit, which is more of an interesting idea that again, timeless a person in power who doesn't really who you know, makes a big nose but isn't actually anything. Hind the curtain. You know where the emperor has no clothes kind of idea about this a lot right now as a critic in the time of Trump, every movie feels like it has a Trump connection and and does it do I wanna keep talking about it in everything like x. in the time of Trump, we don't analyzing through that which has its pros and cons, and I really wrestled with how much to do that in my abuse. So I would read a couple more negative reviews, and I want to just say, by the way, people are using language in these that we wouldn't use today. So sorry that is advocating this. They're not advocating this language because times change of the new Republic wrote, quote. Us has Dorf music, technicolor freak characters in Judy, Garland. It can't be expected to have humor as well in for the light touch a fantasy ways like a pound of fruitcake soaking wet. That is one of the best quotes of all time. Time magazine wrote as long as sticks to magic. It floats in the same rare atmosphere of enchantment that distinguished Snow White when it descends to earth. It collapses like a scarecrow in cloudburst isn't it goes on to say, it's final scene is a sentimental as Little Women, and it's singer midgets go through their paces with the board sophistication of slightly evil children. These heartless, heartless. Well, let me ask you question. 'cause I'm always wondering about this when you watch a movie, like if you were to review vase, are you looking at that differently than you would look at? You know, like the phantom threat yet? No, I'm so glad you brought that up because I was thinking thinking about those advise that there is a tendency to dismiss her undervalue or not expect the same things out of a children's, reviewing it to either Pat it on the head and give it an easy pass like, oh, it's dumb, but kids will like it Domin to underestimate children, which really offends me like children have standards, and you know what also pops out to me about this review. Is it. Pairs it to Snow White, which everybody was doing when the wizard of is came out. I think of these firms is two separate things now because in the course of history, it's like they're Snow White, which I saw here, and then there's the Oz which I saw later, but these two films coming out really close to each other. They were having a conversation. People were comparing them instantly because they were two films about a magical woman with a bunch of little people in this fantasy land, right musical numbers. I mean, a lot of why they wanted to kill somewhere over the rainbow is they wanted the songs to be cheerful like they were in Snow White. So it was trying to rip it off. Kind of it was sort of trying to get that Snow White audience. So interesting and that's, I think, probably the movie did not do so well in its original theatrical run. It only was later that it kind of came to be this Colt thing. Maybe it was the separation of those two films that allowed it to kind of be its own thing and not just, you know, a direct comparison to something that was popular. These things Disney was just. Ping pong off all these Disney classics 'isolation because the year after wizard of Oz comes out, then you have Pinocchio and Pinocchio is blue. Fairy descending in a bubble straight fucking rip off of his Avaz. It's crazy. It's interesting though because even though it had the reception wasn't a tremendous financial success, it was still nominated for best picture best Matafi, best art direction. Best effects best musical score original song and best academy juvenile ward, which I think they should bring back best juvenile academy to people that every year it'd be amazing did. So it did win for over the rainbow was nominated for the other ones, but it lost out to. And this is by the way at the twelfth Academy Award gone with the wind was the big winner of this year, which is interesting. Like those are the two big films and they're so different. Yeah, but they're directed by two of the same people. It's like either way Victor Fleming and George Kuku are like, yeah, we did a good job. Some confused about this, therefore directors listed for the movie. Yeah, this is the MGM madness because they're making two giant films at this point. Okay. Making wizard of Oz in gone the wind. Okay. So two of the directors that we have here just got also thrown back and forth. Gone with the wind people are getting like swapped in with the craziness over the construction crew. It's like, are you're working over here today? We're gonna over here today. Fleming you're, you're going to leave this. Go to win for a second victim Fleming's like, but I'm really cool. Like in wizard of us actually. I don't know if you really said that by the way, talking about getting a serious performance out of duty,

MGM Snow White Howard Kremer ju- Hitler Victor Fleming Paul f Oz Netflix Kansas Time magazine Disney Neil young Trump Amelia Earhart Jimmy Buffett Academy Award Poland Ben Schwartz John Early Cape relent Walter
"george kuku" Discussed on MASTERPIECE Studio Podcast

