18 Burst results for "George Eliot"

Finding connection in solitude Margaret Atwood & Mark Haddon

VINTAGE Podcast

08:39 min | 1 year ago

Finding connection in solitude Margaret Atwood & Mark Haddon

"First into younger share with you is mark had author of the curious incident of the dog in the nighttime most recently the porpoise. He's talking about book. We published that. He contributed to stop what you're doing and read this. Which is an excellent but by the way is one of the books already as go as a bookseller in one of the books that made me want to really work vintage books and he talks about how he believes in the power of a good novel. A term he defines as a piece of work is humane and generous. I particularly found comfort in his description of reading as a compensation a reader and a writer sitting opposite each other. In each other's company I can write plays and films and even poems in which some of the characters are genuinely unsympathetic for which you and the reader feel no empathy partly because those forms are spectacle to a certain extent. You you can sit back and watch it from a distance but I think all novels A conversation I I tend to picture a novel as you. The writer and the reader sitting in adjacent chairs talking quietly to each other. You know a novel is never declaimed or acted out or overheard. It's it spoken quietly to the reader and of course a really long conversation and to make the long conversation work you've really got to you with a like the narrator. You're gonNA like the person who's talking to you. They can be taught or scathing satirical. But they've got to have an underlying warm both towards you and and towards the people they're talking about and I think you can see that. All great writers and Dickens in Jane Austen George Eliot in Tolstoy and in fact in Warren Pace. You can see where it doesn't work because when he does start declaim in those separate chapters about his theory of history he can lose you completely and it's one of the great novels in the world where no one reached the last chapter. Because he's just telling you stuff you don't really want to know. I think this is particularly true of Virginia Wolfe It's not just her warmth than her interest in the people she's talking about but the speed the ease with which she seems to flow in and out of different people's minds in and out of different consciousnesses in a very short period of time often around dining table in and out of the minds of people talking with with one another and I think the way in which she does. That makes you very aware of something about your own mind personally. I'm always reading Virginia Woolf and thinking Yes yes yes that's what it's actually like to be a human being not just that stream of consciousness stuff which she does so well the way you flick from memories of Childhood Your plans for dinner to the fear of death all within thirty seconds the way we move from sense of loneliness sudden empathy with people around us the way we feel sort of sealed in one moment and then suddenly we dissolve and we realized that we members of a group of people or we members of a family and a part of verse exists within all those other people in the room at the same time the way we move from our past to our future back into our president. I think there are other right to have a wide range of characters and a wide range of situations. By doting. There is anyone who understands articulates what it is like to be a person from one moment to the next so the other interview. I found interesting was one. The Margaret Atwood gave on stage all those years ago when she'd written novel taxied. If you don't know already exceed is retelling of Shakespeare's tempest in the interview. Margaret Talks about the theme of exile in tempest. And how she explores to have writing the contrast between freedom. I'm confinement. I know a lot of us feel like we're in a very strange very necessary. Exile from our normal lives in big. I'm small ways so I hope like me find this interview. Refreshing or at least a little comforting. Let me start by asking about the genesis of high exceed. Of course it's part of the hogarth Shakespeare series but why the tempest yes. Why the tempest Luckily I was early on the list of people who are asked so I got I got my druthers and that was my brother because I had thought about it quite a bit before. It even written about Prospero before in my book on writing which is called oddly. Enough a writer on writing it used to be called negotiating with the dead but I think the day word was a bridge too far for some people in the publishing industry. They don't like the D. Word. No no not always coming to say it does what it says on the tin it. Does I think what it says on the tin. So it's not about my writing and it's not about how to write about. Who are these writers? What do they think they're doing? And how are they different from other kinds of artists and The chapter in which Prospero of here's is a chapter on diabetes. Magicians because of course writers are dubious. Magicians they create illusions and are those illusions always benevolent. So that's what I what I was writing about in that book and one of the other ones in that chapter is the wizard of Oz. Who has he says is A good man but a bad magician he has no real magic. He's an illusionist. So what you need to ask about any writer probably is. Are they a good man but a bad magician or have bad man but a good magician? Which is often also true or possibly. They're good at both but Prospero in the tempest is very ambiguous. And therefore the he's been open to many different kinds of interpretations. It's also play with a lot of unanswered questions. And it is the one play above all in which Shakespeare is writing a play about what he actually did all his life. He's writing play about a director producer. Putting on a play with the aid of a very good special effects man called aerial. So that is what happens in the book and a director producer puts on a play by means of which he hopes to get revenge on the people who have done him dirt twelve years before them. Light on the setting. Because it's one thing. It seems to me to consider prosper on his magic in an essay. It's another to construct a whole story which you could read perfectly plausibly. I think without even knowing that the tempest existed I think it helps to know that the tempest exists and by the end of it. You're certainly going to know that the tempest exists. Because what they're putting are isn't is the tempest. So how did I come to all of that? The epilogue has always been very intriguing to me which Prospero's steps out of the play addresses the audience. But he's still prospero. He's not saying hello. I'm an actor playing Prospero. He is still prospero and that play is about guilt and forget and forgiveness and and and liberation because the last three words of it are set me free. But it's a bit puzzling in the epilogue of what is Prospero guilty. Why does he feel guilty? And from what is he being freed now that he's outside his own play

Prospero Writer Shakespeare Margaret Atwood Virginia Mark Virginia Woolf Margaret Talks Diabetes Warren Pace Director President Trump Dickens Jane Austen George Eliot Producer Tolstoy
"george eliot" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

