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17 Burst results for "George Cukor"

"george cukor" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

02:05 min | 3 months ago

"george cukor" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Thank you have a between you and might actually be infected we all have a role to play in preventing person to person spread of this disease which can be deadly for vulnerable groups for more information on how you can social distance please go to corona virus stock while Congress was debating the economic relief package American industry was stepping up to provide some of the items in high demand during the outbreak three M. ran out of those specialized ventilated protective hoods for doctors and nurses and so Ford Motor Company offered help after we take off the shelf automotive components the best three M. and they're inside I'm developing this medical equipment use respirators and develop a simplified system for D. P. Jim Bob exes the wearable hoods needed to blow filtered air and Ford had a way to do that or motors out of heated and cooled seats out of an F. one fifty with a battery pack off of a cordless tool and leveraging filters from three M. actually create these hard and with Ford's United auto workers volunteering to do the labor they're helping three M. make more Evan brown fox news the world's largest democracy now one of the world's biggest lock down India's one point three billion people ordered to stay at home in a bid to stop the corona virus pandemic from spreading and overwhelming India's fragile health care system more movies are going online for the homebound the tribeca Film Festival is hoping to ease tensions at home by offering more entertainment you can stream online for free the series a short film a day keeps anxiety away debuts a different film from a different filmmaker each day starting March thirtieth well Turner Classic Movies took their now cancel popular annual classic Film Festival and decided to bring it home with the TCM classic Film Festival special moment the entire festival will air in your home for free starting April sixteenth with George Cukor's a star.

"george cukor" Discussed on Fame is a Bitch

Fame is a Bitch

01:44 min | 5 months ago

"george cukor" Discussed on Fame is a Bitch

"In Gone With the wind because the director George Cukor was a game in and he knew about Clark Gable's early days of hustling and the Glory Holes. And whatever the fuck else they did back then before popper became the rave and gable was also uncomfortable working with him because he knew that he knew now. You can't prove that theory but George Cukor was fired as director of Gone. With the wind in the middle of production. Now what kind of Star would have the power to do that? They replaced them with Clark. Gable's good friend Victor Fleming so there may be some truth to the matter. That old Clark Gable. Frankly my dear I don't give a dick mean. Damn maybe he was playing for wall. Hey knocking to hold it against them although we'd probably want me to hold anything against them that's it for today. My tooth is better. I'm going to have a nice weekend. I got a bunch of football to play. They Bill Valentine's dinner so we'll see we'll see they'll spring for the system like a nice steak from system. They know how to keep the pink inside. All right guys I made. That was your podcast for February fourteenth. Two Thousand Twenty happy downsize hug your loved ones. Don't be an asshole Tornado fighter. Stupid Shit that work. Help breath winning sheets instead of fucking flowers ten times. I'll talk to you guys Monday. Have a good weekend. Thank you for listening. Fame as a bitch is an AJ Benza. Workhouse connect production featuring the endless wisdom insightful commentary and sometimes fucked up perspective of a J Benza executive producer. Mike Agatha no technical producer Brian Vasquez..

Clark Gable George Cukor AJ Benza director J Benza Bill Valentine Victor Fleming Mike Agatha executive producer Brian Vasquez producer football
"george cukor" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

01:44 min | 6 months ago

"george cukor" Discussed on Kickass News

"Academy Award. Nominations were just announced. This week and a record breaking number of women are up for Oscars this year accounting for no less than a third of all nominees. It's one of those. dominoes is incredibly talented writer actor producer and director Greta Gerwig who will be returning to the Oscars for the second year in a row following following her writing and directing nominations for last year's Lady Bird. This time around. She's being hailed for her masterful. reimagined action of Louisa May alcott's beloved novel Novel Little Women which has received six Oscar nominations including for best picture and best adapted screenplay for Greta Gerwig and today. Greta joins me on the show to talk about the daunting task of adapting an American classic. Delving into Louisa May alcott's diaries and letters to imbue her film with even more of the author's own personality personality and why it was so important for her to acknowledge the original ending. Alcott wanted to give her book before. Her publisher talked her out of it then. She talks about the status of female directors and writers in Hollywood recalls a conversation. She wants hat with a studio executive about how women talk that made. Its way into her latest I film and how Meryl Streep inspired some of her most insightful dialogue about a woman's role in Nineteenth Century Society Greta also reveals that she was secretly grittily pregnant while filming little women and what it's like for her and her husband Noah Baumbach to both have competing movies vying for best picture this year. Plus last we talk about whether actresses in the thirties and forties got better roles than actresses today and our mutual love of the films of George Cukor. Greta Garbo and the wicked wit. Dorothy Parker coming up with Greta. Gerwig in just a moment.

