35 Burst results for "George George Mason University"

Mediaite's Sarah Rumpf Offended by Mark Levin's 'Ranting'

Mark Levin

01:51 min | 2 months ago

Mediaite's Sarah Rumpf Offended by Mark Levin's 'Ranting'

"And it puts some really vicious stupid people to work Now I would not call Sarah rump a vicious stupid person I don't know her All I said is she seemed like a 12 year old Her lack of substance in her writing style she took grave grave not even great grave offense She pointed out I'm a lawyer And she was upset at my ranting And she said of course I didn't provide any substantive information in response to her genius Of course I did it's right there on the video that she attached But she's a slow listener She said you know there's four elements for elements in greenhouse gases really Who knew Sarah I've studied this issue at great length many many years ago When you were 12 years old doctor Edward wegman from page one 32 of liberty and tyranny I wrote that book I thought you should know A professor at the center for computational statistics at George Mason university Chair of the national Academy of Sciences committee on applied theoretical statistics Board member of the American statistical association More than just a lawyer was tasked by congressional committee to lead a group of experts in examining the hockey stick evidence Now this evidence but like getting into great detail you see Sarah broadcasting you have limited time Which is why when you write a stupid essay you have all the time in the world

Sarah Rump Edward Wegman Center For Computational Stati National Academy Of Sciences C Sarah George Mason University American Statistical Associati Congressional Committee Hockey
Navy Ship to Be Named After Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Mark Levin

00:32 sec | 6 months ago

Navy Ship to Be Named After Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

"It would be good to know there's going to be a navy ship named after the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg I would think that'll scare the hell out of the enemy wouldn't it mister Medusa Oh my God here comes the Ruth Bader Ginsburg How many things By the government ships or anything have been named after Anton and Scalia His death preceded hers I guess I guess none While George Mason university law school I didn't say that

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Navy Supreme Court Ruth Bader Ginsburg Scalia Anton George Mason University Law Sc
Politico: DOJ Shuts Down China-Focused Anti-Espionage Program

Mark Levin

01:53 min | 7 months ago

Politico: DOJ Shuts Down China-Focused Anti-Espionage Program

"I don't get this This is from Politico which is a reliably left wing site but nonetheless Department of Justice shuts down China focused anti espionage program Now we hit on this the other day but not enough The China initiative is being cast aside largely because of perceptions that it unfairly painted Chinese Americans and U.S. residents of Chinese origin is disloyal A listen to this by grouping cases under the China initiative rubric we help give rise to a harmful perception That the department applies a lowered standard to investigate and prosecute criminal conduct related to that country or that we in some way view people with racial ethnic or familial ties to China differently So this is an attorney general for a national security Matthew Olson For delivery the George Mason university in Virginia But justice's top national security official insisted that the decision amounted to a reframing and recalibration not an abandonment Of muscular law enforcement response to the national security threat posed by the People's Republic of China So let me get this straight Communist China is it's not even a close second is by far number one in terms of stealing our information They massive espionage program in our own country The FBI has said to the greatest threat the CIA has said that the greatest threat everybody knows they're the greatest threat But we should eliminate this initiative which was supported by Democrats and Republicans alike when it was first put in place Because it creates a pejorative about Chinese people

China Matthew Olson Politico Department Of Justice George Mason University U.S. Republic Of China Virginia FBI CIA
"george  mason university" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

05:18 min | 8 months ago

"george mason university" Discussed on Revision Path

"And I learned that quality is actually something that happens when the whole team works together as a unit when everybody helps each other. And so I also, hire people that don't have egos, you know, because we really do critique each other and help each other grow. And ensure that everything that comes out, everything that comes out of our shop has the quality that the customer expects. The client expects. But most important, I learned how to manage. I learned that if you treat your people, like your equal. Like people, you're not their parent. And you shouldn't be. But you treat them like you're equal. And you know, if you're having a problem with someone, just have a conversation and say, hey, what's going on? Is everything okay? How can I help you? You tell me how I can help you. Then you have a team that is that will come to you first, you know? If anything goes wrong, my team just comes to me and say, hey, here's what went down. And then I'm like, okay, so how did you fix it? So we worked through the solutions and we grow people. And I think that that is such a wonderful quality that I loved during the 15 years. I love being able to go to my boss and say, here's how I screwed up. Here's how I think we should fix it. Do you agree? And 9 times out of ten, he did. Oh, yeah, that's a great call. And you know what? It's okay. We all screw up sometimes. And so I managed the same way. And I think it's really important that folks feel folks feel free to grow and to make those mistakes because that's how you get exceptional designers, right? And I have exceptional designers. So I am a very lucky person. I mean, yeah, definitely sounds like, you know, to be able to have that level of openness among the team like that that really takes really, I think, death toll would also very skillful kind of just management and with being an aesthetic as long as you have being able to really learn that in that environment is definitely helped out with what you're doing at hatcher. Absolutely. Absolutely. 100%. Now you also are a design educator. We've had several design educators here on revision path. You're an adjunct professor at George Mason university where you've been since 2008..

hatcher George Mason university
"george  mason university" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:30 min | 9 months ago

"george mason university" Discussed on WTOP

"Mandates While George Mason university says it strongly encourages its employees to get vaccinated but they're not required to anymore All other masking and testing requirements remain in place at this time James Madison university also ditching a requirement that employees get vaccinated All staff faculty and students are required to wear a properly fitting face mask while indoors on university owned or least property At Virginia Commonwealth university employees are now not required to be vaccinated or to report their vaccination status to the university Masks will continue to be required indoors throughout the university and remain in effect for health system facilities And UVA has also dropped the requirement for workers to be vaccinated but they are strongly encouraging everyone to get their regular shots and their booster Meantime George Mason university is celebrating its 50th anniversary and we talked with the university's first black president about challenges it faces in the future The biggest talent is just getting above the noise in the community Gregory Washington made history as a university's first black president in July of 2020 He says one of the biggest hurdles is that there are at least 18 other universities within a 30 mile radius of George Mason There are just so many in and around our area and everybody is trying to do great things He said one of their biggest goals is to make higher education accessible to everyone We had made about 90% of the students now who apply Usually that's frowned upon by universities but we graduate more than 73% To be a TOV news Up next in money news home buyers are.

Mandates While George Mason un James Madison university Meantime George Mason universi Virginia Commonwealth universi Gregory Washington UVA George Mason
"george  mason university" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:45 min | 9 months ago

"george mason university" Discussed on WTOP

"The requirement to show vaccine cards at restaurants citywide goes into effect January 15th George Mason university is now requiring all faculty staff and students to show proof they've received a booster dose of the COVID-19 vaccine in order to combat the omicron variant The university says the deadline to receive a booster and upload documentation is February 15th Those who are not eligible for boosters before February 2nd will not be considered non compliant until two weeks after their eligibility date Students who live on campus will also have to take a pre arrival COVID test Police in prince George's county are asking for your help after a man was shot in the face with a flare gun What began as a road rage incident yesterday morning involving two men near the intersection of hybrids in Annapolis roads ended with one of them firing a flare gun in the face of the other at Bowie town center following an argument between the pair and caught on video released by buie police and available at W TOP dot com The victim is suffering from non life threatening injuries at an area hospital police say the suspect drove away in a white Ford pickup with a white cap over the bed of the truck if you have any information Police would like to hear from you Matt's small W TOP news Alexandria police are mourning the death of a veteran member of the department known for her service to the community Sargent Charlotte Mitchell died last week following an illness she served three decades with Alexandria of police department working many years in the dare program aimed at preventing drug abuse by young people She was a huge huge mentor to so many different people within our ages as well as people that were in the community Sergeant Cynthia Hurley says Mitchell was a selfless person always ready to help coworkers or residents Hurley says Mitchell leaves a legacy of.

"george  mason university" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:54 min | 10 months ago

"george mason university" Discussed on WTOP

"A $150 gift card to fogo to shown for tickets and information go to National Theater dot org and fogo dot com also more information as a WTO dot com search contests Here is the voice and good luck We can't get to attach to something that we've done that we know that becomes second nature no matter how much we love it 8 22 Traffic and road congestion this year in our area remain below 2019 levels before the start of the pandemic There are more people taking part in the daily commute this year than last year But a private transportation analytics company concludes that D.C. area traffic congestion is about 65% below what it was in 2019 The inrix company estimates D.C. area commuters losing 44 hours this year in congestion during peak commuting periods compared to off peak conditions That compares to losing 124 hours in 2019 and just 29 hours last year Particularly on P news George Mason university is now recognizing the Native American tribes who long held the land that the Virginia school sits on The new land use acknowledgment is a step in the right direction according to Gabriel tayak and associate Professor of public history at George Mason university It's been an intergenerational project to have more awareness Tayak is a member of the fiscal Indian nation herself She says the statement is up on the George Mason website and they're incorporating it into daily life as much as they can including an email signatures and an event She says it's something anyone can do Take some time to remember those ancestors who were here Valerie balk WT news The holidays can be challenging for people who are going to parties but struggling with addiction and don't want to drink What an addiction psychiatrist says My biggest advice for folks is to make a meaningful change.

inrix National Theater D.C. George Mason university Virginia school WTO Gabriel tayak Tayak George Mason Valerie balk
"george  mason university" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:06 min | 10 months ago

"george mason university" Discussed on WTOP

"The one year anniversary of the January 6th attack on the capitol While the House select committee continues to investigate the attempted insurrection there are new developments in the courtroom NBC four Scott macfarlane says where finally starting to see some high profile defendants be sentenced In one case the defendant accused of punching kicking police hitting police with a baseball bat defensive offered a plea deal that would range between 6 and 7 years in prison The defendant didn't take it the defendant who's in the TC JL pre trial didn't take the deal but it's an indication of where some of these mid level or higher level cases are going There are nearly 700 defendants so far A local university is recognizing the indigenous people who once lived on the land where the school is located It's long overdue Gabrielle tayak and associate Professor of public history at George Mason university said they recently issued a land use acknowledgment to recognize the Native American tribes on whose land the university is on in Virginia There are Native American people and tribes that have contributed widely to the formation of our country and the places that we are and often to great sacrifice Tayak is a member of the piscataway Indian nation and says that anyone can develop a land use acknowledgment with research Take some time to think about an investigate who was in the place where you are New first of its kind legislation to ban algorithms that produce discriminatory results has been introduced in the district D.C. attorney general Carl Racine says the legislation would make it illegal for companies to use discriminatory algorithms to make decisions about key areas of life These algorithms are making important judgments that impact individuals educational opportunities health and healthcare opportunities employment opportunities The problem is with data used to feed the algorithms if it contains historical biases the decisions the computers make will in turn be biased Kyle Cooper WTP news A nonprofit in Fredericksburg is using a centuries old craft as a unique way to support veterans I can really put our whole mission in one word and that's healing Steve hot served in the military for almost 17 years After dealing with PTSD he found support through blacksmithing and decided to serve as a Beacon of hope for other vets He founded black horse forge Once we get to know individuals that he can access the building whatever they need From pots and pans to knives and trinkets more than 11,000 vets have found comfort and support through this old school art And my proudest number of all that is that we've had zero suicide Steve is now hoping to expand into a space where vets can bring their families an important part of the healing process We want to be part of this community and part of a solution Melissa Howell WTO P news coming up after traffic and weather together almost two years since the pandemic began and most of us are still not back to commuting Sports next 5 14 If you've tried antidepressants and talk therapy but continue to feel depressed you should know it doesn't have to be that way Greenbrook TMS neuro.

