17 Burst results for "George Clayton Johnson"

"george clayton johnson" Discussed on The Twilight Zone Podcast

The Twilight Zone Podcast

15:03 min | 2 months ago

"george clayton johnson" Discussed on The Twilight Zone Podcast

"Cancer. And the people i know in their sixties in older are extremely vital in extremely isn't like a dividing walls all of sudden. You're you know obsolete and you just can't sit there staring off into space and So the cast is astonishing. It's michael barney's warranty is the new black and book ronald cartwright's in alien and birds and invasion body snatchers. Bob cardo is in it. Barbara bain again. gosh marta. Kristen from the original lost in space Eastern phillips star trek voyager. I mean of end James pong from blade runner although china's so i mean it's just gonna be superfund we've done to end gates mcfadden from star trek next generation. So we've So the script is written. We've done table reads via zoom and will be very shortly as well. I remember speaking to way back. When and you you produce the dvd's and blue raise for the twilight zone you've done a ton of commentaries on and off for all of them even then you are planning on doing what we're going to be talking about tonight like i said you've got so much on the pandemic give you the chance to kinda. Does that often say okay. Now's the time to do all the reason for it. Well first of all did fifty two commentaries on the blu ray with all the people who worked on those shows so they got commentary with george commentaries with george clayton johnson. Neural hamlin's richard donner before we lost them in their gone on the record is phenomenal. And that's still left over a hundred. But i hadn't yet done and so i always had an serving the back of my mind. Do them at some point. Because literally i have all this i get one hundred people worked on the show. I've got this encyclopedia of twilight zone in my head and some book. Some of violence companion. In fact i just a new addition that hundred more pages because there was so much more to tell But i thought before. I'm you know a memory a To share all of those stories and all of those things. These people told me plus there. Many many people who are the great creators of science fiction shows now and other shows that are huge sterling fans and they were inspired by surly to create the disney golden age of television people like Vince gilligan. on you better call saul breaking bad and david chase on the sopranos one more of the bs. G galactica and from mankind. And on and on. I mean brandon bragging. You name it. And so so. I'll be so my idea and also but also there's this thing called money and you can use it. You can buy stuff with which is very helpful and support so my idea was. My wife is a number of strips that we wanna get made am. I thought well i could. I could do the rest of the commentaries and raised like maybe one hundred thousand or more For work which. I very much like do since she writes. Wrexham produces with me and she's been doing space command with me. That seems only fair to return the favor in in sweat equity in cash and so I came up with us ideas so you now have a site called spy lights own. Commentaries dot com. Where people can put in their contact info and then watch kickstarter campaign and they be informed when that is up and the idea will be that. Every week i'll be doing a live commentary on two episodes of the twilight zone free year. I'm going to the that year The people by putting like forty nine bucks. They'll get all hundred plus audio commentaries. They can just watch episodes in this to the full commentary. And that and this other perks were through a little more money than like an archive of my entire file of the twilight zone. Companion everything in my file cabinets. When i did the twilight zone comply get us or another another perky as they they can ask questions and i'll answer them in the commentary on their specific episode or they can have an episode dedicated to them or and this is a higher ticket item. They can act commentary with me. You zoom and again you know. It's just kind of something. I'll do like once a week for year and that'll cover the hundred hundred and four episodes and and it'll be great fun because you know again. There's so much discover still in. There's so much to do. I mean the fact that i'm not working with. Ron cartwright on sweet haven she started. I sing the body electric. Which is the only episode of twilight zone by ray bradbury and There were two other strips that wrote the show but to sit down with her. And just say okay. Let's talk about this episode. You know because it's it has a very very stormy production history where they test one actress to play the robot grandmother and it didn't work and then months later they hired another director and came back and shot leaving actress so they there will be. She's on that some months later. And so it'd be very interesting to sit down and talk with rhonda about that and that was the with fans so You know and then of course. I have my might mr sci-fi youtube channel where you know. I'm closed all the time and people can watch space command. They can listen to my opinions about any number of things and and it's just it's just super fun. Yes that's going to be quite an interesting journey because it's all five seasons the twilight zone. It includes things like the pilot. I never did a comedy on. Where is everybody on and on. I mean some of the great episodes and so be be super fun. I'm kind of fascinated by your archive. Because imagine you. You probably had to put some stuff out of the companion or otherwise it would have been like so yeah hundred hours of audio interviews with the people that i mean. Everyone from burgess meredith to and francis to all the producers of twilight zone Interviews with richard matheson and george clayton johnson and earl hamster. I mean it just goes on. And on william windham name it. I mean george clements. The the dp i mean. Yeah there's i'd say ninety percent of the stuff that i got from the interviews in for my researchers aren't in the book from rod sterling has subscribed to clipping file From around nineteen fifties theban nineteen fifty six fifty seven until his death so every article was ever written about him was in these big leather scraps in chronological order was like the encyclopedia rod sterling and up in his attic in his house in pacific. Palisades and you know i would. I would take these volumes home and make notes and so all you know. So my notes turned in the files. And i will transcribe the interviews and type up this tons of stuff and photographs. I over two hundred photographs from the twilight zone with. Maybe three hundred will not publish so You know you name it. I mean it's it's very fun and Again i was twenty one or twenty two when i started working on the book and and so everyone is still around. With the exception of rod sterling who died two years earlier and charles beaumont you know it premature much everyone else was still alive so it was phenomenal and You know and again. It's it's it's funny because it's really an oral history of the twilight zone and because one thing to have an academic have opinions but in a way that's almost in my opinion worthless because some deicing well you know if you look at twilight zone admits metaphorically to bad mouth academics. Heaven forbid but but there's something about say. Yeah i was on the set. And you're shooting death alley big thing in chocolate milk. I pass game. Refrain it's like it's like that's a very different kind of story. Then someone's opinion you know it's it's recollection isauro on I love talking on those people. It was it was terrific. It's interesting that you you mentioned. You know you're in your early twenties when you wrote this one of the things about the twilight zone. Is you know i. I've reviewed episodes on this. Podcast may be eight years ago or something. And as i get older i will revisit those episodes and i think you know what i've grown into that episode. Now i think completely different about it. I mean you ever been flicking through the twilight zone companion and think you know what. Maybe i was hard on that episode. But i actually. I'm an older man now and i. I've got a new perspective on has happened. Yes it has. A for instance bigwigs who which and pool Wish i had problems with because you may data from skill mockingbird starred in and they had to loop voice in about of june for ray doing sort of her voice. it's it's really odd doesn't really work but But someone wrote me a letter. When i came out saying that i didn't like the episode and they said when i was a kid appearance divorcing and there was no one getting a divorce on television all happy families and i saw that twilight zone episode about these kids whose parents divorcing and and i knew i wasn't alone and and validated how he was feeling and i said well. That's that's really that's really valid. I mean i can't. I can't of be negative about that. So when i wrote the new entry in the new twilight zone companion. I included that and i said no i see how that has value and Sh you know so. Yes sometimes my end. Sometimes my opinion changes. I mean one thing that really does stand out with twilight zone. It's just the astonishing artistry of it. I mean the us cinematography. The grates or is by jerry. Goldsmith and france. Waxman bernard room in on you know and and it just keeps going. I mean just in every category in that chain from surly because the writing was such high quality than everyone else in go. I don't wanna be loved the week. Lincoln this chain so So it's it's really something and Yes so it's But but like so yes. Sometimes i will change my opinion and even the bad episodes are. There's this stuff of value in them. I mean even some that like we're rod talks about Advertisements he was so tired in writing so much he felt like it was too rod sterling talking to each other getting seen because he had such a distinctive way of talking. And that's a very demonstrative that is the fear with hazel court in mark richmond. Where it's like. Yeah it sounds like two hundred to two servings talking each other but but even a lot of fun. It's a lotta fun in so yeah so but i and again you know one. That's things about one of the ideas. I have my the twilight zone companion. Was i'll have the information about egypt's so that will be unbiased. That won't have an opinion for or against. And then i'll have my opinion. But i be the information and so so in other words i have never ever minded someone having a different opinion because if someone says to me well you know my favorite episodes shelley berman. Okay about that. Or the one with carol burnett which she is the only one with a laugh track and then they took the laugh track at out the iran. It's like you're just a saline and then they wait for no particular reason they say the next line because they were timing for laugh track. So it's a it's a strange episode with or without the laugh track but have you ever been tempted to kinds of. I mean you ought to. Because i've got your new twilight zone companion the updated one in. It's great that extra material but have you ever looked one and saw you know why i'm so such a different man now. Such different person that. I like to completely rewrite my opinion on Let me think to the challenges that there's so many great twilight zone episodes that i i watch them. What was really astonishing to me was For many years after. I wrote the twilight zone companion. I didn't watch by light zone. 'cause i'd spent five years working on the book. And then they were going to do a documentary on rod sterling american masters and pbs. Contacted me and they said well. We're going to in black white and one interview you on film and i was very nervous about. His flattened talked about violence on really even thought about it much for like a decade or two so brought the book with me just in case i needed to consult it and they interviewed on camera for two and a half hours and i never once opened the book because it was hard. That's what i knew was into my head so so yeah yeah. I mean maybe the encounter is one. I've changed my opinion about that. One i i was down on and now i will like it. I think george novel branch terrific You know there's there might be a few but again. I you know i think pilots batting average just in terms of great episodes is so high. You know it's like when you look at you know when you think about okay. Rod strumming spends week and he does the the lonely and in the next week. It's walking distance and then the next week so it's stop. Whenever the next week it's time enough at last night all each how these are all great is classier and even with the our ones which were very problematical. You've got an amazing episode on thursday. Believe for home. I don't know any other piece of writing. The deals with someone who's a hero in can't let go of power and stress himself is writing and james whitmore spectacular or desktop lately. Great mathis nap so I just. I just got the space from that episode. So she's hanging hanging over there l. about fourteen spaces or so because because we being space. Command sewn backgrounds Buying in space. The one behind me is from outland by the way. So it's so it's safe to say then that if people listen to these commentaries of probably going to hear things that they've never had before a absolutely hundred percent yes and because because again there's so much bow these episodes that aren't isn't in book. I mean you know it's it's just it's just one of the reasons. I do the updated while his companions because asked rice finished writing the book and it came out. People kept telling me amazing. Stories like for instance. Douglas gays who became a very dear friend of mine he had been director on. Many of the great episodes told me that i am the beholder. He realized that they were gonna run. Short and rod was out of town and unreachable. This is before the internet of course and so doug road seen inroads style and shot it and ever see the so seen whether in the in the break room the doctor and the nurse smoking a cigarette and he says i've looked under those bandages. It's a human face that was written by doug hayes not rod sterling and then released put it together and screened in for rod. Doug was you know in the back of the screening room sweating bullets. He had to write a scene of installing style and then at the at the end of it when they when finished.

rod sterling george clayton johnson michael barney ronald cartwright Bob cardo Barbara bain gosh marta James pong gates mcfadden Neural hamlin Vince gilligan Ron cartwright twilight zone Interviews earl hamster william windham george clements richard donner david chase charles beaumont Wrexham
"george clayton johnson" Discussed on The Twilight Zone Podcast

