28 Burst results for "George Carlin"

"george carlin" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

06:19 min | 4 months ago

"george carlin" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Aesthetically significant. Our jazz critic, Kevin Whitehead, says roach's landmark album, scores in all three categories. They were free. Through Mercedes must be lying can it really be can be can believe it, but that's what they say they know longer as they know longer this is freedom day. Street and day so those shackling chains away. That I see says it's really true if green Abby Lincoln in 1960 singing freedom day. Oscar Brown junior's lyric celebrates Emancipation and maybe looks ahead to freedoms yet to be secured. The album we insist max roach's freedom now suite, epitomizes African American jazz musicians, support for the burgeoning civil rights.

"george carlin" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

07:08 min | 4 months ago

"george carlin" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Out of the way. And when you got in there, how did you do inside? You mentioned you were a court martial three times. How did you respond to the authority within the military? Poorly to the authority. I was very good at the thing they trained me for, which was electronics and computer analog computers. There was a system called a K system bond system on the B 47 and I was trained in a very elite squadron. I'm proud to say it's one of the few conceits I have about myself, but it is a genuine one. I qualified for a highly elite school and passed with the highest T score they'd ever had. And therefore, but I loved it because of the theory involved. It was all blackboard. It was none of the screwdriver stuff. So when I got to my base to practice this art science that they taught me, I spent a lot of money on me. Right away they tell you, pick this up, put it over there, put those here and just take that. I didn't care for that. And so I became a disc jockey and a downtown commercial station instead when I was 18 and I had already begun my career while I was getting my military out of the way. But I was a behavior problem. They are just as I was in school because I didn't accept arbitrary orders from people who I thought were possibly were inferior. Who were the first comics that you heard where you thought they nailed it. This is what life is about. Like they just described life. Well, you know, I don't know. I know that the gist of your question I can answer. Of course, comedy changed in the 1950s when the individuals emerged and nobody was all the same anymore. It used to be very sane, very safe and very same. And then Lenny Bruce morsel, Nichols and May and a lot of other people in the improv groups and some underground press and so forth. Took hold of comedy and changed it. And so it was that crop in the 50s I was then approaching my 20th birthday. And Lenny Bruce was, of course, of the most, the one who inspired me the most because I saw for the very first time, utter and complete honesty on a stage, and it was a brilliant form of it. It wasn't just honesty. It was, it was a great satire, even in his days of his just his parodies were great. But then he started talking about religion, things and I thought, boy, that's wonderful to know that you can do that, that it can be done. I didn't say, well, I'm going to do that too. But I sort of said, okay, now I know that. And it really did help me later to decide to be myself. How much do you think your comedy has changed when you first, from when you first started doing stand up? Well, of course, the times helped the changes illustrated by the times I began in 1960, I went through about 8 or 9 years of what essentially were the extended 1950s, sort of a button down period. But that was when the country was changing. I was 30 in 1957. The people I was entertaining were in their 40s, and they were the parents of the people who were 20 18 in college changing, beginning to change the nature of our society to a great extent. So I cited more with them because I was anti authoritarian and the authority. And I just let myself revert to my deferred adolescence and be one of them in terms of my work rather than these people, I really disliked who I was entertaining these year old plus people. So that's how my comedy has changed. The times we're safer and I was a safer mainstream comic in the 60s and then I became this other person who was a little more honest and open with language and his thoughts. Were you performing to older audiences because those were the people who could buy the tickets in the places? That you were performing? No, not strictly speaking. What happened was this and I can do this briefly for you. I had always been this law breaker outlaw type kid and adolescent an air force guy as you pointed out. Never stuck by the rules. Always swimming against the tide. But I had a mainstream dream and my dream was to be like Danny Kaye in the movies or to be like Bob Hope in the movies. So I never put those two things together. I never saw that they didn't go together. And I followed this other dream in the way that you did because the only way you could do it was to please people with mainstream safe comedy cuts with the period demanded and so I did that until the two became it became an untenable situation. I couldn't. I could no longer be myself inside and serve these other things. And when I saw the mix when I saw the mistake, I went about correcting it in a slow and orderly manner. It took about two or three years for my change as it were to take place. Well, George Carlin, I'd like to ask you to end our interview by reading the final piece in your new book and the book is called when will Jesus bring the pork chops and this piece is called the secret news. And you're welcome to say anything about writing it before you read it or to just read it or whatever you prefer. I have a big file called news and it has a lot of odd news formats and one of them was this one called the secret news. And this was actually written and designed to be on an album, maybe a studio type album where you could use sound effects and you were simulating an actual broadcasting, but it works this way too with the sound effects indicated verbally. I'll do that for you. It's called the secret news and we hear a news ticker sound effect. And the announcer whispering, saying, good evening ladies and gentlemen, it's time for the secret news and the news ticket gets louder and he goes and the ticker lowers. Here is the secret news. All people are afraid. No one knows what they're doing. Everything is getting worse. Some people deserve to die. Your money is worthless. No one is properly dressed. At least one of your children will disappoint you. The system is rigged. Your house will never be completely clean. All teachers are incompetent. There are people who really dislike you. Nothing is as good as it seems. Things don't last. No one is paying attention. The country is dying. God doesn't care. Shh. George Carlin, thank you so much for talking with us. Sure. Thank you. I always appreciate them that flattering here, an intelligent interview and thank you for that. George Carlin, speaking to Terry gross in 2004. George Carlin's American Dream and outstanding new documentary by Judd Apatow and Michael bonfiglio premieres tonight and tomorrow night on HBO and is available now on the streaming service HBO Max. Coming up, Kevin Whitehead revisits we insist the newly reissued 1960 album by jazz drummer max roach. This is fresh air. Last month, max roach's 1960 album we insist was reissued on CD. It also was named to the national recording registry, a roster of works deemed culturally, historically, or.

Lenny Bruce Nichols George Carlin Danny Kaye the times Bob Hope swimming Michael bonfiglio Terry gross HBO Kevin Whitehead Judd Apatow max roach
"george carlin" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

06:54 min | 4 months ago

"george carlin" Discussed on Fresh Air

"To the NPR politics podcast. George Carlin was one of the more popular and influential comics to emerge from the 1960s counter culture. He died in 2008, the week after he had been named the recipient of the Mark Twain prize for American humor. Terry gross spoke with George Carlin in 1990 and again in 2004. We'll hear excerpts from both interviews. When Terry spoke with him in 2004, they listened back to his 1972 recording of Carlin's comic monologue, 7 dirty words you can never say on television. Of course, we bleep the words that made this routine famous. There are 400,000 words in the English language, and there are 7 of them. You can't say on television. What a ratio that is. 399,993. To 7. They must really be banned. They'd have to be outrageous. To be separated from a group that large. All of you over here, U 7. Bad words. That's what they told us they were. Remember? That's a bad word. No bad words. Bad thoughts. Bad intentions. And words. You know the 7, don't you that you can't say on television? Huh? Those are the heavy 7. Those are the ones that'll infect your soul. Curve your spine and keep the country from winning the war. George Carlin, welcome to fresh air. Thanks, Terry. Can you talk about what led to this routine? Like what you were thinking about how you wrote it well, I don't really know that there was a Eureka moment or anything like that. What happened was I'd always held these attitudes. I've always been sort of anti authoritarian and I really don't like arbitrary rules and regulations that are essentially designed to get people in the habit of conforming and obeying authority blindly. So I have always resisted that in my life as a child as an adolescent and as a young adult, and so I held that attitude. That was the fertile ground for all of this. Secondly, I have a strong interest in language that is in part genetic and part then fostered by my mother. And I have always taken great joy in looking closer, more closely at language. So those things were in place. On these other things, we get into the field of hypocrisy, where you really can not pin down why what these rules they want to enforce are. It's just impossible to say this is a blanket rule. You'll see some newspapers print F blank blank K some print F asterisk asterisk K some blank F blank blank blank. Some put the word bleep, some put expletive deleted. So there's no, there's no real consistent standard. It's not a science. It's a notion that they have. And it's superstitious. These words have no power. We give them this power by refusing to be free and easy with them. We give them great power over us. They really in themselves have no power. It's the rest of the sentence that makes them either good or bad. In your 1972 recording, you talk about how it's perfectly okay to say, don't prick your finger, but you can say, don't finger your blank. Yeah, you can't reverse the truth. You can't reverse the two words. So comics work with the power of word. And the fact that certain words are supposed to be taboo, as you point out, that gives them power. That's right. And that makes those words more powerful for you when you want to use them. So do you feel like you've been able to work with the taboo nature of certain words? And make that work in your favor. Well, like in that classic routine. Yeah. That is an interestingly disguised way. And I don't mean you were trying to deceive me or anything, but it was in a disguised way of saying, well, don't some people just use these for shock value. You get this phrase all the time from interviewers, shock value. Well, shock is a kind of a heightened form of surprise and surprise is at the heart of comedy. So if you're using the word in a way to heighten the impact of the sentence or season this, do they are, after all, great seasonings. There are sentences that without the use of hell or dam even, lose all their impact. So they have a proper place in language and in my case, I just like them because they are real and they do have impact. They do make a difference in a sentence, but if you're using them for their own sake, that's probably kind of weak. If you're using them in some way that you feel enhances what you're doing and delivering that's another thing. Did you ever expect that that comedy routine would be actually played on the radio? It would be part of a case that made it all the way to the Supreme Court. And that it would become as important and famous a case as it became. Well, I knew that it wasn't out of the question that it may be maybe played on the radio. FM radio stations at that time, and there were commercial ones who qualified as what was called underground radio. And an awful lot of liberties were taken with music to music that had very kind of hate the words explicit and graphic. But those are the words that would be used by someone to describe those kind of songs. Those lyrics, I knew there was a chance, but of course, you know, no one ever sees other things coming that are unexpected and larger. I just knew that I had done a piece that summed up my position very well and sort of had a nice, it had a wonderful rhythmic the reading of those 7 words, the way they were placed together had a magnificent kind of a jazz feeling a rhythm that was just very natural and satisfying the way those syllables were placed together. And so I knew I had done something that was making.

