20 Burst results for "George Armstrong Custer"

"george armstrong custer" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

03:13 min | 2 months ago

"george armstrong custer" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Called Oh, we know they're on the junk yard dog. Bad bad. Leroy Brown was at the top of the Billboard pop singles chart becoming Jim Crow Cheese first. Big hit. Unfortunately for Jim and all of US crochet died in a plane crash Two months later September 20th 1973 On this day in 1989 former President Ronald Reagan was inducted into the Cowboy Hall of Fame. In recognition of his role as George Armstrong Custer in the Santa Fe Trail and his host of televisions, Death Valley Days in the year, 2000 special counsel former Republican Senator John Danforth issued a preliminary report on his investigation of the assault on the Branch Davidian compound near Waco. In 1993. He obviously wasn't paying attention. Because he concluded with 100% certainty that the United States government was innocent of wrongdoing in the fire that killed 80 people. Birthdays. If today's your birthday Happy birthday to you, you share your birthday with the man called Ernest Miller Hemingway Pulitzer Prize 1953 Nobel Prize winning writer 1954, the Old man and the Sea. The Sun also rises a farewell to arms for whom the bell tolls. And more, and I've read them all. Birthdate. Don not nip it in the bud. Nip it. Emmy Award winning actor Andy Griffith Show once twice 34567 different times. Don knots. Janet Reno, former United States attorney born 1938 died November 2016. Happy birthday today to Stephen Dmitry Giorgio. Wow. Come on, People think you know Stephen Better as cats Evens Muslim name now, Yusuf Islam Cat Stevens is 73. Cartoonist Doonesbury. Garry Trudeau, 73. Robin Williams. Good morning Vietnam. Mark from Mork and Mindy. Good morning, Vietnam. Mrs. Doubt Fire Dead Poets Society will forgive him for Popeye. Won an Academy Award for Good Will hunting in 1997 died of suicide 2014 and lastly, wow. First time I heard Dad, I thought it was a bugs Bunny didn't found out. It was faith. No more guitarist for faith no more. I'm kind of glad they are No more. Jim Martin today is 60. Well, don't look for another Texas mask mandate on the horizon despite covid cases trending in the wrong direction. Fully vaccinated. White House staffer has tested positive for Covid after meeting with Texas Democrats who.

Jim Martin Leroy Brown Janet Reno 1993 2014 Robin Williams Stephen Dmitry Giorgio Garry Trudeau George Armstrong Custer November 2016 1997 1989 Waco 80 people 100% 2000 Jim 1938 60 Academy Award
"george armstrong custer" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

04:01 min | 9 months ago

"george armstrong custer" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"That's what one of these Yes, I I know that that particular reference myself from many tumbles down the hill. Michael down you go. Yeah, coming back to my my teacher before the break, though, And that's one thing that really frustrates me is when people are so stuck on looking at past events. Through the lenses of what we know now and what we experienced out and what we believe now. And I think the Alamo is a perfect beating, whipping horse for that sort of a thing. I mean, we and that's what I love about your book is you, You look at both sides of the equation there. And make sure it's very clear that it's not fared as someone sitting here and you know 2022 to look back at whether the Texans are right or wrong or the Mexicans were right or wrong or just it. Just it was what it was in the context of what happened. Yeah, You can't beat up history with the lens of today. I mean, that's one of the most important lessons of history is that in each one of these battles, for example, that signifies Having a frog in my throat today. I'm sorry to say that signify the Hungarians and the Croats were fighting for Christian religion and the Turks were fighting from Islam. Both Have I still got? You said yesterday. I'm like, Yeah, Both of them were fighting for what they believed in. And the fact was that the only one could win. So we can't bring our standards of today to the lessons of the past. Do you consider that to me? It's almost like historical malpractice. Particularly you're talking about young minds. Yes, I believe it's cultural malpractice, and it's It's something I got into in both of my recent books, Devils, Pleasure Palace and fiery Angel. Uh, you can't just dig up the past and hang it because it didn't conform to your notions of what's Correct. Do you think in doing your research Michael that, for example, there's there's certainly a lot of historical debate about whether You know, Davy Crockett died standing on his feet, You know, fighting to the last man or or Jim buoy or any of those characters. The difference between we saw in the John Wayne version of the Animal versus the more the recent version. At the end of the day, though it doesn't really matter does it to the bigger message of this of the story. Uh, no. Look, you always glorified the guys on your side, especially the ones who died in these particular battles. I mean, the Romans certainly did. I think Livia is talking about the Roman historian Livy. Talking about Connie and Saying how they found a Roman soldier. Face down in the mud, but he had the nose of the ear of Numidian opponent in his teeth because he thought right, literally to the end. S so we glorify those guys. But, you know, the question is did Jim Bowie died gloriously lying in his bed, emptying his pistols and fighting to the end there. Was he hiding in a closet. I mean, you hear all these stories in history. Treats both winners and losers differently sometimes. But it doesn't change the sacrifice. Obviously, that speaks to the importance of having good publicist. Maybe, But Michael, we come back. Another interesting theme. I saw that that permeated the book is not all Last stands, You know, sometimes last stands have a good ending. Some, like Grant at Shiloh. That really was the springboard for him to move on to greater things. But in some cases, like in customs case, it cut short a life that might have moved on to greater things. We come back. I want to talk with you about the battle Shiloh and also George Armstrong Custer. Ladies and gentlemen, is your host Ben Beeler Garcia talking with Michael Walsh. The book His last stands. Why Men fight When all is lost,.

Michael Walsh Jim Bowie Ben Beeler Garcia George Armstrong Custer Davy Crockett Livia John Wayne Grant Devils Pleasure Palace Connie
78: The Indian Wars Part 2: The Battle of the Little Bighorn (the Greasy Grass) - burst 02

History That Doesn't Suck

00:55 sec | 10 months ago

78: The Indian Wars Part 2: The Battle of the Little Bighorn (the Greasy Grass) - burst 02

"It's the afternoon of june twenty fifth. Eighteen seventy six as many as a thousand lakota. Cheyenne and arapaho village sprawl across the prairie. It's six to eight thousand. Inhabitants are enjoying a relaxing day. You're currently at war with the united states. But no one is expecting an attack presently. Us troops should be at least a day's travel out. Women are preparing food and chatting. Young men are watering their ponies. Playing hoop and pole gain still others are sleeping in after a late night of salvatori dancing as the hot afternoon. Sun beats down. Kids are swimming in the river at the villages edge these tribes and many other indigenous peoples of the great plains. Call it the greasy grass. You might know by another name though the little big horn river but the mood of leisure comes to an end around three pm. They're charging the charges are coming. A messenger yells

Education United States Research Irreverent Podcast History American Lakota Cheyenne Village Commander Lakota Cheyenne Pickoff Marcus Reno Prairie Cheyenne Battalion Fred Gerard Horn River George Armstrong Custer Charles White Tucson Beatrix Arapaho Salvatori Great Plains SUN
"george armstrong custer" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