12:11 min | 2 years ago

"george eliot" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"To recalling what the truth comes out and welcome back to coast to coast recalling one of course is an internationally renowned hypnosis trainer author counselor founder of the mind motivations an Australian academy of hypnosis he is an expert in special disorders we're gonna talk with Rick tonight about evil spirits hypnosis and exorcisms Rick walking back it's been three four years since your last on the program George Eliot thank you for having me he to not tell me let's talk a little bit more about what you do with hypnosis first of all in an area that has always fascinated me how did you get into the look life I first began when I was twelve I read a hypnotic into action in the spider man comic controller to my brother and it worked and from there it became an interest until nineteen ninety five when I went into it professionally and since that time of never look back with many different versions and variations of it to its normal was sign I've always heard that you cannot make someone under hypnosis to do what they don't want to do is that true that's only if you're not a well trying to hi I'm new at any any stage hypnotists worth their salt knows that that's not true that it's sort of profit out there by the academics and if that's what I like to believe then good luck to them but now it it it isn't true about twenty percent of people you could might do anything when the in jail for mind control programs are on George Estabrooks did a lot of experimentation with this in and prove that discredited that ferry completely there are Manchurian candidate south ident brick all definitely will without a doubt there is what they use them for I don't know if a P. down that road but I would say I'm definitely there is yeah let's talk a little bit about hypnosis and exorcisms have you have you come across anything like that where somebody was possessed or demonic the first time that ever happened to me so the answer the question is yes I'll be practicing for about six months and I was very academic using what was corner of sanity in hypnosis and little Irish feel pain with a mother and said to me look of the spirit gets me and throws me on the ground and rapes me in my bed and was showing me these bruises and what have you and I thought this is interesting a solicitor who the hell long since you came off your speeded diction and she looked at her mother and another said I didn't tell him anything and should come office the deduction a year early on and so I thought she had speed psychosis or printed notices and and in those days we used to count people down from ten nine eight seven six one three two one those on counting it down I I get so for now I guess is this voice comes out that was not a a young Irish will have already come from do you because I knew that I have a tag talk on all in all my god here we go and the only reaction I could have less it will want you brave getting into a little girl like this come on throw some furniture around and do some vomiting them what have you and she sort of bounced around in the chair a bit and made this growing so I'm not sure a mist coming out of a and it went through the air conditioning slats for the depressurized section on the clinic door and of that convinced me that I had to look at other alternatives of what's going on in the day to states of mind but it definitely wasn't the skill so it went away loss or a few more times in about a month later came back and started and knowing your again then I found the spiritualist that I used to use for these types of things after that it was a little bit too deep for me to handle and he fixed her up and it never came back so there is some strange unexplainable things happening with hypnosis all mesmerism that that can really be explained scientifically enough and what is the difference between hypnosis and mesmerism okay hypnosis grew from mesmerism which was bored and divide by friends Anton Mesmer who was very discredited in the seven a nineteen hundreds ms but never spoke with the injuries to transfused energetic transference and what's known as hypnotic fascination which is the look into my eyes type thing and from then on it it sort of became very distorted after ms Miller was was discredited and in his time on those a little miss Morrison magnets to surround such as Valentine great ranks and many others as well and that is from the half it sort of became of the whole thing is those of a British doctor by the nine of China's bright you went to see a magnet to scold laugh on the train in Manchester in the seventeen hundreds to discredit him and found that it worked and laugh on trying toward bright a lot of the the magnetic techniques but bride was terrified of what the medical association with side so he basically for the baby out with the bath water and set on it's all about words of relaxation and and the focus of imagination and concentration with mesmerism that was nice speaking down so that was a squatter surgeon by the name of James is dial who went off to India to work in the hospitals that and he use ms ms exact no word message and he did a hundred and seventeen document as limb amputations using mesmerism of nice speaking and had great success with it and he had a five percent mortality in post infection right when the usual going right was about fifty percent when the medical people said to him this is all of the imagination is say he was bright enough he said will to his association moly imagination in the world one stop the gushing of blood in the screening of pine when I removed the disease room with a sore so something obviously in it but it got this Intel down to words and a lot of what is hypnosis now would be better off this for this relaxation therapy if this doesn't get down to the the truth is not exercise I'm sure in your career Rick you've come across some really bizarre cases adventure I have tickets for what to be on the one you just mentioned what what are some of the others I worked with a young girl once who came in to to see me who'd been having seizures for a long long time and that started sure that had a baby and the baby was about four months old and she put the baby down to bed and she went a midas officers sandwich in the baby began to cry again so she went to settle a by being came back and she picked the sandwich shop and took a bite and had a seizure because the the the toasted sandwich the cheese was bubbling and from that day on she started having four or five seizures a week and she had every non medical treatment in the world to do with this and we tried everything and if we could minimize them down a little bit and then I read Brian weeks I had written a book called many lives many masks yeah that past life regressions and I'll never done one this was in the early guys listen would you like to try she she said she was so we gave this past life regression and she found herself in ancient Rome she said walking down the seventh who with her brother and she was a fake and I said to go ahead to the last day of that life and so she's chatting away in a quiet voice and she has a little most of what happened and she should some vendors switch asking us and I fell off a cliff and let's see where are you now she's on floating always colors the end of the the bottom line was from that day until this she never had another seizure again and yet we didn't talk about the seizures well she was having this experience or will before it was just something unique to try that what was interesting hi was in a motorcycle gang here this was in Queensland as I was alive and he was a six foot five are cool to live in the terrible and he came in one day and she was a little girl and he said to me might or could pick you up with one finger motion it well what would you want a really so I've done enough of us and I said what's that he said when when she has the seizures he said about put my hands underneath there are countless they're off the bed so something we it's got on here on the strong man so there's definitely influences out there that can affect us physically mentally and emotionally there's no there's no question there there's something there it was strange with the hypnosis I was of I was very academic or learned not to they are broke out of the model the cycle Eric shiny and if not a system affected the traditionalism then when I started to learn mesmerism which is the sole basically in Europe is other than that I don't do the verbal hypnosis they they use more mesmerism but after that I began to study ms Morrow in the school of medicine of for ten years now a lot of strange things began to happen which is quite extraordinary and a lot of the dance of talk about because people think you have made that that doesn't discount the fact that certain things happen and you just have to go with the flow if you will almonds and think well to me now I called unexplained science and these are real things to these things yeah look all all tell you I had a very strange experience I used to a lot of cancer work in Europe and I also visit Nisman's grave in music in Germany every year so I was doing some cancer was I was in Switzerland and account could lose son studying this very nice old hotel and I'll be working for ten days and I said to the the fellow that it's taken me over there I'm going to Germany tomorrow I'm going to drive over there this is it's a six hour drive and again this visit miss miss cry so off I went and I took an American doctor with me as well only when I visited the grad we came home that night that's back to the hotel and I woke up and was exactly two in the morning this is figure standing at the end of my bed and a black because of this and are small just nodding and I thought this is an interesting trains and then also not but I'm not training in Las Vegas just smiling at me in north little turn the lamp on the side and if I wake up in the morning in the lines on the sides and obviously it was real it's not that was a was an amazing lucid dreams did that looked up the figures go went back to sleep work have at I thirty in the morning and there was the lamp on the bedside table on the side so it's it's just or oracle we had stuff it doesn't doesn't bother me worry me it's just the way it is Rick are there certain people who are more susceptible to being possessed or having these demons attack them look I think the reality of that is a lot of people that have been for some extreme form is in there in in the very young age or people that have been really involved in drugs eyes I think that's a lot of the chemical drugs open up close you which if you will in the in the final receptors that and I believe other energies to come through and attach themselves to certain individuals that I can put a person into hypnosis someone stay down and that the state it can be asked if there's anybody else there and often you'll get a yes and you'll get a strange and I think it's like a past life regression and the the interesting thing is that these attached entities will often leave the they'll be quite happy to to lead them.