George Carlin Terry Terry gross Mark Twain Carlin NPR Supreme Court
"george carlin" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

07:54 min | 4 months ago

"george carlin" Discussed on Fresh Air

"With some of those who truly knew him best. His brother Patrick, his first wife Brenda, and his daughter Kelly. All of them look at George's life and their own with the objective honesty the George eventually brought to his stand up act. And while we learn of George's abuse of father and oppressive mother, and of George and Brenda's descent into drugs and alcoholism, respectively, we also learn about what drove George Carlin to keep developing and altering his approach to comedy. In audiotapes recorded for his autobiography last words, Carl and explains his disdain for authority figures in almost clinically detached terms. My own experience of authority is one of opposition to not just questioning authority, but actively opposing it and trying to undo what it had in mind. Everything that had rules and regulations, I managed to either get kicked out of or leave early on my own. The choir, the altar boys, the Boy Scouts, summer camp, and schools. The first half of this excellent HBO documentary follows George Carlin's many evolutionary stages, providing clear samples of each. Stage one arrives in 1957, when at age 18, young George joins the air force. He lands a part time job as a disc jockey in Louisiana using the kind of on air voice and persona, he would later make fun of. 18 minutes before 5 o'clock, and this is music from Carlin's corner, and that ain't half of it, $30 in the lucky license jackpot, a call going out soon. Coming up Warren storm with trouble. I got trouble. Troubles. He forms a two man comedy team with Jack burns, and they moved to California. The duo breaks up after only a few months, but Carlin stays put, pursuing his interest in comedy. He's in the audience of a Lenny Bruce show on one of the night's Bruce gets arrested. And Carlin gets arrested, too, out of solidarity. His own onstage comedy then, in nightclubs and on TV, is mainstream and conventional. Until suddenly it isn't. When he starts to introduce such counterculture concepts and characters as TVs obviously drugged out, hippy dippy weather me. Okay, the radar is picking up a line of thunder showers from Utica New York to Middletown. However, the radar is also picking up a squadron of Russian ICBMs. I wouldn't sweat the thunder, shower. Tonight. No 25° to Mars high whenever I get up. As the 60s progresses and Carlin decides to talk about issues more directly, he refocuses his energies. He starts booking appearances almost exclusively on college campuses, where the students would be more receptive to his new material. His beard and his hair get longer, and his comedy routines get more topical. As when heavyweight champion Muhammad Ali's conscientious objection to the Vietnam War has him stripped of his title for several years before finally being allowed to step back into the ring. George Carlin, talking outdoors to a small college crowd, sees more than a little irony in that whole situation. Hey, they're letting Ali fight. He happened to lose, but at least they're letting him work again, right? For three years, the cat couldn't work. Muhammad Ali. And of course he had an unusual job beating people up, you know? But the government wanted to change jobs. The government wanted him to kill people. He said, no, that's where I draw the line. I'll beat him up, but I don't want to kill him. And the government got spiteful, they said, look, if you won't kill him, we won't let you beat him up. From there, George Carlin's comedy routines get more dense, more bold, and more obsessed with the poetry, meanings, and impact of language. All this leads to such uncensored comedy albums as class clown. Put out, I learned in this documentary by a record label owned by another groundbreaking comedian, Flip Wilson. That album includes his infamous 7 dirty words routine, which identifies and talks about the 7 words you can't say on television. When New York radio station WBAI played parts of that routine, it was objected to by an outraged parent tuning in, leading to a court case pitting the FCC against the corporate owners of the radio station. It was a free speech case, FCC versus the Pacific a foundation that went all the way to the Supreme Court. The court voted in favor of the FCC in what basically was a blow against free speech. Carlin wasn't saying those words for shock value. He was talking about their usage and symbolism and why they had been given such power. Many young George Carlin listeners recognized the subtleties in the issue and the comedy routine that the Supreme Court had not, and some of them grew up to also become comedians obsessed with words. One of those youngsters was Stephen Colbert, who later became a household name because of such self created words as truthiness. He was a giant George Carlin fan. Is that he's The Beatles? Of comedy. At a certain point in his career, there's this huge shift. You know, he's doing the community conversion of love me do for the first part of his career. And then suddenly he puts out the comedic white album. Another major George Carlin enthusiast was Jerry Seinfeld, who also, like Carlin, delighted in questioning the accepted norms around him and using precise language to do so. He personified that thing that you see when you're young and you go that. That's it. That's the thing. That's the thing to be. And I want it to be just like him getting every word in the right spot. Because when he did it, it thrilled me, you know. And I wanted to do that. I wanted that skill. And I've spent my life pursuing it. The first night of George Carlin's American Dream follows his rise to stardom, his 7 dirty words controversy, and his counterculture coronation as the very first guest host on the premiere episode of Saturday Night Live. It ends, though, with Carlin's seemingly on the wane, no longer in touch or in Vogue. But he was determined to change and rise again by being even truer to himself and his opinions. In part two of American Dream, and for the rest of his life, George Carlin did exactly that. George Carlin's American Dream premieres tonight and tomorrow night on HBO with both parts available today on HBO Max. After a break, we're going to listen back to portions of two of Terry's interviews with George Carlin. This is fresh air. This message comes from NPR sponsor, the John templeton foundation, who believes in advancing humanity's understanding of the profound questions in life, funding research and catalyzing conversations that inspire people with awe and wonder since 1987. The John templeton foundation is proud to support leading scientists, philosophers, and theologians from around the world. Learn about the latest discoveries related to black holes, complexity, forgiveness, and free will at templeton dot org. This is Tamara Keith from the NPR politics podcast. We've been following the news of the draft leaked opinion from the Supreme Court on roe V wade. For more on what life in the U.S. could look like if roe is overturned, listen.

George Carlin Carlin George Brenda George joins Jack burns Muhammad Ali FCC HBO Lenny Bruce Utica Carl Patrick Kelly Middletown Flip Wilson Louisiana New York Warren
"george carlin" Discussed on Túnel de vento

Túnel de vento

07:18 min | 1 year ago

"george carlin" Discussed on Túnel de vento

"Vive <hes> vive equipped in what wall decor dogmas was when these incommoded civil the preakness creams crimson repeal. Waesche when you lose george carlin. Elliot's some the pursuer ulan swing caps. He's put ash muslim. Ms mc stemmed the goof francia mc stone doom. ish bureau. Sound which tom did. George carlin so stuckey steam. When you lose. So stu where might people east. You ought to the trash deal in june to do against knicks foot over in a ring ring at tech there suji arguing. Will miss holton do eleni. Blues josh scheduling. Follow swing george carlin misquakees fall. George carlin this strange mayes of again to is meant modern jentzsch as stay on rasa. He falcons super tuto volumes. And the viewer kyong content. Pow ash bookish segment. Gary defeated mentha qui vient tunes euch civil and would yell at. They're put in a while winchcombe with yellen and evokes greeted out these cologne management. Rather oku visual bookish. George carlin a swim falls assault. Quainton reached the epa vehement. The quizzes much relish could concern would mostly showering mesh niche premiss. Yeesh the v the professional. George carlin you'll come so wish them lucian rue the starred rather specified says on cordelia stars yakuza quiz via in leash. There's massive muslim men tutor. Yeah <hes> spat back fragments. Tackle fossil in contra owned george carlin star a seek proper you swim imagine teague bhaskar town. He starts getting seal to kill at the sweet at all to emit to issues issues so asked them make you zero s the possessing east salt abuse abysmal inconvenient masses. Kim them but look and lesions approve it before about the male democ cows into bullying. You know tweeted. E- employed gordon philosopher moore e caution shugart super convenient comedian fash mma piazza beata. Them seem own lack promising piano album or physics. You believe the law wish the comment cup. It open mass bruce. solve this. You seen you a visa ville ish compliment. Chronic is released each child. Because you seen you key amherst nikolas any savile. Ceo shikwati ouch who intellect wise yummies. Worcester see lasts orange diagnostics. Calm sewer a launch. Since this obscure every meant masuma parrot absolutely pass slow hip law few of survey mash up a besson kill susie casuals ilna. Sewers are starting a condition. Others steve nash. Mika mayes year process launch. Assu a decent government. No michelle manche shovel. The vehicles process. Windy didn't end since now. Who send the carleen. it also varies. So we'll see them. We need the fee. you'll muslims. There's india's ange tomato soup. Pursuant seizure incorporates as contests weaving password at the start are jewish bleached inch pew that this win to on the boys. Thirty the to my veg. E bull visitation school source will have result you into the school of zone team temp through petya mosquito visa cameras on my job movies. On scene path you movie. Zanchi address should is final. And the consequent team he continues to be carrying a former camilla. Barak mir out truce in india's and say and pavel groom wish that into still volatile yeston. Polat there's necklace by then soon. Easter viking cement clear for party push guessing as well so the gavitt nist cosmic yavuz seen liam show lawyer single and the person that you allow neglect well boom would eastern but ask your salted sue. We simple mesh cabal. Steve martin is seeing somebody. With whom wish that who should give a mccovey. Cigarettes bash diverse chronic bachelor firma. Camille follow mail. Order soon was compiled sues up now it but as momentum. Sewer reopens eastern point. New assassinate him to one in contempt. And you think of some old through but as would sipe needed serum quiz lakers res silent. Battling with asleep have ruined squished. Boone would remain this in psalm. Darville mash cross implemented. Stan stasiak nausea. Would pronouncing sundar will ever simp- park would add permanency schmancy that yes a patron. See the city of lalo book michigan apart here. A medical suit prison gyms nauseating forms known calcium. Scooting are woodenness. Would that seizure comedian. Sison sewer companies urge staff zone intellect one minutes on kosovo with deep zoom shirow europeans islamization malene. The stone do brute who start a patten's interested in carrying in tow inventory contain mercato longer. It pursue provided them falls become sean part indian rivera the interval scottish segment carmen ramya. You're seeing things simple zone. The geologist will sound substandard media. Mining a swanscombe force was with tricia them for a sweet crashing. The temps attempts zeroed encompass embargo sufis. You empathic is podcast level. Beijing volcker are mildly bluer. She can with lavish yet. Day bro sema.

George carlin Waesche suji jentzsch yellen Quainton lucian rue teague bhaskar gordon philosopher moore piazza beata amherst nikolas Ceo shikwati susie casuals holton Mika mayes michelle manche carleen stu Elliot knicks
"george carlin" Discussed on Túnel de vento

Túnel de vento

04:58 min | 1 year ago

"george carlin" Discussed on Túnel de vento

"Ganesh given. Sarah streams the practical nash. The seat sang. A sympathy sank cushioned but concern plan. Djuric follow same problem practical story. I seen leash. A snooker is followed. The divisional follett mish when follow follow. Suit abandonment quello preliminary study ill my megan skull dow commodities convenient. Fash part this could put push push jerry. Only vacuum vacuum abella would woody stainless unlash. Started gosh to that. A schimdt couldn't keep ten task jira or and we hugh masekela jin linear temp in key. Thirty copy off air popper skin will leave you if fujita rejoin the motel have a simple ish circle f. Era aim clinton you a fair to ambush in jambi cerro kappa. Marsh shaved him. Segement so anthra- app. Saddam associated raiders. Now aghia so aisles. Resume seashore vision. Bain komo's emc sched on these parables. Eleven inch masako. Emc kept patty rouse them. Our fund khumbu come which could veer poetic commend in sui love rowson. No circle each by push. Push down your vehicle. Eric as simple. Mccall wilmington love. Make it easier. Uncle auto having young while ceesay stubbing meant of environs offish exquisite beautifully and..