House select committee Scott macfarlane Gabrielle tayak Tayak attorney general Carl Racine George Mason university NBC Kyle Cooper Steve hot baseball Virginia D.C. Fredericksburg PTSD Melissa Howell Steve
Pretty Much All of Journalism Now Leans Left, Studies Shows

The Larry Elder Show

02:09 min | 10 months ago

Pretty Much All of Journalism Now Leans Left, Studies Shows

"The media overwhelmingly left wing, I've seen studies showing self described liberals or Democrats outnumber self described Republicans or conservatives 8 to one, 5 to one, ten to one, depending upon the study. I don't believe The New York Times has a single conservative member of its editorial board. I don't believe the LA times to the single member, whose conservative of their editorial board. A growing number of Americans get their primary source of news from the algorithms that have been formed for them from Facebook or for yugo for Google. Yahoo, all left wing. And Biden has a nerve to complain that he's getting negative coverage. Can you imagine how bad the coverage would be if the coverage were truly fair and balanced? There's a book called left turn. We talked about it a little while ago. By professor from George Mason university named Tim gross close. And came out a few years ago. He looked at the top 20 sources of news, almost all of them were left wing. And based upon a study that was done, if the media were truly fair and balanced. The average state would vote the way Texas vote, which is about 8 to ten points in favor of Republican. There are two major newspapers in Washington D.C. The Washington Post in Washington times. Washington times a much smaller, of course, in The Washington Post, but it's one of the rare cities to have two newspapers one left wing and one right wing that are considered to be major newspapers. And so the people that were subscribing to The Washington Post were given free subscriptions to the Washington times, and the people that were subscribed to the Washington time for giving free subscriptions to The Washington Post. And then they looked at voting in those areas to find out whether that made any difference. And it did, the people that were subscribing to the Washington times a conservative newspaper were now voting slightly more left wing. The people who were only reading The Washington Post would now were getting free copies of the Washington times, voted substantially more conservative, meaning if they only knew what was going on, they might very well change

Washington Times The Washington Post Tim Gross Washington D.C. La Times The New York Times George Mason University Biden Yahoo Facebook Google Texas Washington
Professor Files Lawsuit Over University Vaccine Mandate

Dennis Prager Podcasts

02:43 min | 1 year ago

Professor Files Lawsuit Over University Vaccine Mandate

"Welcome back by friends. I'm dennis prager and a professor on todd. Zoecke z. y. W i c k by a professor of law george mason university and a fellow at the cato institute in august believe it was august. Let me see here. you wrote a piece in the The wall street journal was august professor. There why gogga's that's right down is so you wrote a about why you're not going to follow your universities. Demand that you get a vaccination for cans covert in order to be able to return to campus and you cited the fact that you had in fact cova and in fact was was when you took tests. You've had the antibodies to kovin. They stay continued to stay in your body and so you sued. george mason. Is that correct cats correct and it's okay. Yup no no you go ahead. Yeah so i so. I tried to resolve this the nice way. Then it's wages. I tried to torch mason claims to the place the respect science that Respects truth so. I reached out over the summer After i contacted by immunologists and i did a full immunity workup including an anti bodies tests. That showed that my anybody's level With comparable to somebody who had been fully vaccinated And And there's more there's more than you needed that but this is sort of a slam dunk case is this is how you measure of somebody's immune protection listens how they measure whether somebody needs a booster shot for any for any disease whether it's measles or covert or anything else And so. I reached out. And i said here's here's the evidence They blew me off. I reached out to again. And i'd attached an affidavit from my immunologist as well as to leading public Stoller sir. I'm sure you're familiar with jay body charge at stanford martin cool dorks harvard. The presenting all the evidence to show this george mason again. Just blew me off Issue their policy saying that everybody had to get back and and so i reached out to the new civil liberties alliance at that point and some ask them to represent me so we brought a lawsuit eventually george mason and they're giving the medical exemption after all this In civil and changed the rules so that wasn't being disadvantaged as much as i had so the lawsuit itself has been resolved. But now there's you know many cases now following raising the same issue as vaccine mandates of spread around the country.

Gogga Dennis Prager George Mason Cato Institute George Mason University Cova The Wall Street Journal Todd Stanford Martin Cool Dorks Har Mason Civil Liberties Alliance Stoller JAY
"george  mason university" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

05:56 min | 1 year ago

"george mason university" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"A and so. I've jumped from i. You know. I get bored easily to right so i jump from area to area so then you not try my hand in new bake so look over the last five years of my career. I've been the chief science officer for discovery. The space science education manager at nasa headquarters administrative position. And you know. I bet a lot of television and i've not been in a classroom at all right and so now even in your twenty twenty you know i. I spent that year in in half and mostly twenty nineteen writing the book right. So you know hopefully make a movie and do a podcast by own and do other things. And i just started a new professorship at george mason university's all Very cool. I love that and and so as and when you do your professor ring are what kind of science i always like to ask this of especially of cosmologists. Like what is your quote lab look like is it. A whiteboard is it. Computers is it you know like how are you doing your science so let me tell you the description of my last lab okay. I i switched between highly computational work and laboratory work right building instruments detectors that sort of thing so my last research ruben actually had to research groups one was doing what we call near. Field cosmology or galactic archaeology and basically the idea is we find stars for whom they have a special characteristic which means we know how bright they are either different types of pulsating variable stars and because we know how bright they are based on how bright they appear. We can tell how far away they are all right so once you do that. For many many stars you can map them out in three d. space and sort of identify and disentangled the various substructures. That came together to form our galaxy And if you understand how our galaxy formed that informs the on how other galaxies may have formed and tells you how to university ball so that was one side. The other side was my plasma physics group so our laboratory is the surface of the sun so we publish a lot of solar physics papers. But also i would tell my students to pay attention to phenomena. That is what we call scale in barriot. That means that you know something phenomenon and we're looking at it in stars in may happen on the scale of millions of miles in stars but he can happen on any scale. And so what am i. Griping students identified Such a process. That accelerates ions in the in the sewer atmosphere and so we split off of experimental group. That is doing ion propulsion based on this new technology so we published the first paper on it in two thousand seventeen and now it's about building. The prototypes wow so Studying phenomenon that occurs naturally within the furnace of the sun and then saying way we can maybe take that and utilize the science utilize the physics and the chemistry that we've learned from it and actually then apply that to something that we can use here on planet earth absolutely absolutely. That's part of why i call my work hacking. The stars hack into ways right. One is to repurpose so To learn this stuff from studying the sun analysis use it for this technology. That idea immediately. Graham school i have several patents in Manufacturing computers to go after physical technique and applied it to semiconductor manufacturing right..

george mason university nasa ruben Graham school
"george  mason university" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"george mason university" Discussed on WTOP

"Metro George Mason University and points within the city of Fairfax. Hop on and take a cue. I'm Rob Stallworth. W T o p. Traffic alright in some parts of the area, turning out to be an active afternoon in the Weather Department. Let's get more now from storm team for meteorologist Mike Standiford. And good afternoon Mike. A flood warning continues for South eastern Fairfax County, the city of Alexandria until 7 45 this evening. This area hit hard by flooding over the last couple of days is not going to take much for areas to flood once again, stunting for radar showing nearly stationary thunderstorm stretching from near Beltsville. Where, uh, the Beltway comes into 95, then a broken line right across the district along I 95 3 95. Then south along I 95 all the way down to a quiet harbor and down to the Stafford area, and these cells are basically not moving at all. So flash flooding is going to be an issue as we go over the next several hours, another nearly stationary storm over far northern Frederick County in Maryland, near the Pennsylvania border, and more cells are popping up along the eastern front of the Blue Ridge. So our forecast for the rest of the afternoon scattered showers and thunderstorms. These will be slow movers. The ground is saturated so heavy rain may lead to flash flooding and the atmosphere is a bit unstable, so some storms could be severe. The means that will be wind damage or has been the eighties to lower nineties. More showers and a few thunderstorms tonight. Once again, the rank could be heavy at times, and those will be in the seventies. McGee with the risk of showers and storms on Sunday highs mid upper eighties by Monday, just a slight chance for shower thunderstorm and highs in the mid to upper eighties and right now, Mike 83 Gaithersburg 88 in Manassas, and we have a temperature of 82 at Reagan National. Thank you. Mike 2 22 a w T o p weather brought to buy new look home design, offering 0% financing and free three d rendering of your new roof. Only two days left before school starts in many districts in school leaders across the region are scrambling to hire school bus drivers that includes Fairfax County public schools. We've been experiencing a driver shortage for some time..