03:15 min | 1 year ago

"george armstrong custer" Discussed on KTOK

"Even though I know that Oklahoma's been lumped up with a bunch of other states when it comes to per capita infections are infection rate is down. Our hospitalizations are down. And I see you stays are down, plus total number of cases that are active down all of that worth celebrating on NewsRadio 1000 Katie. Okay, We also heard about this teacher who's diagnosed on Friday in South Carolina and then died on Monday. But they're not saying if she has a pre existing condition and after seeing a picture of her, I'm surmising that with apologies she did. Because she appeared to be livin large. I'm not saying that I'm blaming her. I'm just saying that that is the fact of the matter. And where is this news story is trying to make it sound like you're going to get it on Friday and die on Monday. That's simply another case. Eight. Borland Towels and Leigh Matthews, Katie okay dot com. Bill O'Reilly has a new book out. It's called Killing Crazy Horse, but it's about the American West, and a lot of it. Deals with what happened here in Oklahoma. Including George Armstrong Custer, who was stationed over in the Black Kettle region, and Ah participated in what had become known as The battle of Washington River. They used tactics in that battle that he later tried to use again at Little Bighorn. That you didn't know that. But that's the kind of things you learn when you read a Bill O'Reilly book. Killing crazy horse will tell us about that and current events to speaking of Corona virus. Why did they hold the vaccine trial? Bill's effort will join us with that information on NewsRadio. 1000 Katie. Okay, eight for a 1000 Leigh Matthews, Katie okay dot com to join in the conversation I see on social media. That the Minnesota Vikings have awarded their first George Floyd Legacy Scholarship. George Floyd, As we all know, is the man who was taken into custody by police. They kneeled on his neck till he couldn't breathe. We recently found out he had enough. He had enough dope in him to choke. Godzilla. And that that contributed to or Could have actually led to his death, even if the policeman had not had him in a stranglehold. But it was the stranglehold that killed him now before I go down this road Once again. I want to tell you. I don't think George Floyd should have died. I don't think he should have had his neck melt on. The man was immobilized Why? That cop chose to continue to do that? I don't know. And I'm sure it'll come out in court. But as far as this Minnesota Vikings scholarship goes I wonder what that's going to help fund. Glasses on How you can Resist arrest. How much Um, actually continued. Khun take until you pass out the best way to try to pass a fake $20 bill..

George Floyd Bill O'Reilly Minnesota Vikings Katie Leigh Matthews Oklahoma George Armstrong Custer NewsRadio George Floyd Legacy Scholarshi South Carolina Borland Towels Little Bighorn Khun Um Black Kettle Washington River
"george armstrong custer" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"george armstrong custer" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"How are you? We're back together again, like am Rachel, How are you back? What's happened the past four months? Quite a big quite a bit. Oh, somebody would have said the 1st 6 months of 2020 was going to be this I would this year is going to be for gotten really forever. Is that guy related to George Armstrong Custer? Is he related? No, I don't think so. It wasn't little bighorn deal. No, don't know. Now, Rachel, you're listening today. Your good friend, P G. Sittenfeld on with Sloan. And there's a reason David Man looks like he's an 18th century president and so is on is on the Mount Rushmore. Cincinnati's been married twice before. So the fact that David Mann is a liberal's liberal. Is saying, I'm running for mayor because that guy can't do the job, which is pages. Sittenfeld is a luster tip. But it says time I think PG is like, 36 37. I'm going sexy underwear business. And Peggy said Felt says he's in the sexy underwear business. Hit that again. I'm gonna sexy underwear business. I didn't know that. What is your rush? Something else besides council, right? What? What does he do? What's his job? I don't know. Nobody knows. I don't know. You don't have a job and be a lawyer. He's no lawyer. No. What's his job? You're having insulted when she lies. P G. Come on, man, come on, and by the way, his chief of staff So my Denard. She's singing like a canary to the feds. Yeah, so we'll see what comes of that. I don't know, But when you put your thumbs and device they start tightening a little bit, you start acting like you're in the movie Deliverance up against the hill here under the white hot lamp, Right? It's a bad situation. Talk talk. Speaking of talking Detroit, I'm watching your buddy James Craig had him on many times. Is she fair? Go to Detroit..

David Man Rachel George Armstrong Custer G. Sittenfeld Detroit Denard David Mann Mount Rushmore Cincinnati James Craig Peggy Sloan chief of staff
Black Sparrow and Buffalo Soldiers

Your Brain on Facts

04:22 min | 1 year ago

Black Sparrow and Buffalo Soldiers

"Since colonial times African Americans have fought in America's wars. In every war in fact, The first person to die in the revolutionary. War Christmas attics was black. Black soldiers have put their lives on the line for a country that for centuries enslaved segregated and discriminated against them. Until the Korean War black served in segregated units under racist leadership and often relegated to labor and service units. Despite the continuous discriminatory treatment that denied blacks full participation in America's military efforts, these brave men and women lived lives that deserve to be remembered. My Name's Moxy and this is your brain on facts. Possibly the best known all black military unit comes with a bit of mystery in its history. They were called Buffalo soldiers, though there are competing reasons as to why. In eighteen, sixty, six and active congress created six all black peacetime regiments later consolidated into four, the ninth and Tenth Cavalry and the Twenty Fourth and twenty fifth infantry. Initially the Buffalo soldier regiments were commanded by whites with being forbidden from holding the ranks officers. These. Troops often faced extreme racial prejudice from the army establishment. Many officers including George Armstrong custer of boo and a his there. Refused to command black regiments, even though it costs them promotions. Further black troops could only serve west of the Mississippi. River, because many whites didn't want to see armed black men near their communities. It even sometimes happened that the buffalo soldiers suffered deadly violence at the hands of civilians. The Buffalo soldiers main duty was to support the nation's westward expansion by protecting settlers, building roads and other infrastructure and guarding the US mail. They served a variety of posts in the southwestern great planes, taking part in most of the military campaigns during the decades long Indian wars during which they compiled a distinguished record with eighteen buffalo soldiers awarded the Medal of honor. We don't have time today to dwell on the irony of African American soldiers, fighting native people on behalf of government that accepted neither group as equals. The exceptional performance of these soldiers helped to overcome resistance to the idea of black officers paving the way for the first african-american graduate from West Point Henry O flipper. Who will hear more about later? But. Fellow soldiers played significant roles in many other military actions. They took part in defusing the little known eighteen, ninety two Johnson County war in Wyoming, which pitted small farmers against wealthy ranchers and a band of hired gunmen. They also fought in the Spanish American and Philippine American wars and played a key role in maintaining border security during the high intensity, military conflict along the US Mexico border during the Mexican revolution. In Nineteen Eighteen, the tenth cavalry fought at the Battle of ambos Nogales where they assisted enforcing the of the Mexican federal and militia forces. Discrimination played a role in diminishing the buffalo soldiers involvement in upcoming major conflicts. During world. War One the racist policies of President Woodrow Wilson among whose claims to infamy include segregating federal offices led to black regiments, being excluded from the American Expeditionary Force, and placed under French command for the duration of the war. The first time ever that American troops were placed under the command of a foreign power. Then prior to World War Two, the ninth and Tenth Cavalry Regiments were essentially disbanded, and most of their troops moved to service roles. However the Ninety Second Infantry Division known as the Buffalo Division did see combat during the invasion of Italy while another division that included the original Buffalo Soldiers of the twenty fifth infantry. Regiment fought in the Pacific theater. The last segregated. US Army regiments were disbanded in nineteen,

Buffalo Soldiers Tenth Cavalry Regiments America United States Ninety Second Infantry Divisio Us Army Buffalo Division George Armstrong Custer Army Twenty Fourth American Expeditionary Force Congress President Woodrow Wilson Mississippi Ambos Nogales
"george armstrong custer" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