Louisa May alcott Greta Gerwig Nineteenth Century Society Gre Greta Garbo Greta Academy Award Meryl Streep Dorothy Parker George Cukor Noah Baumbach Oscar publisher Hollywood writer executive director producer
"george cukor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"george cukor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Err from the Missouri has pretty much become the protests and lyrics that really resonate of people's hearts and also the Missouri as it is a really famous musical and a lot of people would know that song and I think music has got this power photo influence on Pepose is giving them a way to release the emotion it is also a way for sue thing the so what role do you think Hans can play in home com cheering this time of political instability I think feed her excuse so if you like all a safe space for people to sit in and process and digest and to sue for this so and to reflect upon themselves and what's happening in the society because it's been a very long battle a lot of people are free bottle of with a look the frustrations and anger and thoughts we only space to by chance and two feet in the access and say to director Billy site when the process is stays to SEC that Saddam's military headquarters in Kansi Maddie the CA iconic images and brightly colored murals began to a pay will over the CC they became the visual backdrop to historic protests inspiring the movement that would continue for fifty days and lead to the ousting of Saddam's then authoritarian leader president but she but you know early June the system was forcibly dismantled and deadly clashes with the military led to a massacre of protesters and the medication of the arts two losses that witness those moments with the Sudanese activist and filmmaker George Cukor you may remember spoke to the cultural front line from the sixteen back in may and it may have some he painted some of the murals that were on display in county they said the memories of what happened first to Hey Jude when the massacre happened I was in the states in and I was called by the rapid response forces and basically I was surrounded by thirty of them I have long dreads and my food was broken I was in a cast so they were just screaming and they ended up beating me up and I was hit on the head and blood flow throughout all of my head and I fell on the ground and at that moment they thought I might die and they they were debating should they finish me off when that girl and when I moved they just let me go but he wasn't even easy after that it was a long adventure to actually get out of the citizen and eventually find hospitals get stitched up on June third the day of the massacre that tacking forces one of the things that they did was actually burned the tents and some of them we moved like anything that resembles that we were there so part of that moving was they had some great so they actually eighty over it some of the paintings and in the beginning it was very specific to the areas that were very close to the headquarters we surpassed by the area and we still noticed that others if you there's some areas that are not painted over there some walls that were part of the heart to mean in the city and those still exist but day after day they they're planning over another one one of the things we really want is to be able to go back to that area to be able to hang out again and to be able to recapture our sense of being and the thing that still is remaining the only thing that's remaining are the murals and there's already talk about turning that area into an artistic revolutionary Memorial space where people can go in years that I left that also have more artists come back three five please a lot of people think that the best moments of Sudan and the revolution where the fifty something the office it the visual arts in Khartoum start date right before I visited with his graffiti artists.

Missouri fifty days two feet
"george cukor" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

The Next Picture Show

03:26 min | 1 year ago

"george cukor" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

"Finally, it's time to catch each other up on films or film related items. We've seen in the interim since our last podcast, we call it. Your next pitcher show in hopes that will put some interesting choices on your radar Genevieve RC for star of are rising star you're going to take over the entire stream. We're going to go jump in Lake Michigan. What in the film where a lot of pressure can handle where we all have confidence that you can't just take off. Fake. Thinking. One of the film world has been good for you lately. Well, I I kind of tease in the first half it. I did back in watch what price Hollywood the nineteen thirty two George cukor film that sort of the original blueprint for a star is born. And it's tasha noted in the keynote for the for CEPA, the strong that who are declined the opportunity direct, the nineteen thirty seven film because it was too similar. But there also some key differences in what price Hollywood chief among them is that it forgoes romantic relationship between the ascendant star Mary Evans, played by Constance Bennett, and Maximilian Kerry the alcoholic film director who discovers her play by Lowell Sherman. There is a central romance. But it's between Bennett's character. A third party polo player. Played by Neil Hamilton. Their relationship is plagued by some of the same issues of jealousy and career demands that we see in a future stars born stories, but I really like that what price Hollywood has Mary's career a little less tangled up in her marriage and the relationship between her and max is predicated pretty. Simply on him recognizing and appreciating her talent without any overt romantic leanings. The other interesting element of this one in comparison to is later stars born is it takes place at the height of the studio system. So the way it engages with that element of movie stardom is notably different. And I also just want to highlight what a joy conscious Bennett is in this film. She's warm and funny and glowing and she brings across this element of Mary where she is really active in pursuing her own stardom like we see her working for it. It's not just thrust upon her the way, it can seem like it is in later star is more. So yeah. Some really interesting comparisons and contrasts going on here. It's the same director. Roughly the same story is if before version, but ultimately a very different movie. It's not a musical. It's black and white. It's only eight minutes long, and it is on film struck. You can watch it there along with all the other stars Bornes. They're all there. And I think there are also some DVD copies of what price Hollywood out there. You can probably find them at your local library. Whatnot. So like, I said it's short, and it's super interesting, and I would definitely recommend you check out what price Hollywood Keith. What about you recommend a little movie is making the rounds? Now that is not a blow you away in terms of inventing a new story that's been told before. But it tells it very well. It's called what they had played Sundance early this year. It's just a very nice Lee done family drama, starring Hilary swank, and Michael, Shannon, and Robert Forster Blythe Danner entice her for migra can tell you can tell you right there. It's a pretty pretty pretty stacked Cassar chump co is a believe at first time writer director and story is of Hillary swank. Character is Los Angelino returns to our beloved Chicago in the in the winter to deal with the fact that her mother played by Blythe Danner needs care as has a dementia and needs to be put in a situation where she can't hurt herself and disappear in the middle of the night as she's been..