Mike Standiford Rob Stallworth Mike Beltsville Stafford Sunday Blue Ridge Pennsylvania Monday Manassas Metro George Mason University Fairfax I 95 I 95 3 95 95 Alexandria 0% McGee two days 82
"george  mason university" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"george mason university" Discussed on KOMO

"Campus. First lady, in fact, did the virtual ceremony from George Mason University in Virginia just last week. Karen thanks for the update, ABC NEWS White House correspondent Karen Travers Commodities time 6 20 an hour propel insurance money Update. ABC NEWS Wall Street now earlier gains for the major stock indexes evaporated by closing time yesterday, leaving the Dow Jones 267 points lower. Just about 34,000. He s and P 500 gave up. 35 points to NASDAQ composite shed half a percent on the day. The Bitcoin sellout that began a week ago continued yesterday with the digital currency falling 13% to hit 38 5 85 at midday. That was its lowest level since February, 9th the last time that it dropped below $40,000. The Commerce Department says housing starts fell 9.5% in April compared to the month before. Analysts say soaring lumber prices are most likely forcing builders to delay starting on new projects. Supply chain problems. They're still slowing deliveries of all sorts of products and packed ports. Maybe the major issue. Cargo ships are being forced right now to wait for days off shore before they can unload at Port. Generally in ABC News, where poised for some more losses today, the Dow futures are down 377 points that's over 1%, the S and P is down. 1.3% and the NASDAQ Futures are down more than one and three quarters percent right now. Coming up. Next, we'll check traffic and weather. Cuomo.

Karen 377 points Karen Travers 9.5% 13% Virginia April February, 9th 267 points ABC NEWS yesterday last week George Mason University 1.3% today White House P 500 half a percent a week ago Wall Street
No Shrooms on Mars, Just Misinformation

Kottke Ride Home

02:00 min | 1 year ago

No Shrooms on Mars, Just Misinformation

"Yesterday. there was a bit of excitement online about a new paper. Claiming fun guy had been found growing on the surface of mars. The news really made the rounds buoy. Perhaps by reddit co founder. Alexis hannigan tweeting out one of the articles on it and tagging elon. Musk sane quote just think hashtag space shrooms are gonna be intense af and quotes but sadly the whole thing was a bunch of crap. Basically just the latest in a long line of one particular hacks attempts to get his pseudoscience hogwash published in legitimate journals so the claim that was actually published in the journal advances in microbiology and included co-authors from harvard smithsonian center for astrophysics george mason university and other institutions. That should know better. Was that images taken by. Nasr's rovers on mars as well as its reconnaissance. Orbiter high-rise camera show several fungus like organisms. And that they believe the images show fungus because quoting the paper. Fungi thrive in radiation intense environments and quotes and quoting from future ism. The team went so far. As to say that black fungi. Bacteria like specimens also appeared atop the rovers. They didn't stop there. The team also examined photos taken by nasa's high rise and found evidence for amorphous specimens within a crevice that change shape and location than disappeared. It is well established that a variety of terrestrial organisms survive. Mars like conditions. The team concludes given the likelihood earth has been seeding mars with life and life has been repeatedly transferred between worlds. It would be surprising if there was no life on mars. The team argues that these martian life forms would have evolved on an already be adapted to the low temperatures intermittent availability of water. Low amounts of free oxygen and high levels of radiation and quotes.

Alexis Hannigan Harvard Smithsonian Center For Elon Reddit Nasr Nasa
"george  mason university" Discussed on 550 KFYI

550 KFYI

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"george mason university" Discussed on 550 KFYI

"Raiser for George Mason University's Center for Psychological Services. In response to the pandemic, the center has been providing free psychological support for essential workers joined the virtual event on Monday, May 3rd at six p.m. to raise funds for this important cause and watch the band shade perform a song from their newest album. Yes, but you already know, register now had go doggy m u dot e d u slash food for thought This message has been made possible by leidos Ellie i d O s com Novak is powering a new generation by providing renewable energy, including solar. Once new solar projects are completed in 2023, no vet will provide enough to power 100,000 homes. Members may also purchase solar panels now through Noveck Solutions. Protecting the environment, providing reliable, safe, affordable electricity because future generations are depending on it. Novak keeping life bright Hi folks. It's Kris Allen, CEO of I Cleanse In the past. You've heard me talk about I cleanse and our UBC disinfection products where the company that's been helping to keep your employees and customers safe during this pandemic. We've done this by using our pad and state of the art UBC disinfection products to disinfect your phones, tablets and other devices around the workplace. Well, today I'm proud to announce our revolutionary new product. We're calling it the I cleanse Swift UV. The Swift UV is faster, more efficient, Operate and kills the coronavirus flew in I'm cold in his little is 15 seconds. It does all this well coming in at our lowest price point ever. And just like our products it's made right here in the U. S. A swift UV is already getting rave reviews. Just listen to what Larry Santilli, CEO of Athena Health Care had to say about it. Chris Allen and his team have developed an amazing tool to complement are expanding infection prevention programs. So don't wait. Go toe I cleanse com to learn more about swift UV again. That's the letter I cleanse dot com. I care. So I cleanse, do you At night, I would hear my mom cry. In her room and she would do it alone. Because now that I know why she isolated herself because she didn't want my siblings tonight to know that She was just a fearful of thus, to hear more stories from home stretch graduates who have transformed their lives. Please join our virtual vent on May 6th at eight. A.m. is that home stretch via Orkut Register, Salesforce.

Blocked Suez Canal Exposes Global Supply Chain's Fragility

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

01:56 min | 1 year ago

Blocked Suez Canal Exposes Global Supply Chain's Fragility

"Lead. Today comes to us. Courtesy of the ever given that is a thirteen hundred foot. Long two hundred foot wide containership. One of the biggest of its kind. That is as of this moment. Most embarrassingly stuck jamming up the suez canal. Nobody going north not going south one of the key routes of global trade basically closed we have gotten christine. Mcdaniel on zoomed. Help us understand how this might play out. She's a senior research. Fellow at the mercatus center at george mason university. Thanks so much for coming on. Thank you nice to be here. So i have to tell you the first thing i thought when i saw pictures of this ship turned sideways in the canal. Other than how the heck did that happen was wow. The global supply chain is really really fragile. If this can block a major artery yes. It is fragile. There's lots of moving parts but remember the global shipping industry logistics. They are used to supply shocks demand. Shocks weather related war-related. So you know it's nothing they haven't dealt with before fair enough but if you are a a tanker company looking at this traffic jam in the suez canal. How long are you gonna wait and let your extremely valuable ships. Sit there in the backlog before you go around down the south of africa and angola the long way round right. Well economists especially trade. Economists have spent some time trying to calculate how much time cost and international trade The couple economists demanded that each additional delay of shipping is equivalent to about a half a percent to two percents patera And then of course. This is cascading. Because it's not just the stuff on that particular ship That's that's delayed by that. it's everything else. That's getting delayed because of

Suez Canal Mercatus Center Mcdaniel George Mason University Christine Angola Africa
Indoor Farming With Jackie Roberts Of Appharvest

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

04:40 min | 1 year ago

Indoor Farming With Jackie Roberts Of Appharvest

"Okay. So we've all seen greenhouses interviewed domino olen for example who runs the greenhouse at george mason university in virginia about how her facilities providing food and even spices to the university's food service and see greenhouses with just flowers like it were states and other properties and now we see cannabis plants being grown in greenhouses. But what about greenhouses on a commercial scale and ones that recycle water do not use toxic. Fertilizers or get more out of the acreage than tenting and outdoor farm would right. Well that's what my guest today says there novel. Indoor farm will actually do so. Let's find out how it works. I'd like you to meet jackie. Roberts chief sustainability officer at ap harvest. Jackie has been in the sustainability spaces. I said for probably twenty five years including in the same role chief sustainability officer at the carlisle group which is investment company and as senior director of the environmental defense fund. Or where. I first met her probably about ten years ago. I think it was right. She earned all her degrees from yale. Smart cookie that she is including a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering and to help them manage degrees one from the yale. School of management and the other from the school of the environment without further ado welcomed green captions radio jackie. And thank you for joining us. I'm so excited. Thank you down. It's great to be here. Oh you're welcome. you're welcome. Congratulations on your new role at app harvest. Give us an overview of the indoor farms. How does app harvest actually work. Where they you know. where is it located. I chance in appalachia but give us a little more details. You know kind of what you're growing give us give us the proverbial thirty thousand foot view app harvest. I think is a really unique company in that are core product which is healthy vegetables is combined with a very sustainable climate. Resilient way of growing those vegetables and we're doing it in appalachia where the opportunity for job growth and economic development is really appreciate The the core product is a chemical pesticide free In in our first large greenhouse which you can see a picture of in my background but at sixty acres for those who can't see it Is a growing tomatoes and chemical pesticide free. Gmo free because the way we can grow in a closed system enables us to use biological pest approaches to control pests and disease and also a lot of trained workers and other interventions that can prevent outbreak. So we you know as a mother with three children knowing that what's coming out of our greenhouses is zero. Residue is a real attribute that i value. But how we grow it in your introduction spoke to it is we are very climate resilient in their storms that the that recently hit we had some employees that had trouble getting to work other people had to pitch in. We had one employee show up on their tractor to make sure they could get to work But you know we really did incredibly well in terms of being resilient. We had all the things we needed. We were harvesting on time stuff was getting out to the markets and it was a real testament to this strategy as an important part of the mix of different types of agriculture and When when we're growing We are able to use one hundred percent rainwater. We have a system of irrigation. That is set up where the rainwater is captured on the top of our sixty roofs it stored in a retention pond. And then we bring it into the greenhouse with a little bit of filtration through sand and you'd be late and that water re circulates. We don't ever a released anything into the atmosphere. The nutrients are put into the water and stay in the water until we need to add more. We can measure very precisely. It's a space where a has really enabled us to do very precise measurements and the plants. Exactly what they need. We do Nanotechnology with the water. Because bringing more oxygen into the water enables the plans to absorb the nutrients even better but all of that is is a closed system. And you know when when. I started in chemical engineering. The reason i went into chemical engineering is a wonderful professor. Who said if you care about environmental problems you should study chemical engineering because you learn how system works and where all the pollution comes from and how it's released to the environment

Domino Olen Carlisle Group Environmental Defense Fund Jackie Appalachia George Mason University School Of Management Roberts AP Virginia
What to know about COVID-19 variants' potential spread, impact on vaccines