founder Rick Australian academy of hypnosis three four years twenty percent fifty percent five percent four months six months ten years six foot six hour ten days one day
"george eliot" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

03:37 min | 2 years ago

"george eliot" Discussed on Overdue

"You can also hit us up on Twitter and Facebook at overdue pod. Thanks to folks reaching out to us in the past week, including Melinda. Nicole Magherran cat Maggie Fritz Jake Andrea Jacob Kevin Gloria Leah Michelle and Jeff Andrew folks wanting to war by the shore, should they go. She go to overdo podcast dot com. Internet website up there. We have links to apple podcast Google play RSS feed. You can also find us on Spotify and on Stitcher among other services, get new episodes when they come out on Mondays and a bonus episodes when we released them we're going to talk about our may schedule in a sec. But we have a couple of bonus episodes coming out this month that we're pretty excited about. You can also go to patriot dot com slash overdue pod to give us a little bit of money and get some of our bonus stuff a little bit early. And we'll be talking about that more later this month, not quite yet. But if you've been following our stop Homer time episodes at all we have plans for our next project, and we're going to start talking about that sin. Yeah. So may introduce red middle March in may beginning of men sure, we miss something there. I don't know. I'm reading well weird. I'm reading eleven twenty to sixty three by Stephen King. Even though it's not November. We just really beefed it on this too. Two then enters reading, sir c by Madeline. Miller reading drowning Ruth by Christina swertz around not the month. And then we have two bonus episodes for you from our stop hometime series. So patriots borders have gotten one of these. And we'll get the second in like a day or two like early early this week. So the first that's going to go up on the main feed on may seventeenth is our chat with Emily Wilson. Who did the translation for the odyssey that we read and it was so fun. She silk. Well, ho- cool such a cool. Eighty and at the end of the month on may thirty first will post on the main feed our book, twenty four and closing thoughts. Episode that a wrap it up. And that's where we'll tell you what we're doing next. So stay tuned for that. And then last show business thing is that you may have noticed on our social feeds, but the choose your own adventure episodes are back up. We can't really like say a lot more beyond that. But I think things are going to be able to continue as they as. They were before. So that's you know, back to normal as good state of things for us. But yeah, this would not have been possible without all you guys and your impassioned support for our dumb thing. Correct. Any really gratified that so many of you were moved to send messages into choose co and pleading are are on our behalf. And if you if you want to four at us, those messages over deposit dot com is our inbox. We will gladly really would file away in the folder called read these when you're having a bad lead for happy. That's the that's what we should've called this podcast read for happy for happy. Okay. I'm done for done. All right. Thank you. Everybody for listening. We'll be back next week. And until then try to be happy. That was a gum podcast..

Maggie Fritz Jake Andrea Jacob Twitter Nicole Magherran Emily Wilson Facebook Spotify Google Madeline Stephen King Jeff Andrew Miller Christina swertz Ruth
"george eliot" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"george eliot" Discussed on Overdue

"If folks want was I I was worried about not liking it. And I was worried about we'll be really mad at me about it. I'm glad I came around. Yeah. Because it sounds like it has the appeal of like now, even when you were getting into the the middle of it of just like, yeah, we're in this community, and here's all these people's business, which is like both what the book is revealing as problematic and part of the appeal of most of these like community based dramas. I mean, the main issue with is just like for every six slam on poets. They're like twenty pages of descriptions of people's relationships to other like a minor characters or their room. I log like, it's it's not always it does sort of just wash over you, though, when it really wants to grab your attention, especially once you're kinda used to its rhythms. Yes, you're it can grab you pretty good. All the bull strode stuff. When that starts really happening. It's like, whoa. Suddenly, I'm I'm switching into a more engaged mode, which. I'm not always in when I'm reading this book like ends up. Having a a a more has more power by contrast. Maybe share? Yeah. Yeah. We'll call if middle marches you or your favorite book, you the listener, you're favorite book. You can Email us at two g mail dot com. You can also hit us up on Twitter and Facebook at overdue pod. Thanks to folks reaching out to us in the past week, including Melinda. Nicole Magherran cat Maggie Fritz.

Maggie Fritz Nicole Magherran Twitter Facebook two g
"george eliot" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

05:00 min | 2 years ago

"george eliot" Discussed on Overdue

"Here's some like here, some opium or whatever. And do follow my directions. They should be. Okay. And. Raffles dis. Oh, and then you have a dead clown in your house Liga, and he has a debt you have a dead clown in your house and live gate suspects, his directions weren't followed. But doesn't want to rat on somebody like he doesn't he doesn't wanna drag someone's name through the mud like without evidence. But all the town knows is this guy who bull strode new came in and died at the same time as lid gates debts. Mysteriously went away lid gate has treated this guy. Did bad clown towns happen to die at the same town know that the clown had something on both strode. So there's this guy whose name I don't recall because he's really only a plot device to make this one thing happened. But he does right before raffles dies is implied. That raffles has revealed something. To this guy. And this guy comes to bolster and says, hey, we can't really do business anymore. Oh, and because everybody's so unfailingly passive aggressively. Find out what the thing is. Oh, no. But all of the I don't know everybody just thinks that. Of course, it's really to this guy raffles, and it must be you know, it must must be something toward happens. Yes. So yeah. This is where we back to the gossiping nature of middle March. And we we've gotten to a point where it doesn't. It doesn't matter whether this happened or not because everybody thinks that happened, and everybody's sort of propriety prevents everyone from talking about it in in in open way that would either confirm or deny that the stuff happened. Okay. And so because all of these rumors going around both bull Strodes and and lid gates reputations. And fortunes are basically in ruins at this point good good. So here's where Dorothy comes back in. She inlet gate were pals. They it's pretty clear that they weren't like romantically interested in each other. But like laddis law and lid gate were friendly for a while. And Dorothy and laddis low. Of course, we're friendly for a bit until they all kind of know each other and their and Dorothea is known as a, you know, a kind and. Charitable individual. So lit gate has not been able to you know, he has his his side of this thing. But he hasn't told it to anybody Dorothea comes in and says, you know, I've I've heard that they're things going around. And I just I don't believe of you, please tell me what's going on. And she is the first person who like even Rosamund. Does not say to him when she hears this stuff. Like, oh, I don't believe that you could possibly do. This like Dorsey Dorothy is the first person who seems like she might come to his defense or because he just doesn't have that many friends. She doesn't have he doesn't have anybody to speak against the rumors. And when the the court of public opinion is literally the court, right? Right. It's. Yeah. All your allies sort of matter. Nobody's really eager to defend bolstered because people were kind of on the fence about him. Anyway, like he has a lot of money. He has some political power so people sort of tolerated him, but I think. When it becomes clear that somebody like that is weak their allies sorted concert them pretty quickly. So Dorothy talks to lead gate and. You know, he he tells her everything. There's also a bit because Dorothy has come back to town for the first time in a wild following like sort of period of mourning. Like, I said she kind of disappears for a little bit. Sure. Mix in the middle of the book because she was she was explicitly told that she could marry the she wanted varies. So and so she goes to talk to Rosamund and Rosamund is with laddis law. Oh because the and there there's like hold hands in a room together. They might as well having sex. They might as well because Rosamund, and that's very much. The react. Everybody has is Dorothy just like a back out of the room. And everyone else is more. But will has this big scene where he,.