The Twilight Zone Podcast

07:32 min | 2 months ago

"george clayton johnson" Discussed on The Twilight Zone Podcast

"Editor full-time a you know like a film editor. We have someone running up physical production of our studio over physical studio et cetera. So i was able to keep all of our people on salary and I've raised over. I've raised over two and a half million dollars from space command. Since i've started being spacecom entirely my fans via kickstarter campaigns and seven investment shares of seventy five hundred bucks each and so so but the interesting thing was i realized that because everyone will stuck a moment going crazy gnarly because so many of my actors are so well known and so busy of. They're not available. It's very difficult to give them all together at one time but they were all sitting at home. You know just climbing walls because all the studios everything at shut down so i had. I came up with idea where elaine wrote a bonus to our episode space command that are actors pitching in their own homes with their own cameras so they could save but We shot the first three hours in space. Command recorded an audio prequel. But i but i had already worked out most of the for season. And i knew where all all this was going. And they're a bunch of characters. I hadn't yet introduced i. We would be so armee. Shimin christina moses in so many. Jj hurts so many actors that which is waiting and wings and now they were home so by by doing this. Two hour episode allowed me to introduce a lot of people like barbara bain. Space nineteen ninety nine is in spacemen. Now emeals grass tyson. It's an of riches. So why are episode and Our entire visual effects bag of tricks. For instance wait a scene between one of our characters who's based in atlanta. An actress meghan a castle access to play his daughter and she was in scotch one and we managed to put them together in the same living room. Even though they both starred in their own homes and were never actually politically together and so a very very fun and And then in the meantime i finished a new book called lighting yourself which is basically how people don't have to rely on the studios or the networks even the publishing houses to make their dreams come true how the internet and having video cameras in our pockets and all of that allows everyone to sort of as i say light yourself so i just finished that book and sent it off my publisher and yeah we. We didn't slowdown during the pendency. Ramped up and we're busier than ever. It's elaine. And i just celebrated our forty fourth anniversary and we write direct produce together. And it's it's a dream come true. So i'm i have no complaints and our people are all very very well healthy. Sadly mira furlan. Who was one of our test in space men who i worked with on babylon five passed away from west nile virus all things not covert and that was really a great loss and she was amazing actress in your soul. And i'm glad that we got to have her in space command as much as we did because she was kim come true. I watched some of that before online. Some of that two hour special and that there are some names in and michelle nichols was in there. Yes yes i mean. It's insane the cast. You've assembled in pristina. Moses who's on a million little things on abc currently and she plays sues daughter in the star trek episode. i did with decay. And that was her first tv role ever and she's just phenomenal and she'll be continuing in space man and also in in magic time another one of my projects and So yeah yeah. And but the now we're ramping up to do the show runners network where i'm creating six series with the creators of Farscape and the expanse and defiance and on and on. And i'm ansa doing six shows including a rod sterling series really. It's an amazing time. Yeah yes we can we can talk about. All of these. Various things is that. Is that news out there. Mark of of i got a bit of an exclusive. Can we talk about that. Why negotiations with the states. What's not lockdown. But ninety i came up with a wild. Oh which was. It's called rod sterling sampler twilight and Basically rod as you. I'm sure you know dictated all of his. Everything's script sledders folks. Everything he lounge by his swimming pool in the backyard in the morning and he'd have a little recorder any would dictate everything into the recorder. Secretary would type it up. And he'd make him directions and it was up at all of these according were lost for decades and they just discovered a thousand hours of them. In a couple of archives podge archives and so my idea was to create a new show that would be narrated by rod sterling from that material plus is a number scripts that either never got made with throwing road or or written during the live. Tv era the no one has seen since then and this would be primarily fantasy science fiction horror at plus media scripts from the others violates on writers that were not made and scripts by a new generation of writers. You know people. Like neil gaiman jemison again. We haven't we haven't earned that. But that's my idea and joe dougherty who was executive producer. I'm pretty little liars and won an emmy for thirty. something is aboard on that project with me. So he's an old friend and so i've been in communication with the ruling stayed and with their representatives. And we'll see if we can make that happen but it's definitely project i want to do and So we'll see but that's right now. It's on the list. The thing is you know this. The jordan peele twilight zone came out. And i and i really enjoyed it. But it was quite divisive with fans i think. Sometimes people find it hard to accept a new twilight zone. Dante without rod serling is also difficult because rod. Sterling really was irreplaceable. There's only one of him. And and then the writing staff he got he got three of ray. Bradbury's proteges sign. Henry were friends and ray recommended charles. Beaumont richard matheson and george clayton. Johnson also came aboard to and they became the core of that amazing writing team. That created twilights. Earl ham also came aboard. He played on the waltons falcon crest but he was a very different kind of writer. He was much more rural and was matheson. Beaumont george clayton johnson which is tackler a science fiction fantasy writers and And so they just. I mean it was just a match made in heaven and so you know. I won't script for the twilight zone. Will they brought it back in the eighties. That was an amazing writing. Staff was harlan ellison allen george martin michael tacit and so forth astray strong writing staff but very hidden this you know and the scripted i wrote. We will week away from web. Doug hayes was directed. He direct is beholden howling man many great episodes and and sensors pull the plug on it because they felt it was too hard. Edged is called nine avail. So that's one of the strips. We're going to be shooting on if rod sterling after twilight Another ost by lights on script. That i'm i'm very proud of tv sack off. Wanted to do it a few years ago and so we'll see what we what we do with it. But it'll be fun. It'll be very fun. It sounds amazing. Because i think it will probably be a lot more palatable for those people who just can't accept a modern twilight zone. This is kind of somewhere in between isn't it. You know it's it's still got.

Shimin christina barbara bain rod sterling elaine mira furlan michelle nichols meghan pristina neil gaiman jemison joe dougherty atlanta Moses kim abc Beaumont richard matheson george clayton Earl ham Beaumont george clayton johnso swimming
"george clayton johnson" Discussed on On Mic Podcast

On Mic Podcast

04:00 min | 9 months ago

"george clayton johnson" Discussed on On Mic Podcast

"Today's guest is terrific. His name is richard lert sman and he along with lon davis has written deconstructing the ratpac joey the mob and the summit the rat pack in this case with a capital t. featuring the chairman of the board frank sinatra dean martin. Sammy davis junior. Peter lawford and of course. Joey bishop among others. His book is tell all that brings the inside scoop of just how the mob a future president and five extraordinary performers took the world and las vegas by storm so without any further ado. Let's invite richard alerts men to join us on mike. I'll begin with this. I just saw ocean's eleven for the first time in about fifty years and it was so much fun and it was perfect. Timing because here's your book and is so much here that revolves around this group of individuals. Welcome it's nice to meet you richard george. So it's the sixtieth anniversary of the rat. Pack celebration Is there an actual start date to this particular group of rat packers or what. Yes the start. Date was february of nineteen sixty and never lose based fred's professional friends And they had no each other The the work together and it came together in nineteen fifty-nine ranko nine percent of the sands hotel and he had watched this great. We prima and keely smith. Sam butare at the sahara's lau jack and he loved that looseness that craziness oh prima and when the Owners and the The publicist l. Freeman came to franken said they wanted to create a mega event. He thought of Of the martha hit just worked with some come running and a film and he thought of Of sammy davis junior. Who was just recovering from losing in tramp in a car accident. Frank was kind of pushing them back. Get back on. Stage get his balance and he thought it was great. Enjoy bishop happens to be frank opening act for about eight nine years so he not putting them together no earlier in homely hill he was part of a group with david niven and humphrey bogart alarm a call and mickey rooney and Learn call costs. You look like a pack of rats wrap so when these guys get together. The press started calling them back and in february nineteen sixty got together. Interesting yeah i heard about the the bogey ratpac from a lot of reading on humphrey bogart and all that. And that's kind of cool and lauren. Bacall was a young beautiful lady and she had to. She somehow stuck it out with those guys and was able to put up with and drink with him. I think i mentioned the movie. And was that a planned coming out party for the rat. Pack or whatever. Where did the movie fit in. Ocean's eleven eight. It was all very pleased when they started putting together the summit they called it in las vegas in february nineteenth century Peter lawford had been shopping around the script that he that he got from a gas station attendant. Who ended up his name. Was george clayton johnson. When did up later right. In all a lot of twilight zones logan's were on but at that time he based He in the army he was the black market group out of the army in germany and he thought of the idea bringing the guys when they came back to to the us ever union and to have a heist in las vegas. So that was a script. Frank saw the script from peter. Peter lawford and he says this is so good. You know why should fill much is do this it. So frank took jack warner jack warner loved it. So frank's idea was why. Not shoot this in las vegas where yo- nine percent of the.

lon davis george clayton johnson richard david niven february nineteenth century germany Frank humphrey bogart Sammy davis Peter lawford richard george Joey frank february nineteen sixty february of nineteen sixty l. Freeman Bacall jack warner nine percent peter
"george clayton johnson" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

10:14 min | 1 year ago

"george clayton johnson" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"And welcome back to coast to coast George nori with you mark Sikri back with us as we're talking about Hollywood dead television shows movies Twilight Zone you name it we got it Hey what did you think of Scorsese's the Irishman that played on Netflix I loved it because I knew Jimmy Hoffa mark it was long the thing was like two and a half hours longer three hours or something like that it was way too long but what did you think of Netflix's decision to bring that in and do it as a as a movie on there and on their network yeah well I actually saw on the big screen George because they screened in movie theaters here in LA but the main strategy as you said was to have it on on the network network channel I thought it was a really fun movie I've I really enjoyed it and I think he had the technology was amazing of the angel you know that the three lead actors you know so that they could be enough that's really phenomenal and and you know more and more they're able to use the mobile you know visual effects to allow actors to extend their careers and and and if if if they are able to deliver the performance is why not I think it's great I really enjoyed some well you know it's just amazing about all that too is the diversity of channels now that are available in our early days mark even before you you know we had ABC CBS NBC once in a while there's an independent TV station so we have three to four stations that people could really watch now it's everywhere I mean there are hundreds of stations yes it's why a hundred people even find the programming on some of these channels well you know that's that's the truth of it and and the funny thing is you know now on YouTube I have my own channel Mr five five and I can post all shows that I wrote all sorts of stuff and you know so it's it's it's amazing strength and also something you didn't mention was that when we were growing up you have to watch a TV show when it aired you couldn't they're they're one of those you know you see articles like that you it was like you watched it when it aired and and your memory was the way he played the back you know that was basically how it works I I remember that that the experience of the child is sitting up and watching movies you know like it's when the morning and that's what women maybe analysts used car commercials and you would just it was it was just excruciating but that so no I I I prefer the way things work now and what's amazing about streaming is that you can take that YouTube channel you have mark in you know a couple years ago you watch it on your smartphone or your desktop computer and that was that now with right and everything else you can literally watch YouTube on your big flat screen in your living room but that's the really fun thing I mean millions of people have seen the content of posts on this two five five and in fact in fact it was the starting my own YouTube channel on on science fiction was suggested to me by Clemens era who was the show runner on the walking dead so so many of us are now seeing the enormous possibilities the internet allows and that and it's great fun because what you what what the difference is also is that when when I started television you'll basically be riding with the mind of a screen anywhere from eight to twelve inches can maybe twenty who answers a twenty seven inches now when you write something you have to be mindful of composing it visually so that it can be watched on a on the iPhone or on you know seventy inch TV and so if you have to be very aware that there's very big differences in perception of the image and so that's that's just it's just fascinating how it's changed and but the speed of that I mean the fact that I'm able to do this this new space command up some during the pandemic and my actors attending the conference from all around the world then again if you live in amazing times well we really are worth March agree we're going to take calls with mark next hour here on coast to coast how did you get interested in sci fi wow you know I was reading science fiction from the soon as I can read I think you know it's interesting looking Twilight Zone companion one of the things that impressed me about those writers was what turned them toward writing science fiction and fantasy and I found that many of them George Clayton Johnson and Charles Palmer there was a traumatic incident in their child's either an illness or an injury or something and for me my parents were divorced when I was three and I think there was a need for a skate and and space with his serve as far as you can go and that was very appealing to me and then when Star Trek came on the islands and it was such a family they were always there for each other in the enterprise seem like such a welcoming home it was just very beguiling Jimmy and and that's just a difference it's never simple I love John and I I also grew up during during the the the the race for the moon and we ality and science fiction very much work when dissecting tomorrow afternoon god willing to more astronauts some going to be launched you are on the line musk's space falcon and I'm looking forward to that yeah well the funny thing is that when I was a kid as we all the science fiction by people like Robert hi minorities you Clark and they were always having someone finance a trip to the moon because some crazy millionaire would like to thank all of them would be a stainless steel you know rocket ship and attacks which you can think of a billionaire making a stainless steel rocket ship to go to the moon and Mars I mean it's it's every science fiction fans dream come true it's exciting isn't isn't it this will feel lacking it should it because you know mankind you're going on the space we've we've managed to not have warned space we've managed to work collaboratively together you know as soon I think it's the best of humanity I think with the landing on the moon wasn't just a great moment for America was a great moment for humanity and I think I welcome that the the colonization of Mars I think it's gonna be great well that international space station seems to be the one area that has anything to do with planet earth where people from other countries tend to get along yeah yes and also you know when you look look down at earth from space you see but if we have this one home and we share it and we really have to find ways to get along and and it's crazy that we that we destroy each other and and and also destructive you know when when there's so much good in the world and no and yeah I think I think having a loving heart is very very important you're gonna love this story dean Koontz the author who's been on our program a couple times wrote a book back in nineteen eighty two call the eyes of darkness nineteen eighty two in that book he talks about a virus called the Wuhan four hundred now what are the odds of doing that so we can we talk to dean you don't want to come on here to talk about it but he didn't think it was a big deal that he came up with that but why not did forty years ago practically yeah yes and I and I was just reading and we mean World War Z. the novel and he has the zombie plague come out of China so again you know it's it's interesting if need be so things like World War Z. like movie contagion Avenue residence when you watch them when you're under lock down so you know exactly where where you're living a reality that none of us that have experience in science fiction so hopefully will be Concord soon and we can all go back to something resembling a normal life mark what is it about some of these writers who just seem to have the ability to look into the future whether it was dean Koontz or anybody else and in the end they see this how does this happen yeah well you know I think it's because for instance rose think about the impact of technology on on people and they're always extrapolating they're always looking forward it's funny I'm mystified fire just the baby I read the first story I ever sold instrument when it's eighteen in that story the wanted to take over the world and if you give me a call because the world and become Disney world literally and and the story is every bit as relevant now as when I wrote it back when I was eighteen and so so it's it's fun to be able to show that but I I think you just kind of think about it you're you're thinking about if this goes on if this gets worse you're always looking at where we come from and where we've gone I'm I'm constantly being history in fact I'm getting H. G. wells outline closely right now that you wrote yeah I'm not exactly it's about exactly you yeah and yet and yet his observations of fascinating and of course he wrote the time machine and the island of Dr Moreau in the middle man and more of the world he was one of the great visionaries of all time I stumble across Walt Disney on YouTube where he was talking about his animation of lady and the tramp and he was talking about Peggy levy the singer who sang the Siamese song you remember that song of course of course with the two cats for singing while she apparently did both voices and they were experimenting with tape recorders way back then I mean not now they'd be doing all kinds of things but does so she did both of the cats voices you know we are Siamese and but it was just it was just amazing how even Walt Disney started and look how big that company is today it's huge yes it's a very very and then unit one because it was an amazing engineer too I mean I grew up in in LA and I would go to Disneyland the chairman tomorrow when the rocket to the moon and the the journey in the inner space and all these amazing rides which is phenomenal and the brother told me about the time that she met Walt Disney in the luncheon walls office and that and and they both agree that both being geniuses they should ever work together because they were just had but that the in the lunch Walt Disney said we've got a great J. thing I can do for you and and ray says open your vault as we call down to the vault he said let him take whatever you want and they left with an arm full of cells animation cells and all the great Disney films and bags that was one of the greatest things with his life my mother who just turned ninety one yesterday Barker sister who's still with us her sister in law was a made to Walt Disney wow talk about a small world there and I was like nine or ten I didn't even know who Walt Disney was really I am but the small world huh well well this is why it why I love talking to older people and in.