Morning Edition

04:15 min | 1 year ago

What to know about COVID-19 variants' potential spread, impact on vaccines

"And I'm No well, King. Good morning. Ah, virus that spreads a lot has many chances to mutate and covert 19 is doing both in this country. Researchers in the U. S now say they have found at least seven new variants here now. Other countries, the U. K South Africa and Brazil. They've all reported variants to with some big questions like Are they more dangerous? Still outstanding. MPR's health correspondent Rob Stein has been following This one. Hi, Rob. Good morning. Well, what have you learned about the U. S variance? So the first of these various was spotted by researchers in Louisiana. But it turns out the same kind of mutation looks like it also emerged completely independently at least seven times in this country. No, That's it awful large because it suggests the virus is doing something called convergent evolution. That's when an organism evolved in a way that gives them some kind of superior power. Here's what Jeremy Camille of Louisiana State University says about what the virus is doing. He spotted the mutation. It's infected millions of humans around the world now and it's probably just, you know, getting Into a more intimate relationship with our species. The question is, What is that more intimate relationship mean? Exactly Does it make it spread more easily from one person to another doesn't make it more contagious. Do do. Researchers know the answers to that? Yeah, well, no one knows yet it looks like it's spreading quickly in the places where it's been spotted, but it's not at all clear. That's because of the mutation. No viruses mutate all the time. Sometimes there are big problems, but a lot of times not so much, and there are other mutants that had been previously spotted in this country. Like you know, one that took over in Southern California Scientists are still trying to figure out whether it's more contagious or, you know, just got lucky. Now this newly identified mutation occurred on a key protein that sticks out from the surface of the virus called the spike Protein. It's how the virus infects cells. That's also the target of drugs and vaccines. So any change could be really important. I talked about this with Andrew Peco Shit. The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. We should keep an eye on it. I myself have already passed this on to the people in my laboratory, and we're looking to see if we can find viruses with this mutation because if we can, we're going to bring it into the laboratory and try to study it to see what's actually happening here. Now, you know to be clear. Pecos means he passed on the details about the new various Those colleagues Yes, so they can determine you know whether they're more contagious or not Now, no one thinks there's any reason to panic. You know, far from it, actually. And we already know that there are those other various circulating in this country that we know we should be worried about. And what about the non US variants, some of which were identified before ours. How are they evolve? It Yes. So you know, more than 1100 cases of the one first flag in the UK have been confirmed. At least 40 states and British scientists just released more data than makes them even more worried than ever that, in addition to spreading faster, it may also make people sicker. You know, and the first one spotted in South Africa has not been detected in at least eight states and the one originally seen in Brazil is in at least two states. But the reality is they're probably already way more common than that. The U. S just isn't sequencing the genetic code of the virus enough to really know how widespread they are. And the spot any new variants fast. I talked about this with saucy of pop sq at George Mason University. We're flying blind right now, when it comes to mutations, and how prevalent they might be on the community already, so we really need to ramp it up. The CDC says. It's trying to wrap it up. But the country still has a ways to go. And what about the vaccines that we currently have? Will they help against the new variants? Yes. So the vaccines maybe someone that's effective against some of these various, but so far they seem to work pretty well. But the most important thing is to keep these viruses from spreading as much as we can to prevent any more dangerous ones from occurring. You know, the virus is still spreading like crazy in this country, which makes the U. S essentially a giant Petri dish that could easily produce even

Rob Stein U. Jeremy Camille MPR Andrew Peco Brazil Louisiana State University South Africa Louisiana ROB Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School King Southern California Pecos George Mason University UK United States CDC
"george  mason university" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"george mason university" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Me this morning, Cam you You've been a trooper this week. Listen, it is my pleasure. I am happy to be here got up early this morning and Already started smelling the wonderful stuff that my wife's cooking up, so I'm glad to be hanging out with you for a few hours. Oh, well, thank you Say, that's all the girls, um So you have you have funds? How old are your kids? What in what are their ranges? Okay, so this is going to get real confusing My wife's nine years older than I am. She had two kids when we got married, but they're my kids now, too, So I have a 32 year old daughter, who is not at home this Thanksgiving. She lives in Oklahoma. I have a 28 year old son who's at the house by 20 year old son came back for Thanksgiving. And then I have 2 15 year old twins. Okay? Yeah. Board you've got you've got the range, So let me ask you. Do you have any liberals living in your home? Um, I don't have any crazy wack a doodle liberals. I would say that my kids are not as conservative as I am, but they're more Libertarian that they are progressive. Okay, so you can have a conversation with them about politics, and it doesn't involve into them just screaming at you and calling you a racist. Exactly. Yes. OK, Thankfully. Okay, good. Well, um I. George Mason University students were asked by campus reform about Thanksgiving. And you know the whole idea that you know you don't talk about politics and religion. Those are things that you just don't bring up at Thanksgiving and I can remember, you know, back in the day when we be at my grandparent's house, Depending which side we were celebrating Thanksgiving with Um, you knew that you knew where the time bombs are in the family, right? You knew where they were right? You know, the one uncle that once he starts to drink a little bit too much is gonna make inappropriate jokes or inappropriate comments, right? It's still like everybody knows who the time bomb is. The aunt who always cries and you know that kind of stuff. Mm s. So you knew there were certain conversations that just were not had. You just didn't have them. I had an uncle who didn't show up for Thanksgiving for years. Do you know this is the hand of God? True story? It might and uncle have been divorced for several years before someone actually uttered the D word in our home because they're all Catholic, and they and I didn't know for years that Uncle Billy wasn't married anymore to my aunt. Oh, wow, come to family events, and it's like Where's Uncle Billy member? There's like how he could make it like they were divorced. That's why he couldn't make it. Just that's a hit. This is the true story. This explains a lot of my weirdness because of the dysfunctional weird family I grew up in. So Yeah, because you couldn't say the word divorce under our roof because God was going to strike it. So, um so yeah. So that's what Thanksgiving is. So the students at George Mason University were asked whether they plan to talk politics at Thanksgiving this year. Do you think this year more than ever? It's important to bring up those hard topics at the dinner table. Oh, yeah, Absolutely. Yeah, I think it's important to talk about most definitely, especially with.

Uncle Billy George Mason University Oklahoma I. George Mason University
A Climate Bomb in the Amazon

Why It Matters

04:54 min | 2 years ago

A Climate Bomb in the Amazon

"We read about fires in the amazon frequently. So how are they started. Are they sorta like the california wildfires or is it something completely different so actually quite different from wildfires in other parts of the world because the rain is wet. This is dr. Tom lovejoy a senior fellow at the united nations foundation and a professor at george mason university in virginia. He's worked in the amazon. Since nineteen sixty five focusing on scientific research conservation and policy whitening strikes. Don't start fires. In the amazon people start fires and to give you a sense once. Somebody is cut down some forest. They have to wait for five days without a drop of rain before it is dry enough to set fire to get rid of all the stuff that's between the firebrand and turning it into some kind of agricultural project. Nine countries share the amazon but roughly sixty percent of it is within brazil's borders which means they have a lot of control over its fate and today across this vast territory. Small groups of people are intentionally setting fires in order to dry out the land for logging and to clear it for agriculture way of clearing land for whatever activity you want to do is very damaging to the soil. So what happens is that if later you want to reforest that particular patch of land it becomes very hard to do because the soil changes as soon as you clear it out because it's now sustaining a different kind of environment which is not rainforest like and then you can't really grow a rainforest back in that sort of setting. This is monica to bowl. A senior fellow at the peterson institute for international economics and a professor at the school of advanced international studies at johns hopkins university. People refer to amazon a lot as the lungs of the world. But that's not really what the ham was on is what the amazon does is that it keeps a lot of greenhouse gases from getting into the atmosphere. So it's not bad. The forest breathes for the world. It's that once. The forest is standing all of those greenhouse gases which are in the soil there kept. They're they're not released into the atmosphere and as soon as you start cutting down the forest. Those greenhouse gases start to go into the atmosphere started to be released. It's sort of like a climate bomb. And as soon as you start cutting down the rain forest. Bob bob is released. So how big is that. Carbon bomb really big. Scientists estimate that the amazon stores sixty to eighty billion tons of carbon or roughly twice the total amount released from fossil fuels in twenty eighteen worldwide. Losing the amazon would accelerate warming with harmful impacts felt around the world. The other issue is these hydrological patterns so when we say that we're referring to the rain cycles and it's not just local. Because given the size of the amazon again it creates a micro micro-climate but a sort of macro climate within the whole of the south american region even affecting a bit of central america as well given that the amazon is so far north. And so what happens. Is that the rain cycle patterns as you cut down the forest. They change and sometimes they change really dramatically to the point where you destroy people's lives because they can no longer grow the crops that they used to grow because the rain cycles are completely different. That has already happened. In many parts of south america that have felt this direct impact and this is only going to get worse if deforestation continues. Hydrology is the study of the movement and distribution of water because the amazon is so large and so wet. It's hydrology has a huge effect. It supplies water to almost every country. In south america and in fact according to nasa deforestation has already been linked to reduce rainfall in the region and then on top of all that you have the issue of amazon tipping point. So you get to a point. Where if you go beyond that point in terms of deforestation. The rainforest is no longer self sustaining. It's going to turn into savannah. Simply because of the ecological dynamics of how rainforests behave and there's a lot of concern that where the amazon is right now is dangerously close to this tipping point

Amazon Tom Lovejoy United Nations Foundation Peterson Institute For Interna School Of Advanced Internation George Mason University Johns Hopkins University Virginia Bob Bob Brazil California Monica South America America Nasa Savannah
"george  mason university" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