Mary Evans Constance Bennett Hollywood director Robert Forster Blythe Danner Hilary swank Lake Michigan Genevieve RC CEPA Hollywood Keith Neil Hamilton George cukor Lowell Sherman Los Angelino Lee writer Maximilian Kerry Chicago Shannon
"george cukor" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

The Next Picture Show

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"george cukor" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

"A shame that a couple people had to seriously tainted by being jackals. But that said, it's such a good scene. It's every film festival you go to you're going to have a lot of really good conversations about film. So you have that to look forward to. I think the baseline advice is if there's a specific kind of cinema you're into like docs for true false, like small international cinema for Rebecca cult films. I go to HP lovecraft specific film festival in Portland every year. That's very specific. It is very specific whatever you're super into. I would actually look for that film festival. I should. Yeah. I didn't get to go this year. I did get a great festival a couple years ago. Overlook thoughts festival. Oh, you went over the first year they had it. And it was at at the hotel. They shot the exteriors for the shining this year New Orleans, I would've loved to have calm, but that was great totally immersed in the core films for very close base with a bunch of enthusiastic people. That was I would love to do that again sometime. I hear super great things about that my colleague Brian Bishop goes every year and is hugely into it. I actually got to meet the people who do it at south by this year. And they were really cool. I would love to go. We can't send to people the same teeny tiny foam festival sherve. But I'm glad you're at a good time with great. Look for what you're into. There's a phone festival for it. Well, that was a lot of thoughts on film festivals. We love like big questions about film, which we don't get enough of in feedback 'cause they produce interesting conversations. So that is a good reminder that we always appreciate when our listeners share their thoughts their recommendations and their big questions about cinema some them to us. So we can talk about them on a future episode or post those letters on Facebook for discussion to reach us. You can leave a short voicemail at seven seven three two three four nine seven three zero. Or Email us at comments at next pitcher show dot net. That's it. For this episode of the next pitcher show in part two will look at another star being born many decades later in Bradley Cooper's very much updated version of the same story look for that next Tuesday or better yet. Subscribe to the next picture show on apple podcasts Spotify or your pad catcher of choice. Find us at next pitcher show dot net. Follows at Facebook dot com slash next pitcher show and follow us on Twitter at next pitcher pod seal always know when a new episode drops until then could you turn around real quick. We just wanna get another look at you. So I can't quite big call overnight sensation floor. It started many. I was. In the. Panoply.

Facebook Rebecca Brian Bishop New Orleans HP Bradley Cooper Twitter Portland Spotify apple
"george cukor" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

The Next Picture Show

03:19 min | 1 year ago

"george cukor" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

"But they also get like a lot of small an interesting things. It's just it's really varied. But for me like at this point hands down the festival that I would send people to is fantastic fest, which is also in Austin, but it is entirely at the the Alamo draft house. Now, if you're going to go to fantastic fest, you have to be into cult cinema, preferably seriously into horror films and genre films certainly into violent films because there's a lot of that kind of stuff they do a handful of retrospectives that was heavier this year, but they mostly get a lot of world premieres of mostly smaller, indie films international films and stuff that's just going for Colt fame. The trick to it is at every other film festival. I've been at for non industry people you're gonna spend a ton of time standing in line. Just get used to it. Just huge long lines that you have to queue up in. An hour in advance of the film, at least and like more. If you're worried about not getting in if you don't have like a fairly expensive, most of these places have tiered passes. So unless you've got shelled out for one of the higher level passes. That is gonna get you in. You're probably gonna be standing in line for an hour. And then you might not still get into the film, so fantastic fest. They don't ever book. You don't end up standing around in line? It is the best organized foam festival. I go to there's a weird queuing system where you kind of put in for the film's you most want to see. And then there's kind of a lottery that tells you what film you do get into? But you're guaranteed to get into film every slot. And it's very easy to see five films a day. If that's what you're looking for because it's all at the draft house. There's good food there on site. So you don't have to be constantly like eating a sandwich out of your bag surreptitiously in the middle of the movie that you a drugstore, and I just love the films. I know the fantastic fest has a bit of a rep problem because of the whole Devon frost. Thing and like everything that went on with with the Alamo around that. But last year, Katie right from the club got a bunch of women together. And basically said we wanna fix this. Because we love this film, and they more or less wrote a manifesto for fantastic fest in the draft house to the effect of. Here's what we want to see change around harassment and the Alamo adopted it, and they're they're doing their best. So important strides are being made there, and I really just think it's important to not write off this festival because of a couple of really bad eggs, and the people that enabled them for a long time for a long time and tried to bring them back into the fold without anybody knowing about it behind the scenes the stories around. I it's not our place to get into. Who's to say says, you know, I'm glad to hear. They're trying to make some changes. I that waiting for the big article Swain me how much Allen has has improved. And I can kind of feel better about it. Again. Yeah. I don't know. I just the people who work there veer so hard in the direction of queer and people of color, and you know, people with tattoos and piercings that are super super into cinema. You just you get a lot of you know, outsider people who are doing what they love around the thing they love, and it's just it's.

Austin Swain Devon frost harassment Katie Allen
"george cukor" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

The Next Picture Show

02:57 min | 1 year ago

"george cukor" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

"So that you can afford this. You can afford true false the audiences are wonderful every fill every filmmaker shows up. Everybody is all is there with their movie. And so there's a lot of great conversation with filmmakers with critics all in close proximity stuff. So falsely my answer. I don't get a lot of festivals. I don't I mean, it's really been my role eighty club and dissolve in the Uproxx sort of I've got to stay home and edited things while everyone else, I'm kind of in the same boat. I think I'm going to Sundance this year though. So it's kind of exciting I been to live into to film festivals one, which is the Milwaukee film festival. I think I mean Milwaukee's pretty far away from Tampa. You know? But in might be a little jarring to someone who grew up in my name is happening now or just wrapped, you know. So, you know, Milwaukee in late October might not be your, you know, your ideal definition, but it, but it is a very good and affordable festival, but the only sort of more major festival I've been to south by south by southwest. And that is a just a big kind of unwieldy festival because it happens concurrently or sort of overlaps with their interactive and music and comedy arms. So there's like a whole lot going on. And it's it's it's a little overwhelming. But there's also like some very interesting things that premier there. I think generally kind of a little more genre e or comedy type stuff there. But, you know, same a lot of people show up. Austin is a great town. There's a ton going on there. Maybe too much going on there, depending on you know, what your your speed is. But. If you plan far enough in advance, you know, really sort of map out what you wanna do. I think it would be a very fine and acceptable. Is that it's in March. I believe right for me. I'm going to echo like everything you guys have been saying, I would not recommend a first timer. Try to go to Sundance where you're dealing with elevation sickness and usually snow and the difficulty of getting around and housing there is expensive. And then on top of all that you're gonna spend time. It's. In the snow to see a movie at the local public library. I like southbound is fun. But I do think it helps if you're if you're into the collective, and if you're into like, okay, I'll see two movies today. And then go to an interactive the thing and then go to concert as opposed to trying to go for like full-on, film density. I also I don't think I would send people to tiff Tribeca in New York. I'm very fond of it's more low key. You're not gonna see like south by head the premier's believe the world premieres of no they had. I love dogs. I think a week after Berlin were premiered you, but I like at the top hopper. Tune to see baby driver premiered there. Right. I wasn't there. We've had some pets. Not ready Claire one sue mcgruder premiers. So they do get some bigger things..