MASTERPIECE Studio Podcast

05:43 min | 3 years ago

"george kuku" Discussed on MASTERPIECE Studio Podcast

"Nevertheless, education isn't everything. I got away from bullocks Wilshire, sad affair rather enjoyed it. But I got to go to MGM studios and from from there through this friend, I got to meet the great George Kuku the director who was looking desperately for a young actress to play the made it, yes, light. And therefore due to that wonderful happenstance meeting George ca-car and the writers and producers of gaslight I got my first chance to act, which is what I had really been preparing all my life to do. I finally got to do it. What is so amazing to me is Nancy, Oliver gaslight, you're seventeen years old. It's your first film. It's opposite Ingrid Bergman what. Was this? Like as a seventeen year old, filming this movie as as your first role? What was it like? I was, I was completely awed by being in a major studio, it cover city which was M G M in those days, which was, you know, on the number one big studios producing great movies with hundreds of great stars under contract. It was a very grand affair to be -ployed in a great studio like that in those days. And I, I was just nothing. You know, I, I didn't have a proper dressing room. I had a funny kind of lean to black place that I could change my clothes in and put my Nancy outfit on. It. It was also new to me that I, I didn't realize what I was really embarking on and what was going to become. Thank goodness. Finally, an interesting career in movies. Now you followed up gaslight with roles in national velvet and the picture of during gray. What was it like making these two films? So soon after your debut role. I took it in my stride of thank goodness. I was able to adapt. I, I went from being Nancy and gaslight to being the young girl in in national velvet with Elizabeth, and that was kind of going backwards. I was a little embarrassed playing a teenager, you know, after playing Nancy, who is a really a tough broad. So that was a bit of an adjustment. The picture of Dorian gray was so extrordinary and unique and quite a genuinely demanding role for me and working with Albert Lewin who's the great director in those days. Each one of those films were the best film work I ever did after that except for the Manchurian candidate which came way after. MGM just wasted my abilities as an actress for about ten years, and I did it for the money because we, we needed it. What was that experience like in terms of being under appreciated or underused? Pretty darn difficult. This I, I needed the income. I needed the experience. Nothing you do as an actor is wasted, you know. But I knew that what I was being used for was as a utility and as a character actress. So I was not a sort of glamorous type of young woman of those days which was required if you were going to be built as a star, I was a character actress and. Remains all my life. You know, got to play some very glamorous women. But again, I was acting that part. I wasn't just a glamour girl and the most successful young actresses at MGM in those days were in the first place. They were just great looking gals. They had great legs. They danced well, they sang, they did all the right staff, you know, and I just wasn't that I always I was sort of a meat and potatoes actress rather than just a camp ago. The only time I think I showed my legs was in the Harvey girls, and they made the most of it called legs lansbury for a while. In the men Cherian candidate. You were only three years older than Laurence. Harvey who played your son in the film and blue Hawaii. You played Elvis, Presley's mother despite only being ten years older than him. Why was that a a recurrent theme during your career. I think it was do deniability to characterize and to play older than myself and to take on the kind of overt after beauts of an older women. And that's part of acting, you know, if you're a character actress, you, you know how to do that and to behave like somebody who deal older than you are. So that wasn't extraordinary for me to do, and it was fun. I didn't mind doing that before this next question of brief word from our sponsors. Viking

Oliver gaslight Nancy MGM Ingrid Bergman MGM studios director bullocks Wilshire George ca-car Dorian gray George Kuku Presley Harvey lansbury Albert Lewin Laurence Elvis Elizabeth ten years seventeen years seventeen year
"george kuku" Discussed on Novel Targets