George nori Scorsese mark Sikri Hollywood Jimmy Hoffa
"george clayton johnson" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

10:34 min | 1 year ago

"george clayton johnson" Discussed on KGO 810

"Will you now back to coast to coast AM I'd KGO eight ten welcome back to coast to coast George nori with you mark Sikri back with us as we're talking about Hollywood dead television shows movies Twilight Zone you name it we got it Hey what did you think of Scorsese's the Irishman that played on Netflix I loved it because I knew Jimmy Hoffa mark it was long the thing was like two and a half hours longer three hours or something like that it was way too long but what did you think of Netflix's decision to bring that in and do it as a as a movie on there and on their network yeah well I actually saw on the big screen George because they screen in movie theaters here in LA but but in the main strategy as you said was to have it on on the network network channel I thought it was a really fun movie I've I really enjoyed it and I think the at the technology was amazing of the angel you know that the three lead actors you know so that they could be in that that's really phenomenal and and you know more and more they're able to use the mobile you know visual fax to allow actors to extend their careers and and and if if if they are able to deliver the performance is why not I think it's great I really enjoyed some well you know it's just amazing about all that too is the diversity of channels now that are available in our early days mark even before you you know we had ABC CBS NBC once in a while there's an independent TV station so we have three to four stations that people could really watch now it's everywhere I mean there are hundreds of stations yes it's why a hundred people even find the programming on some of these channels well you know that's the that's the truth of it and and the funny thing is you know now on YouTube I have my own channel Mr sci fi and I can post all shows that I wrote all sorts of stuff and you know so it's it's it's amazing strength and also something you didn't mention was that when we were growing up you have to watch a TV show when it aired you could there there was this video VCRs and things like that you it was like you watched it when it aired and and your memory was the way he played the back you know that was basically how it works I I remember that that the experience of the child is sitting up and watching movies you know like at two in the morning and that's when the navy analysts used car commercials and you would just it was it was just excruciating but that so no I I I prefer the way things work now and once someone mazing about streaming is that you can take that YouTube channel you have mark in you know a couple years ago you watch it on your smartphone or your desktop computer and that was that now with right and everything else you can literally watch YouTube on your big flat screen in your living room well that that's the really fun thing I mean millions of people have seen the content of posts on this to satisfy and in fact in fact it was starting my own YouTube channel on on science fiction was suggested to me by Glen mills era who was the sole runner on the walking dead so so many of us are now seeing the enormous possibilities the internet allows and that and it's great fun because what you want what the difference is also is that when when I started television you'll basically be riding with the mind of the screen anywhere from eight to twelve inches can maybe twenty who enters a twenty seven inches now when you write something you have to be mindful of composing it visually so that it can be watched on a on the iPhone or on you know seventy inch TV and so if you have to be very aware that there's very big differences in perception of the image and so that's that's just it's a fascinating how it's changed and but the speed of that I mean the fact that I'm able to do this this new space command up some during the pandemic and my actors attending the conference from all around the world we began its we live in amazing times well we really are worth March agree we're going to take calls with mark next hour here on coast to coast how did you get interested in sci fi wow you know I was reading science fiction from the soon as I can read I think you know it's interesting looking Twilight Zone companion one of the things that interested me about those riders was what turned them toward writing science fiction and fantasy and I found that many of them George Clayton Johnson and Charles Palmer there was a traumatic incident in their child's either an illness or an injury or something and for me my parents were divorced when I was three and I think there was a need for skate and and space was a service far as you can go and that was very appealing to me and then when Star Trek came on the island's tents it was such a family they were always there for each other and then if I seem like such a welcoming home it was just very beguiling to me and and that's just a difference it's never since I just I love John and I I also grew up during during the the the the race for the moon and we ality and science fiction very much work when dissecting tomorrow afternoon god willing to more astronauts of going to be launched you are on the lawn musk space falcon and I'm looking forward to that yeah well the funny thing is that when I was a kid as we all the science fiction by people like a lot of time line not the C. Clark and they were always having someone finance a trip to the moon because some crazy millionaire would like they call it in and be a stainless steel you know rocket ship and the house that's actually you can think of a billionaire making a stainless steel rocket ship to go to the moon and Mars I mean it's it's every science fiction fan's dream come true it's exciting isn't isn't it this will feel lacking instead it because you know mankind you're going on the space we've we've managed to not have warned space we've managed to work collaboratively together you know actually I think it's the best of humanity I think with the landing on the moon wasn't just a great moment for America was a great moment for humanity and I think that I welcome that the the colonization of Mars I think it's gonna be great well that international space station seems to be the one area that has anything to do with planet earth where people from other countries tend to get along yeah yes I also you know when you look look down at earth from space you see if we have this one home and we share it and we really have to find ways that long and and it's crazy that we that we discourage other and and and are so destructive you know when when there's so much good in the world yeah I think I think having a loving heart is very very important you're gonna love this story dean Koontz the author who's been on our program a couple times wrote a book back in nineteen eighty two call the eyes of darkness nineteen eighty two in that book he talks about a virus called the Wuhan four hundred now what are the odds of doing that so we too we talked to dean you don't want to come on here to talk about it but he didn't think it was a big deal that he came up with that but why did forty years ago practically yes yes and I and I was just reading and we mean World War Z. the novel and he has the zombie plague come out of China so again you know it's it's interesting if need be so things like World War Z. and like the movie contagion Avenue residence when you watch them when you're under lock down so you know it's definitely where where you're living a reality that none of us have experienced except in science fiction so hopefully will be Concord soon and we can all go back to something resembling a normal life mark what is it about some of these writers who just seem to have the ability to look into the future whether it was dean Koontz or anybody else and in the end they see this how does this happen yeah well you know I think it's because for instance rose think about the impact of technology on on people and they're always extrapolating they're always looking forward it's one on the south side just maybe I read the first story I ever sold instrument when it's eighteen and in that story Walt Disney takes over the world hence okay just give me a call because the world and becomes Disney world literally and and the story is every bit as relevant now as when I wrote it back when I was eighteen and so so it's it's fun to be able to show that but I I think you just kind of think about it always you're you're thinking about if this goes on if this gets worse you're always looking at where we come from and where we've gone I'm I'm constantly being history about that meeting H. G. wells outline Christy right now that you wrote yeah I'm not exactly it's about exactly you yeah and yet and yet his observations of fascinating and of course he wrote the time machine and the island of Dr Moreau in the middle man and more the world she was one of the great visionaries of all time I stumble across Walt Disney on YouTube where he was talking about his animation of lady and the tramp and he was talking about Peggy levy the singer who sang the Siamese song you remember that song of course of course with the two cats were singing while she apparently did both voices and they were experimenting with tape recorders way back then I mean not now they'd be doing all kinds of things but does so she did both of the cats voices you know we are Siamese and but it was just it was just amazing how even Walt Disney started and look how big that company is today it's huge yes it's amazing entertainment unit while Sydney was amazing just natural I mean I grew up in in LA and I would go to Disneyland as the chairman tomorrow at the rocket to the moon and the the journey and in this case all these amazing rides we just a nominal and regretted for me about the time that she met Walt Disney in the luncheon walls office and that and and they both agree that boasting geniuses they should ever work together because they would just have like that the in the lunch Walt Disney said Lee Bradbury J. thing I can do for you and and ray says open your vault as a call down to the vault he said let them take whatever he wants and they left with an armful of cells animation cells all the great Disney films and bags that was one of the greatest things in his life my mother who just turned ninety one yesterday marker sister who's still with us her sister in law was a made to Walt Disney wow talk about a small world there and I was like nine or ten I didn't even know who Walt Disney was really but that small world huh well well this is why it why I love talking to older people and in a you know many of my friends many of my mentors are you saying I'm older mark not you just.

George nori Scorsese mark Sikri Hollywood Jimmy Hoffa
"george clayton johnson" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

08:24 min | 1 year ago

"george clayton johnson" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

"Thank you. Yeah and it was very funny leading for Star Trek because it's such an enormous huge universe now with all the stories they've done all of the series and to come up with two stories totally or never done before on a great honor and a great challenge and And funny because the inspiration for a hobby on stars working the booth fifty nine fiction writer on my first my first paid mentor which Theodore Sturgeon and I got no ten very well written of course to Great Star Trek. The original series. I'm a crime. And surely and he also written for Galaxy magazine in the magazines. Fantasy science fiction back fifty. And so that's why I got the germ of that idea to write about those guys who who wrote science fiction back there then for the love of it and you wouldn't have star wars and Star Trek. Those wonderful writers like head and our regret Brie and many of those wonderful writers and then Harlan Ellison Harlan was not offended. Mentor he He did a a cording little that he recorded about writing. During that era in the fifties Ray Bradbury and I know you're doing a memorial for him at the Convention I know you're probably gonNA say some things while you're there but just kind of What's your first memory of of Ray Bradbury's work you know it's funny i. I was reading from when kit and he actually gave a talk in the library when I'm ten years. And he was the first rider I ever saw person and is so impressed with and even then he was so alive and so warm and so encouraging and I remember that somebody said that then was for writer your life and your art and your work all come from the same place in this offense and I think that's when I first even even started thinking of becoming a writer and then in recent years over the last fifteen years I became very very good friend. And he's a terrific mentor and every month or so. I would go over to the house and we just didn't talk. What an honor that was and I'm a huge fan of his work. I mean the Marshall Chronicle for five lanes or mazing amazing books. And I'm I'm I'm glad they`re. They've been establishes classics and will live on and it was funny because I knew it was in poor health. I'd seen just a few weeks before he died and and yet when he died it was still such a blow because there was only one of him another one. I was so honored to get snow and just be someone inspired insurance work and we'll see where things lead. I mean I. There was a project and I wanted to do together. A mini series called Bradbury's Lost Mar based on twentieth. Aren't in the Marshall Chronicles and And I hope is doing natural kickstarter to down the road when base. Command is finished. And we'll see if that happens. I I really want to do that. That'd a nicer tribute to him. I think he would like that. Very much. That's That's one of the things that you were involved in your directed an episode. World Enough and time for a star Trek new voyages talked to Jim. Cawley about that project and I kinda look at. As the semi pro ball of Star Trek were professionals working with almost professionals on there and I thought that was very unique. And I the thing about those episodes of really has given characters like your episode was on a sue and really fleshed out a lot of his character with the alternate history and I really enjoyed that I. It's I know it's hot shooting on that bridge but I mean it's it certainly looks good and and the stories were certainly really cool to watch. Well Yeah I'm I'm very very of that. We'll nothing time. I wrote it and directed and executive produced it and Michael Visas Michael Right on. He also for next Gen and on an emmy for the for Batman the Animated Series Star Wars novels. Now writing books with Neil Gaiman and it'll be riding one of our men movies with me. Well worth one and it was great because I always wanted to work with Georgia. We met when I interviewed him for the twilight zone companion when I was working on that book in my twenties and I'd I long to work with him and when I found out about star trek new voyages which is now called. Cirque DU I remember the story line. Michael Lifson pitch to Archer case to win paramount with can do that show in the seventies and it's a great suitable episode and they end up making it took because they needed star. Trek Movies into that theory. I called Michael and I said you wanNA write this with me we can do with these guys in upstate. New York and he said sure. And then we start to Georgetown Georgia's House and Sit Down with them in in vining them and I had type of the storyline in three pages. And I said you're brilliant actor not just in another things. I've seen which I mentioned. I said you all you never got the deserve here. It is and I need you to read these three pages right now and tell me. If you'll do this you'll make with me. And he read three pages right there and he said Yeah. I'm in and it was great because you know I think is my favorite star trek character. Really because he's just such a great character such intelligent and competent and loyal great qualities. I wish that they had done the captain soon. After we did one on my than I can Winston Engle and I actually wrote up a captain whose dairy recycle and and outlined a full to our movie and the networks just went the CDs. Just wasn't interested. It was funny. Cbs now on Star Trek to television and because CVS Viacom Paramount. You know and And they just didn't fit in with their business model. Wow you guys just really. Don't get it you know so But I'm glad that I actually generated that that document because of what do series would've been enjoys can't be to work with I. I look forward to working with him again and I really appreciate your time but I can't let you go without saying that many a times I would have the twilight zone companion with me. After watching an episode. I would thumb through that and pick out the different details about the episode. And also what you thought of the episode and it just really made it so much more enjoyable by doing that. Thank you and it was great. It was on the book and You know I'm very glad that I wrote a book about twilights on what was stoppages. Something you know. It's not such quality I mean I recently I did. Fifty commentaries violate them. Blu Ray also produced and sit down and watching them again rash after all these years and it's just finishing. I mean mazing work. And I'm so glad that Rod that show that show and brought Matheson Beaumont and George Clayton Johnson aboard and or Ham nermeen the nominal work and various five. And I go back to twilight zone over just reminded of what possible. And he's just a huge inspiration and Bradbury too. As a matter of fact his is the only episode were Sterling's narration his in it because that's the way Bradbury wrote you know it's real. Yeah Yeah Lane. I talked about What's funny 'cause when when Rod serling sold the twilight when he called Ray and he said I don't know if you're not science fiction and they said come up with the House and I'll I'll teach you came over the house? Ray took him into his basement whereas office was closed. Some books off the shelf one by one of his short story books and by Mattress Bromont when John Collier gave him the Rodney. Read these. And let's talk until Matheson in. Beaumont came aboard twilight zone physically because of of recommending. They were two of his shaved and how that happened and so it was a he raised. Yeah and boy were glad they did. They really added so much to the show and the direction show absolutely phenomenal as far as space command. It'll be a website for that eventually or Space Command. Well they know the stakes command movie. Dot Com which takes you started and and pledge base. Command takes you to the website if you go to started patriots and click through their website. And I think once the once the campaign is over fiscal end movie Dot Com. We'll just either direct line to the website so if one is just used to going that route. Think the right over right over to the website and there's lot of video content and artwork as a concept art and there's a lot of good look at on the website even now great great. That sounds great. Thank you so much for your time mark. And we'll certainly help. Get the word out about this really worthy project. It's going GonNa be a lot of fun for me. The ten year old boy is jumping up and down right now inside of me. So it's GonNa be every day is like my birthday. I really appreciate the opportunity to talk about Tony because he can tell that I really love it. Oh Yeah it's That's that's great. I mean that kind of passion is so necessary. These days In any kind of project. So I'm really glad you've had it for this and also really in your career to do something like this. Thanks.