Milwaukee Sundance Austin Claire Tampa Berlin New York
"george cukor" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

The Next Picture Show

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"george cukor" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

"Now, it's time for feedback. When our listeners weigh in with their responses to recent episodes and anything else, you wanna talk about in the world film, should've you're a resident superstar you wanna read all of these letters. Now, actually, I was thinking should Keith some more work. So I'm going to give this one to him. Okay. Hello fine. I'll take you get it. Nicholas rights. Hey, all following your social media posted film festival in the world has me itching to go to my first non-local film festival. I grew up in Miami. And now live in Tampa Florida for school. What would you suggest for an affordable? First time film fest outside of Florida. But inside the US having eater this fall or winter. So we're a little late to the the ball game on this one. This is posted on face. We're we're a little far into fall slash winter. But you also well past festival season. We're we're out of festival season. But to be on next year awful lot of these film festivals. You you really wanna do your planning in advance? We started giving our solicitations to set up our housing for south by southwest two months after south by southwest. So like, I think we're gonna talk about film festivals a little in general, and you you really wanna get like your housing ticketing book to in advance. Now it varies a lot depending on how small end or regional film festival is, but I think we just kind of talk about the calendar year a little bit guys. You've all been a bunch of film festivals including some some like really small specific ones. What would you recommend to somebody of a first time out of town film festival will group in Miami? So he surely what's the Miami from festival which is quite good festival. It's it's very much modeled after similar to the New York Film festival, and that is really just one screening house. It's large you can see every single film that they show. It's only, you know. So that's very curated. There's quite a bit of Latin American material. So that's a good festival festival. But he's talking about going outside of Florida. So Mike answer for that would would be to false that was that was That was my my guess. guess, which which I've gone to last for years. It's in Columbia, Missouri in the early days of March the first weekend we can March like a Thursday through Sunday. It's a documentary film festival though, though, it is the titled through fall suggests your emphasis on movies where the the line between. What is what is fiction was nonfiction is blurred? They like films that kind of play in that area. A little bit more rather than your more traditional documentaries, though, they will show those to life, the Mr. Rogers doc was there this year. So it's not like they're verse to showing those types of films, but you will see a lot of more on guard, documentaries there and more form breaking. Yeah. It's very well curated, and it's very quirky. They have these buskers like bands that play before every screening. They have these provocations that that people will give whether where they give little speech a little presentation a little. Talk before the movie. That's that's usually usually funnier thought provoking or something. That's that's interesting. The food is unreal. In this town's. College has goulash Eli has the goulash like it has it has the donuts. I like, I mean, I I really just leave that much closer to death. When I what I eat. So well it so badly at the same time. But but it's very affordable. I think it's extremely acceptable to people because that's an issue with a lot of these major film festivals. Is that they some of them are impossible to access like I think Sundance in Canada, just a bad idea. Some are challenging like like tiff which is a public festival in which you can get tickets, but it's it's large in daunting. Tickets can be really so so this is like dollars for a single movie. But if if you're if you're not like buying a membership, which can run into the thousands..

Miami Florida Keith Tampa US Nicholas Mr. Rogers New York Sundance Canada Missouri Mike Eli Columbia two months
"george cukor" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

The Next Picture Show

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"george cukor" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