Dorsey Dorothy Dorothea Rosamund opium
"george eliot" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

04:46 min | 2 years ago

"george eliot" Discussed on Overdue

"Even though they he's gotten through the rumor mill at long last that this thing about marrying him. Specifically is in the will. And so he is kind of quit middle March for a while. But he is still gonna pining after Dorothea and Dorothea still pining after him. Thinking about like, well, everyone in town knows that I'm not allowed to marry someone that I like, I guess I'm just gonna leave that seems right seems a reasonable on team allowed us laws. Pose there's also this thing with laddis law. And there's this whole other family named the Fairbrother's who there's this. There's this little bit of stuff about him where like a patriarch of that family dies. And then his his estate gets divided up in a way that is that like, I think that Fred or will see this is where my confusion of is becoming a problem. But yeah, I think Fred Vinci is supposed to get some. Some big payout from this estate. But then that doesn't happen in that also gets his dander up. And that's part of why he also leaves middle March feels like he can't catch a break. Sure. So bull strode, wait. A lot of Slaw and Rosamund. Did we do that? That's I mean, that's pretty much all there is like they have an established sort of not relationship, but like a history together, and that you need to know about as we talk about blow. Sorry, I didn't know that it was set up for bolstered. Okay. 'cause bull strode is the is the the third acts Seinfeld thing where all the plotlines come in and intersect again. Okay. And then bowl strode pools the golf ball from the blowhole of the way on the book is over man, minimal was angry that day my friends. Bull strode is going about his business. And in town into town comes this guy. Name raffles star. Apple his name's John raffles. And I never my initial my brain, you know, how your brain draws an image. And if you haven't seen the movie or TV version of the thing, then there's nothing to compete with the image that your brain draws. So I hear raffles. And I of course, imagining a clown like a fool circus clown. Raffles the clown comes he's not a clone. I can't emphasize enough that this is just the thing that my brain has done with his name. Okay. Is that when all the stuff happens? Imagine it happening to a clown. Great. Can't wait. John raffles is a man from bull Strodes pass who knows dark secrets about his past. Okay. That we aren't really privy to. And raffles comes into town. He's like, hey, Nick because full stroz name is nNcholas. Hey, Nick, I'm coming into town, and you can give me two hundred pounds, and I'll leave by coming in and he's blackmail sky. Okay. And bull strode is like sure, I guess I really don't wanna see you again. And raffles goes, but they comes back and he's in kind of poor health and he's still trying to blackmail bull strode, but he's not doing very well. Income's lid gate trying to get money from pretty much anywhere to cancel his debts and save his marriage. And he has come to both read before bullsh- is told him non I'm not interested in this. And he comes the bolster at again because bolsters asked him to come look at raffles who sick and bull strode? All of a sudden is like, hey, I want I have changed my mind. I wanna give you these thousand pounds after all and in the book is a very close third person. And so you are it's never clear whether you getting what is actually in the characters heads. I think usually you are I think it's like it's that free indirect discourse thing anything. Yeah. I think that bull strode does have just just like things have happened in his life to make him think a little bit differently. And so he softens is like, yeah. Okay. I am going to give the sky the money. That he asked for but at the same time, and this is where the gossipy community of middle March comes in the things like at the same time. He just happens to have lived gate come in and take a look at raffles and live gate is like, oh, this guy will probably be fine..

bull Strodes John raffles Fred Vinci Dorothea Slaw Fairbrother Fred Nick Apple Seinfeld bullsh two hundred pounds thousand pounds mill
"george eliot" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"george eliot" Discussed on Overdue

"Doctor Dr Tertius over here is Tuesday, whether or not to have to servants three servants God or one whatever it's a big drop off in servants crag. It's sixty six percent reduction in servants. Okay. So he's living beyond his means. He's he's living beyond his means. He gets into quite a bit of debt, and this introduces strain into his marriage with Rosamund, and I can't honest to goodness cannot tell whether Elliott wants me to think that lid gate is the Jerker Rosamund. Oh, because they both kind of seem like the jerks of gets them into all his debt and doesn't tell her about it for a while. And then she goes behind his back to like he's trying to move them into a cheaper house. And she goes behind his back to make sure that it's unavailable. He wants to he doesn't want to ask his family for money because they are like a strange, and she thinks that she knows better. And so like rights to her dad or his dad or is or something, and they get a very nasty letter back in response because he was right about his family the entire time. And he gets really mad at her for going behind his back and keeping secrets from him. But it's like my dude, you're happy enough to keep secrets when you ran up a thousand pounds of debt without asking anybody. So their whole situation becomes strained is this is any of this money stuff like run through a lens of like being on unable to know other people or like the difficulties of knowing what's going on in other people's private lives. Because that's the thing. I saw crop up in a couple articles about the book. I mean, when it becomes clear that the lid gates have people over at their house like taking their stuff, and like tending to this obvious debt yet that is gentleman detrimental to their social. More on a personal level between the two them or any of the other relationships that are like this is like I keep the way the ways in which like, yes, I could keep a secret. But also like all of my thoughts are actually secrets from another person. Unless I tell them that kind of like way, I didn't mean it just get high for a second. I guess what? I'm wondering how much of the of their relationship or maybe Dorothea is like. About like their own personal wants and needs and like being unable to express it to another person because that's a to me that feels like a trope of the time period too. And I don't know if Elliot is concerned with that or not I mean, I kissed there's. Some of that. I don't really know how much they sit around and angst. If I over good word. Like, they they. They do in each of these cases people have gotten married quickly. And then realize that for one reason or another this is not what they really wanted. Okay. Okay. And me in twenty nineteen to live with my now wife for like six years five years like some number of years before we got married, but. Yeah. Me and twenty nineteen my. Yeah. Of course, you barely know each other you like stood in the same room and shared glances for you're like four times. And now, you're married. Like, of course, you're going to discover that you're not fundamentally compatible after that I've read an article about how millennials are killing cheating now. I think part of it are we why we're not getting divorces. We're getting divorced because king married either. We're killing well, we're getting married later later because we're hanging out with our partners for longer before we get married, and so you've prop more likely vetted. Someone you've also invested in them for more time. So you're less likely to then like skip out later. Also were not degenerate, we're not the free love like boomer generation are we killing sex too. Yeah. That's part of it. So like, there's less you're like stepping out to go get some because you're not having sex in the first place because you have Instagram. That's really what's the problem. That's the real problem. But we are killing cheating..