Newsradio 600 KOGO

06:14 min | 2 years ago

"george mason university" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

"Saudi Arabia. Interesting like that have done comprehensive studies on the efficacy. Of their strategies is relates to curfews. Big curfew like how he qualifies the Saudi. That's Prasad e interesting when he knows that that's gonna raise that's right where they don't let women drive cars where they throw gays on top of buildings and where, by the way, if you want to go to a boring fashion show Saudi Arabia someplace, Okay, you look just don't look different. The idea that the idea that we're benchmarking against Saudi Arabia As relates to public health. Um well, I actually had to check into this and figure out what the hell does this guy I mean, Apparently, they're already looking at it in L. A. The L. A County Board of Supervisors. And whatever happens in L A or San Francisco very quickly gets adopted. By Nathan Fletcher L. A County Board of Supervisors are looking at a core curfew. Where they basically will. Close business is down by a certain time every night. Everyone is to be shut down. Um, by in this case, 10 PM some people haven't eight PM or 9 P.m. curfew for businesses to completely shut down and what they're saying is by shutting down restaurants. That you won't have people sitting around late at night drinking. Without masks on well that a second They're all outdoors. You just shoved everyone into the purple tear, So it doesn't particularly matter, And there's no bars. So everything that you read every place that you are drinking. You can also order food. I think you have to order food. S so you're not getting you know you're not getting smashed out there. You're just living your life. Yeah, Covert. Apparently only attacks at night Zombie movie thinking hard night against worse. So now I mean, when, when his first seating at restaurants and seating people three o'clock If you've got a close up, I hate how you gonna get three rounds of people in your 25% capacity that you have in the bargain lot. Come on, They don't care about the financial impact of this. Anyway, There's actually been some study of the curfews. Unlike what Newsome says his eye of scientific studies on my desk no, actually, uh, on infectious disease up and be epidemiologist from George Mason University, Saskia Pop base Q. Has done analysis on these curfews and says curfews actually condensed people visiting businesses into a more narrow period of time because they know that things are shut by eight o'clock, man. O'clock 10 o'clock at night, Everyone shows up at what six o'clock seven o'clock, and it gets more busy in that general General area rather than you know people deciding that Oh, I don't have a time limit. I can go when I would like to go. Also, I see that every Tuesday is everyone's going out for taco Tuesday. What's happening? Everyone is just hanging out in front. Of the restaurant, waiting for tables in the parking lot, open up and then enjoying a margarita standing on the sidewalk talking. I mean, it's such a joke. Another example is that whenever you do a, uh closed, closing down last call for alcohol, people end up going to a non after party somewhere else. So if you do it earlier in the evening, say, nine o'clock, eight o'clock 10 o'clock people with those young kids, and this is where the covert numbers are coming from 18 to 34 years old 30 34 year olds. They'll just say, Oh, let's go to Ah House party, whereas the restaurant would have protocols in place to make sure people are drinking responsibly and socially distant, or they get thrown out because you wanna lose their license. If you want to get the public health, you know, issue People will just go somewhere else and not have those protocols in place, so you're actually encouraging more risky environments. Um, And by the way, there's studies on this for closing times in California we have a 2 a.m. closing time for bars, which means that the last call for alcohol is 1 40 in the morning. On bunch of people, you know, pound alcohol for those 30 minutes and Bam! They are all on the roads all at the same time Extend those hours. There's a lot of evidence suggests that people don't do the binge drinking, and there's not a big drunken rush all at once on this on the streets, but anyway Um Nothing scientific. Supports the notion of a curfew. It gets back to the people who wanted to ban wreaths across America. It's like now covet. What do we do? Well, let's just not do this and say that we're the covert Crusaders. Well, how are you a quote covert crusaders? Because I just come up with a mandate that limits your ability to do things and I'm doing in the name of covert. Give me a prize like a trophy. No, I'm gonna give you the dunce cap. Go stand in the corner. Because you don't have any science on your side. What you are doing is virtue signaling And this is where this is where he captures my biggest problem here with with all of this. Newsom in the politicians. They don't know how to control, guv it they're not following the data or the science. What they are doing is virtue signaling like Let's do a bunch of activity and hopefully, if anyone dies, you won't blame me. We're not gonna blame you cope. It is from William Anyone. It's the Chinese but Cove. It is a disease, and it requires an adult scientific risk based, focused strategy. And that's all we could expect of you. What you're doing right now is you're you're not benefiting us on Kobe you what you are doing is you're damaging us on so many other realms, including mental health. Personal health, personal freedoms. And, of course, the economy. That's the problem that we're having. And that's why we raised these absurd ideas that have no basis in science and won't do anything. I mean, this is not none of these actions are going to cause these numbers, too. Move backwards or were forward get better get us closer to freedom. It's just going to cause people to do other other other ways of socializing. By the way, did you buy? Did you buy your stash of toilet paper? Yet? No, because it's gone like may be too late for you. Here's another example of why people aren't thinking scientifically. Or data driven when it comes to cope in 19, is you some of you may be part of the problem. All right. We'll tell you all about it coming up. Quick Break, But first, let's check Traffic and Lord came from your helpful San Diego Honda dealers. Traffic center. Still busy ride.

Saudi Arabia County Board of Supervisors Nathan Fletcher Prasad San Francisco Crusaders California San Diego George Mason University Newsome America Honda Newsom William Anyone
For Trump, Conservative Catholics Are The New Evangelicals

Morning Edition

03:47 min | 2 years ago

For Trump, Conservative Catholics Are The New Evangelicals

"The Republican nomination in 2016, he gave special thanks to one faith group Evangelical Christians this year. President Trump has a different favorite. I grew up next to a Catholic church in Queens, New York, and I saw how much incredible work the Catholic Church did for our community. These are amazing people. NPR religion reporter Tom Delton has been looking into what has changed. Trump's new interest in Catholic voters is probably the result of realizing what actually got him elected. It was not the evangelicals, says Mark Rozell of George Mason University. People were quite amazed at the overall impact that the white evangelicals had in the election, but I think what was missed was the critical role of Catholic voters that we barely appealed to them. Trump managed to win the Catholic vote last time. Former Republican congressman Tim Hughes camp is a political advisor to a new group Catholics for Trump. There was less recognition four years ago. I think many were surprised about what happened in Michigan and Wisconsin and Pennsylvania. It was the Catholic vote that won those states for Donald Trump Lesson learned. This year, The Trump campaign is focusing less on the evangelical vote and more on Catholics. This administration has made a concerted effort to reach out to Catholics in a way that we haven't seen in the past. Brian Birches, president of Catholic vote dot or GE, a conservative group, wholeheartedly supporting Trump's reelection. The group's been around for 15 years, but this year is special, Birch says. We've grown every year, but this year we we grew exponentially Catholic vote dot or didn't even endorse anyone in the last presidential election this year. Even with a Catholic candidate on the other side, the group is running ads that leave no doubt where they stand. Joe Biden would force American Catholics

President Trump Donald Trump Catholic Church Joe Biden Mark Rozell George Mason University Tom Delton Political Advisor Brian Birches NPR Queens Reporter GE Birch Michigan New York Wisconsin
Refocusing climate change as a human problem

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

07:06 min | 2 years ago

Refocusing climate change as a human problem

"Been talking about how to adapt to climate change and how technology and the tech industry can help. But here's the part even on tech show where we acknowledged that climate change isn't just about tech solutions or Whiz Bang inventions, and in fact, like the pandemic climate change is a problem that reflects an exposes lots of things about our society Ion Elizabeth Johnson, and Katherine Wilkinson Co edited a book called Can Save Truth Courage and solutions. For the climate crisis, it features poems, essays, and other works of art by women working on climate issues I spoke with them. Both will Told me there's a lot in that subtitle we need to have eyes wide open to what is happening listened to the science we need courage, and then of course we need solutions and not just the solutions that kind the climate rose are really into like evt's and solar panels we definitely need those on just got Tesla. I think that's the TRIFECTA right though truth courage and solutions when people are like well, if not hope then what that's our answer. A when did we find ourselves at a point where we sort of stop talking about climate? As the thing we live from the air, we breathe the rain that falls or doesn't fall. Do you think it's important to like even before we start talking about solutions to recenter the conversation as a human problem? Yeah. Even though we didn't cause this problem, it's in fact one hundred corporations who are responsible for seventy one percent of emissions. There is a wide range of possible futures. And we so deliberately curated this book to show the wide range of ways that people can contribute building the best possible future. So it includes farmers and architects and artists, and journalists, and of course, scientists and policy experts and lawyers, and all of those skills are are needed and very much wanted. How much of this storytelling is also about making the simple economic argument that saving people also saves money. When we talk about the cost benefit analysis of doing various things to address the climate crisis, we usually only focus on the costs as opposed to making sure that we are also thinking about the benefits. And I think that is quite bolstering to me as a marine ecologist by training and thinking about nature based solutions and how protecting and restoring nature actually makes financial sense. 'cause it's cheaper to have mangroves and marshes and sea grasses than seawalls, right for example. So so I, think this book really shows not just some sort of techno Utopian version of the future where we like. Innovate, our way out of everything and instead it talks about the huge array of work that needs doing and the costs of of not doing it and what the world could look like for the better. If we do I feel like this conversation about racial justice, climate, justice, social justice, the importance of involving women in these conversations, how many women are leading solutions all over the world. is still kind of new and still kind of Nathan which is so lame but you're right. Which is pretty lame. But maybe take some explaining you know like what? What is what is this relationship between Racial Justin climate change and why don't people understand that I think we don't understand it because. Don't want to because it's it complicates something that has already really hard right like that's the. That's the push back that I hear most often it's not like I'm a racist and I WANNA, save the planet. It's more like solving climate change is hard enough without bringing in all these other layers. Can we just please focus on climate change now I and we'll deal with Lake police not murdering block people for no reason later. And the answer is no. No, we can't. We have to walk and Chew Gum on this one and there are many reasons for that. One is just it's the right thing to do, and so I hate having to give other reasons. But one of those other reasons is we know from polling by Yell and George Mason University's the people of Color actually are more concerned about the climate crisis. They're more motivated to be a part of the solution and to hold the politicians to higher standards on Climate Policy But how you know how can we expect black people to be focused on climate solutions when? Making, sure they have the basic right to live and breathe. and so this I can't breathe has become a rallying cry across You know across the racial and climate justice groups that it's not just in relation to police brutality but in the ways that communities of color are burdened with more polluted air and where or low where power plants decide to locate themselves, and then you know people who are breathing that dirty air being more at risk for extreme forms of of Covid, and so of course, these things are all connected and wouldn't it be great if we were building the winning team by including the people who were already on board and beyond to help and if we could unburden them from. Our White Supremacist Patriarchy, which is certainly not serving us in terms of really anything. But definitely, it's it's preventing a lot of people from being part of climate solutions because you know they have to dedicate their time and energy and ingenuity towards solving other problems about quality of life and justice and I. I just WanNa add because I think on articulates the. So incredibly well that when we think about climate change as quote unquote the problem I think that's where we start to miss. These intersections and entanglements when we understand actually that climate change is a manifestation of the problem, right? It's emerging of a system that we're getting so much feedback that it's not working. Racial violence is part of that feedback massive wealth inequality as part of that feedback the epidemics of loneliness and meaninglessness are part of that feedback, and also an atmosphere that is kate marvel says is larded with carbon dioxide and is having all of these climatic impacts that's also part of the feedback. But if we're just thinking about climate change as the problem we need to solve. Then our analysis isn't defense about what's actually going on here and thus what it's actually going to take to solve it. Kathryn Wilkinson and Iona Elizabeth Johnson Co edited the Book All. We can save truth courage and solutions for the climate