"From like musical sing along thing that bar here in Chicago. Does that vacation Lee plays that sequence? And but like, I said a much smaller portion of it. So I was just like what is happening. I need a snack break. It's not my favorite sequence in the film. Again. It's very impressive. You know, from the perspective of garland, and and from a filmmaking perspective just the way it does. Like we've in an out of styles and time periods and whatnot. But I don't know. It's it's not my favorite. I wanted to plot ways that. Yeah. Of course, you do an intervention there. What else can you do drop the? Yeah. If it was very that was supervised by Roger Edens who worked for the freed unit and GM. So that's if you want someone to get that style down go for someone actually helped create that style. Yeah. And that was like Arlen go-to guy. Right. Cooker wasn't even onset anymore. When they did that right curse to me that the film. The sequence reminded me so much of the end of an American in Paris to which end in which it has that same thing where where it's just like this going medley, the keeps going that is by least favorite part of American Paris. But I'm still gonna happy to have it in both films. And I think this is more strikingly filmed even the sequence in American in Paris. But it is kind of a WT f thing to have this just a certainly long, you know, musical sequences changing backdrops stuck in the middle of the movie. But but again, it's like, I think as I was saying before, you know, you commit to this smorgasbord of a movie. I would not commit to this mortgage board of movie. I like, I'm I'm glad to have seen it. I think if I was going to watch this movie again, I'd probably consistently skip it, oh, we part of the movie. Can we go? No, you can't you sit down you you hit play. And you watch even even on second viewing your that? What about it? But yeah, I mean, I'll I'll sometimes I don't get to finish things. But I don't get parts of a movie. That's that's insane. Onto times speeds. Everyone sounds like chipmunks. Yeah. That's great. You're you're you're you're IB because I'm usually I'm usually Mr. dog I like so you if I seen a fill before. Yes. Okay. There's a stretch of the film that they they don't really want to have to deal with say brothers film, and their musical sequences that are just meant to showcase the not very great singer of the hour. And you just want to get back to the funny. Marx brothers. I when I was a kid. I wouldn't do it now part of the movie because it's part of the movie, I think you may be the tasha in this discussion all right to everybody's house. And just pop the up the Ford. I don't even like I have trying to get out of like I started actually like whenever I can leaving my phone in the other room. So I'm not tempted to even look at it. But I mean, that's good. That's that's good. It's hard when you know, when you have like, you know, editing task you have to do make my interrupted trying to watch a movie but child or small Trump, I resigned a long time ago watching movies and two three sometimes more sitting in that they have to. But I don't skip it. That's time. Take a break during the work day, and like watch a scene that I like like on YouTube fine. No, that's fine. That's fine. Because I haven't committed anything. No. But I mean, if you're watching a movie. The opening credits. Roll your in committed fast forward through the opening credits of movies where they're all up at the front, and it's just a bunch of text and music the overture. You are in your seats and ready to watch when the overture ovens. Wow. I I never knew I never knew you were the stuck matter. I could probably say a whole bunch more stuff about born at trunk. But I really kinda wanna let that stand guys if you're skipping any part of movie, you're doing it wrong. I really wanna hear what the listeners thing about this was zone out or something..

Paris Chicago Roger Edens American Paris Lee onset YouTube garland Arlen GM Marx
"george cukor" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

The Next Picture Show

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"george cukor" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

"But I mean, you're actually distorting yet and undistorted the when you shoot in cinemascope. So you probably it'd be new they're probably losing to if you look at if you look at a frame of film, that's cinemascope it's squeezed, and then you put it through. It opens up just real quick before we leave the topic of like how portrays Hollywood I really kind of delighted to at the scene at the Academy Awards to learn that apparently people used to dance at the Oscars. Like. Okay. Let's dan. I was thinking about you know, ratings are going down dancing. But only right. Will you can have somebody in the background hosting and just making horrible cynical comments about how much time it's taking and how the audiences hating it. They're perfect all the Oscar problem all the sound people. All of a sudden that are winners stance the aisle and they're seeing. Yeah. I don't think I had ever seen anything with James Mason young. I am not sure I'd seen him in anything here. Here. Never never looks young. A few years later, though. I mean that's seen what low litas only what eight years later. Really? I mean if hard. I would have been his mid forties north by northwest. That's around the same time. Kosh is it. He just he looks so young to me here. So that's that's young in my world, Scott. He looks so young compared to to what I'm used to and to hear that voice. Like that deep gravelly James. You wanna do it? No, even threatening to do all the threatening to do because I don't think I can do your Robert Shaw. We're not going to get your James Mason. Sorry. It shot to probably do like I forget, which one is. But there's a Beatles. Recording the famous germs Mason impression. And that's probably I didn't have selling. Mostly what I was what I was getting at the long way around it ended up being even longer way around was a any any thoughts on the performances here. I ready. Good girls. Unbelievable. Yeah. She she absolutely breaks, your heart that little bit of extra textual information that you mentioned the irony in the movie that she was going through a lot of things that he is character goes through. I think that, you know without project you too much it certainly feels like she understands that so much and as able to feel it in a way that maybe she wouldn't have otherwise, I don't know she she does. She's so perfect. I don't know what she how she did it. But, but I think she's so moving in the film, and then she just can show you how does she can sing dance and do everything to its full performance. Kind of maybe thing like I gonna look back to see how the hell shit win best actress for this like if like just cancel the whole award. If you're not gonna give it to her Grace Kelly Kelly for move. Not even claimed she lost by six votes. Really? Yes. I like from what I've read Judy Garland. Never really recovered from not winning the Australia. They called Grace Kelly up in fury about how this was her only chance to win and she'd have chances in the future, and she doesn't appear on screen in a movie, she just voice for pushy isn't on screen in a movie for another seven years, and she's she wasn't around for a whole lot longer. I'm back that wasn't. But like watching it today, you know, like so removed from the drama. Yeah. Like, it's like how. I was just so reminded of the when my week with Marilyn came out..

James Mason Grace Kelly Kelly Academy Awards Scott Hollywood Australia Judy Garland Kosh Oscar Robert Shaw Marilyn eight years seven years
"george cukor" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

The Next Picture Show

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"george cukor" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