Rosamund Jerker Rosamund Elliot Dr Tertius Elliott Dorothea king sixty six percent thousand pounds five years six years
"george eliot" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"george eliot" Discussed on Overdue

"Yet, but this one sounds like more like the bummer side of what must have been going on for folks in the nineteenth century like the ways limiting the ways in which you got into it for one reason. But the other person doesn't share your reason. Well, it does feel like when folks get married like this happens to live gate and Rosamund as well is live gate whose first name is Tertius. Stop by the way. On a name. She Luke gate. And he's a he's not. He's a main character Turci Tertius lid lid gate. He sounds like he has his own series of Nintendo DS games where you go around and saw plus all federal. Tertius lit gate in the middle March chronicles, Reggie, call me. We'll make this game happen. Doug Bazargan at me. Oh, man. Man. I don't know. So what do you want to? What else? Do you want to just touch on one thing that I I wanna get into a little bit? So you talked about the because I just keep jumping from like. Yeah. So episode forever. But you know, the general shape of thing like these are the most important relationships. So set up we talk more about bolstered in a bit because it pops I do wanna know about that. What I before we even dive a little bit more into Dorothy IX, I wanna know what her deal is is like how present is the is the community of middle March or the place of middle March like how much of this feels like her? Elliot like writing about a specific place in trying to like dive into it. I don't wanna say the community is a character. Because that feels like a sort of cliche way to get at it. But it does feel like she is writing a very pointed critique of a certain kind of community. Sure sure, let me read this is actually toward the end of the book. But I think it sums things up pretty well. In middle March, a wife could not long remain ignorant that the town Hella bad opinion of her husband's no feminine intimate might carry her friendship so far as to make a plain statement to the wife of the unpleasant fact known or believed about her husband. But when a woman with her thoughts much at leisure got them, suddenly employed on something grievously, disadvantage, disadvantages to our neighbors. Various moral impulses were called into play which tended to stimulate utterance. Kinder- was one to be candid in middle March phraseology meant to use an early opportunity of letting your friends know that you did not take cheerful view of their capacity their contact or their position and a robust candor never waited to be asked for its opinion. And again, there was the love of truth allied phrase. But meaning in this relation a lively objections to seeing a wife, look happier than her husband's character, warranted or manifest too much satisfaction in her life. The poor thing should have some hint given her that if she knew the truth, she would have less complacency interbay. It and enlight dishes for a separate party. Oh, man. Yeah. This this feels like everybody gossiping Guzman all the time and everybody gotta take everybody down a peg. Yes. It just I don't. I'm not familiar with the Austin candidate. Also, I don't know how Austin renders it. My impression is that. It's more about individual people in those societies. Whereas this feels like a bridge towards something we've talked about like with like Peyton place, and like some of the like early early to mid twentieth century stuff where it's like, ooh, here's a small community where everybody knows each other all up in each other's business. And yeah, I think if you've this is maybe a deep pool for for some folks. But if you've watched the TV show Cranford, I think it is doing a lot of the same stuff..

Luke gate Tertius Turci Tertius Rosamund Dorothy IX Doug Bazargan Nintendo Austin Peyton Cranford Hella Elliot Reggie Kinder Guzman
"george eliot" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"george eliot" Discussed on Overdue

"But that first one is important in terms of like people living. In the countryside or living outside London or or city centres? And what that eighteen thirty to act did was like it changed who was in franchised was essentially kind of like redrawing districts for parliament like if you want about the American house of representatives. And it it got so into it was going to read something real quick. Please read me something real quick. This is from Wikipedia many of these early boroughs, and these were boroughs were, you know, people would vote for their MP's from where substantial settlements at the time of the original in franchise -ment, but later went into decline and by early nineteenth century, some only had a few electors, but still elected to MP's. We are weird. I've never heard of such a thing weird when when power is assigned geographically, and then population density changes that power becomes lopsided. Eared? So this book focuses on that timeframe. But it was written not long after the eighteen sixty seven reform Bill which further attempted to expand the British electorate and did some more redrawing things, apparently like pro democracy folks were emboldened by the union victory in the civil war. So all that to say it's like it's not one to one on the issue. But in terms of the timeframe as a historical novel. I imagine it's sim-. It's like folks during the war on terror writing about like Vietnam to look at like, why war happens, and what it does to people like it's a forty year gap, which is a little it's not most things that you would call a historical novel or actually like a bit wire than that. But it seems to be very interested in the time period. And that's all I got in. I wanna know what happens in the book. So I bet you too. I just bet you I bet you can tell me some of it. Let's see. Say. It's the middle marches eight hundred pages long, and it is split up into eight books. Like, I said, I'm the bulk of it like the vast majority of it is caught up in these characters live gate. This new doctor who has fancy ideas about like hygiene as it relates to mess..