04:26 min | 1 year ago

"george armstrong custer" Discussed on WTVN

"Girls who were taken captive by general George Armstrong Custer the seventh cavalry after the attack of the why should fifty three St women and children in the movie as we point out they were treated like livestock they were kept in a corral at fort Hays and then some of casters and senior offices captain miles while the key being one of them wrote in his letter to his brother that you know the offices in the seventh cavalry could have up to three of these sand women in girls per night and so they were systematically sexually abusing the shy and women and girls during their period of captivity but you know we would consider in an indigenous context that you know that was them relatively recent now you can take this issue all the way back to fourteen ninety two and you can read account from the colonial perspective that speak about the abuse of indigenous women and girls from that time forth and this is just the historical reality you know I mean in twenty twenty there's no point trying to deny it see you know I know that you is quoted some statistics about a lot of the huge percentage of the the violence of murders and more and rape so indigenous women are committed by non indigenous males but but there's also a lot of a crime that comes from within the reservation from the tribes of it seems like reservations are like a concentration of all the things that the ills that plague society in general alcoholism and drugs and poverty it all kinda combines into a into a toxic still on reservations am I saying that wrong I think that that's a generality and you know you we use this is not just kind of happened put in isolation of this is this is come from hundreds of years yeah colonial domination and oppression and you need to look at the entire and history of the interaction between the colonial powers and the indigenous peoples on this continent to be able to understand it in its full perspective but if you just want to go from less this is taken date for example eighteen eighty four the secretary of the interior of the United States at the time was Henry teller Henry teller issued what was called the secretary's orders in the secretary's orders or is essentially a D. tribal lies ation harder so indigenous people are in a position now where they'll lands of being lost and understand that most of the land of indigenous people you know were not taken through warfare they were taken through as set of treaties which so far as indigenous people were concerned were sacrosanct but in respect to the government's perspective on the street is that we just basically cards I fraudulent real estate deals I mean that's how they approached it and so the majority of Indian lands will last through choirs I legal malfeasance but the people I left now on a reservation and they are being made and highly dependent upon a colonial power which was the United States and in that they did become ultimately dependent you know this was it this it's almost impossible to explain this I think you misunderstand where I was going with that question is that I I'm aware that there is a couple hundred years of of circumstances and treachery that led to the situations on the reservations now I just I just meant that you know it's whatever for a combination of reasons have led to conditions where this kind of violence takes place well you've got pretty dire socioeconomic conditions invasion yes yeah yeah when people are talking about yeah over many reservations out in the western.

George Armstrong Custer
"george armstrong custer" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

12:09 min | 2 years ago

"george armstrong custer" Discussed on KGO 810

"John. This is the John Jay stas. And we have the Indian fighter to the tragic conclusion into town. And there are two episodes that are important to point to one more at this point complicated than the other. So we'll rush to that in eighteen seventy four. The word is that there is gold in the Dakotas there might be gold. There may be cold in the country has been troubled by catastrophe of a recession. We would have called it a depression in those days. But this is a great recession that we'll go on for more than five years, and they're desperate for a way out. The unemployment is high businesses failed Wall Street is blown up money short everywhere, and the word of gold tells the national leadership. This is eighteen seventy four the national leader in eighteen seventy three. They start looking for at the national leadership wants an expedition to see if this is accurate, if there really is a gold field, and who they call upon to lead the X. Expedition, George Armstrong Custer TJ at this point is he America's answer to poverty as well. Have they made him into such a magical weapon that he's no longer fighting the savage, the Indian the aborigine, but that he's going to he's going to save America from its poverty? Do they talk that way about him? I wouldn't put it quite that way, the way that the seventy four expedition, worked is that, you know, Custer had had made a refreshed his reputation in eighteen seventy three when he was deployed to the, the northern plains where the where the Sioux were concentrated and that's why I came up against sitting bull in seventy four to sitting Seventy-three. Yes. That's right. And that was an expedition in which, again, he'd gotten into trouble because of his terrible reputation, actually fought two major battles with the SU it conducted himself, quite well, which makes his final battle, so interesting. But eighteen seventy four the army was did not have the same view of that expedition as the general public did. So the army sent him to the black hills to scout the site for fort because the army was so him string after the civil war that what they wanted to do with a su-. We're at the peak of their power was to be able to retaliate again. Them if they carried out raids on other native nations or on settlers in, so they this was a hole in the chain of forts around the great Sioux reservation. But the public headlong heard rumors of there being gold in the black hills in newspapers wrote of how other expeditions had been beaten back by the sue. But they figured that Custer would would find gold. So there was a great expectation that Custer would find gold. And so a lot of the blame is put on Custer Custer went to get gold. That's not true. But it is definitely what people expect it out of the expedition. Then sure enough, they Feingold and not only do they have to remember at the time, there was still a gold dollar there sort of two currencies. Gold dollar a paper dollar the greenback. So gold was not worth money. It was money. It was like finding an ATM that, you know, in the ground that's putting up cash. Of course you would go to it. And so he finds they find gold on the expedition. But customer doesn't oversell it. But he says something very important. He says anyone can find paint golden paying quantities with very little effort, the idea of accessibility would drove gold rushes. The fact that you didn't have to have, you know, big money apparatus, and crushing machine and all these other things that you need later on that you can go with a pin, and that's enough. And so, it's that excessive -bility that sparks the gold rush. And so this is on territory that the US has recognized as security, western Sioux Lakota, it's their territory. And yet, people flood in by the tens of thousands, US, do, and the army, you know, actually does try not as much perhaps as they could. But they do try to stop people from going in records of people being arrested in taking off the reservation but it's much too much of the army in the high command the army. Is very reluctant and Custer. You know, he's he's says, you know, listen, this is a territory, just really valuable. We'll do whatever I do is retold to keep people out. We'll try to do it but he's still talking about the value of the black hills. So he's not the great villain of the piece. But he's certainly accessory to this invasion of, of Lakota territory. Eighteen seventy three Custer leads a successful contest against what becomes sitting bull in the su- in eighteen seventy four. He leaves a successful expedition into the black hills and as TJ just explained defines gold, and then he takes time off to go back to New York to pursue wealth again to get in trouble with stocks way over his head in debt and to plunge again into very rough politics. The worst of the second granted ministration TJ I the short selling. I like your careful Resig recreation of the moments where Custer borrow. Stock that he doesn't own and sells it back. This is in the long recession of eighteen seventy three that goes on, and on, and on, at the same time he's mixing with the corruption of the Indian territory, the, the south lers, the Indian affairs, the secretary of war. William Belknap is in charge of that, these are two parts of his brain. Is that how to read this at one time? He's being rascal on the stock market taking risks and the other time he, he is haughty towards people who are or abusing are taking advantage of their thirties that had to read him to people. I think that I think that's true. I mean one of the key things about Custer's how deeply coach dictator he is. And another thing is the way in which it all his coach addictions. He so cynically reflects America at this time so Custer was a gambling addict. He found a stockbroker who had been a Hungarian revolutionary. And I suspect, I absolutely love this man, just just I've been he is, again, he's out of Trollop Trollop could've couldn't have Bennett a many better than he is. Immediately recognized him and taught yes, this is this stockbroker who you know, managed to come to the US after taking part in Hungarian revolution. Even adventure himself Custer finds in the men begins to finance Custer's trading. You know, he doesn't force them to put up a margin in Custer's early trades. He's short selling which, you know unless you are major financial player in your, your hedging for, for good reasons, you know, short-selling was a speculative technique, and it was purely speculation inventing it at the time. There are no rules. There's no FCC. There's just you just take your chances here. You could lose your you lose your life. If you're on the wrong side of this sale. Yeah. Exactly. And Custer plunges into it, and unfortunately, for Custer the early trades make money and, you know, for a gambling addict that, that begins to fire off all the snaps is that say, you know, I'm winning easy money, keep it going. And what happens is the ends of making. At least extensively in the kind of formal value of the trades. He ends up making four almost four hundred thousand dollars worth of trades. And this is at a time, you know, when is I as I point out the final debt that he accumulates from losing this money with interest because, yes, right outta promissory note amounts to nine thousand dollars. This is at a time when the president of one of the largest corporations in America might have an annual salary of six or seven thousand dollars. I mean it's enormous amount of money for, for an army officer and so was plunging into this at the same time, he was a partisan democrat, and fierce political partisanship is something that we are very familiar with in the entire episode that he gets involved in is very, very contemporary for us. You know, the, the Democrats won control of the house representatives in the us. They're control. The house to do what to carry out investigations of the administration in this committee hearing after committee hearing uncovering scandal after scandal. Now, there are thinking true scandals in the grant ministration. He was also most of it was a continuation of businesses usual within the departments, but some of it was very high profile and it became an issue with that it never had before so Custer is in didn't it in outraged at this corruption, even though he himself is men who stole horse with his power as an army officer or who is now gambling on the stock market when it's a political matter. He becomes indignant and he begins to leak information to hostile newspapers. He biens of right articles themselves. We believe criticizing the administration and again, he's a serving army officer today, it would ruin your career. But at the time, you know, he's inserting himself. Into politics in finally brought him to Washington DC in early. Eighteen seventy six to testify before a hearing, that is trying to, they're, they're impeaching, the secretary of war, even though he had resigned because a scandal that that he was involved in it come to light in Custer. Presented evidence very hostile to the administration and more than that, he, he actually strolled around Capitol Hill with political opposition, he, he wrote letters to his wife, literally at the table of the democratic opposition that controlled house of representatives on Capitol Hill in the capital. So he's not making is not just he's doing his duty. He was throwing himself into the political contest identifying with grants position in grit. I think legitimately was very upset with this grant, one grant wanted to get rid of him grant, wanted grant ordered him to, to be separated from the expedition that was set up for the. Spring summer of seventy six he said, get rid of him and Sheridan one more time rescued him. TJ one last time. That's right. And even shared in at this point, was fed up with him Sheridan, who had been his mentor. You know, you've you read his, his notes to grant about this matter that you don't have to read very much between the lines. See even Sheridan is getting tired of, of Custer's antics, and it's the departmental commander is immediately above Custer. General Terry who really is the one who intervenes in his request for Custer has willingness to finally say, I'm sorry, essentially that, you know, I you know, to kind of say, I I'll be humiliated if my regiment goes off without me. All fight is a regular soldier. I don't have to be in command and finally grit, relents and ironically, it's grants, mercy, his relenting that spirit that Lee. The was death. Customers out with the seventh on may eighteen seventy six brother Tom who's one two medal of honors his younger brother, Boston his nephew, eighty and family friends, they ride out with the seventh cavalry on an expedition to pursue and destroy the sue. When we come back little Bighorn. I'm John Batchelor. This is the John Batchelor show. John Batchelor show. Balance.