Djuric quello Ganesh Fash nash abella jambi cerro hugh masekela Sarah Bain komo fujita woody jerry Emc patty rouse Marsh clinton Saddam raiders
"george carlin" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"george carlin" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"No, he I think he had a heart attack or something. I don't know if it was dry. Don't remember ever reading that it was drug related or something. He would just had a health condition. So how about you? 749 7800 the big £1 700 on a T and t. What band? What person while performer would you have liked to seen? Before they passed away. And this is honor of Charlie. What's is there Anything in your mind? Rob that comes to mind. Well, another great drummer Neil Peart and Rush. Somebody just mentioned rush. And I heard you mentioned George Carlin. Man. I'd love to have seen him too. See, I didn't get to see George Carlin either. I saw Henderson a few times and, uh, but no never gets and I saw Robin Williams one time. Who is another one, But George Carlin, man, his his intelligence was off the chart. Yeah, he was a very smart man. The stuff that he came up with was just beyond brilliant. And I would have loved to have seen that live from the UC Health Traffic Center. You see Health transplant moves patients off the transplant waiting list 50% faster than the national average. This is science and in science Lives. Hope. North Pounds 75 Year Stop and go from Mitchell. Two paddocks southbound, You slow out of Lachlan down towards paddock nor 71 pretty steady traffic from past ridge distort And South 70 one's heavy south of Martin Luther King on 24, 71 stop and go Traffic but heavier traffic east to 75 between 71 Loveland Madera Road in Kentucky West to 75 slows between 4 71 and Taylor Mill Brent Spence delays beyond six minutes from 12th and Pike Street South found less than 10 minutes from.

Neil Peart UC Health Traffic Center George Carlin 50% Rush Robin Williams Lachlan six minutes Henderson Rob less than 10 minutes Pike Street South 75 Year £1 700 71 Loveland Madera Road Two paddocks Charlie Taylor Mill Brent Spence 24, 71 stop 12th
"george carlin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"george carlin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Can see naive realism. It work in everyday interactions. Take, for example, something that the comedian George Carlin observed. Have you ever noticed when you're driving that? Anyone who's driving slower than you is an idiot? And if anyone driving faster than you is a man yet? Yes, I love that quote. It reminds me of one time I was in the kitchen, preparing some food and my Seven year old was in the playroom with my father, his grandfather and they were looking at different cars in a magazine and my son kept referring the big SUVs. You know, my father preferred the little boxer type cars and at some point my father said to him, I know what's a matter of taste, but your taste is stupid. Uh, that's a great story. That's a wonderful story on and I feel it speaks to something that that that I think is really important. You know, parents and teachers are constantly trying to teach this lesson. You know, don't jump to conclusions. Slow down. Don't assume you know what's happening in someone else's head. And yet it's so hard to remember to practice these lessons, right? I mean, I mean, as a parent and as a teacher yourself, do you sometimes go? You know, I'm doing the exact same thing I tell my kids not to do. Yes, because these things are so automatic and so natural These air tendencies that we have to override in ourselves. We can't eliminate them right? Because so the tendency to think you see the world as it is an objective reality. And therefore, if you like the race car better than the SUV that it truly is better. That tendency is sort of inescapable. And when Children do it, they don't realize even that there does distinction when they're young between Perception is reality. As we get older, we come to recognize right. Oh, wait a second. That's a matter of taste. Straight, like at some level become, too relies on. You know there's different perspectives, and it's an artist. But that initial belief that we haven't from childhood that my perception is reality doesn't really go away. And so it does actually feel that the car we prefers the better one. There are a lot of implications that stem from what Emily calls this basic architecture of the brain. Here is one that should be familiar to all of us. If I'm late for a.

George Carlin Emily
"george carlin" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"george carlin" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Pregame To get some enjoyment out of the game because I like football, because, like I watched the bear's last week and thoroughly enjoyed it, I'm watching the U. S. Open this Sunday. I don't I'm not an NFL guide where he needed 24 7. But as long as it's not shoved down my throat. I know what idiots these guys are like. The Pouncey guy ends in and in Pittsburgh. Took the guy's name off his helmet. He's Oh, no deal. What it was. They just They just told me to put it on there. And so until I read about him, I said, Okay, that's who we're dealing with. I know what we're dealing with. But all week for about two weeks now I got people hit me up on Twitter. Well, you watch the NFL. The NFL's complicity with black lives matter. Their marks us. That makes you a Marxist. That's getting a little far fetched here. Why don't we pump the brakes a little bit? Because I've always said you do you all do me? I'm not a boycott guy. As a matter of fact, I enjoy the comedy of George Carlin. I like the early movies of Jim Carrey. I can listen to the music of Ice Cube. Dr Dre, and I disagree with those guys politically on pretty much everything. And it's even like with the golf whether it's CBS or NBC as the open this week. It's not the Gulf doing this. But the network is airing the social justice messages during the broadcast. Price hit mute. I and I'm going to carry on and I'm going to enjoy wing foot on on on Sunday. I just Yeah, I am with you if I know when it's gonna happen, and I don't have to subject myself to it now, the NBA's different story because you've got to see it 24 7 and I'm all out of baseball. Something was on the mound. You can still enjoy something if you can avoid being subjected to it, And if somebody told you, Rob, I agree with what you're saying, but I enjoy the MBA. So I'm going to watch the MBA. Would you have a problem with that? Not yourself out. Knock yourself out Real quick visiting here with Jason Hammer, one half of the Hammer and Nigel Show here on W A. B C. I got a big beef with the fact that the Colts are telling or I guess the culture doing it but the city in coordination of them, saying you could only have 2500 people today 7500 people a couple weeks from now because I was sold on a tax increase for me because I live in a donut County on funding Lucas Oil Stadium. All the tourism the attractions will stay your hotels and browns. We're gonna be great. I got a real beef with this, and I don't think I should have to pay the tax if you're not delivering on what you promised. Well, I think if you decided to not pay taxes every time a politician didn't deliver on a promise you'll be getting a knock on the door from the IRS because you had never paid taxes. Real quick 30 seconds..

NFL Rob Jim Carrey Pittsburgh George Carlin Dr Dre Jason Hammer Twitter football Gulf Lucas Oil Stadium NBA Colts IRS golf donut County baseball CBS NBC
"george carlin" Discussed on Apathetic Enthusiasm

Apathetic Enthusiasm

05:55 min | 2 years ago

"george carlin" Discussed on Apathetic Enthusiasm

"The afterlife. The portrayal of Rufus. Daughter. Is Chris Christie, right yeah yeah I thought she was great I like her in just about anything but the the way she was like on whatever futuristic trains dimensional cell phone just like bickering with her mom, the whole time and all this like. Then, even like a scene where they're in hell and she's just like Oh yeah, like what great did you plan work and and like all this I thought some some of her scenes are are really fantastic. They did a good job of trying to bring George Carlin into the movie in some way. Without. Him being, alive and honoring that character through through a Hologram. which which I thought was cool as well. Yeah. Yeah is. This isn't a role rolling on the floor laughing saying at all but the the end of the movie in the the moral. The climax of the of the film which won't get into in detail here, but it was. You Now I'm a I'm a I'm a big music guy and i? I. Love Music and I I think music is just it. It's a great way to to connect to two other folks and in in in twenty twenty. You know as as a lot of a lot of us are teleworking you and I are always podcasting. It's not as if we'd hang out anyways because you're in a different state, but still we would would hang out if we if we could. and. It just. Made me kind of. That aspect of of the world where we're not all kind of holed up in our houses and on face met with face masks and all that type of stuff and so so the climax of the movie and in the credits of the movie I was like don't don't you get back in there, tear don't you come out come out there tears you were this the that's that's the unexpected part of this film is it has a great message. In there, and by the end of this film, it does it does tell us something to end it It's a movie that has a lot of hope. You. Know Kinda snuck in and the the ideas around music and the power of music to bring people together immediately thought of you not just because you would. Require that I watched this but just the way that you have been able to use music to connect with people and I. I think that that's that's terrific and I I think that that adds a lot of value to the movie for me in how it how it ended..

George Carlin Chris Christie
Alex Winter on how he and Keanu Reeves brought George Carlin's touching cameo to 'Bill & Ted Face the Music' (spoilers!)

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

06:10 min | 2 years ago

Alex Winter on how he and Keanu Reeves brought George Carlin's touching cameo to 'Bill & Ted Face the Music' (spoilers!)

"Jesse Thorn. Our guest is Alex Winter you probably know him best as bill from bill and Ted along with Keanu reeves he starred in bill and Ted's excellent adventure bill and Ted's bogus journey and the brand new movie bill and Ted face the music. Alex is also a director who's made several documentaries. His latest just came out a couple of months ago it's called show biscuits. It features interviews with former child stars about how their time working in the entertainment industry affected them. Let's get back to the conversation. There's a lot in this in this movie also about parenthood and the ties that bind to their and in particular how children kind of actualize the dreams of their parents in some ways for good and bad. I saw that theme also and show Biz kids. Your documentary that made me wonder if you saw parallel there to do you find that particularly compelling. I was raised by two artists. My parents were modern dancers. My mom had company in London, which is where I was born in my dad ultimately had a company in the Midwest. which is still going on when we moved to the states house quite young. I started out as a child actor professionally by like nine or ten I was working professionally by twelve thirteen I was in two long running probably shows back-back. Took me all the way into college so. My relationship to. My parents and to my family and the complexity of that and this idea of I wouldn't call destiny. That's the sort of of the movies that. But you know this idea of expectation and what is your life supposed to be, and of course, it's never going to be that and it shouldn't be that and and and how do the children affects the parents? How do the parents affect the children and of course now I'm a dad and so how'd now it's a triple layer cake right And Those are all those drams or fusing together and crazy ways and I had really wanted to make a film that allowed people who had experienced this firsthand meaning people that come up as child actors. I wanted them to be able to express the very nuanced layers of of that experience. Intimately I just had not seen that done and I had. you know obviously had done it myself in private, but I'd never kind of attacked at. So you that was very satisfying to be able to make and it was really odd to try to make show Biz because for the first time about ten years ago I couldn't find financing and it was exactly the concept. So it was very very strange to. Lovely. But strange to start making the film, shoot a bunch of interviews go away, make bill and Ted be dealing with you know Ted's problems with his dad our issues with our daughters live and our destiny that didn't end up the way it was supposed to in how did that impact everybody and you know, and then of course, like acting for the first time gangs I left act the acting business in after doing Dylan Ted to really Very consciously, and so acting again and I'm making a movie about child actors about parents and their children and it was it was like Oh did this all really need to happen at once was that necessary? I my Gosh. Every aspect of my entire life right now. So Yeah it was lovely and heavy Frankly yeah. Tell me about that decision to kind of I. Think you said, disappear for a minute and then come back and be doing more behind the scenes work than acting. Well. We talk about it in in show Biz kids and it's really not uncommon. It's. It's you know I had started acting I had a very, very public life from around ten years old to about twenty five on nonstop even through college. I was still acting on TV and doing commercials and TV shows. Nonstop and after bill and Tattoo amid and other film called freaked I was just psychologically. I was just worn out and I knew. That I was not I had some friends around me that were crashing hard at a couple that actually died. It was a pretty heavy scene. For Lot of us that had come up because we're all around the same age. So a lot of us were trying to transition from from you know sort of youth in the business too young adult business. We're not having the best time of it and and at the same time I gone to film school and was very very committed to my work as a writer director But it you know for me, I needed to make a conscious decision to get out of the public eye and just go live some normal life and I didn't feel like I'd really gotten to do that through pretty. Formative Adolescence and postal license and. Evan Rachel Wood speaks about this really well in the in the movie sodas will we? All everyone had the same experience I was sitting across from Diana Kerry, the hundred year old woman who was baby peggy, and she literally laid out my entire life story was completely jaw dropping. And that's what had happened to her when she had to really figure life out and she had to get away from the business and. And just be in the world and that's what I did I left. I left my acting representation and I moved and started a production company in London and I just shot commercials and wrote scripts and had a kid and live like regular Joe and. Got My head together and did some growing up and when I felt comfortable again, I started training again to act that was a while ago I just wanted to act for myself I didn't WanNA act. NAFTA, worry about it for paycheck I trained for a long time and it was just coincidentally had started kind of rumble back into life. But it was really lovely. It was a great way to come back can't owner. He's like, what am I, very, very dearest and closest friends in the world and. Everyone on that sat was family and if they weren't, they were really gracious and very happy to be there. So it was extremely sweet environment to step back into but Yeah, it was fun. But I I guess I needed the twenty five year break I I took it.