Ray Bradbury Michael Visas Michael Right writer Matheson Beaumont Marshall Chronicle Georgia Blu Ray Harlan Ellison Harlan Theodore Sturgeon Galaxy magazine Brie Rod serling Neil Gaiman New York Cawley Cbs Winston Engle Jim
"george clayton johnson" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Scribes

Sci-Fi Talk Scribes

13:47 min | 1 year ago

"george clayton johnson" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Scribes

"Sci-fi talk today's interview with Master Storyteller William F Nolan. Who has more than eighty three books in print he is known for Co Authoring. Logan's run with George Clayton Johnson. But his work is not solely confined. Sf pending thirteen horror novels and working briefly on culture the night stalker has a new collection of stories for paranormal investigator. David KINCAID ON ROCKET. Ride books but true legend. Sf and Har William F Nolan. It was It was great to to have the opportunity to speak to you about Your new project that you're working on King Kate Right and So you can talk about that. Was this something that you had an idea for recently or just something that you've been has been kind of with you for a while now can't goes way back to the seventy s when I was working with producer director. Dan Curtis on a On a movie the called enormous David New Orleans was the paranormal investigator. That was called to this woman's house because her husband was was Had RISEN FROM THE DEAD? She felt in with threatening her life and So that that developed under where we the week and then many years later I decided I would take the character of a paranormal investigator and do some stories about him. But I didn't want to didn't WANNA call him nor or less of the other. The other thing was called the New Orleans tapes. I called him David Kim and instead of David nothing but he was still basically the same character. Paranormal investigator who had strong doubts about the paranormal. And the and the and the supernatural investigated these things that they came up and I I wrote a original Novella for for Special Nolan issue of Weird Tales and the nineties. I think ninety one that was and And then I thought well that's the end of it. But no I I got another idea for Cam and wrote a second story. A dollar left call pirate's moon and then that seemed to end it but no I got an assignment novella for a small publishing house. Call cemetery dance. And so I wrote a novella starring Kim Kate for for them under the title of the Hard Winchester House and then when when The opportunity to camp came along to put them all together into one book. That's what I did and And that's that's the origin of cool. How did you and Anthony? Find each other well. He asked me to do He told me with doing who goes there. Oughta he'd heard that I'd done some work on. Who goes there and I said Yeah. I did a complete outline for for universal. They called me into allied before before they did the final version with another director and writer and I said I did earlier version and he said well you still have that and I said yes I sh- I still have it and I. He thought it was terrific and and printed along with a reprint of the story. Who goes there by Campbell and so we we've came associates at that point. That's cool. What's interesting is Assisting can cater kind of helping him. A little bit is is a cup friend. Mike Lucero his policeman so he kind of take places that maybe he wouldn't be able to go on his own. Yeah Well Sara is not based on any real person is based composite idea. I have of what a sheriff's station a sheriff's station officer might might might be like and I i. I gave him some kind of wild background by shopping character. I always like to create three dimensional characters not just flat cardboard territory so Michael Acerra became. I didn't think he would become as important as he did. Became Khaimah co Co Hero you might say along with nor Orleans. He's almost as important as New Orleans. He's in every adventure and He he enormous rick close friends and They help each other and I ended up writing a lot more about Mike. Massaro that I ever intended but that happens right as over. You never know what you're GonNa do with your characters until you start to develop them. It's cool actually. I do remember the tapes and If I remember correctly that was Roy Thinnest who played them into the investigator right. Yeah that's cool. That's really interesting. I realize you behind that at that was excellent. It was probably at that time just a little bit too much ahead of its time like culture. Was You know? Well it would've been a series Did a sequel call that the return the New Orleans return but let the problem was a minute. We had the thing on the air and I've got very good ratings and good credit to critical acclaim. But the minute gone here. The the writers guild of of California the WG a called a strike and the strike lasted for two or three months of title was over all the projects that they did different networks that had in the works were discarded and started up with a whole new line of work. Which is very typical. Hollywood and Orleans went the way of other than it would have been a series but the writers strike killed the idea as far as can que. Did you know if there is going to be an audio book done of this as well? I'd heard something about that. I don't I haven't seen it or I I really don't know much about it. I heard something about the fact that would be Since you wrote this screenplay for the thing how do you not a screenplay with it was a complete film outline? Yeah so what? What is your take on the On the story and the cinematic versions event story was quite different from the one that they finally went for They I had the idea of a of ancient spaceship. That crash on earth. Many millenniums go deep buried in the earth deep very under the ice on the Arctic and this ship lands there the carries the creature that from the movie. Think about other world that's simply scout ship set. Try to locate the mothership. And when they do locate the mothership they rebuild it underground and it I out of the ice returns to the stars at the end. None of that. None of ETA than they The final version. The final four. But I thought it worked really well. Oh cool cool now for kincaid as it's the casebook so about how many stories are in the case. I've only ridden three. And they're all in their cool who you know. There are some interesting things a headless corpse. That sounds cool Yup. I handled that rather well. I thought I had. I had the description of the two people swimming out into the ocean and and I said one went home with the other. The other ones he stayed and His body law back and forth in the ways and then and I created a kind of a moot piece and then I put a single and I said he wasn't returning home for one thing as head was missing that introduced the Carson the beginning. Yeah and you have a shape shifter Demon as well. That's right that's always a lot of fun. Yeah well I figure that if the whole story went through the The the idea of a of a of a woman being the the Villain Anna turns out that the shape shifting mail. I mean it's it's a shape shifting demon become. A woman are male desires. I've never seen that used before. I've heard of shape shifting demons but I've never read any stories about them and I thought boy this would make a nice little twists there. They've been seeking. The woman turns out to be a male demon. So that was fun. Okay and then There is Your well it's typical but there's a house horrors or perhaps haunted house housing there too. Well Yeah my wife and I visited the Winchester House which was Many years ago by thorough winchester she was the wife of the man who invented the Winchester rifle and she felt very guilty about all all the men and women and children have been killed over the years with winchester rival associate when she moved into winchester. How small farm. And she said that she's GonNa keep adding at building to it in reparation for all of the all of the harm. Her husband's a rifle 'cause and She felt that she was being haunted. By the ghost of all the people that have died under the under the winchester rifle. So I I visited winchester. How the IT's up in San Jose California with my wife and I asked that the caretaker there i. I'm sure there've been a lot of ghost stories written about this place and she said nope not a single one. I said you're kidding. I said well let all right one. And that's great so Mr Kincaid heads up there yes yes he's one of the character is still by him in part but it's also televised victims of the House. The Guy in the house. I switched the narrative around I the other two are totally narrated by him and first person with the winchester are I moved different narrative narrators around I. He never as part of it and he is a central core of it but he is the only one that tells the story the the the stories also told from other perspectives kind of a challenge to the writer to be able to pull something like that off but I think it works. We're kind of lead you in that direction. What was the idea behind that? Oh I just I got tired of doing the same thing. I every. Every time I write something I try to stretch the Vulcan going a slightly different direction and I thought it would be fun to chat to switch narrators and here which is seldom done and story and tell it from different perspectives. I it was just an idea I had. I think it's a very cool one. That's great. That sounds awesome. So is there Are we going to hear more from caney thing where people have asked me about a novel and and and I said well if it pops into my head to do something for him? I never thought ended up doing three things about him. I thought I'd only do one originally. I said so who knows that that might happen. At the moment. I have no plans for any further kincaid writing. But you never know. Would you ever consider maybe having him come to the big or small screen It would depend on some kind of film actress or somebody if If if the publisher can get people interested in the film Yeah sure I bring to the screen but if I ate. I'm way beyond their age where people write original screenplay are even adapted screenplay so it would have to be somebody in. Hollywood red got interested in it had contacted the The publisher but I don't expect that's going to happen. But if it is sure I'd be happy to make a crack at it. Now you know you're behind Logan's run certainly a really a really unique idea for fi novel that Your Life actually ends at thirty. I thought that was a really cool thing. The twenty one of the novel twenty right. Yeah and much more frightening out of your chains and suddenly you're under your twenties near dead at thirty The reason it's thirty in the movie and the remake of doing that Warner Brothers is the age of they moved up Asia thirty like MGM originally twenty five years ago but the reason. They did that they. They can't cast a whole motion picture of experienced actors under under the age of You know when they're fifteen or sixteen or Seventeen nineteen or twenty. They can't do that and they have to have older actress. So the The star Logan's run is his name Gosling. He's thirty years old so they they moved up to thirty which I don't think has nearly as effective. I can understand why they did it. Sure sure and you mean what's your thought on the original film that came out in nineteen seventy six with Michael York. I think I think it's a fun film. I think the that's are wonderful and other headquarters and they all Lincoln memorial so forth. I think that's great but I think the authorities rather silly but but Michael York Ungeni editor. We're so good at the British trained actors. They're both Shakespearean trained actor that they transcended the characters has written a screenplay they made the characters bigger than than the screenplay actually projected them And so I'm very pleased with what they did with the main characters. I'm not so happy with the last third of thing where they met Peter Youth off and he begins this whole thing about the cats and all I thought that slowed everything down to a crawl and it wasn't a book anyway But the first two-thirds thought we're pretty good. I enjoyed it now So how did the new version had today Today contact you about it. Is that how it started or no? They bought all rights. Mgm bought all rights to Logan's run not to the secret. I did Logan search longest world and journey. I've done three sequels but not they. They bought all the rights and once they buy all the rights. They don't have to consult a writer anymore. They just take the whole project over and give it to other writers. The new version of the more brothers has had eleven different writers on it over the last fifteen years and four different directors. They finally got a package together. Now that they're gonNA film and British Columbia and Vancouver in the fall and released next year. So it's going to happen. Finally but it's taken fifteen years. Hollywood moves very slowly on these things but when you figure they're spending a hundred and twenty five million dollars one one sale now. I guess you don't want to rush into something unless you're sure what you've got so that that's why. I think it's a long know that the original film was Was dated and also it lacks special effects. We can put into it. They really fantastic special effects that they didn't have back that day or talk to you at all about this in any way I might come in as a as a consultant at up in British Columbia as a as a film that I might come in but I haven't really discussed anything L. on that line and I they didn't have anything to do with the writing of it so I'm just I'm just a coffee..

investigator Logan winchester Hollywood writer New Orleans Mr Kincaid Orleans MGM director Har William F Nolan David KINCAID Winchester House Hard Winchester House Dan Curtis David New Orleans Co Authoring Mike Lucero Michael York
"george clayton johnson" Discussed on The Twilight Zone Podcast

The Twilight Zone Podcast

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"george clayton johnson" Discussed on The Twilight Zone Podcast

"WanNA give my marbles with bows in the she and is like fees. Gosh oh she only had long hair so with the component and parts chosen. Why don't we wait for the factory to do their work and get back to the story? Behind the story we've had array bradberry submitted three stories to the twilight zone but only one was made. So was this the reason that the relationship ship between him and Rod sailing soured will according to Ray Bradbury. There was more than in your book. You examine the accusations of plagiarism. The bradberry makes against Rudd sailing. So what was he. Basing these accusations on was a particular stories was in Bredbury story of Peter's changed well it changes favorites plus when he accused him of players in the sixties in it again later in its life when his authorized biography came out he changed the accusations. Different story so bradberry story players hit more so it's important to recognize that just in later life he had taken early in life he'd taken walking stents which is a very personal personal and almost autobiographical story. That certainly had come up when he was back on. A family vacation. Also made some accusations about where it is every body didn't he yes. That was the one where he was compared to the guy on Mars who gets who hooks up with a woman by phone so you know you. You examined examined these accusations. What what did you find? Surly wrote two letters of his time in finding exact date in December nineteen sixty sterling two letters one. It's to Beaumont journal December fifth in one. Is Ray Bradbury in the letter to Beaumont is much longer. He says dear chuck in he laid out the accusations in more in what happened was is almost like a snowballing in avalon. The fact of played Comes out of this is is that there was plagiarism. A bradberry but not by Rod serling but actually George Clayton Johnson. Really in what I pointed out the George Frank Johnson. I interviewed him the same week of interviewed Bradberry in bribers at his home in Jordan Johnson. We went restaurant. Had the PATIOS for three Hours George Clayton Johnson. In Ray.