Custer Custer George Armstrong Custer Custer America US army John Batchelor Sheridan officer depression secretary Sioux William Belknap John. FCC Feingold John Jay Trollop Trollop
"george armstrong custer" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

12:31 min | 2 years ago

"george armstrong custer" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Live with little story of each of them. We built a nice little anthology over the years of doing this this week. The book is called wild Bill. The true story of the American frontiers. First gunfighter. Tom Clayton is the author book just came out last week. Is that right, Tom? It just came out in February. Yes. Wow. Congratulations. Yeah. Because. Well, this is this a person we should emulate or should we or does he have characteristics that we should be doing? Well, I think so because you know, one of the pleasant discoveries working on this book is that, you know, while Bill Hitchcock model people will say, okay, he's a gunfighter and he probably killed people. And and maybe a hired gun. He may have been an outlawed at some of the things I have wild Bill hickok, but the true stories that he's somebody who really live with a code of honor. He he was a fierce abolitionist anti-slavery person. He was very much. He took on bullies bullied heated unfair fights, he hit injustice, and he did have participated in gun gun fights. But it was only when there was absolutely no resort. And somebody challenged him would let him just slide. So he he really tried to treat people as he wanted to be treated. And I think that's something that emulate we could jump on on each of those. But can we go back to the beginning? Can you give us a quick little? Bio of wild Bill will abilities, actually, born James Butler, Hitchcock in Illinois in eighteen thirty seven and he his father operated, a farm, and Illinois that was a station on the underground railroad. So when he was when he was a kid his family actually was would load up runaway escaped slaves and their wagon and that takes them during the night to the next stop on the underground railroad. So he grew up with with that kind of family environment during the civil war. He joined the union army, but became a spy, and I spent a couple of years behind enemy lines in confederate uniforms and spy getting the information secretly back to the union lines that would have an impact on the subsequent battle because you know, the union army would know what the confederate on was about to do. Thanks to their spy on the other side. He was a plane's, man. He was an army scout after the war. He did become was known as a gunfighter. But at the same time, he also wore bad. She was the Marshall of of Abilene Kansas, for example, and cleaned. Up that town. So he he picked he packed a lot of lives at the end to one relatively brief life. What were the reasons for his dad's or mom's I suppose his parents abolitionist views at that time. Well, they were originally from New England the Hickox when they emigrated over from England Ireland. They became farmers in Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut and a couple of decades before the civil war, you know, most of your abolitionist fervor was in was in New England. So the Hickox father was the very first one to break away from the family and decide to head west and establish a farming, Illinois. He brought with him along with their possessions. He brought with him that that abolitionist fever very much anti-slavery and his his sons including Jimmy grew up feeling the same way. What did that you mentioned there like smuggling slaves inside of what did that whole process? Teach Bill when he was a boy that he brought with him. Well. I taught him two things one was that he just to have caring and compassion for those who have been brutalized, you know, people who have who who need do need help. He was always on the side of people needed help it taught him, or at least he came to believe was that the bullet hadn't been made that would kill him because I'll brief explanation for that. Is what his father used to do as he put the slaves in the back of a wagon throw some hay on them or blanket. And you always get a couple of his sons to sit up front with him to make it look at. It was kind of innocent thing they were doing is know strolling along lane. Well, every so often about hunter or a law man would realize what was going on and give chase. And there would be bullets flying all around. None of them would hit hit the Hickox. He would later in his life. He did say that to somebody who said they asked him. How come you could be cool and calm in the middle of a gunfight? He said the bullet hasn't been made that could kill me. I'm sure you've thought about that too. And he was spying other competitors. Did he have a deep reason for that as well? Or was that just because he lived in the north on the union side. Well, he joined a union side because of his anti-slavery feelings, but initially saw his first battles. He was as a scout as a guide as a messenger a sharpshooter with the union army, but his superiors notice this the guy who really is cool and calm under pressure. And let's give them a try. And so he went behind enemy lines. And he always kept emerging and coming back with good intelligence information. There were a couple of ties is one time in the book. I talk about he was discovered, and he was placed into a shack that he was going to be executed in the morning. He managed to escape and make his way back to union lines by think it was that that fearlessness that common to pressure him to disguise himself as other people that made him a very good Spicer's literally wearing a confederate uniform during these. Yes. Yeah. There's even one time when. He was he he managed to wangle himself a job as a staff assistant to the general commanding the confederate army. So he's actually sitting there next to the general where they're discussing this strategy in the next couple of days that ninety slipped out and made his way to union lines. And gave it all away. How long did it take for him to get that position? Like, how long did you have to gain the trust of the confederates? You know, he came up with these schemes that make things pretty easy. He actually joined one unit of the confederate army pretending to be the brother of he found a found grave of a confederate soldier who had died. So he showed up a few days later with this unit because they put out seven th regiment or something like that saying, I'm Joe's brother from Alabama. And they said, oh, you're one of us was so good to see you. Your brother was a fine guy. Come on come on. Leo, join us. So he he was very bright guy. And he would come up with these schemes obviously was successful because he was still still on the side of the growl and the civil war ended. So this is already we haven't even gotten to the characteristics. I didn't know anything really about wild Bill, but the nickname and with the gunslinger and stuff I thought he was a bad, dude. Right. And I'm getting no, no he was not. I mean, I'm not saying that he never fired his pistol. But he always it was always like I said last resort. He he wanted to avoid confrontations. And the reason why sometimes he was able to avoid confrontations is if he was slow to anger, but when he gonna angry got had this look on his face, these steely blue eyes and people who were trying to confronted with see that. And they would they would think to themselves light bulb. Go off and say this is a dangerous, man. This is not gonna come out. Well for me. They would just turn and walk away or. Oh, sorry Bill. I was mistaken. So every so often he was a confrontation. But it was as a last resort. He he really, you know, he wasn't like John Wesley hard was an outlaw. And he's a character in the book. His motto was I never killed a man who didn't need killing. Yeah. That's kind of an extreme view to justify yourself. Haycock didn't have that. He really really did not like to shoot people. But sometimes there's a law man, especially he had no choice. Well, you've touched on a few already. But should we just maybe your first official characteristic of of wild Bill honesty. He was very honest, man. He didn't want to miss this leave people she later in his life. He started to repeat some of the tall tales. That was being spoken about him. I think probably because he probably could no longer separate fact from fiction anymore. You know, there's a John Ford movie. The man who shot. Liberty Valance is a great Lyons says when legend becomes the fact print the legend, I think later in his life. He was living bore