Dylan Ted Alex Winter Jesse Thorn London Director Nafta Keanu Reeves Evan Rachel Wood Midwest. Diana Kerry Peggy Writer JOE
Are You a Rock Star or Member of The Band?

The Daily Boost

04:11 min | 2 years ago

Are You a Rock Star or Member of The Band?

"It is Monday. On Monday. Fourteen years I've asked a question. And if you've ignored me for fourteen years, God bless you you are good. You're awfully good because I've been doing this every single Monday. Have you done your homework? Just sit down and just take a few minutes. Maybe five minutes just today maybe after this program has done. And look on yourself just to see how you doing. It's like your mom opening the look at any after she took piano at night right? You know she opened the door, but you pretended to be asleep. You can look at it on yourself say how how doing? Marolles my family roles, my relationships, roles, spiritual roles, my physical rolls, my financial world how many doing my life? Are there things in my life I just really love and he just want to keep so much gratitude for. WanNa make sure they stay in my life or the things that I don't love that much and maybe I'd like to have them go someplace else. But you haven't thought about how to do that yet. When you take a few minutes to self assess where your focus should be. I'll make you this promise. Next week when you do it again, a lot of the stuff that you are concerned about this week that you discovered, it'll be different next week it'll be you'll be on your way you'll be transforming moving in a different direction that's how it works. When you become aware would you like what? You don't like you start making natural changes its natural, right? So do homework. You know what are the ways it all begins is taking control of your time and allowing yourself time to well to be yourself and to spend time with yourself in the do things that are important to you. If you haven't picked up my perfect week planner, go get it. It's motivation and we've DOT COM or perfectly finer dot com. It's a quick little pdf download watch the video. It'll teach you how to gather control of your time and give your life back. It's fast it's simple. You'll see it it a change everything and just a couple of days I promise that. So you rockstar. Or you'll member the band which went are you it's Ok does it really matter which role you play I don't really care. I just WANNA make sure you're moving towards your goals a long long long time ago I remember this I was raising kids. Those of you that are. Probably remember the old George Carlin. Album called am and FM. What happened? Got A kid. What are you GonNa do with a kid. Going to raise them. So I was done I was raising the kid. Micah folks raise my kid I thought what he's eighteen. He's Outta here. He's done right well, that didn't happen. They never go away those who've had kids. It doesn't ended eighteen those you have older kids you know that never stops. But he was gonNA. Move Out. It was time to go out on his own. Conversation about that. The rockstar conversation. So he he's staying out to four in the morning being a rockstar every single night trying to be a rockstar keeping his mom up kind of disrupting the households twenty one years old he wasn't really working or anything. I don't do roommates. Just don't I mean I. Get it. But but this is a little bit disruptive. So because it's okay, I'M GONNA move out I'm going to go to Hollywood and sing on Sunset Boulevard. Yar. Now's a guy who's been all kinds of big dreams in my life and done a lot of things. A lot of experience a had some perspective and I just wanted to say it are you willing to do what it takes to get you to the top? To be that Rockstar. And if you don't get. Do. You think you want to be. Are there any other options that might make you happy I mean what if you independence as as a background player with that? Happy. He said, you know I don't think I would I think I gotta go for my dream said great as long as you know where you're going to go but then we talked a little bit about what may may occur on down the road but he said I gotta go from dreams at on I think you probably should his dad did that I did that I got out of high school and took off and I said I'm going to be a rock and roll radio DJ do morning shows I did all over the country everywhere all kinds of cool stuff had a great time is a Rockstar on the radio star back in the day when that's what they were back then. But you know what? I kind of learned something. My son learned to. As, much as it was really enjoyable as much as I really had a good time doing it. Then frankly as much as I was good and he was good to never forget him. Shooting facetime say hey, look I'm on stage on sunset boulevard singing the song is it how was it goes not what I expected

Rockstar George Carlin Hollywood
'Bill & Ted Face the Music' isn't excellent, but it's still kind of fun

Mark Thompson

01:51 min | 2 years ago

'Bill & Ted Face the Music' isn't excellent, but it's still kind of fun

"Ted faced the music. It's not significant nor extremely funny, but it's certainly fun. And it's so amiable that I'd be kind of a meanie to say anything too critical of it. In case you're thoroughly pop culture challenged. This is the third movie and a trilogy of Dumb Guy, Buddy Cos. That began 30 Count them 30 years ago with the time traveling Stoner Movie Bill and Ted's excellent adventure that was 1989. There was a sequel Bill and Ted's Bogus Journey and 91. These guys are best friends, suburban goofballs in one of the rock star's billing tender in high school in the original film, they're gonna fail history. Oh, and by the way, they're played by then and played by now. Alex Winter and the Evergreen Piano. Reeves. I mean piano Reeves. His career is Blowing back up. There's a big resurgence with John Wick films and The Matrix franchise is continuing, but he loves this character, and he's got a great relationship and report with Alice Winter. Eso. They've come back for this third film and You know. Initially they're visited by this hipster from the future named Rufus, who shows up in some kind of phone booth that can traverse time in space. Like like doctor who's police box, and by the way, Rufus was played by the late great comedian George Carlin, and he takes them on a trip through time to help them pass his history tests and tells them that they are going to write and record a song that will bring the world together in peace and harmony. Will, apparently by this third film. Three decades later, they still haven't written a song to sign the song. I've always felt that the world is just one song away from peace and harmony to to bad. Hey, Michael, do you exactly that I have to want hilarious.

TED Reeves Rufus Alex Winter George Carlin Evergreen Piano John Wick Alice Winter Goofballs Michael
Bill & Ted Face the Music Review

Pop Culture Happy Hour

09:04 min | 2 years ago

Bill & Ted Face the Music Review

"One, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, nine, we met bill s Preston and Ted Theodore Logan in the movie bill and Ted's excellent adventure they returned in bill and Ted's bogus journey in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety one, and now almost thirty years later they're back in bill and Ted's face the music Alex Winter and Keanu Reeves return as well. Bill and Ted respectively, and this time they'll need not just their triumphant man to save the world but also their daughters I'm Stephen Thompson and I'm Linda Holmes we're talking about bill and Ted face the music on this episode of Pop Culture Happy Hour from NPR here with me and Steven from his home studio is plan Weldon of NPR's arts desk. Linda and also with us from his home in Washington DC, we have JC Howard who is a producer of NPR's Ted Radio Hour and how I built this I. J. C.. Good to have you back good to have you back. So if you are all not familiar, there's not a lot setup that you need or these films except to say that Bill and Ted were introduced to us as teenage bro Friends who had a band and just wanted to have a triumphant band when they were older and eventually they got sucked into time travel and picking up different historical figures, and later we're going to try to save the world and there was. A whole story where they were going to ultimately right a great and triumphant song it's it is a surprisingly complex canonical story of which you need to know practically nothing in order to enjoy I think these films Stephen now that I have thoroughly set the table kind of what is your attachment to bill and Ted these movies. If you have one, well, I've seen bill and Ted's excellent adventure. A BUNCH OF TIMES I've seen bill and Ted's bogus journey a couple times. These are movies that have kind of existed on the wind for the last thirty years. I re watched these movies within the last five years I. Think I talked about the. What's making me happy on this show but still kind of needed to go back to be reminded of what happens in them going into this movie I mean this movie is coasting on goodwill. There is a certain amount of fan service going on here. I mean I'm not sure how many people were clamoring to revisit these characters almost thirty years later but at the same time. Something really really smart happens in this movie and you can tell before you even start watching it, and that is that it is ninety three minutes long all three of these movies are about ninety minutes long and I think they understand that that is the perfect lengthier. There is a certain amount of sequel bloat here. The first two movies are incredibly Chintzy. The stakes in the first one are no greater than maybe Ted we'll get sent to military school and you're there's like the entire fabric of space time can be ripped apart. This is a very shaggy movie. I. Think there are stretches where it sags but. I do appreciate the number of updates. You don't have the gay panic stuff that really dragged down the earlier movies are no gay slurs in this movie. This movie bothers to give its female characters a little bit more agency the women who become their wives barely have any part to play in the other movies, and here you get more of that you get their daughters who are given kind of their own subplot. So I appreciate that it's not just rattling around with these two dudes who are now middle aged, but they're taking an interest in people outside of just bill. Yeah and you do get their daughters. The structure of this one is kind of that they go on one journey through time and their daughters meanwhile who are played by Samara weaving and bridget lending pain go off and tried to get a band together for their DADS to play with on this epoch song that's supposed to save the world. So you kind of have the one journey going on the other journey going on then naturally in the third act it all comes together and I did like those two performances from the daughter's there are also some kind of new faces in this one kristen Schall plays Kelly who is The daughter of Rufus who was the George Carlin character in the original JC it feels to me like you are too young to have a moustache attachment to these movies but I have been assured that that is not the case because television. Yeah. That's exactly right. I was actually super excited to hear this movie was happening and I'm going to show my age a little bit and say that I was born pretty close to the release of the First Bill and Ted Movie of Bill and Ted's excellent adventure. So my first encounter with these guys was as as they say a most impressionable youth. And I was one of what I can only assume are millions of kids who watch bill and Ted's excellent adventure every time it ran on cable TV. The thing about the first movie is the problem that they needed to solve was very simple. Billon Tade just needed a good grade right granted the solution to that problem was a little larger than life and included doctor who like time travel home box and all but the problem itself was simple. The second movie bogus journey was certainly a little nuttier. It had killer robots and aliens and the grim reaper. Didn't feel like it hit quite the right notes for me. No Pun intended. So win a third film was confirmed. The main question I had was like, what are they going to do? Are they going to try to recreate the success of the original and go back to simple run of the mill time travel Orlean into the bizarre and crazy and from just the trailer? It was clear that they weren't going to just lean into the bizarre, but they were diving in head first. But I think what separated this one from the nineteen ninety one sequel is that it has a lot more heart. The original movie was really about the friendship of bill and Ted and saving that they didn't seem to care as much about saving the future as much as they wanted to just make sure that bill and Ted could still just be friends. So it had this kind of surprisingly earnest quality and I think that was what was missing in the second film in this third one for all of its bizarreness in all of its doubling down on death in heaven and hell, and all these kinds of weird things. It really reignites the idea that there are friendships and. Relationships here that are worth saving. Yeah I think you're absolutely right that they go back to the relationship between those two guys being the center of the story and I. Think it's really funny. One of the things that I think is featured in some of the the trailer stuff but they are both married they both have you know lovely wives that you have met before since they got them from the past and they have relationships with their wives that are completely enmeshed with their relationship with each other. So they can't conceive of having individual marriages that aren't some. Like a four person marriage I thought that stuff was sort of funny because I think one of the things that carries over like if you're going to take these guys in age them thirty years you have to either assume that at some point they became more normal, which is a weird thing to assume about bill and Ted. Or you have to assume that they are still very bill and Ted, which would mean that they are still kind of very fixated on this idea that they are a duo and they are always together and they are each other's right hand Glenn you had indicated on twitter that. You perhaps did not have the same nostalgia for these characters that perhaps I have and others may have what is your take care? All right. The ticker about to hear from me Linda Holmes is going to be a subjective it's rigorous. It's clear eyed it is on demand by the gauzy scream nostalgia because unlike all y'all I never saw these movies until this week just to prepare for the show and I didn't see him for very simple reason I didn't have to I. Mean I was a junior in college nineteen, eighty, nine I was studying marine biology. I was dating a string of profoundly unfulfilled women and. Being. On a college campus and eighty nine and not here boobs heinous strange things are afoot at the circle k just over and over and over. So I felt like I got it. And think about the time late eighties early nineties mainstream. American. Comedy was kind of stuck in this catchphrase based mode and I was like, okay. I don't need to see this while I've seen them all now and I'm here to tell you. Sure I guess that's your thing. I like the Guy Listeners of the leads I. think that's the appeal here but left only once an excellent adventure. It's a visual gag that gets tossed off. It's a Freud at a mall holding a corn dog and it's like, okay, fine. You got me I mean it's low hanging fruit, but you got. And in face the music this new film shore on Paper Samara, Weaving Kristen Schaal Holland freaking Taylor they are gunning for me they are coming. But ultimately didn't stick. It's not supposed to. That's not what it's for. It just evaporates on contact with the eyeballs and maybe that's exactly what the world needs. Right now is dumb sweep dumb but I