Trifecta EVT Tesla Elizabeth Johnson Katherine Wilkinson Co George Mason University Chew Gum Kate Marvel Kathryn Wilkinson Covid Iona Elizabeth Johnson Co Nathan Lake
Maryland Panel Tasked With Investigating State's Lynching History

All Things Considered

04:09 min | 2 years ago

Maryland Panel Tasked With Investigating State's Lynching History

"Government backed commission of its kind is about to start investigating a harrowing part of the state's history. The Maryland Lynching Truth and Reconciliation Commission has set out to document the state's 42 known racial lynchings. The panel delivered an interim report to Maryland Governor Larry Hogan earlier this month. Charles Davis Jr is the commission's vice chairman. He joins us now to share the commission's plans and goals for this project. Welcome. Thank you so much for having me so tell us. Where did the idea to create this commission originally come from? Sure, most historical scholarship concerning racial terror lynching is centered in the deep South. And so you have states such as Arkansas, Alabama, Mississippi and the like who get noticed for their history of racial tear. However, it's important for people to understand that lynching took place throughout the United States. I'm in. One of those states that is often overlooked is a state of Maryland. And so we call Maryland the middle ground in many ways, because it represented like most border states, a style that was southern but also had a progressive leaning on. So this oftentimes caused the state to be overlooked in terms of looking at the legacy of racial terror and tell us what are the primary goals of this commission. The commission is tasked with investigating lynchings that took place in the 19th and 20th century in Maryland, and we are centered and focused on salvaging the humanity, first of the victim's arm and then really laying out each case individually and hopefully bring about some semblance of Justice to the family members in the descendants of the deceased victims. Can you talk about a specific case that the commission is investigating? Right now? Sure. Yes, we're looking into the lynching of Matthew Williams, which took place in Salisbury, Maryland, in 1931, and so Matthew Williams was a young labourer who got into a dispute with his employer over discrepancies in his pay Following that his employer was founded. And Williams was actually hospitalized after the employer's son shot him and the lynch mob descended upon the hospital and drug him out of the first floor window. And the lynching commenced. And he was eventually taken to the drug to the courthouse lawn in front of thousands, along with local law enforcement politicians, religious leaders who did nothing. Eventually, as if that wasn't enough. He was eventually burned, and no one was ever held accountable. And no one was ever held accountable. So what does the commission do with a case like this? Today. Your ultimate goal I imagine is trying to figure out exactly what happened to Matthew Williams. Yes, And that is the ultimate goal. And it's important to note that we see the racial terror lynchings of old that took place in Maryland. Directly in relationship to the ongoing racial tear that we're witnessing in the United States. And so that's important to consider when we're looking at this and investigating this today in this fractured America that we're seeing, as relates to race relations on DSO. Yes, The truth is what we're seeking getting to the bottom of it, seeing who indeed was complicity and involved whether it was locals on state government officials because we believed that the descendents are owed this truth. Is the state. I'm in what we hope the citizens of Maryland and decisions of nine states learn from this work that we're undertaking is that truth comes first. And if we have the truth in there could one day possibly be Reconciliation. Charles Davis Jr is the vice chairman of the Maryland Lynching Truth and Reconciliation Commission. And he is an assistant professor of conflict resolution and history at George Mason University. Thank you very much for

Maryland United States Reconciliation Commission Matthew Williams Assistant Professor Vice Chairman Larry Hogan George Mason University Salisbury Arkansas America Mississippi Lynch Alabama
Airlines Are Asking for a Second Bailout. Congress Should Say No.

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:00 min | 2 years ago

Airlines Are Asking for a Second Bailout. Congress Should Say No.

"We begin today with airlines their CEO's and union leaders are begging Congress for an extension to the twenty five, billion dollar industry bailout that was part of the cares act travel demand isn't returning fast enough, and now the industry is warning of a massive wave of layoffs if lawmakers extend funding before October first, but Congress is fighting and. Preoccupied. So where does that leave the airlines and their employees marketplace's Andy Euler reports according to the Trade Group Airlines for America passenger volume is off about sixty five percent from a year ago and airlines are collectively burning through five billion dollars. Each month CEO Nick Kelly says airlines are asking for six months federal help because hopefully by then we will be over the Hump and we will start to have a pickup and travel by next spring. The conditions of the previous bailout protected workers until October First Kalua warns that up to one hundred, thousand airline employees could soon join the ranks of the unemployed and Robert W man, a former airline executive and industry consultant says a second bailout would help the US economy recover faster when the pandemic Wayne's if the industry were to fall into disrepair if it were to fall into. Destructive restructuring during the pandemic, the question would be, what would you have around to help your on the other side? When exactly we get to the other side of the pandemic it's still murky and Federal Nikkei Day Rusia George Mason University says, another twenty five billion dollars is not going to solve the problem. This is justice coning the inevitable as long as the demand doesn't go back up. This is just basically a band-aid patch. She says bankruptcy would be the best option airlines have shown that they can emerge from restructuring healthier, and she says that needs troubled airlines don't pose a major risk to the economy at large. I made Euler

Trade Group Airlines Ceo Nick Kelly Congress CEO Andy Euler Wayne Rusia George Mason University United States Kalua America Robert W Executive Consultant
After 2011 Disaster, Fukushima Embraced Solar Power. The Rest Of Japan Has Not

Environment: NPR

08:06 min | 2 years ago

After 2011 Disaster, Fukushima Embraced Solar Power. The Rest Of Japan Has Not

"Before the earthquake before the NAMI and the nuclear disaster Japan got nearly a third of its energy from nuclear power. But after the Fukushima nuclear disaster in two thousand eleven, the country took all of its nuclear reactors off line, which has led Japan to increasingly rely on fossil fuels and also solar power. NPR's cat ORF continues our series on recovery and Fukushima. She only endo is saying a final goodbye. To the home she once shared with her husband and three kids and for Cosima it's less than a mile from the Daiichi nuclear power plant where three reactors overheated and exploded in two thousand eleven. They left fast only taking what they could carry. Their things left nearly exactly as they were the day everything changed to coffee, Cup sit on the kitchen table her daughter's old school uniform is laid out on a bed a calendar on the wall is still flipped to March two thousand eleven. clueless you the kit ago. Muluzi. Nice. This is sad. She says this House System Nice, but we can't come back. She looks around your moon to Ni life is so different diddle do remind us. To start from nothing even less than. A totally reinvent ourselves after the disaster digging up this. She's here to give the keys to government officials. This house will be bulldozed soon and the land used as part of a storage site for radioactive topsoil scraped from the earth and the massive cleanup effort Tschumi heads upstairs. And takes one last look at the bedroom shoes to share with her husband Hitter Yuki. He died a few years ago suddenly. And then she walks back down to hand over the keys. The thing is pretty unceremonious though in reality she only says, she said goodbye to this part of her life. Disaster when her family piled into a car and drove as far south as they go to the southern tip of Japan on the island of Kyushu. Here, she's a single mom to her bubbly ten-year-old son Cagey who was just a baby when the disaster happened, he doesn't remember Shema at all her other two children are grown and live nearby, and she only has found herself within unlikely job running a small solar farm. On a big hill overlooking the tropical landscape Ma hidden is yet. She never imagined. My life would be like this guy when we first moved here, I was in my late thirties my husband was in his forties unanue issue we were like, okay. Do we get new jobs? So we decided to do this. We saw as investment for the future month on her husband worked at the Nuclear Power Plant for over twenty years and for him, the switch to solar was purposeful. He felt that nuclear power had betrayed him do on didn't He grew up really believing nuclear power was safe and then he lost his home to come see today the energy collected by these panels has allowed her to build a new life. The power is sold to the local utility company and brings in thousands of dollars a month when her husband died suddenly a few years ago she only took over the work and the family placed his grave in the center of the solar panels show me walks over to tall marblestone. Hook. With an inscription that says. Good you send do essentially remember that this family is here because of the Fukushima nuclear disaster in two thousand eleven cocoa use. A message to future generations she explains looking away device. My biggest wish is for renewable energy to take over I mean look at my old home, it's going to be a storage site for nuclear waste. We can't deal with that kind of wasted drivers go. Joey's wish might not come true though her family started their business at the right time. The price was so generous and also delegration was sold loose. So anyone can register. Naida is the executive director of the Institute of Sustainable Energy Policies. In Tokyo, he says in the early years after the disaster Japan pushed renewables to help fill energy gap left after fifty four nuclear reactors were taken off line the. Government offered big incentives, new investors, lots of people like me and her husband jumped on board to build smaller operations. incorporations rushed in to build massive solar and wind farms but also the liberation was more strict compensation dropped. It got increasingly harder for alternative energy producers to connect into the power grid edith says, this was partly due to the big utility companies trying to maintain control and the government allowing. It to happen the sitting kind of a body of to north to Laputa increase anymore, the institutions make a big difference that's Jennifer Sclerosis of George. Mason University she studies energy policy in Japan, and she says, there is technology an interest for renewables in Japan, but the bigger power companies in government need to commit if people in place do not watch to implement policies to empower the economics and the. Technology innovation then it can't happen regardless of how advanced technologies earn regardless of how good the economics look many of the major utilities as well as the Japanese government are still waiting to see if nuclear power can make a comeback and renewables just aren't that reliable yet. So in the meantime, I would assume the defaults going to import gas import coal eater agrees is the most the early sick and Not so optimistic future, but one place in Japan that is optimistic about Renewables Hookah Shema the local government here has set a goal for the entire prefecture. The third largest in Japan to be completely fueled by renewable energy by twenty forty. It's a real turnaround for a place where nuclear power ruled only a decade ago especially in the former exclusion zone near Daiichi, there are solar panels everywhere from small ones on roofs and hillsides to massive mega-farms along highways making use of land available after the disaster some of these panels are run by big developers and others are not. Lake the solar panels on farmer. She get Yuki Corneau's field. He's seventy four years old and this land has been in his family for generations he gestures around it. This is all my land, but it's nonsense. Nonsense because it's relatively useless the wind carried radioactive material here after the disaster and the government has scraped off all the topsoil in decontamination efforts. The farmers here can't really far much anymore. So small local power company came and asked sugar. Yuki if they could rent land for solar panels, he said, yes could you go I was really worried after the nuclear accident how would we get power most of his neighbors also agreed but that means everything is different. Now he says there were Rice patties all around here with tiny frogs that created a kind of soundtrack for his life now it's quiet. He misses the frogs a lot and he says, and he doesn't make nearly the same amount of money as he did farming. But She Yuki says he sees this as a necessary change. He has nine grandkids they all live far away now but they were just in town the other weekend for visit running through the fields. Suze my grandparents farmed here my parents do. But now it's time for Change I've realized it's a new season pitcher. This he says looking out over the solar panels is for future. Generations Khatlon store NPR News Fukushima Japan.