the legend than the fact, but but for up until that point he honesty was definitely characteristic of his what's what was that. What was the legend? Did you ever example of maybe there was one example story where here's what actually happened? But here's the story told well again going back to when I was a civil war spy, there's at least five different lease five different stories of him being discovered a companion of his jumping on their horses racing across this river to get to the union lines and escape and its companion. You know gets gets gets shot, and he can believe that story one time, but it was five times. In fact, my research, and I found out that that one of his dead companions found out. He had died by reading the story that is big. The second characteristic of wild Bill. I think the second characteristic was compassion. He started when he grew up in a household and helps his father gets slaves to escape, but he was always help trying to help people. He didn't like unfair fight isn't like injustice. He he really likes people and people mostly liked him as long as you weren't trying to do anything dangerous. They they let me lay like people, and they they liked him. You know, there's a story in the book about he's he's passing by a saloon. There's a commotion inside. He finds out that the bartender had expressed some sympathy for the southern cause in the civil war and six guys jumped him to beat him up. The teaching the hair of his ways Bill went in there with his fists flying to help the bartender. Now, this is a guy who was anti-slavery. But he he had he said there's no way that this poor guy should be getting beaten up by six bully. So he came in on the side of the of the poor bartender story is that. After the war that was actually right at the beginning of the war when it was even more dangerous to take the side of a southerner. Wow. That's that is a wonderful sorry in our in our free slack of free speech country that we're moving towards that's that's a great story. It is characteristic of wild Bill. I think a sense of humor wild Bill was a funny guy. He loved telling stories it was a really good storyteller. And at people like being around him in the saloons are sitting around the campfire. He he had a good storytelling ability. He liked to laugh other people tell stories he liked to laugh one of his favorite stories that he would always, you know, catch people on with. He'll be talking about being chased by Indians. He get some Roxy steak is way between the rocks. Indies? We've come through with them until he ran out of bullets. They come to try and fight them off with his knife. And then he would pause, and then they'd say, well, what happened Bill and Bill would say, well, they killed me boys. And it'll be. But we start laughing because he he liked it. He liked to play the joke on people practical jokes verbal jokes. He was a funny guy. How would he have defined injustice? And are you give a good story there? But do you have any near the definition of injustice in his eyes? Well, I think he felt injustice was when whether in a court system, whether it was just two people where it was a group of people that somebody didn't get a fair shake. And and and so he that sometimes happen that, you know, a lot of times we see the movie westerns the guys out for revenge because the the court was crooked or corrupt, and they let the guy off we should or something like that that happened. You know, he was a law man in hey city in an Abilene other places, you know, it was a rough and tumble Justice system back then so for him. Injustice was when somebody was not treated fairly by by the court or by by community. And he he almost always took the side of the person who got the short end of the stick diva quote to wrap us up with Tom. I wanted to read something very very quickly. He was friends with George Armstrong Custer, and when he finished scouted for the seventy Calvary while Bill did. And when he first met libbie Custer, George Custer's wife, she fell in love with him. And I'm just gonna read a couple of quick censor what she wrote down tall lice and free and every motion. He wrote walkers if every muscle was perfection, and the careless swing of his body as he moved seem perfectly in keeping with the man the country the time in which Stevens lived, I do not recall anything finer the way of physical perfection than wild Bill. When producer Eric wrote that to me, I thought you wrote that. Eric. Some help. I understand at least you did that right there description until after. That's probably right there. That's awesome. Hey, tom. Thanks for coming on tells us about wild Bill. My perception has changed. I look forward to read the whole book..

Bill Bill Hitchcock Bill hickok union army Tom Clayton Illinois Hickox confederate army George Armstrong Custer Abilene libbie Custer Abilene Kansas Eric John Ford James Butler Jimmy Vermont Spicer England Ireland
"george armstrong custer" Discussed on What Really Happened?

What Really Happened?

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"george armstrong custer" Discussed on What Really Happened?

"You may have heard of the black Dahlia it was the name given to Elizabeth short. A woman who was savagely killed in Los Angeles in nineteen forty seven her body was cut in half and pose to horrifying effect. It's still the most famous unsolved murder in American history. Black Dahlia stories have been told for decades my sister, and I have heard them since we were little because we were told that the killer. Was part of our family for the first time ever. All of us are ready to tell our story the real story of the hotel family. My name is Yvette and I'm Russia, and we're proud to bring you the new podcast documentary series root of evil. The true story of the hotel family and the black Dahlia subscribe to root of evil now on apple podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. General George Armstrong Custer was a civil war hero heroically fighting for the union army. His legacy is complicated. He'd go on to take part in the gold rush and is known to have slaughtered. Native Americans in the process in a stunning turn of events after miraculously surviving, close calls with death throughout the civil war. General Custer died when fighting the northern Cheyenne the battle at least in American history textbooks has become known as Custer's last stand. Although native Americans now myself call it the battle of little big horn. But who killed Custer has always remained a mystery. Although recently new details have emerged in one of my favorite episodes of the season, her brother's revenge. The death of general Custer, I chronicled Custer's life and death and the life of buffalo calf road woman otherwise known as. Brave woman. She was part of the northern Cheyenne tribe and fought for her people time and time again as a reminder, here's a part of the story in two thousand five there was a gathering, although not chronicled by the influential publications of our time or really hardly any magazines or newspapers this gathering. I think changed history. It was July twenty second in billings, Montana. And the sun was just beginning to set on another hot day. A group of northern Cheyenne came together to tell a story there were about two hundred people in attendance. Frank, Roland the nights MC announced to the crowd. The chiefs said to keep a valve silence for one hundred summers one hundred summers have now passed and we're breaking our silence in fact, seeing as it was two thousand five more than one hundred summers had passed, although I can't be certain it could be for different reasons. I've tried reaching out to the tribe in earnest and can only take some educated guesses, perhaps it's because of Custer's incredible following the tribe remained fearful of some sort of retribution. Eugene little Coyote present at the gathering said we've been told we were the villains of history. No more. It's important for our young Cheyenne to know the truth, we want to share our history now for the first time in public. They shared details of the battle of little big horn. They showed imagery that presented different moments of the battle. Some of the images were printed over old newspapers, which they found enact. Curate or misleading a man named Clarence spotted wolf spoke of his brave. Great great grandfather who fought at the battle in lost his left eye. But the biggest revelation, which I think changes history is when they revealed who was the knocked George Armstrong Custer off of his horse their history indicated it was buffalo calf road woman, aka brave woman..