TED Bill S Preston Ted Movie Ted Theodore Logan Linda Holmes NPR Stephen Thompson Washington Alex Winter Jc Howard Keanu Reeves Kristen Schaal Holland Producer Kristen Schall Samara Weldon Billon Tade Steven Orlean
Midnight Moment 4 - Voter ID and A Conspiracy Theory - burst 1

The Midnight Patriots

09:56 min | 2 years ago

Midnight Moment 4 - Voter ID and A Conspiracy Theory - burst 1

"Jury of Nation. Part hair and it's time for another installment of Liberty Virus via the midnight moment delivery system. that. I was night three of the Democrat National Convention Day One, hundred, sixty, fifteen days flattening curb. It allows unlucky enough to over here made me throw up in my mouth a little bit I gotta be honest with you wanted to wash the taste out with out. But. In the end, I settled for for a Nice Cup of coffee. George Carlin one said I don't have pet peeves. I have made major psychotic fucking hatreds. So in the spirit of both George Carlin and my complete total annoyance with current events, we're going to cover two topics with you. Tonight the first is a voter ID, and the second as a self developed spiracy theory that I would like your indulgence to entertain as strictly a mental exercise though in our society, there are things you. Have to show ID for buying a gun getting prescription painkillers buying alcohol buying. We'd words legal of course, a buying porn. You have to show ID at the DMV the board, an airplane to board trained drive an automobile the list goes on and on and on survivor is going to be required to do any of the above things or you know conduct adulting in any way as it always is lot why states not have a? Statute that requires valid identification busted as yourself that question for a second, you may not like the answer I mean Article One section. Four of the US Constitution states the times, places and manner of holding elections for Senators and representatives shall be prescribed in each state by the legislature thereof. But the Congress may at any time by law make or alter such regulations except as to places of choosing senator I mean there was. An assumption clearly present in our constitution that citizens right to vote is protected under free speech under the First Amendment. But in a citizen right the but I mean article two section one clearly spells out that our founders framers specified who could and couldn't be president no person except the natural born citizen or citizen of the United States at the time of this adoption of this constitution shall be eligible to the office of the president. Neither shall any person be eligible to that office who shall not have attained? The age of thirty five years have fourteen years been a residence within the United States our founders and framers carved out specifics. Do you really believe they had any intention any intention at all for non citizens to vote in our elections? Give me a break. So if they're going to push the agenda and by the way I'm speaking to leftists and liberals who seem to think that showing identification at a polling place is somehow minority voter suppression Oh really then I say, well, no, I devote no idea by guns no background checks ever for anything. No idea to buy booze or weed. Or board a plane. Is it. Any wonder that liberal states have started issuing driver's licenses to illegal immigrants? Because if somehow some way. We restore common sense in order to our republic and require a valid form of identification vote illegal immigrants will be their voters and their voting block. I'm not suggesting we give up the right to an anonymous ballot that's absolutely protected by the First Amendment I get it. No. One has stating that your driver's license number be attached to your ballot. But. If you can't get into a bar without id if you can't buy liquor without ID, why should you be able to access the polling place? I just want to point out and make it clear the blatant outright shitting hypocrisy and quite frankly left racism in the claim that somehow requiring an idea vote is minority suppression really I mean here in Colorado most liquor stores that I frequent require id for every transaction and believe me I do not look twenty one or younger bars and nightclubs in this area often use a barcode scanners. Id and I know that it's that way in some other states, somehow all of this is okay but somehow requiring an ID to vote arguably the most violent in the world voting is minority voter Suppression Racist Bull Shit. So as the assertion that minorities by the way don't have an ID or don't have the ability or somehow incapable of getting one, I mean the bring specificity again. Zona adults over the age of eighteen are required. To carry ID at all times. That's whether you're walking down the street driving your car or otherwise, and that has been in effect since World War. Two, this is not something new. This is not something that the Clintons or the bushes or anyone else do any time in recent history this has been the law of the land for literally decades. Whether that laws right or wrong as up to you. But really do we really need any more outside influence in our country regardless of what the political spectrum you stand on our guys we've got another segment coming up right after this break. Stay tuned. Midnight Patriot nations spartan here with a shameless plug for our new gear shop shop dot midnight Patriots Dot Com. T shirts, hats, hoodies, mugs, phone cases just about everything else in between we got you covered whether you're looking to embrace your insomnia, show your patriotism or make a liberal hood. Explode. Really. Shop. Dot Midnight Patriots. Dot Com for a limited time. You can save fifteen percent on your order starting now. And now back to the show. So what are the talk about now is? A conspiracy theory I fully admit it. I have no evidence of this except what may be going on around us and some thoughts that I have from the Golden Age of talk, radio in the nineties I sometimes get what I refer to as nuggets of Universal Truth from what most people would consider fairly odd sources. You know movies, songs, sports, overhearing pieces of a conversation, etc one of the things that was kind of profound to me and rain true didn't I didn't really understand the time was the movie captain America the Winter Soldier. Now there's a scene again. Tomorrow will because they're fantastic and I'm going to kind of summarize here there's a scene where they're in a bucket in they're talking to basically an all German scientists. Brain is good put on on a computer and all creepy but isn't that scene they talk about humanity's freedom came. and. One of the things that they said was if you try to take that freedom, they resist humanity needed to surrender. It's freedom willingly. And they finally created a world. So chaotic that you vanity was ready to surrender it's freedom for its own security. Now I know that sounds bizarre and maybe I'm maybe I'm just being paranoid maybe I'm suffering from the Kobe. Kobe lockdown paranoia or whatever you want to call it. The understand this if you wanted to usher in a gestapo-type National Police Force. It had no loyalty to the constitution but only the politicians you know Kinda like Nazi Germany. What would you do? Well. First of all, you'd have to get the police to quit. So if you control the purse strings for the police, department what better way to get them to quit than it, cut their wages, cut their budget and then make them liable for I. Don't know everything. What if he told them to stand down while like Portland Eighty. Three nights of rioting destroys property assaulting assaulting citizens decade the police to quit what about like new? York. They cut the budget of Major Crimes Unit and shootings have gone up. To three hundred percent. Since that happened now, I wanNA make it clear that I do not support a national police force now. Yes we can argue that yes, we have we have federal agents the DA's the ATF the FBI etc. But none of them are actively patrolling the streets but how do you do it? How do you implement a Gestapo of social justice warriors that are essentially thought police, which is what the what's the leftist seem to want anyone that that goes contrary to their narrative anyone that disagrees with any they say politically. Well if you get all the local cops to quit, you have to have something because your citizens will not bag. For protection somebody did is friendly to that idea wins the White House than the Federal Police Force. Is created and then we end up like Nazi Germany. They're already talking about making kids where buttons identified that they either have or have not been vaccinated for Covid. Nineteen. One. Just go out and do yellow stars. Pink triangles. Any sense does you have to question yourself and even do the mental exercise of what's the end game now? This Shit I. GotTa Tell Ya None of it looks good. That was your mental exercise in your midnight moment I'm Spartan have ago. Thanks. Thanks for joining us for another edition midnight moment. Be sure to join us for the main podcast, every Monday night and every Thursday night for more midnight moments. If you like what you hear and support what we do about subscribing. Go to listen Dot Midnight Patriots Dot Com Cook Support and subscribe. Be sure to pick up some merchant gear store shop that midnight Patriots Dot Com. From the Mile High, command. Center. Dot Com studio. This is sport reminding you that the Constitution is not just a suggestion.

ID United States George Carlin Germany President Trump Senator Painkillers DMV National Police Force Congress DA Colorado Federal Police Force Portland Clintons Major Crimes Unit FBI
"george carlin" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"george carlin" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Ishmael. I am She is thisa breeding from Moby Dick. The sexy later, Lady George Carlin Boys. Big, Big Orwellian Big fan of Orwell on 80 for, like terrible 49. So you know a lot. Ah, Tim, somebody was Jimmy Stewart's voice. My good is getting younger by the day. Oh, my God. You want to put that went off with you? You with the man with the worst Clarence Clarence. Is it, Hubert? Shut out to Robin, right? All right Out the door with you. Yeah. Shecky Mental hard. Ah, ad. Autumn, Linda. I don't want to say her name. She wants to hear her name. Yes, and the $200 donation. And do you know Ivanka Trump's voice? Of course. Ideo. I know everyone's voice Ivana Trump, and I just want to think Linda Hardy for her $200 donation. Very generous, I would have given more but Good job window as it ISS as it is living. I'll take it. Listen, It's fine. It's great. Thank you, Linda. Ah, we'll take another stab at Jimmy Stewart there, Tim Andrews, or you won't leave Alibied. Let's leave that one alone. Oh, wonderful life. Jerry Stuart. I've lost him down a rabbit hole I get called Harvey Hall. You confused because I watch a lot of him on the Tonight show from the seventies and eighties. Well, do the order. That's all right. Early poems when he's reading poems on the Johnny Carson Show anyway seventies. Roll roll. Roll your boat. He's a gentleman..