"She comes out of that look looking very artificial. But looking reasonably oh, yeah. Just like the sight of her like in the chair lee-ing examined in you know. No, no, most like medical setting definitely reminded me of bad connection. Depressing March through when she's a contract player sort of depressing March through one manager another just doesn't care. You know, like, oh the publicity department was we're we're we're thrilled to have you or something like that? Yeah. Just shuttling her from one person the next and like she comes out the same door. She came in. Yeah. Almost Escher esque designed to the staircases or she comes down at the bottom of looks at the one that she just went up and just kind of goes, I guess caught in the turnstile. But if you do you think of this is more like a glamorous or cynical look at Hollywood like how how do you see Hollywood is interfacing with what he's trying to do for her what she's trying to do with the world. What the world wants out of both of them. I think it's complicated. Right. It'd be represented by the two men in the story that Oliver and Libby, right? But Oliver is the guy who runs the studio. And and and I think there's a sense of loyalty of trying to do the best thing for for. His people. Guy who lives he couldn't do without him though. Like you have yet to have to you can be the and sit back and support the artist because he has someone else doing the dirty work for them. He's not exactly giving giving Norman any kind of trance. He's ready to come down that scene where he's actually working on the publicity for his death. Is kills me. Because it's just so that that is the most cynical moment in the movie. Yeah. And I think it's also really honest about how things work to. I think it's also important to point out that this movie starts with literally a benefit for Hollywood. You know, the cause is Hollywood because Hollywood was kind of struggling post war. You know, people weren't necessarily going to the theaters people were staying home because it was cheaper to say at home and watch TV than to go buy movie ticket. You know, sounds familiar. Yeah. Right. It's all cyclical everything old is new again. Yeah. Yeah. So the Oliver character Oliver Niles the studio head even the actions he takes that are seen as detrimental to the movies are just to Norman himself. They all come from this place of were hurting right now, you know, where we having to make cuts for having to tighten the purse strings and like we literally can't afford your antics anymore. I think that also kind of relates to these thing, but he also just seems much more of a grudge against Norman because he's made his life so hard for how ever many years, whereas hours coming for more sort of practical, even by beaten down place of like those days are over man. Like, you know, this is. How we got to run the show. Now, we should also say that the film is so much celebration of what a Hollywood production can do. I mean, just with with it being cinemascope with the being in technicolor all his money being thrown at the screen and having these huge splashy musical numbers. And even what would seem like a scene, you could do more simply like like the opening your Hollywood tribute paying tribute to itself that is a packed very complicated very expensive seen. So we get to kind of watch this fellow and just appreciate the glamour of it in in the scope of it. You know, in the fact that they they insisted it being cinemascope patrols this newish wide screen format, and it was a temp to really dazzle audiences. And I think it's still all that sort of holds up. So apparently was not into the cinemascope aspect like the studio demanded after filming had already begun. And I think oh, yeah. They had to scrap existing over with it. So I don't know maybe that kind of influenced. His feelings on it. But. Must be a huge judgment to being to for director to start working in that much wider frame. I I was noticing when I was watching on my TV that some of the edges of the screen and some of the big musical numbers like looked a little warped or stretch. It seemed like people were a little squished is that artifact of cinema sculling way it works. And you know, you're actually a mess it up..

Hollywood Oliver Niles Norman Escher Oliver director Libby
"george cukor" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

The Next Picture Show

03:24 min | 1 year ago

"george cukor" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

"So I think you could talk about the way the film moves and say, well, you'll these scenes of the sequence they don't move the film along efficiently. It's it is an odd film in its full form. It's kind of this big buffet of movie that you'd eat from kind of overstuffed. I get the argument just practically speaking when you're thinking about telling a story efficiently leading audience. Point eight to point B to point C is well as you can be this movie doesn't really accomplish that you so you have to kind of just accept that. And then love it for what it is doing which is just giving you a lot more. When it's doing is giving you this big emotional tragedy kind of for both of them. But as you say in the end kind of kind of for her like, it's kind of a woman's weepy movie, or at least it's partially taken from that form. I'm curious given how much pain there is in this story for everybody. If you see it as more of a tragedy for one of them or the other like, if is this a movie about a woman who loves and loses is it a movie about a man who burns out and tries to get out of her way. Like whose tragedy is the story. It's a tough question. It's it's not necessarily neither are thing. I guess I'm I'm just curious. What you see is kind of the shape of this Gets film. to the end of this and not to get ahead our selves. But at the end of of the twenty eighteen one is is that she will have a life after that. She will go on this is part of a longer story for her not that it's not sad. But I feel like the real tragic art belongs to the man in this in this story, and I don't know because like both versions, and again like I don't wanna get into too much because it'll spoil what I want to say about the new one. But like I think both versions in ending with the woman singing a song to her dead husband and both of them songs that, you know, suggests well in the new one quite literally that they'll never love again, you know, even the suggestion that like Vicky or Alley's life will go on and they'll continue to be successful or whatever. Like, it's just tempered by this tragedy that they are forever scarred and traumatized by this and like baby they never will love. Again. I feel like both films may. Very clear the suggestion that this is it for them that was the one romance. They're ever gonna again, you know, and that is like really really heartbreaking. It's heartbreaking. But I also don't entirely by it like I in both films. I feel like that's a kind of a sentimental Hollywood contract. And if you if you take that career up again, ten years later, you may see a very different thing. But like that's not how movies end, you know, movies movies. Don't go on forever. You have to pick a place to stop and the most dramatic and emotional place in both of these films is the love of my life has gone. Well, but I think that the he'd just you're here is not is not necessarily at least in this. This star is born is her just claiming the name. I mean, she's not Vicki Lester. She's she's MRs Norman, Maine. Right. You know, the reason she was given the name Vicky Vicky Lester is removed from Norman main quite explicitly. She she has her own career that is being nurtured. And there's an interest in that career not being dragged down by the toxic human being. Who is Norman Maine? So for her to be able to say this person was my husband. I don't think it necessarily negates the idea that she'll ever again or anything like that..