George Armstrong Custer Los Angeles murder Elizabeth union army Russia apple billings Montana Yvette Clarence Frank Eugene wolf twenty second
"george armstrong custer" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"george armstrong custer" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"Are you serious guess the sewer and warriors led by Crazy Horse brutally attacked with Winchester repeating rifles as well as Bowen arrows. So it's not just like, they didn't just have bows. At aero. They had Americans rifle. Yeah. Because just repeating rifles also. Yeah. So by that time, and a lot of people, you know, and still to the state people feel that native American tribes are like. Their agent. No. I mean, this is pretty early on in this manifest destiny. Like moving into native American territories in trying to take over the land. They had all the same technology that the white people had like they had all of that. And they knew how to use it, and they were much better at figuring out how to get around and like killing people in an efficient and dangerous way. Very. So the fact that they were like, oh, no they have gone. I think they didn't expect them now. I didn't. But I mean, it's all around them up, and they would come peacefully. Oh, sure. Yeah. Nope. So as the as the US troops were cut down, the native warriors strip the debt of their firearms and ammunition with the result that the return fire from the cavalry steadily decreased while the fire from the native Americans constantly increase because they were taking new buds. This is like this is like video games. One-size video games wanna one if any of these guys had played a single video game. This would not have happened. I'm just saying. And what else does that is the surviving troops may have shot their remaining horses to use as shields for final on the knoll at the north end of the ridge hocken about cutting off your nose is by face. Honestly. So most of Custer's men were armed with Springfield single shot carbine rifles and Colt forty five revolvers they were easily outgunned. Sure. Yeah. Because you gotta Ling. It's got a rating. Yeah. Meanwhile, they have the Winchester repeating rifles Custer's line and command structure quickly collapsed and soon it was every man for himself in the end Custer found himself on the defensive with nowhere to run or hide and was killed along with every other man in his battalion. Yeah. His body was found near Custer hill also known as less STAN hill alongside the bodies of forty of his men, including his brother and nephew and dozens of dead horses Custer had suffered two bullet wins one near his heart and one in the head it is unclear which wound killed him. Yeah. Both are fatal. I would. I'm not a doctor. I've play on TV. Yes. I've seen my share of movies. And I know that both of those are shots. I know I'm sorry in the heat of the battle. It's likely that the need the native American who shot Custer knew that he had killed a US army con even so once word spread the customer is dead many native Americans claim to be his executioner ups. Oh, yeah. I did that that was me after the battle native American stripped scout in dismember their enemies corpses on the battlefield possibly because they believe the souls of disfigured bodies were doomed to walk out forever. Yeah. So that's like the ultimate insult to. Yeah. Yeah. Like, the if you are just figure that means we sorry. You don't get to go to heaven anything you gotta stick around here. So that's I mean that really indicates like how high and hostile and like upsetting this whole like time period was for these native peoples like they wanted this is like their livelihood. These are their lives. They're not just fine. Eating justify, you know. So the fight was an overwhelming victory for the Lakota or Chan interrupt, the US seventh cavalry force of seven hundred men suffered a major defeat while under. The command of Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer five of the seventh. Cavalry's twelve companies were annihilated. Total US cashed account included two hundred sixty eight dead and fifty five severely wounded cow. The battle of a little Bighorn didn't end with the massacre of Custer and his men the native Americans quickly regrouped pursued Reno's and Ben teens battalions the troops fought valiantly until general Terry's reinforcements finally arrived. Now, it was the native Americans who were outnumbered. So they packed up camp and fled bringing the largest defeat of the US army during the plains Indian wars to an end the native Americans reveled in their victory for a time..

Lieutenant Colonel George Arms US Custer hill Winchester Bowen Reno ta Ling STAN hill Chan Springfield Terry
"george armstrong custer" Discussed on Aerial America

Aerial America

03:49 min | 3 years ago

"george armstrong custer" Discussed on Aerial America

"These golden Montana hills. But once covered in blood, they Mark the site of one of the most crushing defeats in US military history. A battle known as Custer's last stand it began with a vision during a Sundance ceremony in the spring of eighteen seventy six in it chief sitting bull. So American soldiers falling from the sky upside down and prophesized a great victory for his Lakota tribe over the US army, the whites want war he said, and we will give it to them a few years before the US government had discovered gold in the nearby black hills and one of the tribes to sell their land. When they refuse the US government was determined to round them up and move them to the great Sioux reservation in. What was then Dakota territory. Eighteen seventy six general. Alfred Terry said out eight hundred seventy nine men to force them to surrender members of the Lakota Cheyenne and arapaho tribes gathered here at little Bighorn river ready to defend their home and hunting ground when he found signs of a large tribal encampment the general divided his troops. He ordered Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer and his seventh cavalry to flank the Lakota and Cheyenne from the south to keep them from escaping the larger military attack from the north. But soon after Custer heard that his troops had been spotted afraid that the tribes would scatter before the rest of the army arrived. He decided to attack even though he had no backup. Custer divided. His cavalry into three battalions. While his own battalion of two hundred ten men at at north. He was hoping you could surround and force the tribes into submission. But Custer's plan was about to go horribly wrong. Little is known about what happened next. But it's believed that hundreds of Cheyenne and Loko to Frickley overwhelmed Custer's troops. Many were killed as native warriors pursued them across these dry hills. It was in this ravine that the last of Custer's men met their fate taken down by clubs arrows and bullets. Not a single one survived. Colonel Custer was found near the top of last stand hill with a shot to his head and one was just legend has it that Lakota warrior Crazy Horse personally killed Custer. But no one knows for sure. Historians believe that the battle of little Bighorn lasted about an hour. Not a single one of the soldiers in Custer's battalion live to tell the tale. Today, a granite monument stands on the site where Custer and the last of his men were surrounded. Most of the soldiers were buried where they fell today, they're marble gravestone still dot the landscape is small groups revealing their frenzied attempt to retreat from certain death. The soldiers bodies related moved nearby to Custer national cemetery. It's estimated that at least eighty native Americans died during the battle. A memorial by native artist marks their loss. The Lakota and Cheyenne may have won the battle. But also they lost the war the United States succeeded in forcing the tribes into reservations and settlers soon moved in to claim the land for themselves..

Lieutenant Colonel George Arms Custer national cemetery US US army golden Montana hills Cheyenne little Bighorn river black hills Alfred Terry Dakota Sioux arapaho
"george armstrong custer" Discussed on What Really Happened?

What Really Happened?

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"george armstrong custer" Discussed on What Really Happened?

"One hundred summers have now passed and we're breaking our silence in fact, seeing as it was two thousand five more than one hundred summer surpassed. Although I can't be certain it could be for different reasons. I've tried reaching out to the tribe in earnest and can only take some educated guesses, perhaps it's because of Custer's incredible following the tribe remained fearful of some sort of retribution. I also look back at what happened a hundred years ago. There wasn't interpreter for one of Custer's fellow generals. George cook this interpreters name was Frank Garard for nearly ten years. He lived with native Americans, but then returned to living with non native Americans. He's documented to be there during the battle of the little Bighorn. He died in nineteen oh five a century before those vows of silence. Were broken. But again, that's only guess and the point to this story is something far more important Eugene little Coyote present at the gathering said we've been told we were the villains of history. No more. It's important for our young Cheyenne to know the truth, we want to share our history now for the first time in public. They shared details of the battle of little big horn. They showed imagery that presented different moments of the battle. Some of the images were printed over old newspapers, which they found inaccurate or misleading a man named Clarence spotted wolf spoke of his brave. Great great grandfather who fought at the battle and lost his left eye. But the biggest revelation, which I think changes history is when they revealed who was the knocked George Armstrong Custer off of his horse their history indicated it was buffalo calf road woman, aka. Brave woman. She put Custer on the ground after falling Custer was then killed if it were not for brave woman Custer may have gone on to live Roland said, we have a moral responsibility to tell the truth. This is the Cheyenne truth. And so there you have it did buffalo calf road woman. Kill George Armstrong Custer. I was lucky enough to speak with Senator Ben Nighthorse Campbell. He was Senator.