MP London Vietnam Wikipedia forty year
"george eliot" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"george eliot" Discussed on Overdue

"Hot enfeeble English when not required. Tell us what you really really Bill. She thought they were dangerous because they undermined like the concept of educating women like these characters would be very well educated. But all they would do with it is very self satisfied and then just pursue a traditional marriage. So from her perspective, it was like ipso facto a reader could be like, well, why would we ever do that? If this is all that's going to happen. This is all they're going to do that. Yeah. There's there couple of of references to two women with education this book, and they're like not always flattering. I dunno. It's it's a complicated book. Yes. She seems complicated opinions about it. She did praise among others like Charlotte Bronte as people that were actually like accomplishing interesting books. And then this book, so we can get to it. It was published in eighteen seventy two Andrew, I don't know how it's rendered in like the full text. But it was published as eight separate volumes like every other month for like a year. Is it feel that like is it like that way? Definitely feels that way. And yeah, the addition that I read is broken up into eight bucks. So, yeah, they're all I'm sure you still have a few other to share. But. Yeah. They're all sort of interlocking. Sometimes you get to a new book. And it's like, okay. This is pretty much as continuing what I was reading before. And sometimes you get to a new book, and it's like, you know, this character. But now, we're going to focus on them and talk all about their stuff. So sure sure sure this is especially evident in this. Character mister bull strode who is a. Who is who sounds like a cartoon bullfrog? But no say. He's a well known and in some corners respected in some corners resented member of this community of middle March. She was like a banker and Reverend I think it has some political power to who is. Like in the beginning of the book as this introduces this power center because this this new doctors town in these kind of getting acquainted with local politics and stuff, but gab we don't really get a lot from him until the last couple books where all of a sudden all of the action is driven by some like mystery from his past that has never fully expanded. The that's life though. Isn't it? Tell me about it. I think one of the reasons it might feel that way. She did like she had started writing two different stories one that was called middle March. And when that was called miss Brooke and both just kinda she just decided to Muslim together. And it was getting as I understand it the middle March book focuses on the doctor character lead gate, and then the other one focuses on Dorothea who is a. Who is not. She is. She is being raised by her uncle, and she marries an older guide for for reasons that. Turn out not to be great. And she has a bunch of misadventures from there. Okay. But it was getting really long, and so actually Louis the guy that she had that relationship with like acting as her agent negotiated a deal that was similar to what Hugo got for les Miz. We're like episodes came out every other month. I guess they like rammed out the last three in November or October November December whatever it was. But that allowed her to not like have to cut the book to get it published, and it is actually considered sort of a historical novel. Even those written publishing seventy two, and we'll talk I guess a little bit about why the eighteen thirty to reform act is very important. But it's I'll say up front like I want you look it up because they mentioned it a lot. But is not like, I don't even think it's actually enacted in the in the taxes sort of a distant political concern because as in many, I think like rural or suburban communities like those people in the government often London. Yup. Getting all up in our business are viewed with some skepticism. Sure. So the subtitle of the book is a study of provincial life, which I think is meant to have dual meaning..

Dorothea Charlotte Bronte Brooke mister bull Andrew London les Miz Louis Hugo
"george eliot" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"george eliot" Discussed on Overdue

"Heck, no. Because Georges a man's name is most of the time. I think I don't know. Well, in this case Marian Evans, or Marian Evans is sometimes spelled was woman in the nineteenth century in England. Born in eighteen nineteen and died in eighteen eighty and she wrote seven novels under the name, George Elliott. Adam bead mill on the flaws silence martyr, which I've heard of romola Felix Holt the radical. Which is my new character for DNB, my favorite super Nintendo middle March. And Daniel Dorando also wrote poetry and did translations a lot of that. She did under her own name and wrote essays in criticism. The whole pen name thing is like her wanting to avoid the stereotype of women's writing will get to that in a second. Sure, she also wanted to separate her fiction work from her existing careers and editor critic and kinda shield her personal life from scrutiny as she set out on this on this thing. Does she have like an open marriage? I feel like she had a fairly unconventional sort of social life or marital arranged arrangement with a philosopher critic, George Henry Lewes. It's it's see the only kind of you can have with the critic philosophy believes in arrangements. He was already married and was in an open marriage. And then they got together went on some sort of Honey moon after which they just declared themselves married, but they weren't. I don't know if in when his actual wife like may have passed. I'm not sure, but like they were pretty open about it. Which was not great for everyone. It actually like again, it's why she took depend named Ord. Elliott's one of the reasons anyway when people found out that she was Elliott because her books are really popular and even after. Adam bead, her first novel, there were people clamoring to take credit for it because she had not come forward as who. She was man. I know right. But eventually like she so popular people wanted to know that the. The seal of approval on her like open marriage fake marriage thing was when she got introduced like and got to meet Princess, Louise. Because her in the Queen were like a big fans like, well, if the Queen is cool with it. I guess we're just going to let these guys everyone else has to be cooling. It does suck though that after Lewis died in seventeen eighteen seventy six she did remarry to younger guy who had bouts of depression, and like almost took try to take his life on their honeymoon. And then did not succeed than she got super sick and passed away a couple years later, and she was not buried in Westminster. In what is called poet's corner where a lot of writers have been buried because because of her fares, and because she had grown to deny the Christian faith, which is a big part of her some of her writing. She did get a memorial stone there later be like on her centennary because England was like no we like her book too much. We should probably make sure. But she started out she was educated like pretty young her father apparently thought that she didn't have good marriage prospects as early as like five or six which is weird. But he knew that she was super smart. So he sent her to school and got her all red. And then after her mom died. I think she moved back with her dad. He was running in a state. And so she spent a lot of time in the library. And then they moved into a city, and she got to meet some like literary folks like Ralph WALDO WALDO Emmerson and just kind of immerse yourself in in literary fashion and also straying from Christianity..

George Elliott Adam bead Ralph WALDO WALDO Emmerson Marian Evans Louise George Henry Lewes England Georges Daniel Dorando Felix Holt editor Lewis Westminster mill
"george eliot" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