Vicky Vicky Lester Vicki Lester Maine Hollywood ten years
"george cukor" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

The Next Picture Show

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"george cukor" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

"And apparently that the nineteen thirty seven stars born had been offered to him. But it was only five years out from what price Hollywood, and he didn't wanna do it. Because of his too close when this opportunity came back around in nineteen fifty four I guess he was kind of lured by the promise of getting to make his first technicolor film, his first musical and to work with garland. Yeah. So I guess enough time had. Past that, he was ready to revisit it. And like there are some significant changes, you know, from that film to this one, but they are pretty close to Scott. I'm curious VHS version that you watched. A while ago. But, but it sounds like from what you said that maybe it didn't have the scenes that Warner Brothers cut because that would have been present before the restoration. I have no idea. I could certainly say that if I saw it on VHS would not have been, you know, this was scope aspect of it would have been totally ruined. I'm sure the colors were probably not there either. So so it really felt it felt like a pretty new experience presumably, you would have realized that there were like film stills with audio. Would have that was we're really watching this time thinking, well, that's you know, that's That's a. a choice meat. Maybe you're just like you had it held over from watching Butch Cassidy and the Sundance kid do something similar this kind of stuff like that. In like, sunrise, remember sunrise, when the when they go to the city and sunrise to humans song to humans is kind of a montage that's very odd and not in keeping with the style of the rest of the film. Yeah. So that kind of has made my brain thinking, maybe this is just a deliberate artful touch. That's being done here. That's a little, but no that's not true. I am mostly just curious because you you had said that you originally thought you didn't realize that these were lost scenes Warner Brothers cut them. And apparently burned the negatives in order to get the extract the silver. So there was no way to recreate them until they like once they want somebody his films story and found the audio. They started trying to put it together. But there were and there were clips that they were able to get from other sources. That were the the positives. So you can see sort of where the the fuzzy color versions are and you can see where they couldn't get footage at all. That makes it really clear where the cuts are some curious whether while you're watching this you had any consciousness any of you had any consciousness of all right? Well, Warner chose to cut this like maybe this wasn't necessary. Yeah. I mean to things like, I did, you know when I hit that part. I kind of tried imagine what the film would be like without it. I can you know, it seems like, you know, if you've got to cut something cut there, but but the other cuts I thought were actually really shocking there were to number two. I really love in in the film. I did not find out later that they were actually cut..

Warner Brothers Butch Cassidy Hollywood Warner Sundance Scott five years
"george cukor" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

The Next Picture Show

03:50 min | 1 year ago

"george cukor" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

"I mean. Yeah, you see something very similar in singing in the rain, which is also like a big bright technicolor musical with a much much less of a dark side, but sort of that vision of the bigness in grandiosity of Hollywood and at the same time just. The pettiness of it. You know, the how easy it is to become a star if the right person decides you should be. And if you're willing to completely give up on who you are give yourself over somebody how difficult it is to stay star. If you fall out of fashion, I never get tired of movies about moving making their so self indulgent in a way. But you know, it's it always kind of comes down to a right. What, you know look behind the scenes in a way, and whether they're sentimental and sappy about like, the business, we call show as Scott so often likes to say or like dark and accusatory. They're just it's so much fun to watch Hollywood send itself up or Pat itself on the back either way. Definitely I mean, this movie it's operating in so many different levels and reminded me of I have a fairly deeply held conviction that cinema itself peaked in the mid fifties. That it's been it's been a very fun ride from there on out. But like this when everything came together, and you can really see it for as ragged. As the stars born was as production as much as it sort of went through. You can just see so much value on the screen. I mean, just the cinemascope photography the technicolor. The opulence of the sets the musical numbers just the the so there's so many layers the foam is working on at once, and it all synthesizes so beautifully under a craftsman of George Cougars considerable, you know, talent and forms are amazing. I just think this movie has got it's the bee's knees. It's got everything everything you wanted movie, and I like being absolutely crushed by film. And I think I think that's that's kind of a value that we don't get much in Hollywood. Which kind of makes the new stars born kind refreshing that it that is willing to go the has to his remaking the film, but willing to go to that dark place that very dramatic and sad place because it's so rare now for Hollywood films to wanted tickets there, and and how let us have that kind of emotional experience and. Stars. Born is just such a full barreled version of that the seventy six version, apparently doesn't I was I didn't have time to watch all four versions or there's at least one Spanish remake. And I wouldn't be surprised if there were other, you know, not American remakes as well. Unfortunately, it just with all the festivals. I did not have time, but a red plot summaries of them mostly because I was really curious about that that end flop point. And it really sounds like in the Christoffersen Streisand version, his death is completely accidental. And I thought it was my my we don't have you seen it. No. I started to watch it. I actually started to watch it after I watched this one. But like, I didn't have you know, I didn't get past credits. But someday, although I hear understanding is it's supposed to be MB ambiguous. It's like clear introduce boy beauity than any other version, obviously, I haven't watched it. But just the descriptions like all of the descriptions, I've read seemed to put it as much more of at least potentially an accident than any of the other three American version. So I think that that's an interesting choice. And it was before I saw the latest version something I was a little curious, and maybe a little concerned about it's also it also stems directly back to what price Hollywood which you may hear me talking a little more about next week. But the suicide plot line is directly traceable to that. As are a lot of things about the story. But that in particular is very directly taken from the from, but directly related to what price Hollywood the cougar was reluctant to do it because of what personally would, but then ended up incorporating elements or had already been made as a star is more..