Linda Hardy Jimmy Stewart Jerry Stuart Clarence Clarence Lady George Carlin Tim Andrews Ivana Trump Ivanka Trump Orwell Johnny Carson Moby Dick Hubert Ishmael. Robin Harvey Hall Autumn Alibied
"george carlin" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"george carlin" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"I did my taxes like when I got them in jail Doorman January. I usually doing like a soon as I get them. I knock it out. I knocked it out as soon as I possibly can. Did big out, survived by the hair of his chinny chin chin one minute left. It's a tie. And the best community. That's no way everyone come in a big house. Arrest on Chinese names the start, he starts wine into the the listeners Get on Twitter and vote for me. How about actually look at the comedians that were drafted and pick the one? That was the best? That's why I'm getting votes Do come both getting boat votes because your big Allen Joe, I'm getting votes because I had the best. I was over. I had that I had the best pick. My best pic was George Carlin. Sorry. He's just a guy. I just I think the guys is funny. He is smart. Is my favorite guy. So yesterday we were just talking about stand up comics, and we decided that we would do our standup comic fantasy draft. Everybody got four picks. The big fella got the first pick. He did pick George Carlin with pick number one. He's my guy, okay? And now that it has been up for 20 Gaff again was my number two guy. Maybe maybe I could have went with a more popular guy for the But he's He's my guy, man. I was listening Jim Gaffigan on the way in the day. Just like the guy. I think he's smart man. It is very It's a very smart comedy that very thought provoking. I'd saw in big outlook because you wind you should win. Whatever. Don't I just throwing it out? Where the post would be closed. It should be closed..

George Carlin Jim Gaffigan Twitter Allen Joe
Joan Rivers: Can We Talk?

Can We Talk?

09:24 min | 2 years ago

Joan Rivers: Can We Talk?

"Joan rivers career spanned nearly six decades she started with cabaret and off Broadway shows in the late fifties and then became a star of late night television hosting the tonight show and the late show with Joan rivers and eventually the daytime Joan rivers show in the nineties. She was best known for her comedic and sometimes mean-spirited interviews with celebrities on the Red Carpet John. Style was self deprecating abrasive. Everyone was fair game including herself. She charted new territory and comedy by telling stories from her own life combined with her willingness to talk about taboo subjects like hot flashes sagging bodies bad sex and marriage problems. You may have noticed that we borrowed our podcast. Name can talk from this hilarious. Talented and complex Jewish woman. Can we talk? Was Jones signature. Tagline sometime. She's it as a punchline. Sometimes it was a setup. It was an invitation to her audience. A signal that she was about to confide in them. Here's Joan on the show in the early. Nineteen Eighty S. I would not cheat. I would not cheek Maine because nobody asked me but I not because I think why we talk. I think my husband's spooner man okay. Which is very hard to save. I feel very close to you. I especially if you can. We talk was also Jones way of calling attention to her flaws and other people's her way of saying let's stop pretending and tell the truth here. Can we talk? Let me tell you something. The reason I have nothing happy the way I'm blessed is because I'm getting older at least seven very drop because Oh oh you don't know what it's like to get older too. You know what it's like to go in the morning to take facial mask and realize you're not wearing what so. Why did we borrow her? Tigon FOR OUR PODCAST. When we started the show Joan had recently died and we were all steeped in the debate about her role and her complicated legacy as brilliant and hilarious. But also crass and sometimes cruel. We love that. She had so many dimensions and that she believed in telling the truth about women's lives and expanding the range of models. We see all things we knew we wanted to do to. We also liked that. Can we talk was an invitation to our audience to join us in this project of storytelling and with that. Here's a wonderful interview from J W as archive recorded in two thousand six for our documentary. Jewish women in comedy making trouble. Joan talks about her early days at the Chicago. Comedy Clubs Second City being a woman on Johnny Carson's tonight show and playing midwestern clubs as New York Jewish comic later in the interview. She talks about going back to work after her husband's suicide in nineteen eighty seven. She starts by telling Interviewer Rachel. Talbot about a fight. She had with her parents over her decision to go into comedy. I left my house in pedal pushes enter old car that I used to drive and went to New York in speaking of the year and it was just awful and my dad wrote me a letter say that we are going to You'd better come home or we're going to have you committed. I was living in the bars on hotel for women and my dad wanted says and pulled me out. It was a scene. I think they ever forgot dragged me out. It was just horrible scene Harles. They just thought I was really life as though question about it. They just couldn't accept that. This is where I was going to end. This is all I could do so the I went back home and then I went away. Yeah it was just awful and then Pity yes that was great. Second City was very competitive. It was six of US thrown on stage. And it was make up your own lines and get your own scenes going and everybody wanted to be the star second city and everybody wants to get their stuff and so it wasn't like being gracious. It was like I got a better idea I wanted. It was very competitive and that was great too. I learnt in second city. You have to talk up and I learnt the freedom of you. Think it's funny try it. Don't wait don't think about it. I still do that if freed me. It taught me to be tough. It taught me to fight. If you thought you're Si was good you went into four four and a taught me co with your instinct. Only do what you truly think is going to be funny. It changed my life and then you you came back to New York Nissan. You learn so much from second cities are how had your comic persona change came. When I came back with second city I was myself onstage. Good bed or different. I was what I was and I was a divorced when no Jewish smart college graduate not particularly attractive girl on stage and I was telling you about my life. It wasn't about my mother-in-law was about what I'm going through my mother's hysterical because I'm single and I'm having an affair with a married man and my gay friends. What happen to my gay friends and it was all about truth. The first routine that really worked. I had a WIG hairpieces. I was driving into New York to perform at this club. And the WIG flew out of the window and a car drove over it and I said there I was walking on the west side highway. With a dead Wigan my arms had says firestone on and no one stops and all the truth and taking the truth and exaggerated and it just opened me up. I never went back. I never went back to. He's so fat that unless I really believe when did you find out Johnny Carson? Nothing in my career. I think that's why I was that you log come easily ever. I've never been the first on anything all my friends. And that time I was working the village with my George Carlin and Richard. Pryor all these wonderful men everybody got through everybody was on Carson and on Griffin and I was brought up seven different times to the Carson show. I was finally rejected by Secretary. Who is eating lunch while I was performing? I mean beyond humiliating. I got on because the night before some comic bom so they called me up and they said you can come on but not as a comedian. They had no faith in me. They brought me on as a girl writer and at the end of the show at the end of that night on air. Johnny Carson said to me you're going to be a star it was maisy and I look behind me. I couldn't believe and the next day. My life change changed overnight. They were getting all these calls and stuff. Was there ever a feeling of like? Oh you're to New York reports. I was doing costume regularly. I don't think it was hosting really I was you know the Golden Girl Carson and the ages come back and say you to New York to Jewish you to New York and my husband was married by that point. Ed You said this is ridiculous. He said picked the worst city in the country. And they said Milwaukee they still have been meetings. This is nine hundred seventy. There's still enclaves. They dress up Nazi uniforms and saw Adolf stand. He said center Milwaukee. And let's see and they sent me to Milwaukee and I was. They had to change the size of the room and put in the ballroom. Our I put originally in a little hotel the pfister in their little comedy room and they had to over the ball and put me in so that changed everything they said. Okay America will get her. I mean people begin to put little pockets and it's so stupid because funny is funny. You're minutes was using back on state. What was that decision? The decision was very simple. One I know money I had to go back to work. I didn't have the luxury of being the widow in the house on the hill so I had to go back to and nobody wanted me and Vegas gave me back my contracts. 'cause isn't nobody wants to see anybody that has that kind of you would just fired. would terrible glistening one out that. I was very hard to work with It was just all wrong all wrong. I was banned from late night. I've never been brought back ever not one late night show So I was really struggling my career and I had all these bills. Listen was in. It was just a bad time so I went back to little nightclubs. I said well I'll start again. I went back and started doing little like us and out of that came the red carpet

Johnny Carson Joan New York Second City Milwaukee Jones Joan Rivers New York Nissan United States Maine George Carlin Spooner Wigan Chicago Talbot Rachel J W Firestone Secretary
"george carlin" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

03:13 min | 2 years ago

"george carlin" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Child takes it down just a notch or as you know the the great George Carlin has a classic routine maybe you've seen it on YouTube a whole areas bet he used to do about germs any of it in essence in this routine he would say he never got sick as an adult because as a kid he and his friends back in the Bronx would swim in the Hudson River in raw sewage and they got exposed to germs they developed immunity to germs and in later life no germ would come near them it would be out of the out of its mind to do so as a very funny bit and there is some truth to that you know we've reported through the program tonight a series of extraordinary steps that are being taken right now by state local governments by national governments around the world by large employers by public health officials in response to the rising number of people with confirmed infections from Copa nineteen you know as we know the projections very broadly about how many people might be exposed how many people might be infected how they will need to be hospitalized and how many will die we don't know yet the thrust of the public response so far has been aimed at preventing a huge explosion in the number of cases all at once to you've heard the term to flatten the curve so that the number of patients do not overwhelm the healthcare system all at once with sort of what's been reported in Italy doctors end up making life or death decisions about which patients taking care for and which ones they can't we don't want that to happen here so people it been advised to to pay attention to self or in team to not exposures up to too much risk to pay attention wash your hands and don't put other people at risk you know we're all looking for sober accurate information about this and hopefully the issue now has all of our attention because what you do can have a serious effect on other people around you made your loved ones or people you don't know what ultimately it will affect our weather people can go back to work and wind so we're gonna open up the phone lines so you can ask doctor Peterson some questions about this virus about risk factors but please he's here to share information not to debate politics please be respectful to our guest will be right back and open up the phones around close to coast area got an incredible guest right now Christine rose how did you become involved in holistic health and healing that being extremely and trying to find a solution I was told I was dying three months to live and I wasn't going to give up I was treated every day Kaneswaran it if you don't do any of that have to be very you know to have the benefits you cannot stop and say oh I had another feel good that is wrong but why I feel so fantastic and then pass the cuticle carnival will make all the difference in the world this is Richard Ostrow owner for carnivore research international call one eight six six.