Novel Targets

04:40 min | 3 years ago

"george kuku" Discussed on Novel Targets

"Done in Lausanne, George Kuku some video rector of the department of one color jeans, the university of Lausanne hospital and the director of the Ludwig institute for cancer research in Lausanne, we are launching a program in personalized cancer vaccines for varying in Luzon, that's a direct continuation of the work. We did with my colleagues at the university of Pennsylvania at the time. When I was a pan we used whole to more license to vaccinate patients because we did not have the tools to develop molecular early defined vaccines. The notion is that ovarian cancer expresses a lot of antigens. But we absolutely have no idea, which is antigens are. And so the best approach at the time felt to be the whole tumor. So we optimize that quite a lot. And we saw clinical benefit in several patients, which was quite exciting. What we're doing on Luzon with a lot more sophisticated tools. We have the ability for each patient to identify new dopes expressed by tomorrow by that. I mean, unique proteins that are expressed into more, but not normal body because these are derived from actually mutations that Tamara acquires. And so this proteins can elicit any municipal bonds because are expressed at the surface of the tumor cells peptides as called his Neil epochs. So we can identify viz new talks now, or at least in fair them through a lot of mathematics and molecular analysis, and then we can actually Nate patients using these so with synthetic peptide, and we are presenting data. Now, I will present this tomorrow and the poster that we can reliably identifying ovarian cancer almost in every patient such new IP talks, which are indeed recognized by the patient's own immune system. And that is. Direct demonstration that is in Europe talks did immunogenetics. So they elicit an immune response spontaneously. Okay. We can then build on that by selecting our best candidates, and we think anywhere between five and ten of this peptides should be probably sufficient to induce immune response. What are you going to do with seeing next? Professor Anaconda left is leading this work in those on. And the team of the Ludwik are doing all of the molecular analysis and the validation so patients with ovarian cancer at completion of chemotherapy will receive various injections with this synthetic peptides that will be loaded on the patient's own than Riddick cells. This again, a direct continuation of the work. We did at Penn where we use patient's autologous than Riddick cells, meaning dendritic cells, we developed from the patient's own blood, and at the time, we had loaded the dendritic cells with that too. Marseils now will load them with synthetic peptides. And we expect them to be way more effective vaccines than what we did at the time at Penn. So that's the expectation and this will be done in the age of and setting meaning after compassionate therapy. Patients who expectedly will have no evidence of disease and a proportion of this patients may never relapse, but a small proportion we hope to improve on that and increase the number of patients who hopefully will not relapse or who will much later than they would have ordinarily. So that's the whole study is this a simple process, it's quite complicated because it requires very deep and sophisticated and is of the patient tumor. So we'll look to market time of surgery will spend the time during chemotherapy to complete all the analysis. Make our decisions of which peptide supervisory ties, and then we'll prepare the vaccine. So they vaccine will be ready by the time the patient. Completes came when I think of dentures, it, sells, I think of the generals of immune system involved with antigen presentation. How does that work in terms of your cancer vaccine? What did they actually do with the new EPA tohp developers? And that T-cells is that the idea so we actually cut through a lot of the natural processes this expectedly should be happening in vivo spontaneously. So the dirt excels going to more they pick up antigen, the go to the lymph nodes, and they talk to T-cells, but this whole process natural is completely corrupt because of them, you know, suppressive environment of the tumor. So we reproduced this but optimize?.

Luzon Lausanne Penn cancer Lausanne hospital university of Pennsylvania Ludwig institute Europe George Kuku Nate director Professor Anaconda Tamara EPA
"george kuku" Discussed on Vogue Podcast

Vogue Podcast

01:49 min | 5 years ago

"george kuku" Discussed on Vogue Podcast

"Yet dream fashion or do you dream scenes? Do you dream fashion end things? Do you go to? I often just have nightmares. Hits hits sort of you know, because even when it's something insignificant in my dreams they turned into nightmares. Now, my last question is, and I thank you for this wonderful conversation. What do you hope for your son, Jack when he becomes eighteen? That I just Mabel to help him fulfill his destiny, I have no preconceived notion as to what Jack should be do. We all have our undetonated, and I certainly don't want to live vicariously through him. So as all I hope is that he's happy and that he is fulfilling his destiny, whatever that destiny might be is he taking lessons as ease for. And of course, now, he swims and he plays tennis and the play soccer, and he's very sporty. And yeah, he takes our class and a little French class and teach all this things at school. And it's it's good. So what is the rest of your day? Like, what are you gonna do day to day on a Friday? Don't worry. I have plenty of work to do. I talking to you is like talking to George Kuku. I would've imagined that. I would have a conversation with Mr. George Kuka. It would run like this. I thank you for the beautiful work. You do always. And it's a great privilege and president talk to you for vote podcasts. Thank you. Thank you. Have a great day, Tom. Thanks caller. Okay. Bye. Bye. The vote podcast is for Duchesne of vogue magazine recorded here at one World Trade Center and produced by Nagaa Hammadi, and he'll be Couric sound engineering by David Lauren's and hosted by me..

Jack Mr. George Kuka George Kuku vogue magazine David Lauren World Trade Center Mabel Nagaa Hammadi Duchesne president Tom tennis soccer Couric