Hollywood George Cougars Christoffersen Streisand Scott Pat
"george cukor" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

The Next Picture Show

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"george cukor" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

"The big chance comes on grabbing a career can rest on a trifle. Sitting here tonight. Content on some of these saying to your better than. Better than you know. Gums little dream go into the big league. So guess what's your overall? Take on a star is born this is one of the big canonical films. I'd never seen before. Wondering if any of us had seen this one before that was one of my library films. But I'd never seen it like this VHS. I'd never seen it. How isn't it? Just like I was completely bowled over by this time. I'd absolutely absolutely. Well, me too me too. I was like why haven't I seen this film many times Florida achievement and just and I just left me like a puddle Agoo of the last thirty minutes of the film. Just kills me to think about this really unfortunate term of murders. May I walked, and and you think I'm going for swim really startlingly dark for a nineteen fifty four technicolor musical. That is not. I mean, it's not an were film like you would expect this kind of twist towards the end from morality Hiller crime pitcher. But this is this is a big technicolor musical while. It's not unusual in the sense. Like this. As a female. We be turned on its head. I mean, there's there are so many movies of this kind tales of females out south Akra Feis movies. Like, Stella Dallas, for example, plenty of melodramas that were popular about about women who make these terrible sacrifices that we see in our moved by. But perhaps the other characters don't understand what's being done for them. And we have this incredibly moving experiences a result. This is that except it is the man in this case who throws himself to the you know to the rocky icy cold water's. So, you know, this this is so so in that sense, I think audience would be braced for what this movie is also it's a Warner Brothers film. Not an GM film as much as the you know as much as the Andrea musicals are so much part of the DNA of this. But I think it's also combination on them as well as well. I mean, it's well that born the Trump thing is like, you know, this is this is the great great GM musical number that never was. But also you see in the film work. Arlen cutter describes like you know, how over the top. Yeah. The living room version of it might be the scene of the movie for me this movie for me is just like, all garland. The her performance is. I mean is the tour to force. It's a cliche. But I mean, it really really is. And that scene in particular of her running through this, you know, dreamed LA musical that she'd been in rehearsals for like even with the forays into like, casual racial stereotypes, you know, that it includes is just like absolutely magnificent to watch her just the both the singing the dancing, but also just the acting that she's doing moment in likely give and take between her and James Mason in that moment with him is just an audience, you know in. She is the only one performing songs in like, he he is not a musical actor at all. You know, it's all her like her stardom is entirely based in this movie musical, you know, realm that is so closely tied to Judy Garland and. James Mason is kind of sort of an afterthought in a lot of ways sina reminded me of in some ways, the whole movie reminded me of is is the Celente seen Mahal and drive where where she she tells like, here's this ridiculous musical, isn't it silly this business? And then it's like, wow, you just blew me away by by by this beautiful. Your, you know, while drivers everything you see is fake. And then you get this version of crying by ROY orbison that just moved to tears, and then reminds you that it's fake at the end to. I mean, the movie it's kind of like doing that as well where it's like it's so much about how you know Hollywood is manufactured, but at the same time, and you know, this is a product of that as well. And yet it's also incredibly moving to that paradox. That part of what why we keep going back to movies in the first place in a way. It's just so much about how famous manufactured, which is kind of a like a cynical..

James Mason Stella Dallas Mahal ROY orbison GM Judy Garland Arlen cutter Akra Feis Hiller Florida Hollywood Andrea LA sina Celente thirty minutes
"george cukor" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

The Next Picture Show

02:40 min | 1 year ago

"george cukor" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

"What today sounds like anxiety, depression and repeatedly taking time off which held up production left and kuker apparently clashed over the. Born in a trunk segment, which cooker and Mason both felt slowed down the film, while Lofton garland felt it was a necessary showcased underline her stardom. There are fights with the studio as well. And after kuker completed the pitcher and Warner Brothers released it to theaters the studio with through the film and cut another half hour from the story. It's been a hugely positive response to test screenings of the initial version. And here's a further irony. When the studio cuts is the backlash led to audiences voiding the film which heard it both at the box office and eventually at the Academy Awards. So this is a lot of art imitates life imitates art for just one film, given that the nineteen fifty four stars born is so fundamentally about the business of movie making about a change in Hollywood that was less willing to pander to protect it stars from their own public gaffes and about how addiction and ego gets in the way of talent. Certainly it's unlikely that anyone involved in the production was looking to reflect any aspect of Garland's life or of the studio actually making the pitcher. But like so many famous movies about movie making stars born ends up feeling. A bit like a portrait of its era. It has the usual trappings of a film about Hollywood the shots on the back. Lot Cowboys and Roman soldiers wander around and mix with each other the potshots at the shortsightedness of studio exects and the demands of spoilt actors the underlying fear that commerce gets in the way of art and that movie making his kind of rolling compromise. But at the same time in spite of its dark elements and the central tragedy a lot of stars born is still about the fantasy of recognition of being pulled out of a crowd and making him Hollywood about the exciting aspects of fame and of being recognized as someone who's voice, really matters. The film doesn't shy away from the ridiculous aspects of filmmaking where the difficult aspects are the way ego and hunger and stars inability to see themselves clearly can destroy their lives. But it also gives into some of the glitzy hopes of Hollywood the idea that we're all stars waiting to be discovered by someone in the right place at the right time and ready to step right past them and up onto the stage and into the spotlight. During the grow. Tonight was I last night we need to San Francisco in the morning. Don't go. Chris Brown's down here. Are going to hear the studio house. It's just a John's, but take it. Do you realize I'd be giving up everything ever worked rugs? But this problems doesn't has to. Career is curious thing talent isn't enough. You need a sense of timing. An I seeing the tanning plant recognizing.

Hollywood Lofton garland kuker Warner Brothers Academy Awards Mason Chris Brown San Francisco John