04:32 min | 2 years ago

"george eliot" Discussed on Overdue

"Enjoying any well told tale they will not shy away from spoiling specific story beats when necessary. Plus these are books you should have read by now. Did you know have? Are you familiar with the phrase pleased as punch yes, I have been pleased as punch ever, you know, the providence of that phrase, not at all did you think that it was like punch like fruit punch is it plan that you just never really thought about it. Is it punch like punch and Judy. It is punch like pongy snap. So I don't know what that guy has to be pleased about but the novel middle March by George Eliot that I read for this week's episode of this podcast Craig's gonna tell you about a second uses that phrase a few times, and they kept capitalizing punch. And I'm like, wait is punch a guy. So if you're out welcome Judy is from sixteenth century its from the media Diller tail and it's about angry, ugly puppets. Yeah. They just hit each other. Performed by of a professor or punch, man. It's a single puppeteer overdue. It's podcast about the books. Even mean to read my name is Craig. My name's Andrew punch man is my favorite and he s game. The. I think there's an anime called light one punch, man. I think the whole is that can you Google real quick punch, man. Is it that he I think he just punches people? Once any wins one punch man is an ongoing Japanese superhero web comic. Oh. Interesting. And he looks kinda like a it's the cover that. I see is just kind of like a Goku punching somebody. Yeah. Everybody in every Onny manga looks like Goku to me. That's that's functionally not true you've seen peak. Ask him does not look like a Goku like a young beheaded to go casher on this podcast. We talk about Goku. And then we talk about books that we should have read by now most of the time, and this is one that I think counts middle March by George Eliot that Andrew read that I did reading it was a recommendation from one of our patriots supporters, Emma? Thank you, Emma. Find out more about that patriot dot com overdue pod. Emma, said it has a lot to say about disappointed ambition and passion, even when those ambitions in passions are for small things or in small fears. I also find it to be quite funny and places without stooping to meanness in order to accomplish its humor that remains to be seen. Andrew. We haven't talked about the book yet. So we'll set the record straight. I'm by all that. Okay. All that stuff. I'm I'm gonna. I want you to police me because I don't want to get into because every time I feel like we read along for the show. We're like, you know, reading along book on a deadline is not. Police soom boom, boom. I know that baseline gold. Okay. I'm going to try not to give sting operation that. Yeah. Every time we read along book, Gary along book on deadlines, the most fun thing in the world. And I'm gonna just say that now, and then I'm going to try and separate it out from my opinion from the rest of the book, which I think I'd if I hadn't had a dead it's weird paradox. Because if I hadn't had a deadline, I probably wouldn't have read or finished it ever. Sure. But reading it on a tightest kind of deadline because thing like five weeks of runway is a tight deadline when. Yeah. I did have to digest it faster than wanted to finish two hours ago, which is hardly as hot as I've been coming in. All of it today. So. Renate in it. Yeah. I read like the first half of it in those last four weeks and then like ten percent or so a day for the last four or five days. Well, I'm not you bad every breath. You take every movie make I'll be watching. Let's talk about George Eliot. Please do tell me about this. Shirley, this this great man, George Eliot..

George Eliot Emma Judy Andrew Craig Google professor Onny Renate Shirley Gary ten percent five weeks four weeks five days two hours
"george eliot" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"george eliot" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"And I know that people that do have children also have at they just add a different dimension to your life. First of all, they don't ask George Eliot. The great author once said that animals are such agreeable friends because they they don't ask questions, and they don't criticize. And so they're they're always pleasant. They're always happy to have you back. Those tail's wagging Meena great deal, especially for somebody that traveled as much as I do. But there's something comforting. And I think maybe it because we're older that are. Are great night's are sitting in the living room. And in the cold of winter having the fireplace going and the dogs curled up a sleep and and having the television on and just being together. And I think the dogs are an integral part of that they go with us a lot whenever we're travelling around the immediate area. We don't fly with them. But I think that's that's just a part of it. They're part of family, and we weren't able to have them until later in our lives because of the hectic nature of traveling. But now we do and now we can't imagine life without them. I'm not sure if that is a good answer to your question. But it's my answer. That's a great answer. So you've done thousands of interviews with people like me. But here's a question. I don't believe you've probably ever gotten before. Is there anything you've learned from having dogs? I sure wish they were like macaws and others that could live a long time. But but they don't because they they bring you so many years of great joy. And then there are those. Very difficult days near the end. And we've been through that with with our pets is anyone who has one or any length of time has if you're an owner. That's that's had dogs or cats or any pet.

George Eliot Meena
"george eliot" Discussed on Living Legacy Leadership

Living Legacy Leadership

04:35 min | 2 years ago

"george eliot" Discussed on Living Legacy Leadership

"It's kind of like taking a few moments in the day to stretch. But it stretching with your mind and your spirit rather than you body. I love that love that. I love to where you said the right book at the right time and expand our life the way love does. Yes. I think we we can learn a lot through books, and what we learn about a lot about ourselves because it slows book and slowest down and get us in touch with feelings that we haven't quite been able to articulate to ourselves. So the books that really resonate with us. I find certainly with me is when the experience of the character or the expression of an author says something that I know to be true. But I didn't have the art or the or the time to to put in words. So that became useful to me. And that's kind of what we do in our relationships with people there people who make us feel better to be around. We wanna be around. We wanna be better people because of these people were engaged in books. Help us to do that by getting in touch with different parts of ourselves. Fantastic. That's amazing. So in the title, of course, it says a life changing list. So, you know, anybody who's into books knows that that's the case, and we can be sort of sucked in an elevated as you just described in any number of the books that we read, but what's your take on that in terms of the life changing aspect what what is your hope for the reader or? However, you seen it happen for people. Well, what I find what I found in my experience of of talking to readers and recommending books to people and having books recommended to me is that. Bye. Bye. It's almost as if books allow us to take ourselves more seriously. And that's what's life changing about it in that on our own terms within our own imaginations as for thinking about a book and getting engaged with something. We can grow people and go back into life, kind of refreshed renewed emboldened in some ways for all the things that were enough to begin with. But the books have helped us to identify. So the change is really bringing those things to the surface and making us grow and evolve and be a little braver about being ourselves and finding out who we are. And how we relate to others. And I love to that, you know, we tend to think of things biographies as as providing that kind of service but half of your book are is fiction as well as the other half being nonfiction. Yes. Yes. So I think all kinds of reading have benefits even you know that that may not be immediate. And we can read stories of one of my favorite books is a novel British novel from the nineteenth century by woman whose pen name was George Eliot called middle March. And it's about a character named Dorothea. Brooke who was a young woman trying to find her way in the world and the book begins with a prologue comparing her to Saint Teresa of Vila who was a great founded monastic order, and the author says that Dorothea born circumstances could not have that kind. Kind of ethic life because she lived in provincial circumstances. But in the course of the book, she actually finds out having how to have that kind of epic life on a smaller scale and to leave a legacy of our own. But the book is all about how she gets there. And it's very engaging. So those kinds of lessons they're not immediate. They're not like reading a biography where you'd say, okay. I can take these lessons and apply them to my work life, or to my, you know, whatever goals on pursuing but more about how we develop as people when we see another character. We see a character do that it gives us a kind of framework in which the think about our own life. It's a that book in particular. It's a great story. And there's a love story, and there's all kinds of subplots. So you you read the book asking yourself to questions what's going to happen to Dorothea..