Ray Bradbury George Clayton Johnson bradberry Rod serling Peter Jordan Johnson Beaumont Bredbury Bradberry Wan Rudd bribers avalon chuck
"george clayton johnson" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

07:08 min | 2 years ago

"george clayton johnson" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Together of which he wrote ninety two and you know the other great writers were Earl Hamner and George Clayton Johnson and maps of sand and. I mean this is the the names were incredible yeah I think it was a pretty seamless team of writers and they all got along and it yeah. I think that's what makes the you know when people talk about comedy you know the writers don't usually get its due the actors do when you when you talk about a classic comedy like a Dick Van **** show Randy Griffith are in I Love Lucy you know everyone talks about Lucy or or Dick Van **** and Mary Tyler Moore whatever Boren comes to drama and because there wasn't a steady actor in there except for your father's presence in every show you know the writers really get the recognition I discovered it was airing and I'm WGN in the late seventies like at ten o'clock at night and I was a kid I mean I was maybe ten eleven years old and I've been hooked ever since but I mean everything you see in this series you know the acting was great everything else but it's really one of the best written shows in television history. thank you at yet again my father would have been so surprised you know did the writers guild and voted it to one of the three top that shows a year ago that he was just been so honored and humbled by that did you mention that there was a documentary on PBS about about Yasser Lee it's got to be ten fifteen years now it's called submitted for your approval okay and they ran it I think on the American experience series the PBS has I found a DVD of it online and bought it well that's cool you know what's what's included yeah so it's entirely in black and white hello I love that it's anti all the interviews they interview people the worked on The Twilight Zone the interview just daughter yes like you did in and other folks is brother talking about you know what went into sterling's head in his mind when he was writing through three when he was frustrating it's frustrating with the tell television business I know ninety galleries rate when he was doing yeah I like doing yeah yeah nothing new but I mean think about you know those episodes I mean they really were they were groundbreaking I mean there was nothing like that ever on topics like that right yeah. nineteen sixty seven Thurgood Marshall sworn in as the first black Supreme Court justice nineteen sixty eight cut the the Cold zombie film night of the Living Dead yes directed by George A. Romero premieres yet that's this is a kind of a precursor to with the walking dead so to speak I would think right yeah a little bit yeah nineteen sixty that money python's flying circus premiered in nineteen seventy of summers Janice Joplin you know was a drifter for your leader the four years later she was a rock and roll legend she'd gone from a complete unknown a generational icon and so what is my purpose of this it she Janice was in Los Angeles putting the finishing touches on an album that would prove to be the biggest hit of her career pearl she did not live to see the album's release on that day in nineteen seventy she died from an accidental heroin overdose was discovered in her Los Angeles hotel room after failing to show up for a scheduled recording session twenty seven years old yeah yeah one is seven the along with Jimi Hendrix who was twenty seven yeah worse than twenty seven and then of more to our time Amy Winehouse yeah that's right that is that what you're reading club I forgot Kurt Cobain yeah and Kurt Cobain as well yeah see I'm not as old as you think the old fool keynote valid yeah there's the old guy eighty five a hub actor rock Hudson at fifty that because the first major U. S. celebrity to die of complications from aids Hudson's death raise public awareness of the epidemic which was at the time bidding Nord by many in the mean there in the mainstream as the is it was just a gay plague like they didn't really understand the illness and and all that other good stuff and it really brought to the forefront it did yeah did and you know he was such a ladies man yeah please yeah but when that did come out and you know it did bring more attention to it like you just said the acid you know just sort of an underground played Kiev where as opposed to it really affecting the entire posture two thousand six wikileaks is launched two thousand eight was the bailout by president George Bush seven hundred million dollars got us out of a little bit let's take a listen I know many Americans have questions tonight. how did we reach this point in our economy how will the solution I propose work and what does this mean for your. these are good questions very first. wow the federal okay with that that that. your bleeping divers urges but have died no it sounds like he was a comedy dead of finding words that could be believed that sounded like other birds. ha. was entertaining nonetheless. right. as he reaches for waist **** allergist with that right now. bliss mortars perspective it's Sunday sponsored by hearing health center dot com hear ye hear ye hear the name caring Yarborough she's the clerk of cook county an expert at doing government the Chicago way using her office to play her politics putting her pals on the county pay roll to help her get reelected you know the Chicago way public official gives well paying job to a pal who then works the precincts for votes like the job of deputy clerk Garbo's given to the former police chief of may would a pal since her husband was mayor of may would and the job he's given to the sister of a state senator pal who's contributed five thousand dollars to the Yarborough political fund that's her personal political piggy bank clerk Yarborough has been harvesting telephone numbers from county personnel records for calling on her employees to fatten her piggy bank she's been caught at it and reported to a federal court by the famous Chicago whistle blower Michael Shachtman member him the guy responsible for the federal check man decrees against political patronage in government his court filing says clerk Yarborough is running an illegal patronage system and he's petition the court to appoint a federal monitor to keep an eye on her she is denying those accusations there are preposterous out rages she says because she doesn't do patronage in government her way she says is in no way the Chicago way well maybe not I guess it just looks that way. I'm Walter Jacobson and that's my perspective for more visit WGN radio dot com or download the WGN radio app..

WGN Earl Hamner George Clayton Johnson Walter Jacobson seven hundred million dollars five thousand dollars twenty seven years ten fifteen years ten eleven years four years
"george clayton johnson" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

07:07 min | 2 years ago

"george clayton johnson" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"That the contract or any of the greatest so could I have a book holder and the week after week is out it was astonishing a nominal and all of the show on this all in one television drama I'm sorry he's our hero you Sir I will be the person was shaking Westfall act that so I think you'd be very successful even more so probably how about Alfred Hitchcock let's get it either these are the nominal nominal challenge and that and then in the end we've all nine of your brothers from the regional fire like the one George Clayton Johnson Richard Matheson game director that means you're just a nominal we will take all and and make that request you to get out that's got a long way away I miss that guy one of the crime I you know he when he wrote I sing the body electric for your lights on and then we wrote a little editorial about it and he loved it and sent me a personal letter I've still got it up on my poster board he wore his heart on his sleeve all right it was he not she was very open about it and that that and I have had very good mentors make hot me in the office and get them to be genuine and to be kind and to be yeah you know I'm not I'm I'm happier now in my life and I've never been I wouldn't want to go back to the ministry that I love the fact that I can that be like myself you know that my audience would help what do you think of our Netflix Amazon prime where they're picking up movies they're doing some of their own programming then it's just truly remarkable yeah it is I mean and and as you said earlier the challenge of course is in so much of that but I think things will get lost in the shuffle but good part is that initial quality of guys that stand out so so I'm singing it's eleven point eleven project with them in the house of lords now we're looking for ten minutes or so the for the fact that they want to the whole class active active arcade alike is writing with litigation long to producers in the U. K. and again one of the executives vassal on them but the fact there's so many different kinds of stories and now I think it's a great plan for the artist I ran in the Russell Crowe a couple weeks ago and just said hi to him I said love your work and he looked at me one you're the ancient alien guy aren't you I want your phone number and the ten I told him about the radio show and he wants to come on the program sometime in September after it's done shooting he's been doing a show time series called the loudest voice a lot about the late fox rupture Roger ailes and yeah gained a lot of weight for the part truly remarkable how he's done that but what a great actor yes when once muscle chromium gladiator genetic movies and usually I at the high school in New Jersey the poll on the movie alien at the high school all the for the call of the final two just coach the number five eleven for you get the structure on going with the fading into the stop the support of a little extra Beck's your outlook for the last gladiator and also the shin signaling doing high school will put it on the entire new get gladiator I'll be back that woman sure are you still mentoring individuals about the the industry I do because again so many people's hearts get broken looks like with the new changes that they've high school kids in a good area because you know it how you can be very cruel and can be very close and and it doesn't need to be and so I just basically took a stand for for that over twenty six years about what I'm going to be someone who will be happy to advise people guide people people behind the console to whatever works or you can just come because my down cable and Schnabel it quite it doesn't take a lot and then on the right course but this whole which misinformation out there on the screen Latin goons would never sold a script and and and I should show you know and back in touch with the people who love when the how to get in the door when the dance right there and stuff you will have to mark kind of people that watch your YouTube channel what we want you to have been mistress five five M. R. S. CI five well you know try I can my name mark quickly and will find it and then they can subscribe and every few days and posted videos and as I said they can watch interstellar space command there and I'm very great all of them and in the kitchen yeah and it's free to subscribe right absolutely free that's the fun part that's great share this world yeah this is a dream come true you know it's funny because some of the shows I've written for the start of next generation in Babylon five inch fathers and mothers who want to defend Dolly shows or watching and loving and it's nice to this point in my life not be just talking about all the things I've done which I enjoyed talking about creating something new and waking up every single day well when I when they did that day mark where do you see the industry heading in the next twenty years what's the what's out there who is in charge of all over the show and then you call the children's network on June the six major chauvinistic shells well going right right six pilots what are the it's kind of all the production and then they can sleep at six so I was in the front of the truck they'll banning it nation of request I love at executive who's on the so called ball on CBS and on my position how costly ritual ma'am and I and and and being and then on the show on this and at the expense and the Arkansas project so much fun I try I sat down generating about three hundred and fifty ideas which we shall when I showed him a bipartisan within one of the six of my partners on this project I don't collide I would have been based on that list or and ideas they might have and will will come will come up with something between us and the and the which is exactly one space command they sell liberating when you can chat with something and off you go and I think that you know digital cameras and meaning that edit on a mac or PC all of us transaction that we all want a video camera in here we all are doing this while watching you over the last fifteen years mark has been a treat just watching our world that really has what I what I love having attention George because that you're one of a kind and and it's just it's rare that you find this concludes as she just doesn't have a goal we're gonna come back and take phone calls with you in the final half hour here March so get ready for calls with Margie Cree as we talk about television movies and all that great stuff.

twenty six years fifteen years twenty years five five M ten minutes five inch
"george clayton johnson" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

08:31 min | 2 years ago

"george clayton johnson" Discussed on KGO 810

"He was able taking acting lessons and he was trying out and nothing big kid really happened for him yet and service sure enough eventually he hit a part where you played a cop and you know now he's getting these roles all over the place and you know his career's growing and growing and growing and it's exciting to see that happen for people yes we all followed by my last name of a line of writers directors actors in three national quality of options all of them twenty six years because everyone I mean I feel I'm not content in the will of the people I feel that everyone gets their dream thank you for the work hard incoming control with the a work ethic and and and actually very rarely talk about our because I've seen people just failed when Alan and I've seen people succeed in just very determined thank you and the shuttle to do their job and and that job can be a wonderful performance it can be anything but well if you stay the course you can't like that's one to grow would ride Charlene and Twilight Zone make it today I know they've tried to resurrect Twilight Zone but would run surely make it today yes I think he was he was astonishing I mean when you realize that one should be blocked writing an actual Twilight Zone like once walking distance in the next week well I mean that I mean there's a hitch hiker any the date of such that I am the holder and the week after week is out it was astonishing he was phenomenal and all of the children themselves with one television drama cheese are he's our hero you Sir I will be the person was shaping ourselves actor and so I think you'd be very successful doing lots of problems how about Alfred Hitchcock of course it's got a good look at them again these are these are the nominal either a phenomenal a challenge of geniuses and and and even when I interviewed the longest residual Twilight Zone George Clayton Johnson Richard Matheson simplicity and directors and news which is phenomenally brilliant people and and regrettably because she got away I miss that guy he was one of the farm I you know he when he wrote I sing the body electric for your lights on and then we wrote a little editorial about it and he loved it and sent me a personal letter I've still got it up on my poster board he wore his heart on his sleeve alright it must be love she was very open about it and that's that and I have had very good mentors make hot me in the Austin too good to be genuine and to be kind and to be on the aspect you know I'm not I mean I'm I'm happier now in my life and I've never been I wouldn't want to go back when the three networks and I love the fact that I I can not mean like myself you know what let my audience itself what do you think of our Netflix Amazon prime where they're picking up movies they're doing some of their own program mean and it's just truly remarkable yeah it is I mean and then as you said earlier the challenge of course is in so much of that all I think things will get lost in the shuffle but the good part is that unisom if quality of guys that stand out so so I'm singing it's eleven point project in the house of lords now what is the extent of his opponents had you called first of all for the peace activists they want to hold this contract arcade and I like his writing it will produce is one of the few producers in the U. K. and again we love the executives also on me with them but the fact there's so many different kinds of stories and movies now I think it's a great time for any artist I ran in the Russell Crowe a couple weeks ago and just said hi to him I said love your work and he looked at me one you're the ancient alien guy aren't you I want your phone number and the right to not told him about the radio show and he wants to come on the program sometime in September after it's done shooting he's been doing a show time series called the loudest voice alarm about the late fox rupture Roger ailes and gained a lot of weight for the part truly remarkable how he's done that but what a great actor yes almost muscle Clodia body of yours you make a movie and usually I there's a high school in New Jersey the poll on the movie alien at the high school for their for their final performance she just coach them on the Bais eleven for you your support structure on going the funny thing is really Scott will support of the loan HM best year I look for me that's the one gladiator muscles considering doing high school we are putting on the entire movie gladiator as it's like I'm I'll be back to that woman sure are you still mentoring individuals about the the industry yes I do because again so many people's hearts get broken looks like with the New Jersey incentives high school kids that when they did aliens because it's you know it's Holly can be very cruel and can be very close and and it doesn't need to be and so I just basically took a stand for for that over twenty six years ago well it's like I'm going to be someone who will be happy to advise people guide people people behind you to consult a whatever works or you can just come because my round table and sh like it doesn't take a lot of the search and then on the right course but this whole which misinformation out there it's on the screen line goons and never sold the script and and and I was just so you know and such as types of people who are like one is how to get in the door yes right there in just a few if you will have to mark kind of people that watch your YouTube channel what is going to happen Mr sci fi it's M. R. S. CI coal at five or they can you know try to type in my name mark quickly and will find it and then they can subscribe in every few days and posted videos and as I said they can watch the first hour space command there and I'm very outgoing and in the kitchen yeah and it's free to subscribe right absolutely free that's the fun part that's great share this with the world yeah this is a good source of income for you know it's funny because some of the shows I've written for Star Trek next generation Babylon five inch wide isn't Schumer's singled to defend Dolly shows because for watching and loving and it's nice to this point in my life not be just talking about all the things I've done which I enjoyed talking about creating something new and looking at every single page as well but what I learned later that day mark where do you see the industry heading in the next twenty years what are what's out there one more records and shows you will have the power over the show and then you call the children's network on June the six major chauvinistic create six shells were going right right six pilots who are obvious finance also production and then take a slate of six holes I looks like and this is rocky abandoning our skate he questioned the fire GL executive who's on the so called evil eye on CBS and one more for the same across the board from them and Iron Man and the and then on the show rooms and the expansive love archaisms project and we're just thrilled when you look so much on edge as I sat down on the generating about three hundred and fifty ideas which initials I'm not sure what part is also within the district of my partners on this project local like I would so then based on that list or from ideas they might have and will come will come up with something between us and block in which is exactly one space command so liberating when you can show us the slide to make something and off you go on a date that digital cameras and the internet and being able able to edit on a mac or PC it's all about see science fiction never connected with law with all the video cameras in our pockets in here we all are doing this while watching you over the last fifteen years mark has been a treat just watching or growth that really has well I I do I love having attention George because that you're one of a kind and and it's just it's rare that you find this concludes as you just saw some particle we're gonna come back and take phone calls with you in the final half hour here March so get ready for calls with Margie Cree as we talk about television movies and all that great stuff.