Japan She Yuki Government Daiichi NPR Japanese Government CUP Fukushima Yuki Corneau Shema Tschumi
"george  mason university" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"george mason university" Discussed on WTOP

"Percent gain and headed for its third record closed this week. The Labor Department's Big July jobs report is Friday morning. But if payroll for maybe peace estimate is right job's coming back slowed sharply. It's his private employers gained or regained just 167,000 jobs in July compared to 4.3 million in June. Washington area employment is down across the board, but there is one exception. Uncle Sam at George Mason University report shows 367,000 federal government jobs in the Washington region as of the end of May. That is up 1.1% from a year ago, compared to a 9.4% drop over all Wall Street's closing bell is 34 minutes away now. Dow is up 320 points. Jeff Global W T o P. NEWS MONEY news brought to you by whole Foods MARKET prime members save it whole Foods market animal welfare, certified beef, short ribs or flanking our 5 £99 through August 11th while supplies last find more deals on the whole foods market APP. Congress still trying to work on some Corona virus legislation that's coming up next 3 26 It's only human to protect the world. We all live in. A Chevron. We recognize Theo to emissions are continuing challenge on We believe it's up to all of us to help, so to reduce emissions in our operations. We've built an integrated carbon capture and storage.

Washington Labor Department George Mason University Chevron Theo Jeff Global Dow bell Congress
Big Tech Funds a Think Tank Pushing for Fewer Rules. For Big Tech.

Pivot

05:03 min | 2 years ago

Big Tech Funds a Think Tank Pushing for Fewer Rules. For Big Tech.

"Dig. Tech firms are schmoozing regulators into to not doing their jobs. Thirty four anti-trust officials were wined and nine last year by the global anti-trust into the suit, a part of the Antonin Scalia Law School at George. Mason University in Fairfax Virginia basically don't regulate us. Please enjoy this delicious meal. Global Antitrust Institute is funded mostly entirely by big companies affiliated foundations including Amazon Google qualcomm George Mason I covered it when I was at the Washington, Post they were always doing this kind of thing like putting up, you know. Being very friendly to corporate corporate citizens as I recall during this time when they were just getting started. Trying to attract a bigger level of professor there and so talk about this Mr Academics in terms of these things that get funded at universities, you institute Scott. Galloway Institute of Jabal Thank for example. That's right. like it's it's were. Universities are not immune from the lure of capitalism and a big component of. Your ability to get tenure is to get research funded, and it's difficult if you WANNA know. If. You WanNa. Know the outcome and a conclusion of research. Just find who's paid for it. Yeah, and in the case of most academic research. It's a lot of times it's funded. By nonpartisan sources are the university itself, and so if there is a a lease bad version of peer reviewed research, you're GONNA. Find it typically universities, but these think tanks if they're funded by. Certain And we have him on the left care we fund. We found groups to do research to basically support our know our narrative so i. don't think this is anything unusual. The question is abound power in that is. In addition to this think tank Sarah now more fulltime Amazon. Lobbyists making I would bet somewhere between four hundred eight hundred thousand dollars a year. Then there are sitting US senators now one hundred full time lobbyist from Amazon living in DC, taking all of these nice women and men to to golf into dinner and saying hey, we just a big fan of your leadership. We fight to get involved in your campaign by the way when this whole antitrust off comes up. We assume that you're you're for capitalism. Your four consumer lower consumer prices. And this is the danger, but I don't think these think tanks. We have on both sides nervous now whenever I time talking to one today and I was like Oh, where did you get your money? Like I never thought this like in terms of. The university and I was like I'm going to have to check in case, I'm. Saying something that sounded reasonable, but it was sort of like who's paying your bills and you know there was some controversy around some of this Kobe testing of where these these researchers have, it just feels like a lot of steph feels. Bogus like. It feels bogus when they're doing this and they're trying to influence, but I think many some universities are doing real research. Others are much more pay for play and I think that's that's really when I was a does. You've inspired her synapse farmer talking about this when I was? Five years into my Nyu Kerr invited me to a meeting where they were talking about doing some research about around financial markets and the impact on IPO's and They admitted meeting. And there was someone from the Nasdaq, and they were willing to fund it Funds Research and fund even fund center, and as one of the guys in the meeting Professor Bruce Buchanan who I think's one of the clear blue flame thinking economists in the world you know at the end of the meeting, said a not comfortable with the Nasdaq taking money. Money from the Nasdaq for research around the financial markets, because ultimately we're. GonNa end up saying that that the Nasdaq has the right you know. He just wasn't comfortable with private enterprise being injected into academic research, and then the meeting ended and I was like what the hell are you thinking? We have an opportunity to go great research here. Don't so pedantic. And as I've thought about it I'm wrong and he was right. Yeah, you can't help it. You can't help, but if they're paying for like all the smoking ones so much damage in terms of like smoking wants. We're like cigarettes aren't bad. That went on for a long time and Whatever the whatever the research is, it just seems like if it's cooked, it's cooked then. How do you pay for like the university should presumably just pay. Pay For right and live and die on the quality of the research, but that's sort of naive. I suspect you in the majority of about any sort of fifteen year overdue apology to a Professor Buchanan Vice. Chancellor Ingo Walter felt the same way that this was just. This creates too much opportunity for bias research so anyways. Net Net in it's a sample size of one, but Nyu takes that got role being a neutral arbiter very seriously. and. You have these funding you know. I'm thinking of all the different organizations are they seem like the like their criminal justice stuff Very Friedman! It feels like it's really good research right now, and that's the thing it's like who you have. They should at least be very clear about who's paying for it, so you know and and what they might turf. What what the what reports they might put in the drawer like the government is doing right now,

Amazon Global Antitrust Institute Galloway Institute Of Jabal Antonin Scalia Law School George Mason Mason University NYU Washington Fairfax Virginia United States Funds Research Chancellor Ingo Walter Professor Buchanan Vice Professor Professor Bruce Buchanan Friedman Sarah Kobe
"george  mason university" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

07:21 min | 2 years ago

"george mason university" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"George Mason University and professor Toprak along with some colleagues you penned this op ed in The New York Times calling for the United States to go big really really big in pursuit of a vaccine and you suggest that a part of it is just the science and getting that right but and then the trials but you also your call is also suggests that that there's a public investment that could be made to expedite this process correct so here's the key point most vaccines fail and they failed even given the vaccines typically take you know ten years to produce we're asking the vaccine manufacturers to start producing something you know in twelve months or eighteen months or something like that so the failure rate is probably going to be quite high that means we need to invest in a lot of vaccines we think at least fifteen to twenty also what we really want to happen is at the moment we have an approved vaccine we want the manufacturers to be up and ready to be running with that now typically a manufacturer they're not going to start investing in getting the factory ready until we have approval we want them to do it before the vaccine was approved it is not possible to do that you know it's not possible for a vaccine manufacturer to get the factory ready before the even know whether the vaccine has been approved so they're not gonna want to do that so we need to support some of that investment with some government support in order to get them willing and ready to run the moment a vaccine is available there seems to be some precedent for this in real time which is Gilly add with rent does severe is setting up for the mass production of that therapeutic if the clinical trials that have proved promising continued to produce good results and ultimately go beyond emerged their merger to use authorization to more general application exactly right and Bill Gates and sappy and Gabby some non government organizations with some government support we have been encouraging the vaccine manufacturers to do this we just need we just need more of that Bill Gates cannot do this all by himself even as the world's richest man we really need more support in addition the vaccine manufacturers can actually start to produce some of that stuff and store it before it is gone through safety and efficacy trials so again the idea is is that once a vaccine is approved I've already got some in storage you're ready to be delivered even at and again that is going to take some money up front because ordinarily it's not possible to do that you're not going to want to start producing vaccine until you know that your vaccine has been approved for sale but we want them to work faster and that's why we need some government involvement here Justin and on that score thinking about investment that that should be part of a conversation that really it's not part of right now and that's the discussion among the political parties in the leadership of the party is about to what new disaster relief legislation may include whether it's a payroll tax holiday or tort reform or more money for states and localities that back and forth I haven't heard much discussion about the the need to preserve set aside some funding for vaccine development that you're suggesting yeah I mean this is absolutely crazy we have spent hundreds of billions probably a trillion dollars or more on beliefs and I'm not against us wine brunch it be much smarter to actually spend money on fighting the virus and we've done very little that we spend very little on testing and we spend very little on promoting vaccines encouraging and incentivising vaccines so we need to get on the ball and start investing in science and part of that is to use the economics of incentives so that we can get these manufacturers ready to roll once a vaccine is approved robin Hanson who's an academic but also an engineer I had a good and interesting posts that you you all profile that marginal revolution dot com he's an interesting thinker we've had him on the show before he actually was talking about the very elation whether you agree with or disagree with that he was at least raising the specter of it to four four five weeks ago just interesting now that you have some studies modeling that but one of the things he talks about in terms of the re opening and I think this commentary from Tyler Conant and reaction to it is this the part of the failure to do things like you're suggesting is a failure of policymakers to consider political economy in their prescriptions for a responding to this outbreak in and when you don't have a holistic contemplation of all of the damage being done by not only the virus but the choices being made to combat it you start to lose legitimacy people start to tune out Lee you know longer have the consent of the governed and now you've got just people going their own way right I think that's a problem and I think look how can we bring all of America together and to me America is the most innovative and ingenious economy in the world we have the top scientists we've got the biggest economy and the American can do attitude is that right the moderates we all ought to be able to agree on that it's amazing to me Democrats and Republicans doesn't matter they all want to be able to agree let's use science to actually fight the virus and that means investing in testing it means investing in the labs it means investing in vaccine research that is how Americans respond to challenge we don't just say what we're going to live through this thing or we're gonna let people die we're just gonna go for herd immunity or even we're just going to protect our citizens with unemployment insurance what Americans do is they go out and fight and the fight was science and that's the way I think that we can unite everyone around a big Manhattan style pro ject Manhattan Project style program to really get to the moon okay to really get to where we want to go which is a vaccine and which is mass testing as the saying goes sort of some of the biggest ideas in the world are the simplest and that's pretty it's a pretty simple baseline we all want a vaccine so why we act in furtherance of it any and with respect to the price tag I think you put on this sort of investment that would be required to get the manufacturing capacity under written for fifteen to twenty potential vaccines you're you're talking about to what my hundred billion dollars and look the economy right now is losing a hundred and fifty to three hundred and fifty billion dollars a month right okay so everything that we spend a hundred billion dollars that will pay for itself even if we open the economy up you know a few weeks out sooner the one virtue of this disaster is that it's so expensive we can afford to go against it I think we can afford to fight a big you know this is like a World War two kind of moment is that it's do or die you know it's go big or stay home we don't want to stay home any longer so let's go big here's Alex Tabarrok partly J. madam chair in economics at the Mercatus center economics professor George Mason University and co host of marginal revolution a blog which I routinely recommend that he if ministers with Tyler.