Dorothea George Eliot Saint Teresa of Vila Brooke
"george eliot" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"george eliot" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"A great George Eliot cool that from all forms of human error, prophecy is the most vulnerable one. So I can only say in thrilling nation. I do not see the empirical historical evidence that will show that partition is such a great solution. So maybe we do need to go back to discount. I would like to have a rhetorical sort of thought to end this on. And that's, I think that we need to take into account that there are examples of coming together of seemingly different cultures into either federated nations or functional unitary states that may have worked for a phase of time which may be. The best we humans can do. In other words, Yugoslavia is an incredibly interesting experiment of bringing together very diverse people, cultures and religions that stuck around for short center in diff- in two different forms. And you know that is something that is an incredible feat with all of its flaws in with all of the violence that happened afterwards. So that's one example. Another example is another British or actually too complicated example of post British empire situations, for example, Tanzania, right? The coming together of Tongan you guns Abar which is one of the more stable nations in east Africa today. So that is a bit of a counter example to post British empire partitions situation, but quite the opposite. And then not to open up an entirely new can of worms. But you do mention Cyprus, because you point out that it's been defacto partitioned, but I would like to point out in counterpoint that that is never the solution. In other words, they haven't been able to reach a solution, but the one solution that nobody wants is full partition there. So we don't necessarily have to assume that everybody sees partition as the solution. Well, incense, all you. You going back to ideas that were few of the inter warring. Purell federalists were thinking about even when they were supporting partition than they were thinking about it as a temporary step on the road, something bigger. So maybe better. That's our DNA of professor of history and Israel studies at George Washington University. Thank you so much for being on the show. Thank you so much that it was a pleasure, and thanks to gizmos. Demere are sound engineer to Tisha them or producer now request many or most of you. Listen to us on the apple podcast app. We'd like to ask you to, please consider writing a review just launch the app. Select the podcast in the library section scroll down to readings and review, press writer, review, and then the hard part you have to actually write one check out our archive. We have over four hundred and fifty interviews if you like our show, you can like us on Facebook, the Tel Aviv review podcast ideas from Israel and follow both me and a lot on Twitter join us again next week for another edition of the Tel Aviv review and until then goodbye.

George Eliot Israel Yugoslavia Tisha Tel Aviv Tanzania engineer east Africa Cyprus Facebook George Washington University Twitter apple writer professor of history producer
"george eliot" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

02:44 min | 3 years ago

"george eliot" Discussed on WLAC

"No it didn't it was just kind of oily no irregular heartbeat or anything like that oh no i just i i'll tell you i felt relaxed not sleepy real relaxed real calm i didn't have the the symptom i don't there's not really important what the symptoms but the symptoms disappeared has stayed so like when i hang up i have to head out but i will like a few more drops take a few more drops and then they say like do it twice a day and it should stay away you that's what we're here for you know i was saying as we got off the air with earl mandel last night if we could help just one person it makes the entire program worth it let's go next to jammer in guide rock nebraska east of the rockies high jam or welcome to the program george eliot i'm fine my friend i'm doing good god bless our fellow man you thank you for years and years and years you're talking about horror stories well you still there yes yeah and and he had his girlfriend kathy with and we were out in pennsylvania out in a place called bunker hill just north of kingston pennsylvania last of kingston pennsylvania anyway we're out there in the hills out in the mountains we're going gonna go camping for the weekend we had all our stuff for this everything was good and i guess none of us realize your sunday storage coming so we decided we'd better get the hell out of here you know 'cause it was about a half an hour walk back to the house point show just one trail blazers along the creek a couple of months before that all the way down the mountain whose right line it was 'cause it was pretty high hill you know nebraska we don't got hills like that back east everywhere they're all over the place and we don't have we don't have rocks out here we just got a.

earl mandel george eliot kathy pennsylvania bunker hill kingston nebraska
"george eliot" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"george eliot" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Man donna that's oh man george eliot pumped up now telling me know she nailed it i mean it's that's protect that's y'all operate that's what you get it protect you know that experience and i don't like to talk about how good we are because it's it's kind of embarrassing and it kinda humble but we do have really good job yeah i mean you know the older i've gotten the more realizing you tell people at i've seen so many people taking advantage of will never take advantage of anybody if someone is unhappy with that we do everything we charge too much just call us where it's easy we don't screen we don't holler we don't throw things okay well we'll explain what it took and maybe they'll agree and bill explain what it took me there wanting to say okay fine let let us help you you know but we're here to make friends and have long term business which is what we have the former against four zero seven two nine one one six four four now george i can carry on about you just donna carried down about arkansas because we have worked with you for years and you're you're incredible company your people are always good in a matter what happens i'll have to do a said george i need help bam at george is there we had one job it was eight foot down the pipe in lakeland we don't normally go customer called us up and said hey we got water bubbling at a parking lot i said oh sounds like the beverly hillbillies water bubbling through but george was down himself he said thomas is a weird or one i'd better go myself and sure enough he found it in the guys doug right were george said eight foot down and there was amazing what's your phone number george tom our number is.

donna george eliot arkansas bam george thomas beverly doug george tom eight foot
"george eliot" Discussed on Men In Blazers

Men In Blazers

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"george eliot" Discussed on Men In Blazers

"But you do you get to understand you and i think you might get to understand character i play him in in blazes dave oh with a little bit more as well ultimately a love story yeah but it's about the sport that we both love the pantheon of heroes and villains the moments of ecstasy and despondency we wrote in the introduction to the book that george eliot once said art is a nearest thing to life it's a mood of employee experience and extending our contact with our fellow men beyond the bounds of our personal lot yeah if you substitute the word football for the word george eliot uses that really is ultimately what the author of the book about it and it's how we wrote it for fans old and young experienced and they fight tumbling collection of great games characters soaring moment salty chance bonds tattoos mullets they're all jammed in there awesome self indulgent detours j k chesterton one set a good novel tells us the truth about terry a bad novel tells us the truth about its author think this book tells you about the authors yeah i like to view is sort of boy meets ball boy loses bull boy gets ball back sorta it is about that for both of us because we fell in love with football young age we both left football a little like when we first came to america we were so infatuated with american doubt we had down and it was tough to find ball when we first moved to america but we got ball back seriously to love story they've stopped the presses we should've put that on the book my friend there separate didn't write that formula he did write essays on tweed corduroy circa say your essay on the balding sectors is the definitive classic on the subject to treat essay it's about forty eight words but there are five illustrations you essay on the old english football highlight show the big match the big match how we used to consume football in the olden days and make macro read it still miss the big match umbro moore's comb over i think we are going to do an audio book it's going to be less audio book where we read the book or more and audio book where we talk about the book we're very very jug.

football george eliot terry america umbro moore