George Carlin
Embodied Presence (Part 2) - Planting our Roots in the Universe - Working with Pain

Tara Brach

09:32 min | 2 years ago

Embodied Presence (Part 2) - Planting our Roots in the Universe - Working with Pain

"There's a story about a Buddhist master pastor who was asked how come he meditated and his response was to see the tiny purple flowers by the side of the road. I say walk to town each day and that to me uses beautiful a reason any our last talk car for the last live talk was on embodied presence. How this waking up to the life of our body coming home to the aliveness of our senses really is the gateway to everything we long before we can really wake up in our bodies we can wake up to our cart art loving and we can wake up to our full wisdom and so what I'd like to do is continue that this will be part two and what what we'll do is we'll look at both the challenges of waking up in our bodies and also the gifts and as we explored a couple of weeks ago one Buddhist master put it really well when he was asked to describe the world has response was lost in fought and there? We go when we look back on. Today it's pretty easy to sense how much we're in that trance manse that kind of virtual reality of of thoughts and often. It's easy to see. In retrospect how little we were actually awake in our bodies and our senses and we know that's the way it goes that we spend a lotta time not only in thoughts in thought sick at us tight like worry the thoughts and like judging thought and like planning when we don't need to keep planning or rehearsing we don't need to rehearse type thoughts so we see that we spend time in those kind of virtual realms than we're not so often aware of the life that's here and this is true even even when we get sometimes into our contemplacion's of the spiritual mysteries or one step removed from from full here nece one of my favorite of this end stories of a young monk who who asked the Abbot of the monastery will what happens after we die and the APP. It said I don't know and the monk was kind of alarm armed said but I thought you were a zen master and his response was I and but not a dead one and so it's a really interesting inquiry about the role of thoughts because we need them to survive and flourish and they do service on the spiritual path and were dictated to our thoughts. We get lost in thoughts. That don't serve us as we well know. And and in the deepest way if we don't know how to step out of this ongoing conceptualizing we can't really contact contact directly the reality that's here. We can't truth directly when we can't get out of thoughts we can't it feel the fullness of love when we're really wide open 'cause thoughts create a matrix where there's a self and other and a sense of separation so we I need to wake up at of our thoughts and the challenges and here's the bottom line challenge that when we wake up out of thoughts and come into our bodies were coming being into the wilderness. Because we're coming into the domain where it can fuel raw and we're there commune intensity of pleasure and unpleasant S. Yes and pain and so there's this inner weather systems we can't control them. We're just if we're opening to our bodies we're just feeling what's there and it's much easier to remove ourselves and stay in the mental control tower. We dissociate I was love. George Carlin's as he says I'm not into working out. My motto is no pain no pain and the reality is we. Don't like hanging out with pain. You know we want to fix it or get away from it in some way so we'll look at together a how we can practice when we do have physical or emotional pain. We'll look at that some and and I'm curious how many of you have noticed when you started meditating that you do find. You have a lot of pain that you're working with. Can I see by hands chiefs. So there's a lot of us for those of you. That are watching. That was probably fifty percent and and that's just like right now. Now are a lot of pain. All of US experienced pain at some time or rather I can save for myself that I've had my reasonable ables share. I had a period where had pretty ongoing chronic pain for about six years sometimes acute not always acute chronic chronic which can be exhausting and of course I know many people that have had it way worse but I know what it's like to sit down to meditate and everything in me is going. I don't WanNa be feeling this. You know I just don't want to sit with us. So if Meditation Means Waking Up to the Yuckiness that we're filling in a body. Obviously we're not GONNA be that drawn to it. So let's. Let's look at this but I wanna I emphasize besides that even when we're not experiencing chronic or acute pain are default and this is built into your brains are default setting when there's any kind of stress at all and that's a lot of the time is to leave our bodies we immediately go to how control things and fix things and we leave our bodies and you might have noticed that the more stress do you get. I always liken this to riding a bicycle physical and we're riding away from presence in the more stress we get the faster were peddling to kind of get somewhere and do something and fix something and then with there's that sense there's not enough time you notice that one. How often we feel? There's not enough time. So we leave Steve and relieve even when there's just ordinary unease we leave our bodies and we kind of go into. We'll go into that kind of some habit of the mind or behavior. Take us away from that discomfort. Some years ago I read a story that was called by a doctor who is the OBGYN and he described when he was very very new in practice. How I'm he was gotten really nervous and self conscious when he was doing pelvic exams for women? It really made them uncomfortable comfortable so he developed this kind of unconscious habit of whistling when he was doing the exams and one day describes her one he was doing doing exam on one woman and she started giggling and then she started laughing and he said Oh. What's wrong in my tickling? You and she said Oh. No no doctor. But what you're whistling is. I wish I were an Oscar. Mayer Leaner so we leave we we get into our habits and some of them are more Some of them cause more harm. Some of them don't cause harm but the deal is the more more intense artists comfort the more fully we dissociate and when I say that we as a society were associated with the more that we are struggling with war or with natural disasters with societal oppression like racism that it creates a feeling of unsafe to be in this body. I remember Tanya how she coats put so powerfully. How being African American and this country means it is unsafe to be in your body so rather than stay with that and the same thing with our personal life so many any of experienced abuse really deep wounding and very early on this is our our survival mechanism we leave the site where it feels most uncontrollable and painful? So let's look at what happens when we leave. What happens when we dissociate and I look at it like we all are somewhat associated and we all know we get lost in virtual reality and forget to be here but what happens what happens when we leave the aliveness sits here and one? There's unprocessed fear when there's vulnerability that we have an attended two or one thing is fatigue because it takes energy to maintain association.

Acute Pain George Carlin Yuckiness Mayer Tanya Oscar Steve
"george carlin" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"george carlin" Discussed on WCPT 820

"The selling apps this was just came at a time when I was like well I was just right health reset that wing my house get ring getting rid of stuff that doesn't spark joy which includes almost everything just kidding there's a lot of stuff you can turn the page I need extrication I had needs mama's got needs kibble related needs and discreet that's one B. suites they go through do you see that I thank you that I need be squeak cash one gets at least for a morning well there's a lot of bribery going on well you know we're talking about working she still works well on a limited basis for twenty twenty you sell your old stop yeah you stuff see what you don't need a place for all your stuff is George Carlin would say you got it what let's go let's clean out what's two with a colon blow for your stuff you're at a needed stuff that's when you got cash sitting around you don't even right here the raccoons upstairs in this will no longer be grey gardens there you go McCurry the selling and make selling almost anything fast and easy here's where you begin go through your own final the stuff you didn't use in twenty nine that needed twenty nineteen that thing on the phone the draw the handbag thank you because you know that one no one hangs on the back then you're never going to use it just do it not that one that the other one behind on the door on the behind thing I don't know from handbag okay all right this listing takes just minutes to take a few pictures and description boom your item is connected to millions of buyers on the app McCurry will even email you a shipping label when it sells everything ships no awkward meet ups with strangers away yeah the app has over five hundred thousand reviews on.

bribery George Carlin McCurry
"george carlin" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"george carlin" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"You know whether the Russians come up with the Chinese it would be better if we came up with it so what do you think about Hey I just taking over the planet thank you but already has made what it has in the sense that is ubiquitous it's it's everywhere no Cornelius I have not seen the the show the person of interest but I would shoot back again that the computers were neither good nor evil it's held the computers are you also I would say that the entire idea of them forecasting some sort of event is probably way out there I think it was meals board that said forecasting is dangerous especially if it's about the future and I think that anything that actually attempts to force not take into account creativity and on on scene consequences I I that's a very George Carlin ask line from Neil for some pretty impresses a good joke yeah it does so then that's where we'll leave it will look we'll move on open lines but I'm sure other people will jump in the conversation somewhere along the line tonight thank you so much for your for your presence in for the way in which you definitely handle both agreement and disagreement and and for mostly for making a strong case which I think this is this is what we all need to do is be part of the sort of thesis antithesis synthesis as we move forward to try to understand the world and it starts with with your book on this subject you can find out more by going to coast to coast AM dot com and clicking on to Robert J. marks have a wonderful night and and a nice weekend and thanks for lose a little.

George Carlin Neil Robert J.
"george carlin" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"george carlin" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Don't understand that you're used to be like Lenny Bruce or or George Carlin or mort Saul and pointing it Richard Pryor and pointing it at this powerful and making fun of them if you if you get a real game your ridicule your point point at the foibles of the rich and powerful but I mean should still don't do that so they they they have a lot of the men of the bully personality and even that was starting out think the audience is a bully first because they're echoing themselves right right and and how did that can rise to the top maybe you know they had to they had to bully somebody or they had to get social Pathak tendencies in it it's not just in the world of entertainment or sports as you mentioned it could be you know to be the head head surgeon how did that that person rise over someone who was maybe equally qualified exactly what it we we talk and they they're good people that said you know you don't you don't know the background with anybody if you're working in an office you have no idea that the person is you know that in the cubicle across from you might have been stuffing nerds in the lockers are for you know for sure there has the tools with their their I don't if you saw the viral video I mention it did happen like probably the yeah last year the year before is a heart wrenching this middle aged guy came before school board and he he talked about how he's been bullied relentlessly and how he's headed I think thrown into the urine or something and he looked at the the head of school board he said and you Sir were the one who did that to me and I I guess it was on believe our video and that you should have seen the good kind of chuckled Eddie and for I don't know and it's it's it's just because people can read in the book for themselves but that's what's out there these are people with that kind of passed and he rose that night a mansion the school board that he's in charge of do you think somebody like that if they're gonna take claims of Boeing seriously when he did something so reprehensible when he and who knows what else answer in part then because that's why bowling isn't being addressed because the people that are overseeing it are themselves many of them perhaps bullies yes exactly that's we don't we exactly and I think that's that's the problem for instance in one of the football cases the person investigated the school found that they were run you know that the the administration of the school were almost all former athletes are people that have been popular and and they just they were it is selling denture to this successful sports program that everything in this school revolved around that and we see that over and over again but I think one way different my book as diversions because this is the first time anybody look at the social hierarchy nobody wants to look there nobody wants to criticize teachers right well we all may end up looking in the mirror don and that's uncomfortable hold on will open up the phone lines when we come back Martha Reeves and the Vandellas easily persuaded right here on coast to coast AM hammer in the ideal this was chaos in the food court at the circle so mall adults being beaten kids throwing chairs in the mix kids were unsupervised down there should have no business being down there in the first place walk around downtown kids are down there just to cause trouble we're seeing so much crime downtown and a lot of it is on supervised teenagers are in night till weekdays three till seven ninety three W. I. T. C. your home is important that's.