twenty six years fifteen years twenty years five inch
"george clayton johnson" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

08:13 min | 2 years ago

"george clayton johnson" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"That happen for people yes we want all fall on my my round because a lot of writers directors actors okay the compassion of Hollywood may give options all of them twenty six years because everyone I mean I feel I'm not competitive with other people I feel look at this everyone gets their dream thank you for the work hard incoming control with the a work ethic and and and passionate very rarely talk about our because I've seen people just let me know Alan and I've seen people succeed with just very determined thank you and Shelton did their job and and that job can be a wonderful performance it can be anything but you know if you stay the course you can't like one big role would ride Charlene and Twilight Zone make it today I know they've tried to resurrect Twilight Zone but would ride surely make it today yes I think he would he was astonishing I mean when you realize that one can block writing an actual Twilight Zone like went walking distance in the next week I wouldn't be writing all of that well I mean there's a tracker any the grade of such that I am a boulder and then the week after week is out it was astonishing a nominal and all of the children themselves with one television drama Jeez are he's our hero you Sir I will be the person was shaking ourselves actor and so I think you'd be very successful even more so probably about Alfred Hitchcock well of course it's got to make a dent these are these are a nominal under a phenomenal challenge geniuses and and and we've all nine again well this religion fire like the one George Clayton Johnson Richard Matheson also fourteen directors that means which is phenomenally brilliant people and and may grab a questioning your levels got away I miss that guy that was one of the con I you know he when he wrote I sing the body electric for your lights on and then we wrote a little editorial about it and he loved it and sent me a personal letter I've still got it up on my poster board he wore his hat and which alright it must be love she was very open about it and that's that and I have had very good mentors they shot me in the Austin too good to be genuine and to be kind and to be on the aspect you know I'm not I mean I'm I'm happier now in my life and I've never been I wouldn't want to go back to living a tree that because I love the fact that like I can not mean like myself you know that my audience is held what do you think of our Netflix Amazon prime where they're picking up movies they're doing some of their own program mean and it's just truly remarkable yeah it is I mean and then as you said earlier the challenge of course is in so much of that thank you things will get lost in the shuffle but the good part is that quality does that stand out so so I'm seeing some of them on the internet adjective from the house of lords now what is being used to tell me if you had called subversives for the fact that they want to the whole class active active arcade and alike enjoying it will produce is one of the few producers in the U. K. and again with other executives waffle on them but the fact is so many different kinds of stories and is now I think it's a big turn for the artist I ran in the Russell Crowe a couple weeks ago and just said hi to him I said love your work and he looked at me one you're the ancient alien guy aren't you I want your phone number and the I ten I told him about the radio show and he wants to come on the program sometime in September after it's done shooting he's been doing a show time series called the loudest voice alarm about the late fox rupture Roger ailes and yeah gained a lot of weight for the part truly remarkable how he's done that but what a great actor yes almost muscle clothing and body image in making movies and usually I there's a high school in New Jersey the poll on the movie alien at the high school all their for their final performance to just coach them on the Bais along for you get support structure on going with the fighting is really Scrabble supportive of them it should be extra or do you guys believe on gladiator I'm also considering doing well we'll put it on the entire new good gladiator I'll be back to that woman sure are you still mentoring individuals about the the industry yeah I do because again so many people's hearts get broken looks like with the new changes that they've high school kids that when they did aliens because it you know how you can be very cruel and can be very close and and it doesn't need to be and so I just basically took a stand for for that over twenty six years ago but it's like I'm going to be someone who will be happy to advise people guide people people can hire me to consult a whatever war or you can just come because my land cable and Schnabel it quite it doesn't take a lot of one on the right course but this whole which misinformation out there on the screen line goons have never sold a script and and and their questions so cockeyed you know and such as type of people who are like when the how to get in the door yes right there in to just chill if you'll have to mark kind of people that watch your YouTube channel what we want you to have been Mr sci fi it's M. R. S. CI F. five or they can you know try I can my name mark victory and will find it and then they can subscribe and every few days and posted videos and other technical watching first our space command there and I'm very and in the kitchen yeah and it's free to subscribe right absolutely free that's the fun part that's great share this world yeah this is the you know it's funny because some of the shows I've written for the start of next generation Babylon five inch wide isn't Schumer's she wants to defend Dolly shows peoples for watching and loving and it's nice to this point in my life to not be just talking about all the things I've done which I enjoy talking about the creating something new and breaking up every single pages well what I'm what I'm going to be doing that day mark where do you see the industry heading in the next twenty years what's the what's out there more more records insurance you're gonna have the power over the show the children's network on June six major chauvinistic create six shells well going right white chicks pilots who are on the line and also production and then the display of six so long as it's a truck bill banning arts gave me only nation the question to find out exactly which one you should call the evil eye on CBS and on mark so this is not costing ritual man and Iron Man and they and then on the show on this and it created the expense and the ark is launched project and we're just thrilled when you look so much fun I just I sat down lead generating about three hundred and fifty ideas which initials when I shared with my part is mostly the local district of my partners on this project local like I would have been based on that list or from ideas they might have and will will come will come up with something between us and in which is exactly one space command so liberating when you can reach us inside look something and off you go and I think that you know digital cameras and the internet and being able able to edit on a mac or PC all of us science fiction never connected with law about video cameras in our pockets and here we all are doing this while watching you over the last fifteen years mark has been a treat just watching or wrote that really has well I I will admit having attention George because that is one of a kind and and it's just it's rare that you find this concludes as you just saw some particle we're gonna come back and take phone calls with you in the final half hour here March so get ready for calls with Margie Cree as we talk about television movies and all that great stuff on.

Hollywood twenty six years fifteen years twenty years five inch
"george clayton johnson" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

12:15 min | 2 years ago

"george clayton johnson" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"One of our long time favorite gas mark Sikri back with us science fiction author director television writer screenwriter is written for many major studios and networks also the author of The Twilight Zone companion mark welcome back to coast to coast thanks George always great to be here looking for to this house things going with space command your movie things are going great were actually making up she considerably more I've got my own YouTube channel now Mr five trying to just close the first hour of the pilot which has done Jones many other stars and so young this is actually going to miss you side by on YouTube and watch the entire first hour of the show well that's great that's exciting and know you when you started space command how many years ago wish we shot we started shooting in twenty fourteen and we've been on going the shooting wrapping up treat more ceaselessly twelve hours and now we're catching it actively the Netflix and Amazon and you too yeah just everybody and when you come up with a project flowing of fear and then in England so if you could give me some time all all sold a million grates on that's exciting for you did you ever think you'd be doing all of this when you were a kid I hope that I would I got the twilight zone in fact check it out on the net and and then the writers of those shows became my mentors love the teenager and I started writing professional one's nineteen and and I was writing for television when I was twenty two twenty three years old so it's been quite a ride you want to school with our friend Billy movie you want to spend you know star in a number Twilight Zone episodes and things and also reason space command is Anne that's right yes exactly is one of our continuing characters and Christina Moses who's in a million little things on ABC is going to be in the shell and many many other wonderful actors my car needs is currently in college new book and I live in orange is the new black I mean that people are lining up the very good to be in space and and I'm also creating a number of officials the pop and rock the abandoned in a local park for the screen how costly when you fall so far it's quite quite amazing comics I can basically at this point on make whatever I wanna make Molly which will basically finance given the glass I want to be in control and with the help of computer graphics and things you've been able to really watch your budget when you put together these high quality films that's right and insurance which is basically in the first hour has nine hundred visual effects shots wow more than more than eighteen he strolled have to our pilot has nineteen hundred visual effects shots and so we're working with him the visual effects artists all around the world because I use the internet and thanks to all these different resource crowdfunding affects us there's no barriers to our to any of this stuff you can each round the world and and and make your acting out of people from every walk of life mark there was a study of that we had last week that said people are generally getting too frustrated watching television because there's too many channels now when they get frustrated because they don't know what to watch your how to find everything what do you think of all about what we'd expect challenging George because when you when you and I were watching I like it back in the day three networks and so while I believe getting forty million viewers a week and that was with the captain yeah and and everyone knew all of which was a long watching gun smoke and get out yeah killed maybe after which scared I dream of Jeannie or whatever and and some of our common the quality but not all even with science fiction I I don't know everything well I don't ya hear about showing up in them that they deal with the big deal it's another three years so one party is that when people find quality man locked within an entrance into the case command yeah ninety five percent comes up which is terrific that's huge we will not succeed checking recently access will be getting million kept on our pilot is that significant you guys yes until now basically what we're doing is building audience and and then the networks will will you know basically come and jump on our bandwagon and that's that's exactly how I wanted one of the things that really has changed too for the networks it's the competition of news and social media these days market all in love let me tell you in my day growing up as a television news executive and the news director in Detroit and St Louis and Minneapolis you know that your evening newscast was the news cast that was it that's what you wanna program yourself for and you covered yourself for you did the stories for that evening newscast now I think the networks the three major networks really need to rethink their news departments because by the time their evening newscasts comes on everybody's already seen everything it's done exactly exactly joyful you know it's funny because that means I have a Mr sack a YouTube channel eleven once a couple of years ago with a friend of mine who was Michelin your own walking dead and he said you know you you know so much about science fiction Chevy on channel well back when you and I was watching PBS kids having your own channel how do you even have had that but now I can talk about latest movies TV shows books I'm reading anything with science fiction anything I want to talk about and I posted a few days and it's free and so the viewers can watch it there's no charge and and it's wonderful because it's funny because I was in England a couple months ago I came out of the underground art scene meeting the BBC and behind me someone on the street call that marks the Kree space my YouTube channel we recognize because my you tube that's amazing yeah it was great it was a great quality in in your right because in those days if you wanted a channeled you'd have to go out and try to buy one and that was like fifty to a hundred and seventy five million dollars to buy a TV station now I yeah welcome well now you're you're right you're just you go on YouTube you do your thing and if you add a little bit of production to it you know you you look like a god yes we don't I think and people are more and more watching it's sort of it's a great equalizer because of someone's watching television on the computer or on the line on that and I had it on the phone yeah they don't even offer me that even though what network makes a given show they just watch what they're interested in and that could be on you to what could be anything and thought I'd love that I'm my own studio now I've got a lead camera needs cool and as I mentioned actors one big network shows we want to be in space planning may and we have a very very very much wanted because of the quality of what we're doing it because of my reputation you know the fact that done so much on a quality work of the over the years we've got a friend of the show's names George Sunday calls himself the guy from Pittsburgh and he started doing the YouTube items on his own channel now here's a guy he sees in his apartment he keeps track of the news he you know he knows what he's talking about but you know in in our kids days for him to get on television or go down to a station say Hey I want to do this report they what is said go away Sir and you know now he's got his own channel he you know he does his own thing and it's amazing what technology has done yes what's also good people what I find is people love hashing people who have actually a lot of people that love interest for the I mean that's what you and I sparks from the beginning because you recognize the offices actually each other the fact that we love what we're doing and it really comes through and and so at a time and if you just consistent and straight and deliver them people want to be part of what you're doing I discovered another picture camping laddie if you give me a million dollars the space command and each of the last few weeks kicking started kicking them this is more eighty six thousand dollars let me tell you the best insurance to fit me talking about future space command on people just email me or call me and and off we go and so I don't yeah when I meet with network executives they're very small I'm doing but there's a great freedom that I have because I don't need done they they want more money you become your own movie studio yes it's fun having a speech to Congress will be the next phase in the future if the car because that's where people can design a futuristic car and the one I choose I'll ship my Toyota corolla sedan and they will turn it into a creature with the car will use it are you looking for a merging talent mark I mean do you have the eye out for people that may become the next superstar in big films here yes we are it's not just that it's like they're actors on the day here in Los Angeles and the waiter is either an actor or a writer or both right and shovel is like I think what we need actors I find interesting outcast some testing some very famous actors of them Jones one sector describing shake the water and shipping water but but I'm also Caskey very talented young people in fact one of my skull missiles Christina Moses said two years ago in a bid to start to get some first occasion plays daughter should never done television before now she's one of the leads on many many things on A. B. C. sold and I think I'm very good eye for talent it's not just actors can be creature design is it can be people wanna make futures and props of space we can be I I'm not you know this I'm not a slob no I don't need someone I don't know if he's working with that you know JJ Abrams get my attention with a good idea to have quality and if they need the number nine visual effects are the some of them are people worked on the biggest movie sales managers and whatever and some of them are a hobbyist in Texas Sir well yeah so do you have to be able to do things that are wonderful I've got a friend of mine he was a waiter at a restaurant in Beverly hills his name is Billy Malone and ability came here from the east coast because he wanted to be an actor and he had this New York cop lock I mean if you were gonna type cast him as a New York cop he'd be perfect for that and I told them that in that you know but he but he was able taking acting lessons and he was trying out and nothing big kid really happened for him yet and service sure enough of eventually he hit a part where you played a cop and you know now he's getting these roles all over the place and you know his career's growing and growing and growing and it's exciting to see that happen for people yes we do no one will fall on my my rounds because a lot of writers directors actors okay the compassionate quality of options all of them twenty six years because everyone I mean I feel yeah I'm not competitive with other people I feel that this everyone gets their dream thank you for the work hard incoming control with the a work ethic and and and actually very rarely talk about our because I've seen people just failed when Alan and I've seen people succeed with just very determined and the shuttle can do their job and and that job can be a wonderful performance it can be anything but well if you stay the course you can't like one big role would ride Charlene and Twilight Zone make it today I know they've tried to resurrect Twilight Zone but would ride surely make it today yes I think he was he was astonishing I mean when you realize that one can block writing an actual Twilight Zone like once walking distance in the next week I wouldn't be writing all of that you know of the name that I mean that the contract or any of the great of since the time of the holder and the week after week is out it was astonishing a nominal and all of the children themselves with one television drama Jeez are he's our hero you Sir I will be the person was shaping ourselves actor and so I think you'd be very successful even more so probably how about Alfred Hitchcock well of course it's got again these are these are a nominal under a phenomenal a challenge of geniuses and that and then in the end read more nine again the longest reject by like the one George Clayton Johnson Richard Matheson also fourteen directors that means which is phenomenally brilliant people and and may grab and questioning your levels got away.