George Armstrong Custer Senator Ben Nighthorse Campbel Frank Garard George cook Eugene Clarence Roland wolf hundred years ten years
"george armstrong custer" Discussed on What Really Happened?

What Really Happened?

05:11 min | 3 years ago

"george armstrong custer" Discussed on What Really Happened?

"Join the movement. Before her death. Buffalo calf road woman was fighting alongside her brother and husband in the hills of North Dakota trying to keep her family and people alive. It was eighteen seventy six for may to November of that same year. The United States is throwing a party in Philadelphia. We'll really a big expedition America's celebrating a hundred years since the signing of the declaration of independence said one historian a century of incredible progress in chievements America survived. The civil war built rails across the continent. This experiment of democracy was working the party is the centennial international exhibition. There are more than two hundred buildings constructed on display were many of the great American inventions, Alexander Graham, Bell's, first telephone was set up to which the visiting Brazilian emperor tried out and immediately dropped the phone frying. My God, it talks Thomas Edison showed off his electric pen. A steam engine was assembled on a platform, which none other than president. Ulysses s grant tried out. It was a Steve Jobs. Iphone launch presentation next to Spielberg doing a tedtalk on the history of cinema with Oprah interviewing JK rolling and on a basketball court people watching Bron James play, Michael Jordan. In his prime some sort of VR technology needs player simulation science. Who knows? You'd have to ask you, Lon musk. Yeah. You owns there. Anyway, almost ten million people come through over the course of these seven months on July third than Illinois paper, I found the daily ARGUS said on the top of page one. Philadelphia is brilliant with flags and patriot decorations in the streets everywhere are densely crowded, and there are constantly arrivals of strangers from all parts of the country. The paper added there were governors from different states together with crowds of other newly-arrived celebrities, but then only a day after this article was published in two days after the official one hundred year anniversary a telegraph came through it read in part, George Armstrong Custer and two hundred sixty one members of the seventh. Cavalry have been massacred by Cheyenne and the coda warriors new. You're a river called little big horn in Montana territory. No survivors Custer was dead at thirty seven years old America shook the party came to a halt, George Armstrong Custer, dead Custer was an American icon. He helped the union when the civil war. He was there when Robert E Lee's surrender. They called it Custer's luck for reason not to mention as one historian would later say the west was won. How could this happen? This was the sinking of the unsinkable Titanic. The script wasn't supposed to be written. This way, the party turned into a melee fights broke out minorities were being shot and killed as some form of nonsensical. Retribution? People wanted to know how did he die? And this part is important because how he died has never been known. I can guarantee you some history. Buffs will right on. Our apple comments section that whatever I say, here's. Wrong to make up for that. Maybe you could say something nice. What is true Custer died in a battle? That has become one of the most ridden about single events in American history. What do Renault happened Custer was preparing to attack village of native Americans? It was one of the battles. I have spoken about during the great Sioux or custard heard warnings that the village they were attacking was prepared. He was scared. They may scatter. And so he attacked immediately. He split his forces and attack the camp from two sides. He was surprised that the warriors didn't take off. Instead they counter attacked, and they drove Custer's forces back leading to defeat ultimately Custer and his brothers were dead said one publication partially to regain the honor and prestige lost at the little Bighorn impartially to fulfil manifest destiny once and for all the US army redo. Doubled its efforts to overwhelm the plains Indians. Waging total war soldiers destroyed Indian homes, food, clothing and supplies. They did not distinguish between combatants and non-combatants. The majority of the fighting was over within a year of Custer's death. Retribution would continue for years in fact, fourteen years after Custer's defeat the seventh cavalry surrounded a group of mostly Dakotas and killed about one hundred and fifty of their people. Custer's early death at just thirty seven years old added to his legend Herman viola wrote that the battle has contributed much to the romantic lore of the west. There's one painting. In fact, that depicts the final moments of Custer's life..

George Armstrong Custer United States Philadelphia North Dakota Lon musk Thomas Edison Steve Jobs ARGUS Illinois Ulysses s president Montana Alexander Graham Cheyenne apple Herman viola
"george armstrong custer" Discussed on What Really Happened?

What Really Happened?

03:18 min | 3 years ago

"george armstrong custer" Discussed on What Really Happened?

"The course of just twenty years in nineteen oh nine nineteen twelve nineteen thirteen nineteen twenty one and three in nineteen twenty six to be clear as time went on some films had Custer as the hero some had as the villain. Others had him somewhere. Between but it wasn't just his life. On the battlefield that got attention Herman viola is the curator emeritus of the Smithsonian Institution and former director of the Smithsonian's national anthropological archives. He's written several incredible books and one of his books. I don't know how to describe it other than saying it's really a once in a generation book. It's called little Bighorn remembered, the untold Indian story of Custer's last stand. So I reached out to him and during our conversation, he pointed out the different sides to Custer, including the fact that it really was a very curious medic person. Of course, he was lucky to be married at his funeral woman. The Jackie Kennedy of her time. And so it was a nice flamboyant kind of couple of the American people, you know, kind of look up to him when working on stories that go way back I go to libraries or newspaper databases to track down old papers. I kept reading about Custer grabbing the attention of the media. But where was the proof? It didn't take long to find during the civil war. Harper's weekly was the most widely read journal in the United States on the cover of the March nineteenth eighteen sixty four addition I discovered none other than Custer himself. He's leading a charge with a group of men behind him men might I add that don't look to thrilled to be with him, but not Custer his hair blowing in the wind a neatly combed mustache, he has his sword pointed out towards the distance in one direction the direction he seems intent on going his horse, perhaps more sensible is trying to go in the other direction the direction that is likely more safe even as men and their horses in the backdrop once you look closely our position towards the safer direction. Historian, Michael a Elliott said one of the things that is remarkable about Custer is the number of photos of him. He understood there was a new kind of visual imagery. At work in society. And that it could be manipulated. But make no mistake Custer was a great strategist and soldier. If he wasn't good at what he did. No number of photos would place him in the history books while soldiers would get mad at him for unnecessarily putting their lives on the line. It should also be noted that in many of the history books. I read it was pointed out that Custer never asked anyone to do anything. He would not George Armstrong Custer wanted to be remembered, and he succeeded perhaps beyond his wildest imagination me, Chris Flannery, executive producer of the show. He has an incredible beard. He's a tough New Yorker. He has that raspy. Ed burns type of voice women love him. Although he's married to a beautiful woman. But his security is vital. He's an important guy. But in all seriousness security is important not just Christmas. And so is your families and your own ring? Mission is to make neighborhoods safer..

George Armstrong Custer Custer Chris Flannery Smithsonian Institution Harper Jackie Kennedy Herman viola director United States Michael a Elliott executive producer twenty years
"george armstrong custer" Discussed on What Really Happened?

What Really Happened?

04:38 min | 3 years ago

"george armstrong custer" Discussed on What Really Happened?