Lenny Bruce George Carlin mort Saul Richard Pryor
"george carlin" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

05:01 min | 3 years ago

"george carlin" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Entries from radio. man on TV discussing the CNN. seven our climate change marathon we talked about it before it occurred in what was going to take place and it took place we'll talk about it a lot today too as you would expect we're in the cleanup hitter spot we can't ignore it. but it really wasn't about climate change wasn't. it was about taking this country in driving us back to the stone age. driving us back to the stone age. fossil fuels. we should eliminate fossil fuels. fossil fuel is what drove the industrial revolution. fossil fuel is what created assembly lines. and a massive middle class. and blue collar work force. and steel and aluminum copper nickel. the electricity. and lights at night. in automobiles and trucks. refrigeration. heat in the winter air conditioning in the summer. and on and on and on these people want to push us to the pre industrial age. that's what they're arguing for their throwbacks. they had no information whatsoever about the climb none. they know nothing about climate nothing. they are throw backs. and again they want to drag us back to the pre industrial age and you need to understand this. that it's not about climate they don't know anything about climate not a single person on that stage. whether a host whether so called journalist whether so called anchorman whether a so called politician knew anything. about the topic. and there was in bold letters on the monitor. throughout the program the climate crisis said CNN. and mascot CNN is an expert on climate nobody. this was a sham this was a scam this was a spectacle. and this is what you have to look forward to should the Democrats take the White House and the rest of the government. de industrialization D. gross. economic contraction. unemployment lines food lines. gasoline lines. this is what they're good at this is what they know. and I don't know what they don't know. about six months ago and before that. I played a couple of segments of George Carlin from his nineteen ninety two HBO special. and given. the arrogance of the know nothings the throwbacks the regressive. who wish to do this to this country and to the people of this country. I have to does this off again and when George Carlin's done. I want to do this in two segments I believe. maybe not. then I want to really dig into this even further. because like I'm like anybody else on talk radio. I've studied this and written about extensively in liberty in terror. in plunder and deceit. in on freedom of the press. let's get started this is from. twenty seven years ago George Carlin. cut nineteen go. this around you countries for now people walking around all day long every minute of the day. about everything. what about the water what about the soil where insecticides pesticides food additives carcinogens word about radon gas for this masters what about saving endangered species let me tell you about endangered species are I. saving endangered species is just one more hour into tempted by humans to control nature. meddling it's what got us in trouble in the first place does anybody understand that's interfering with nature over ninety percent over way over ninety percent of all the species. live on this planet ever lived..

George Carlin CNN. HBO CNN White House George Carlin. ninety percent twenty seven years six months
High Court Strikes Down Law That Barred Trademarking 'Immoral' Words

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:20 min | 3 years ago

High Court Strikes Down Law That Barred Trademarking 'Immoral' Words

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from frame bridge. They make custom framing easy and affordable frame. Your art in photos at frame bridge dot com or visit their new stores located on fourteenth street and Bethesda row. Get fifteen percent off your first frame bridge order with code NPR in the next couple of months. There will probably be a rush to get trademark protection for brand names that use obscene vulgar, even racist language. That's because the supreme court struck down a long standing federal law that bars federal trademark protection for immoral and scandalous language as NPR's Legal Affairs correspondent, Nina totenberg reports the challenge to the law was brought by the owner of a clothing line called, I'm going to let Nina take it from here. The line is called f you see T. You can sound it out yourself. I am not allowed to now. Anybody can trademark brand, but a government approved trademark gives the holder. Extra protection? And in this case, the government denied trademark for F U, C T, citing a federal law that bans such protection for immoral or scandalous names yesterday. The supreme court struck down that law by a six to three vote an odd coalition of the courts, conservative and liberal justices declared that the law violates the first amendment guarantee of free speech because it disfavor, certain ideas, an equally odd combination of three justices disagreed and would have upheld. The law, applying it only to profane, vulgar, and obscene, brand names, and now experts are predicting a race to trademark all kinds of sexually explicit and racist, brand names lawyer Jacqueline lesser specializes in trademark matters. I do believe that this will open the door to indiscriminate applications for terms and words that many or most of us find to be really awful. This is not the first time the supreme court has struggled with this dilemma, though, in a somewhat different context in the nineteen seventies in the pre cable era, comedian George Carlin set out to determine what words he could say on TV and radio I wanted to list because nobody gives you lease. They don't give you a list, wouldn't you think it'd be normal if they didn't want you to say something to tell you what it is, as he put it there were at the time. Lots of descriptions, for forbidden words dirty filthy foul raunchy rude. Crude lewd, less sivvy's indecent profane, obscene blew off color Carlin ended up with seven famous dirty words. All I could think of. And those were the so called seven dirty words that the Federal Communications Commission barred from the airwaves and in nineteen seventy six the supreme court upheld that list ironically in yesterday's F, U, C, T, case dissenters, and at least one of the justices in the majority suggested that the trademark office should have made a similar list, or in the alternative. They suggested congress should make a list like George carlin's in a new statute as chief Justice, John. Roberts, put it in his dissent, the first amendment, protects the freedom of speech. It does not require the government to give aid and comfort to those using obscene vulgar, and profane modes of expression or as Justice Samuel Alito in the majority, put it in a separate opinion. For himself, only our decision does not prevent congress from adopting, a new statute, more focused on obscene, vulgar, and profane brand names. It's not at all clear. However, that the five other justices in the majority would uphold such a statute. So stay tuned. And in the meantime, prepared to dislike a lot of trademarks, you see, they won't be your father's, Nike Swoosh, Nina totenberg, NPR news. Washington. Support for this podcast and the following message come from atlassian, a collaboration software company powering teams around the world committed to providing the tools and practices to help teams plan track build and work better together. More at atlassian dot com.

Supreme Court George Carlin Government Nina Totenberg Frame Bridge NPR Congress Justice Samuel Alito Atlassian Federal Communications Commiss Washington Nike Jacqueline Lesser Roberts John
In the wise words of George Carlin: 'We like war.'

Your Brain on Facts

05:08 min | 4 years ago

In the wise words of George Carlin: 'We like war.'

‘Aladdin’ Producers Set ‘Lilo & Stitch’ Live-Action Remake at Disney

/Film Daily

02:03 min | 4 years ago

‘Aladdin’ Producers Set ‘Lilo & Stitch’ Live-Action Remake at Disney

"But most of the live action Disney adaptations have been of like the Walt Disney classics. And this is the first it's kind like not like one of those beloved fairytale stories that they're trying to adapt. I guess, lady and the tramp isn't a fairytale story either. But you know, every time I go to Disneyland, the stitch merchandises like out of control there is like they sell so much merchandise based on that movie I, it was only a matter of time before this is going to happen. I can imagine that stitch will be like a CG creation and we'll have a young, Hawaiian star kind of I almost picture kind of like, you know. It would being optimistic here, Chris, but I think if done right, this could be like a fun mwana. I've action kind of movie, I guess. I mean, yeah, there's material is there to do something good. It's just, I don't know. I'm just getting. This film was so recent. There's really no reason for Disney to remake it. I don't know why they're so hell bent them. I mean, I know why they wanna make money, but. It's getting a little tiresome. There's remaking everything, but there's definitely the chance this could turn out. Well in the movie has such great style has some good music, but it doesn't really have a strong story, Brad. Do you have any connection with Leland Stitcher? You excited for live action remake. I really liked to Leila Wednesday, which when it came out, it's not one of my favorites or anything like that. But I think that it's it's pretty funny and I can see where it had the potential for like maybe like an Amblin kind of style live action movie because it had has flares t. and things like that. But it's also a little bit bigger and more cartoony than that because you know, there's the

Walt Disney Disney Leila Wednesday Leland Stitcher Chris Brad
Branded RSS in the era of platform expulsion

BeyondPodcasting, BeyondPodcasting.com

26:33 min | 4 years ago

Branded RSS in the era of platform expulsion

"Hi, I'm Ellen Tepper today on beyond podcasting, we'll be discussing branded RSS in the euro of platform expulsion. Thanks. What shooting into beyond podcasting dot com way. We recognize that your online radio show is much more than just a podcast. Your show can be broadcast live, which is not a podcast. Your show can be heard on a website, which isn't a podcast either. Of course, you're online radio show can and shoot also be syndicated as a podcast by RSS where your listeners can subscribe using the standard pod catcher, or you'll shows own branded app, Android, and I o s beyond podcasting dot com. Kevin microphones interfaces, mixers, production, software recording techniques, based practices and mall. Now enjoy another episode, yon podcasting dot com. With your host, Alan Taber, you're listening to be on podcasting Mellon Tepper in the studio in Miami, Florida. And we have Chris curry of podcast engineering school from Colorado. I believe Colorado Springs is that. Correct, Kris. That's right. Colorado Springs about an hour, south Denver, right at the foot of pikes peak. Very interesting. Well, Chris has already become a regular since this is the second time that he's coming on beyond podcasting, so welcome back. Chris. Koren happy to be here. If you would understand the joke, I might say welcome back kotter. Oh, yeah, Mr. gun Mr. Qatar. Exactly. Well, today were here to talk about something different. Something that we haven't talked about before on beyond podcasting, and the name of the show is branded. S s in the area of platform expulsion and that requires lots of explanation. And Chris, of course, is the man behind podcast engineering school, and he's really, really good in audio recording and post production. But he's a podcast her and I wanted to have a friendly podcast or with me to stop me when I say things that are too complex and need some explanation. So that's why asked. This to come with us today, and I appreciate it. Chris, that you're here, I should have brought my whistle. I could blow my whistle when I wanna stop you. Yes, yes. Even though your site kick berry is not there. I might occasionally stop and say, what would bury say because of this situation or something like that. Yeah, several things in the explanation here before we get into the nitty gritty and some of the newbies in this medium might be asking at the very, very beginning, what's in our s s? So let's talk about that a little bit for a minute, and then we'll go forward from there. And I like to make some analogies as we go along. There's the official words that come behind it, which is rich site summary, although a lot of people just call it real simple syndication, and even though that's not the official name for it, I like that nickname that it has because it has to do with syndication. And if we do the analogy of a conventional AM or FM radio station, Kris, have you ever visited one in in your history? Yes. Yeah. Few times actually once when I was in cub scouts when I was real young, but but in my adult life, yeah, a few times I've been radio stations. In fact, you just brought the memory I knew had gone as a kid, but I didn't remember. And I think it probably was with cub scouts also. Yeah, that's great to know. Well, I like to make the distinction that if you're in the lobby, if you haven't come in back to the part where the offices in the studios are because there's usually a lobby and there's usually a big speaker on the wall and that speaker was just the speaker. It was connected to their board in their master control where you would hear what's being broadcast. It wasn't a radio. It was the actual signal of the radio before it went out to the transmitter. So when people come in depending on how you set up your show, of course, but at least with mine when people come in the visit directly on my website and they press play, it's like they're in the lobby of the radio station. It hasn't gone through our assess. It hasn't been syndicated and that's why I like that nickname because it includes the word syndication because of. We always want our shows to be syndicated on lots of different platforms. And of course the popular platforms include what used to be called. I tunes and now it's gradually being converted into apple podcasts and Google podcasts and tune-in Stitcher all these different platforms because we want to be heard as many places as possible. So my analogy is when you're sitting in the lobby of the radio station, it's like when you're on the website, at least the way mine is set up in it, maybe different the way each individual person sets it up because some of the people set up the website so that it's actually using a player that is connected through our assessment, depends how it set up, but at least the way mine is it's playing the MP three directly. So

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