mark Sikri George director writer YouTube Jones twenty two twenty three years seventy five million dollars eighty six thousand dollars ninety five percent twenty six years million dollars twelve hours three years two years
"george clayton johnson" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

09:12 min | 2 years ago

"george clayton johnson" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"A Twilight Zone ended in nineteen sixty four and then the to you two years later Star Trek the view that engine run very was very much a friend and a protege of rod Serling's in fact he gave the eulogy at rods funeral and and run very was very aware of this offer twice and you couldn't have Star Trek and and he cast it's funny because the first pilot he did a pilot for Star Trek called the cage it was actually shot nineteen sixty four is our Jeffrey hunter as captain pike and it didn't sell the show and so they ordered a second pilot and that's when they got Shatner and and the chemistry between William Shatner and Leonard Nimoy deforest Kelley in the rest of the cast it's just was magical and you could see it from the beginning from the first episode that aired he just knows knew that these people were unforgettable and and this state of forgettable all these decades five fifty years as you said mark also had on than not the originals but I had Jolene Blalock on and then the tall yet no bleach on yeah yeah both of them great great folks but when it was really fascinating again is that run very you know when he came up with Star Trek the next generation he showed that it was the universe he created and you could have other actors and will continue to be successful and now with the new Star Trek movies in the Star Trek series is coming down the pike it's really hot legs and and it's it's such an amazing amazing universe to play and I mean having having come up with stories for captain Picard in for Cork and all these other characters I can speak to just how how vibrant all these characters are and and how wonderful these actors are in again I'm working with them both in the Star Trek universe and in space command Robert Picardo in the number the Star Trek actors and continuing to work with just because these are the nominally talented people and and when you meet them you say gosh I don't I don't want to and I just wanna keep keep working with these guys how would you compare the Star Trek series to the Star Wars Ann Arbor is Star Wars film me yeah you know it's funny the very very different I think you know Chris personally I've by as much as I like Star Wars my I much prefer star track and I think it's much deeper in its woman nation on the real world I think it's got a lot more profound inside I think that clearly it's lasted fifty years so this is a lot to speak to it and then beyond that you know I think that because it was started during a time of great turmoil it wasn't escapism is really commenting on the on the real world in a very in a very meaningful way and because again just with Ross on twilight and we went into science fiction avoid censorship run they did the exact same thing with Star Trek and the other thing this key is Star Wars a science fantasy is set and galaxy long ago far far away it's not meant to be a future that we're going to aspire to or reach which starts with this very much this is the future of this this is really something we might some day be able to accomplish in when you look AT cell phones we look at all these are correct that now we have I mean I I frequently talk about my cell phone is a tri Corder because I can you access the world the worldwide web I can watch movies and TV shows on it it's it's much more like a tricorder the communicator because it has all these things you can do that that run very predictive in Star Trek it's phenomenal where were or are some of the writers of Star Trek today well you know these were the greatest writers on television you know when I saw the ritual Star Trek my here is with those writers and and Robert was smart enough he did exactly what what what about selling it on which is he reached out to the science fiction writers and so that first season startribune Harlan Ellison wrote city on the edge of forever an amazing piece of work George Clayton Johnson he noted Logan's run and fly license and Richard Matheson who again in I am legend many great pieces of work on and on DC Fontana is a great writer David Gerald to troubles troubles and many of these writers are still with us a DC Fontana Harlan Ellison David Gerald as I've just seen them recently and this still in in many cases is still writing this still active Harlan is an amazing writer and amazing man I just brilliant and and so I started getting all these people when I was a teenager because they'd start having Star Trek conventions in the nineteen seventies and soon as I was old enough to go to these conventions and go there and meet these writers and they were as brilliant in person as the nominal in person as they were you know on the on in the news in the work they were doing for television and in fact in some cases I would hire them for instance when I was on sliders I had David you'll come in and pitching we bought a lot of scripts from him so because the thing is they were really looking at the real world looking at life and saying how can I tell a story in Star Trek and I've never seen before that will be something that will move an audience will change their lives forever a great example of a great example there was a story that Harlan Ellison is on start to call the city on the edge of forever a great episode first season episode known every TV show ever done before that the hero saves the girl it was just what happened in television and in city on the edge of forever because the time in the lines have been changed in order for for things we said a right the woman that the curve falls in love with has to die could not only doesn't save the girl he's basically throws are under a truck literally and when I was a kid and saw that I was honest and it not only said to me the world is a much more interesting place and much more challenging place because you can have to come to a decision what's going to hurt you deeply but you have to do what's right that was images that show and in that hour just one hour of television changed my life forever and I realized that as a writer I could do the same thing that I could write something directly taken from real life every move an audience that would that would in Richmond I would say something about real life and that could change them for the better and it's a huge responsibility then and a huge opportunity and that's what Harlan else caught me just from that one hour of Star Trek you're gonna get a kick out of this you may already know this in nineteen fifty three there was a little television series called space command yeah guess who was in that William Shatner wow well yeah it is two three while it was a short lived science fiction show and yeah I've got I've got a kinescope of one of those episodes amazing and what goes around comes around phenomenal and but it's it's just because science fiction gives such an opportunity because it's it's wonderfully we talk about possible even say this is where we can go this is what we can create and you know people don't often think about science fiction this way but it went when Martin Luther king said I have a dream and I see of a future where the sons of slaves the sons of slave slave owners will sit together the table he was telling a science fiction story he was talking about a future didn't yet exist but could exist in the speaking in telling that science fiction story he was quitting possibility and that's exactly what starts active and in fact the shell Nichols who played for the for the quick start track and in Martin Luther king met her and said you must not quit the show because the role you're playing is so important you must you must stand on the show and that's what she did the couple twilight zones in the US nineteen of sixty than sixty three yeah he did Nick of time and nightmare at twenty thousand feet but it wasn't until sixty six one Star Trek popped up that he hit it big how did you get that part Mar well you know it's amazing because you know he was a wonderful actually been in judgment at Nuremberg in fact the Spencer Tracy and it is a very dynamic in a very unusual actor and very handsome and as I said in the first Dr piloted Jeffrey hunter who is incredibly good looking very good actor we somehow is a little colder than Shatner and when they went back to shoot instructor pilot difficult to really didn't want to do the second pilot they were casting about for someone else and we've Shatner was available and he was so dynamic and so intelligent and so on charismatic the cast him and the funny thing was my friend Douglas Hayes who is the one the great tracks of the twilight and was friends with when Shatner we've always been trying to get him in the two pilots for him and chat always turn them down so then he started coming on the call center this is what's going on with you being the Star Trek thing Michelle this is it'll never last yes did they get along did you know the main characters well you know there was a lot of competition between Leonard Nimoy and Shatner and there was a lot of because Shatner expected to be the star it was like the man from uncle with Robert Vaughn and and they've McCallum wells in the second minute banana becomes a star as well that's right the spot became this huge effects figure and and and and intellectual figure and so forth and it was it was a buzz about Spock and stock almost got cut from the show the the network didn't want of a pointed ears they really were very nervous about looking so devilish and by then you know run very sectors guns with with with that character but but we've center in new anymore we're very competitive and chatter would be cutting Spock's lines in one of the more lines this box but ultimately over the decades they became very very good friends and and Shatner wrote a book about a boy in recent years March stay with us we're gonna take a break we're going to come back and talk more about the fiftieth anniversary of Star Trek and then I want to get involved in some of the things you're doing on you too what an amazing way.

rod Serling one hour twenty thousand feet five fifty years fifty years two years
"george clayton johnson" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