George Mason University The New York Times United States professor Toprak
"george  mason university" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"george mason university" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Zero seven six minutes to the hour as increasing numbers of people across parts of the world to self isolating at home in an attempt to reduce the number of coronavirus infections more more people using supermarket deliveries to get their food and they don't want to go out in public peoplesoft king then about the possibility of contamination from apostles and shopping bags to clarify this issue a spoke to Katie shank from the department of global and community health at George Mason University in Washington she spent many years working in community prevention of infectious diseases there isn't any solid evidence based guidelines and this is unprecedented changes to figuring it out as we go along there are two main sources of information that we can judge by what we know about other coronaviruses or we could judge by new research that is hastily emerging now and from both of those sources was starting to learn a little bit about what the risks to know the recent study all of the other coronaviruses they concluded that the virus can stay on surfaces for several days maybe even more than a week but it depends on the absorbency of the surface and other functions and we also know that at higher temperatures the virus can be made less active and it can be killed we also know from that study is devoted household disinfectant in wiping away the corona viruses all of these comparisons are relying on a very big if we just simply don't know the extent to which code nineteen resembles its cousins said to speak such a sudden movements we just don't know if people need to go shopping because they can get an online delivery done for them can't afford to buy more than a small number of things at a time what is the best and safest way to do this online shopping is.

Katie shank George Mason University Washington peoplesoft
"george  mason university" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"george mason university" Discussed on WTOP

"The S. and P. five hundred off forty five WTOP now it's twelve thirty one the coronavirus case count across our region has gone up once again today there are now a hundred and forty nine cases in Maryland one hundred fourteen in Virginia and seventy one in the district bringing the region's total to more than three hundred and thirty right now I knew this afternoon George Mason University student who attended classes in Arlington Virginia has now tested positive for coronavirus the school says it's working with local health department to see if anyone else at the university was in contact with that student meantime a third member of the DC fire department is contracted covert nineteen the fire chief Gregory dean says more than a hundred forty members of the fire department in DC are being monitored by the DC health department and they are now off duty CBS news special report president trump closes the southern border to nonessential travel the northern border the southern border it's being traded they're both being treated equally lot of people say that they're not treated equally well they are painful to measure to to get medical supplies to the front lines secretary of state Mike Pompeii on the latest travel information get countries were commercial departure options remain available U. S. citizens who reside in the United States should arrange for immediate return to the United States unless they're prepared to remain abroad for an extended time the IRS is move the tax filing deadline to July fifteenth in New York governor Andrew Cuomo made a plea for more ventilators and said one hundred percent of nonessential workers should stay home they will cause businesses to close the loop because employees to stay home I understand that they will cause much unhappiness I understand that also CBS news special report I'm Steve K. fin this is Michelle Miller on Capitol Hill intense negotiations on the trillion dollar economic aid package are now taking place behind closed doors Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says members of both parties have been broken up into groups and tasked with coming to an agreement that could lead to legislation being drawn up over the weekend it's important for us to be on the Senate floor have a motor on Monday but a lot of issues need to be resolved including financial assistance for the airline industry Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer says he's ready to work across the aisle but also cautions we are not going to go for any bailouts unless they are worker friendly on Capitol Hill Mitchell Miller WTOP news WTLV at twelve thirty four.

George Mason University WTLV Mitchell Miller Senate Steve K. New York U. S. president CBS DC Maryland Chuck Schumer Majority Leader Mitch McConnel Michelle Miller Andrew Cuomo
"george  mason university" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"george mason university" Discussed on WTOP

"Thanks for joining us we've got the latest on the corona virus in our area George Mason University this morning has announced they're extending online instruction for the remainder of the semester the university also postponing commencement by at least one week the school says it is tentatively looking at rescheduling commencement exercises may twenty second that is if future developments make large gathering glargine gatherings possible by then Virginia we're told has its second death from corona virus a man in his seventies from Newport news the first victim last weekend was also a man in his seventies there are more than a hundred and ten cases of the virus in DC Maryland and Virginia right now Maryland and the district have shut down bars and restaurants allowing only carry out and delivery service movie theaters are also closed in DC and Maryland there are fewer restrictions in the Commonwealth in in Maryland and DC but Arlington officials are hoping governor hoping governor Ralph Northam follows their lead and orders restaurants and bars to stop allowing crowds inside Arlington board chair Libby Garvey is asking all local bars and restaurants to switch to delivery and carry out I am trying to do what DC and Maryland have done but we in Arlington do not have the authority to do that only our governor does so I have been in contact with the governor's office I've been in contact with our congressional federal delegation who share the same concerns I've been reaching out to our General Assembly folks all to please ask the governor to you know do what DC and Maryland have done and close our bars and restaurants to dine in service we will likely hear more about this from governor Northam this morning he's got a new Scott news conference scheduled for eleven o'clock also eleven o'clock Maryland governor Larry Hogan will be speaking about whether to move forward or postpone the April twenty eighth primary in the state we will of course bring you the latest on these developments have we as we get them meantime the governor is also warning people they could be the arrested in Maryland if they don't follow the new restrictions imposed on businesses you'll see our local law enforcement agencies enforcing them along with state police and if necessary the National Guard and their strict penalties and they will be enforced were no longer asking for people's cooperation we're not fooling around anymore the governor says more than two thousand National Guard troops will help enforce these rules which include a ban on gatherings of fifty people or more businesses are struggling under all these new restrictions adjusting to the new restrictions has been difficult for some business owners Tom Johnson with the hill restaurant group had originally pushed back against mayor Muriel Bowser's orders that all restaurants and bars must now operate as Kerry out only if you're gonna make these rules you screwed up the natural opening up the buses running they gotta come in the same way we are touched or nonsense agreed to comply and says he'd rather be forced to close his doors in order to possibly qualify for some kind of assistance but says the chances of his business in others closing for good are now pretty high I don't know if there's any coming back from the DC health department says movie theaters health clubs and spas also need to close grocery stores will remain open Melissa Howell W. two opinions I'm a log in steam it is difficult for small businesses but thinking outside the box can help them remain connected to their communities here coffee shop think about not how do you sell a lot of Tay's and hand them to people in person but how.

George Mason University
"george  mason university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"george mason university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The arts so a while back Russ Roberts mentioned something to me that I keep thinking about presses an economist friend of the show he teaches at George Mason University and he has the econ talk podcast so anyway rest mentioned that he heard veterans don't like the red cross we really just don't like the organization and I thought that was curious I think I heard it first from a red cross employee that there was hostility to the red cross and I think most of us think of the red cross is a pretty mom and apple pie organization and I wondered what could possibly create hostility about the red cross and this first of all the donuts I said the donuts to rest spent the next few years sort of casually asking around about this I started to ask veterans what they thought of the red cross any any time I'd meet me there was a relative or somebody I encountered some other setting and it's a but I think in the red cross don't like him why not the don't speak it was it became a sort of a weird rallying cry evidently in those circles the donuts is a well known reference rest said a swear you could go to any VFW hall today seventy years later and mention the red cross they will bring up the donuts so this story that I'm working on has to do with the red cross who's involved red cross so of course I went to a VFW hall in Brooklyn under the highway and the very first guys is out standing at the side of the bar closest to the door we're how we're done US navy served in the forties and Tom came he was an army guy in the forties and as I sat down thirteen seconds after mentioning the red cross here's how we're done very seldom seen.

Russ Roberts George Mason University Brooklyn US Tom
3 Major U.S. Airlines Suspend China Flights Over Coronavirus

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:55 sec | 2 years ago

3 Major U.S. Airlines Suspend China Flights Over Coronavirus

"Meantime the U. S. is advising against everyone traveling to China from the U. S. causing major US airlines to freeze their flights delta United and American Airlines announced that they were suspending all flights between the US and China American says its suspending flights starting today through March twenty seventh delta and United well wait until February sixth to allow time for customers in trying to leave that country United and American both say they will keep fly hi to Hong Kong meanwhile in our area there's a revolving door of possible coronavirus cases the very latest now in DC two people tested negative for the virus but now health officials are keeping an eye on a new possible case in DC in Virginia a George Mason University student has been cleared but there are two other possible cases one in northern Virginia one in central Virginia we're on top of all these developments and we will bring them to you on air and online of course at W. T. O. P.

China United States Hong Kong DC Virginia American Airlines George Mason University W. T. O. P
George Mason University student cleared of coronavirus

Larry O'Connor

00:38 sec | 2 years ago

George Mason University student cleared of coronavirus

"At George Mason University bring breathing a sigh of relief this afternoon after test results are back for a student with symptoms consistent with coronaviruses George Mason University student who is tested for corona virus does not have it according to the Virginia department of health a letter sent from student health services to the school community today says public areas continue to undergo additional cleaning and they're still doing communicable disease prevention planning university officials say they are not aware of any other potential cases among students or faculty meanwhile test results have not come back yet for a second person in northern Virginia who may have corona virus

George Mason University Virginia Virginia Department Of Health