10:25 min | 2 years ago

"george clayton johnson" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"To coast Margie Cree is a science fiction author television writer screenwriter has written many major studio works and for the networks as well he also does his own YouTube channel will talk about that it's called Mr sci fi he's got movies working on call can constantly called the space command and yeah as you know mark of course she's been on our program to talk about the twilight zone companion as well and here he is on coast to coast mark Sikri mark welcome back great to be here George this is an exciting time fifty years of Star Trek fifteen years shot incredible and and and it's amazing that so many wonderful Star Trek stories have been created by so many people over all these decades and I'm sure we're gonna be talking a lot about it we sure are what's new with you give us some updates all my gosh my mind studio I'm shooting space command and that due to the tons of stuff we've we've shot the two hour pilot we shot thirty minutes of the second to our story we now meeting with the networks with here and in England we're we're gonna set it up as a show it's going to be something that everyone's they be able to see and enjoy it's terrific and I'm doing books of course that as you said the new Twilight Zone companion and pitching facility of novels and just on on tons of stuff you're happy with all this life is good for you oh my god yes it's so it's so fun is when I realized that my audience could basically green like me thanks to the new models I thought that's why shop space command the my audience green with me they they finance me and and now we can go to the network's having shot you know the two hours and say this is what we have in mind the next up is the network says okay we we green light is a season and that's very different from the way it used to be so I'm I'm thrilled that would be exciting well Hey you know what nobody deserves it more than you mark thanks to it all right let's talk a little bit about the fiftieth anniversary of Star Trek gathered let's go back a little bit because you've done some work on Star Trek haven't you yeah yeah I I wrote for both Star Trek the next generation and the space nine and then I did as a starting of service George two K. the gotten on Hugo and nebula awards and subs and and start fixing a part of my life ever since I was a little kid the first debuted back in as you know nineteen sixty six and before it even aired the NBC commission a piece of artwork by an artist named James stamina and they would run for ten seconds is just the still illustration thing coming in the fall Star Trek and I would see this planet and this rocket ship blazing around the station placing on this planet and two guys and it went by so quickly this is before video recorders and have watched the thing I sit right up against the screen waiting for this commercial and it's like that guy in the in the back consisting of pointed ears and and I couldn't wait to see the show and then the first episode aired and with this so called a man trapped written by my dear friend George Clayton Johnson and he's been a Twilight Zone writer he will kick the can and nothing in the dark a wonderful writer and it was an amazing episode and from then on I was hooked it was just that was that was really it for me did you ever think that you'd be doing some work on it we know it's funny when when I was a kid a book came out called the making of Star Trek and this is when the fish the show was on the air was written by Steven with field and gene Roddenberry and it was the first book I read about how the TV show was made and that really plan of the sequencer thinking we know I'd like to be a writer producer in television and that kind of set me on that that path and and sold my dream was to create and run my own space going science fiction show and then with space command that's exactly what I'm doing and and so it's just a dream come true but it was very much set in motion I would gene Roddenberry created back back then and it only lasted three seasons yeah funny because you know they were actually an account with the second season and the woman a beach Trimble started a letter writing campaign and and picketing campaign I was part of that as a kid I remember holding my little picket signs standing outside with a crowd outside NBC and writing my little letter there a million letters were sent to NBC and that convinced me to renew the show and it got its third season and then if not for the third season it never would have gone into syndication it wouldn't have those and no one would have ever heard of it again and in fact when started initially aired I was so worried it would never air again that I actually recorded it on reel to reel audio tape as a kid the case of this of never aired I used to love those machines yeah yeah yeah why didn't succeed in the ratings mark we love the funny thing is back then the Nielsen ratings just registered book numbers than that how many millions of people watching an episode the year after Star Trek off the air they switch over cynical demographics when you check not only how many people watching it the what group of people Anne rice yeah and the eighteen to thirty five demographic was the perfect buying demographic and the year after started going off the air the when the demographics and the top rated show the number one show for that eighteen thirty five demographic that they all wanted to start all my god do they freak out the yes because of that if they ever had demographics the year earlier they never would have canceled Star Trek all my gosh it with and they would have made money on that show right that's right another funny thing are another safety about Star Trek with is incredibly colorful you know with his beautiful red and gold and blue uniforms with very colorful enterprise bridge well the the network that airs started with NBC and its parent company RCA television as they wanted to sell color TV's and one of the reason they greenlit Star Trek was because of those bright primary colors because people would buy color TV's just to see Star Trek may actually run ran RCA color TV advertisements the Star Trek so the showing them on color TV's and Iran and all the national magazines I have I have some of those ads that saves since then we've had on the program here William Shatner you brought us George Takei yeah and I think that was it just those two yeah well they're they're they're great I mean their unforgettable their distinctive actors and wonderful and again that speaks the diversity of Star Trek because again when started debuted in nineteen sixty six you didn't have African American actors leave like Michelle Nichols or Asian American actors in the lead like George two K. these were characters were dynamic they were going on adventures they were they were treated with respect by captain Kirk Mr Spock and Dr McCoy it was like a surrogate family of people all getting along all reaching out of the process and these of race and ethnicity to each other and when you think about it Star Trek aired during the nineteen sixties this is the height of the civil rights era it was the Vietnam War was going on the moon the moon landings were happening to me is an incredibly politically active time very first bill with a little bit of political and social turmoil and upheaval and change it was just the perfect time for that show debut what a tragedy a few months ago when Anton Yelchin the Star Trek actor died in a freak accident when his jeep rolled down and crushed him I know crazy at least he works in a medium where we get to see his work and enjoy it and that is a wonderful actor and again the start the characters in the Star Trek axes so the things that is so memorable and and the fact that the well educated could pass the torch to Anton Yelchin if he could do the the you know the the checkup so memorably he'll definitely be remember I think we have Walter onto yes and he's and he's another very distinctive vinyl and wonderful actor and and again each Star Trek character is so distinctive when when I wrote when I world wilderness in time it was for Xbox live quite through all of those characters and the all speak differently from each other they all have different viewpoints rock line will not work for Kirk will not work from Corey vice versa they all are very distinct sense and that's why they lasted the didn't we have James two hands ashes sun off into space it will run very for to I went to major Barrett Roddenberry house when I recorded her for the computer voice in world enough and time and robbers ashes with evidence and up in the space shuttle and and then brought back and so very fitting testament so again what was it like being on the Star Trek set when you were a kid well you know I was given a Christmas present of a trip to the star trek's that when I was a kid it was great the greatest Christmas present ever and it was the last episode of the original Star Trek ever shot if I'd gone a week later the actual would've been gone and it was an S. of called turnabout intruder in which Kirk's of personalities swapped with a woman woman scientists and and it was a win Saturday that Dan Mitchell there to play this chapel and and and the fourth Kelly played Dr McCoy is amazing locking the fence that was sold a nominal and and and fasting because one of the stage hands said last show of the season and under her breath major there it's that last show ever and the irony was the decades later I I recorded her as a computer voice for the starter gifts that I did thirty years later and so and so she was not only wrong about last show ever on on Star Trek she was wrong that even herself because she would continue on Star Trek in later incarnations on Star Trek the next generation in the features and so forth though this phenomenal you and George went to Japan at a convention in you we did yes well when when we did world enough and time and and that yes I did with him and you can actually watch it on my my website mark sickly dot com in its entirety and after we shot that so we went to the world science fiction convention in Japan which means that an audience of three thousand people we got a standing ovation with the crowd with it with with tears streaming down their faces and then the next we were nominated for top award in science fiction the Hugo award which is given out of the world science fiction convention so it was just mazing honor and to be there in Japan with George he's fluent in Japanese and so we were answering questions I would be fielding questions in English and he would be answering in Japanese and I just on the other day there was a big Star Trek convention in Las Vegas to celebrate the fiftieth and fifty cents so I went to it and and George and I were able to reconnect and I very much want to miss this command so we've been talking about the rules will be playing in space command was Shatner there yes and it was it is amazing because he's eighty five years old and you could never tell yes this doesn't look that not not at all and and energy level he seems like a much younger man is phenomenal and as is George two K. George doesn't seem is that like a guy pushing eighty either these are amazingly vital and vibrant people in and phenomenal actors in the you know Star Trek just would have been the same without that group it was a very special group it was it was lightning in a bottle you know it's amazing because.

Margie Cree writer YouTube two K eighty five years thirty minutes fifteen years thirty years fifty years ten seconds two hands two hours two hour
"george clayton johnson" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

06:50 min | 2 years ago

"george clayton johnson" Discussed on KTRH

"Real world I think it's got a lot more profound inside I think that clearly it's lasted fifty years so this is a lot to speak to it and then beyond that you know I think that because it was started during a time of great turmoil it wasn't escapism is really commenting on the on the real world in a very in a very meaningful way and because again just with rod Serling on twilight and we went into science fiction to avoid censorship run they did the exact same thing with Star Trek and the other thing with key is Star Wars a science fantasy it's set in the galaxy long ago far far away it's not meant to be a future that we're going to aspire to or reach which starts at this very much this is the future that that that's really something we might some day be able to accomplish in when you look AT cell phones we look at all these are correct that now we have I mean I I frequently talk about my cell phone is a tri Corder because I can you access the world the worldwide web I can watch movies and TV shows on it it's it's much more like a tricorder the communicator because it has all these things you can do that that run very protective in Star Trek it's phenomenal where were or are some of the writers of Star Trek today well you know these were the greatest writers on television you know when I saw the ritual Star Trek my heroes with those writers and and Robert was smart enough he did exactly what what what about selling it on which is he reached out to the science fiction writers and so the first season starts acute Harlan Ellison wrote city on the edge of forever an amazing piece of work George Clayton Johnson he noted Logan's run a Twilight Zone and Richard Matheson who again that I am legend many great pieces of work on in on the DC Fontana is a great writer David Gerald to troubles troubles how many of these writers are still with us a DC Fontana Harlan Ellison David Gerald I I've just seen them recently and this still in in many cases is still writing this still active Harlan is an amazing writer and amazing man I just brilliant and and so I started getting know these people when I was a teenager because they'd start having Star Trek conventions in the nineteen seventies and as soon as I was old enough to go to these conventions and go there and meet these writers and they were as brilliant in person as phenomenal in person as they were you know on the on in the news and what they were doing for television and in fact in some cases I would hire them for instance when I was on sliders I had David you'll come in and kitchen we bought a lot of scripts from him so because the thing is that they were really looking at real world look at life and saying how can I tell a story in Star Trek and I've never seen before that will be something that will move an audience will change their lives forever a great example of a great example there was a story that Harlan Ellison did on structure called the city on the edge of forever a great episode first season episode known every TV show ever done before that the hero saves the girl it was just what happened in television in city on the edge of forever because the timing of lines have been changed in order for for things to settle right before the woman that the curve falls in love with has to die could not only doesn't save the girl he basically throws are under a truck literally and when I was a kid and saw that I was astonished and it not only said to me the world is a much more interesting place and much more challenging place because you can have to come to a decision what's going to hurt you deeply but you have to do what's right that was images that show and in that hour just one hour of television changed my life forever and I realize that as a writer I could do the same thing that I could write something directly taken from real life every move an audience that would that would in Richmond I would say something about real life and that could change them for the better and it's a huge responsibility then and a huge opportunity and that's what Harlan Ellison caught me just from that one hour of Star Trek you're gonna get a kick out of this you may already know this in nineteen fifty three there was a little television series called space command yeah guess who was in that William Shatner wow well yeah sixty three while it was a short lived science fiction show and yeah I've got I've got a kinescope of one of those episodes amazing huh and what goes around comes around phenomenal and but it's it's just because science fiction given such an opportunity because it's it's wonderfully we talk about possibility to say this is where we can go this is what we can create and you know people don't often think about science fiction this way but it went when Martin Luther king said I have a dream and I see of a future where the sons of slaves the sons of slave slave owners will sit together the table he was telling a science fiction story he was talking about a future the didn't yet exist but could exist in the speaking and telling that science fiction story he was creating a possibility and that's exactly what Star Trek did and in fact the shell Nichols who played for the for the quick start track and in Martin Luther king met her and said you must not quit the show because the role you're playing is so important you must you must stand on the show and that's what she did Shatner did a couple twilight zones in the US nineteen of sixty than sixty three yes you did Nick of time and nightmare at twenty thousand feet but it wasn't until sixty six one Star Trek popped up that he hit it big how did you get that part are we know it's amazing because you know he was a wonderful actually been in judgment at Nuremberg in fact the Spencer Tracy and it is a very dynamic in a very unusual actor and very handsome and for the seventy first started I love the Jeffrey hunter who was incredibly good looking very good actor the somehow is a little colder than Shatner and when they went back to shoot constructed pilot Jeffrey hunter really didn't want to do the second pilot they were casting about for someone else and we've Shatner was available and he was so dynamic and so intelligent and so on charismatic the cast him and the funny thing was my friend Douglas Hayes who was the one the great tracks of the twilight and was friends with winning Shatner they've always been trying to get him in the two pilots for him and chat always turn them down so that if you start for coming on the call center uses what's going on with you being the Star Trek thing is Janice it'll never last really yes did they get along did you know the main characters well you know there was a lot of competition between Leonard Nimoy and Shatner and there was a lot of because Shatner expected to be the star it was like the man from uncle with Robert Vaughn David McCallum worlds in the second minute banana becomes a star as well that's right the spot became this huge sex figure and and and and intellectual figure and so forth and it was it was a buzz about Spock in stock almost got cut from the show the the network didn't want of the pointed ears they really were very nervous about looking so devilish and the van you know run very stuck to his guns with with with that character but but we've center in new anymore we're very competitive in shadow would be cutting Spock's lines in one of the more lines this box the old me over the decades.

one hour twenty thousand feet fifty years
"george clayton johnson" Discussed on Fusion Patrol

Fusion Patrol

04:29 min | 2 years ago

"george clayton johnson" Discussed on Fusion Patrol

"Ooh. Yeah. Yeah. Has to be. That's like that's what he does all day. So at least got to do is to go hunt. Vampires you start in the beginning of the day, you make sure your home safe at night, I'm gonna it's perfectly reasonable anyway, who's tally. The you mentioned earlier that there is ten minutes of setting the story up. I gave a brief lurk, but not enough of a look to found a satisfactory answer. I think that in nineteen seventy seventy-two the typical length of a TV episode after you've stripped it of commercials was about fifty minutes if I'm not mistaken. This was very strange in my mind in that you have the the bits where Norlisk calls is publisher. And they talk about how bad it is. Or how I can't do it. You gotta hear these tapes. And now, I gotta talk to you. I gotta talk to you today. So then they have the whole bit where he goes down. And he sits around waiting for lunch and nothing happens. And then he calls, and we Norlisk ignoring and we see then we seem go back, and it's like a week later, the publisher context Norlisk attorney, and he tells the attorney to look into. To it. And so the attorney looks into it, and then the Terni catches up with publisher days later, apparently, you're right to be worried. I found in the whole stuff about writing up and down on the cable car, and and and go into the club. And and and then finally the publisher goes to Norlisk place, and and starts to process now this movie was one hundred seventy two minutes long. So if they could just kill twenty two minutes with the framing stuff, this would effectively be about what one episode of the New Orleans tapes as TV series would be like probably have about the same pacing. You know, what they would have to cut it up under normal normal circumstances, which is another tip off that they're probably going for a pilot that in the big number one in the number two on the tape. But anyway, this one was written issue by William F Nolan. You familiar with him? I don't. I am not Richard Matheson, who did the night stalker was famous TV writer short story, novelist. Concentrated a lot on horror stories he'd written the movie duel, which I think you owe. But yes. Star Trek stories. He's written says, we'll leave if Nolan also a multiple award winning horror SCI fi writer, also Star Trek the twilight zone, he and George Clayton. Johnson did Logan's run. And I mean, the novels on then William Nolan wrote the rest of the novels. He's he's won countless awards. He's won. Are. He's written comedy things. I guess he's got a Sam space series, which is sort of a comedy science fiction detective PI sort of thing. He's done biographies. I know he's gonna buy of Dashiell Hammett out there. So there's there's a connection that popped in my brain. When I was thinking about the the writing. It's like, oh, yeah. He's definitely trying to do the old PI pastiche there with a gun metal sky and all that kind of stuff. I mean, the guy has got a ton of a ton of work behind him. It's not it's not bad. I'm the premise of the story is I grown when they said, oh, the blood's been drained out of the body after admit that that was the one part in the story that that I just really it has to be a blood drain. Traders. Well, it's back tonight. Stocker it's like, it's another blood draining thing, and yes, they had a good reason for it could reason for it from the in universe story kind of which I thought was novel though, I don't need it to survive. I don't need to vibe. It's like I'm have to make this blood body for this demon. I mean, okay. That's that's the kind of weird stuff I can expect. I I appreciate it. It was as ambi- go. It wasn't your standard zombie wasn't your standard vampire it. It had all the marks. I I thought it was a decent premise for this supernatural story. It. 'execution perhaps it was definitely tweet for jump scares Danker..

William F Nolan publisher Norlisk Dashiell Hammett attorney writer Richard Matheson New Orleans Norlisk place Stocker George Clayton Johnson Logan one hundred seventy two minute twenty two minutes fifty minutes ten minutes