"And this isn't just any cavalry. It's led by Jeb, Stuart one of Robert E Lee's most trusted men, Stewart leads a bad ask group known as the invincibles the invincibles attack the union to overrun the right flank of their army Stewart and the invincibles then take position behind a fence. They're able to shoot at the union army at point blank range. And so the union falls back except for one cavalry, which is ordered to counterattack. A soldier wearing a black velvet jacket with yellow hair curl down to his shoulders rides to the front. It's custer. He looks back at the first Michigan cavalry. And shouts to the men. Come on. You will Rene's with that. They charge into battle one veteran said afterwards. Many of the horses were turned end over end in crush the writers beneath them. Custer's own horses shot so Custer takes over the horse of abuser soldier, man. Who uses a musical instrument to send orders and Custer continues to battle remember over? The course of his career at least sixteen of Custer's forces were shot during battles. Not only do the union troops breakdown the fence, but it takes three of jabs brigades to stop Custer and his men from advancing. It's a pivotal moment for the union army in the future of America. George Armstrong Custer was twenty three years old the boy general they called him on April ninth eighteen sixty five general, Robert E Lee surrendered to general Ulysses s grant Custer sat nearby as a gift from the army. He was given the table in which the peace agreement was signed Custer wasn't just part of history. He had helped shape history. But make no mistake. He was. Been saying you guys, thank you. But please enough about me Custer loved the attention. He had always intended marked one historian on being famous. He wants said there are far more statues of soldiers out there than there are of civilians, but regatta be fair. There are different ways to become famous Custer wanted to serve his country Custer was also keenly aware of his branding from the beginning of his time in office. He made sure regardless of what happened on the battlefield that people. Literally couldn't miss him Custer was familiar with the night. Aaron the legendary figures of medieval chevelle, Rick romance. And he used this as inspiration to create his own modern day outfit. When Custer was first given his military uniform. He replaced it with loose-fitting velvet coats, oftentimes, golden, coats, and velvet pants. He wore this huge sombrero. Much wider than any standard. Hats. He also would put a feather in his cap. He grew his hair long falling to his shoulders and died it a golden red sort of color for good measure. He perfumed his hair with cinnamon oil. Some said he looked like a circus performer a freak, but his daring reputation on the battlefield shut up most of the haters. And if you're thinking the outfits put a target on his back will. Yeah, it did. But it didn't seem to make a difference. At least for Custer the men underneath him fighting alongside him were known to get killed at an enormously high rate, this could be because so many bullets so many attempts at Custer's life were missed and hit others. A larger reason is likely because Custer was so courageous others say reckless that he was often times leading his men into tough opposition was he lucky will. Yes, sure. And he didn't seem too shy away from this. When people started to say he had. Custer's? Luck Custer came to light the name and believed in it. Despite it being known as the bloodiest war legend has it that Custer who fought in the war for its entirety left without a scratch because he made it out alive and well time and time again, the press fell in love with the relatively young man on August. Twenty second eighteen sixty four a New York Tribune article commented future writers of fiction will find in Custer most of the quality which go to make up a first class hero and damn they were right? There are endless movies TV shows books songs paintings. You name it on George Armstrong Custer over.

George Armstrong Custer union army Robert E Lee Rick romance New York Tribune Stewart Michigan Jeb Rene America Aaron Stuart Ulysses twenty three years Twenty second
"george armstrong custer" Discussed on What Really Happened?

What Really Happened?

03:57 min | 3 years ago

"george armstrong custer" Discussed on What Really Happened?

"In due time. Friends and family will call your mom brave woman, capital, B, capital, W, brave woman. Brave woman is trotting on her horse along with her fellow soldiers. They are battling to save their homeland which is under attack. Brave woman's own brother is also in the army and fighting alongside her. At some point during this battle brave woman sees something in the distance a fellow warrior has fallen off his horse. The man is now doing whatever he can to avoid being shot and killed but that is near impossible. There's nothing you can do sooner than later. He'll be dead, but brave woman ride straight towards where this man is straight into the middle of the battle. Where all of the gunshots are being fired in the direction of this, man. The man is our brother if he gets killed. She's not going to watch it as it happens. Brave woman rides right by her brother giving him the ability to grab one hand onto the side of her saddle. He uses his other arm to grab the neck of her horse to keep himself up. She takes them away into save territory. And then goes back to fighting the battle would become known simply as where the girl saved her brother a week later. Brave woman found herself again fighting off people trying to take her land only this time. It was a battle against a group of men led by one of the great generals. One of the great leaders in American history. It was at this battle that he this once in a generation general was killed. The United States of America from the small towns to the big cities mourned, but also just couldn't believe it after fighting for the union in the civil war after avoiding death time and time again over sixteen of his horses had been shot and killed was even possible there were analysts and contradictory reports. How did custody even die for over one hundred fifty years? People have attempted to understand who killed Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer, very recent evidence evidence that most of the world has overlooked suggests remain know who at it may be that mother in her mid twenties. Brave woman what really happened. General George Armstrong Custer was from Ohio. Although some people dispute it most degree he was about five eleven which was quite tall. When the average height for men at the time was around five six Custer was muscular fit and an incredible horsemen Custer went to West Point. That's not to say he had the qualifications to get in. However after his self confidence impressed, a local congressman the man made. Sure Custer was accepted by the end of his four years at West Point. I assume almost everyone knew him he held a few records not necessarily the records. Mom and dad would want. He had collected seven hundred twenty six demerits which gave him the worst conduct record in the history of West Point when grades came in after the final semester, George Armstrong Custer was last in his class. But Custer seemed okay with us. He wants said something to the effect of. Either be at the top or make sure you're at the absolute bottom both are tough to achieve. What was also noticeable, regardless of grades or infractions. He had talent West Point graduates would say that when he applied himself Custer was the best in my research. Although there are a ton of examples of Custer's rise to becoming a heroic union fighter. There is one day that stands out. It's the battle of Gettysburg the future of the union army and the outcome of the civil war is up play. It's the third day of the battle the confederate cavalry is planning an attack..

Lieutenant Colonel George Arms West Point union army United States congressman Ohio America one hundred fifty years four years one hand one day
Explosion at Hawaii volcano spews ash as lava flows into sea

WDRC

01:42 min | 3 years ago

Explosion at Hawaii volcano spews ash as lava flows into sea

"And ongoing volcanic eruption causing new problems on hawaii's big island and other explosive eruption for the summit of a killer way of volcano happening overnight and sparked a magnitude five point four earthquake and is now sending ash airborne words drifting over people who live on the south part of the big island the video from the hawaii county fire department showing the lava fountain at fisher eight that same fountain is feeding a river of lava flowing from inside leilani estates words then dumping into the ocean miles away since the start of the killer whale eruption almost forty days ago while the has covered now nine square miles of land forcing the evacuation of at least twenty five hundred people but some of those who are forced to leave are now returning home to assess damages for the first time swiss voters killed off their countries chances of hosting the two thousand twenty six winter olympics today after refusing to approve financial support for the bid were asked to consider spending the us equivalent of more than one hundred million dollars towards that event a lock of hair expected to bring big bucks at auction george armstrong custer the flashy flamboyant us cavalry officer is best known for his catastrophic defeat at the battle of little big horn in eighteen seventy six he was also noted for his long flowing blond hair a lock of that hair believed to have been snipped off and sent to his wife libby during the civil war has been in the possession of filmmaker glen swanson now retired the seventy eight year old swanson's been collecting custer memorabilia for forty years much of it went up for auction saturday heritage auctions in dallas put a pre auction estimate of two thousand dollars on the historic hair it ended up selling for more than six times that amount twelve thousand five hundred dollars karen mchugh fox news.

Hawaii Olympics Officer Libby Glen Swanson Dallas Hawaii County Fire Department George Armstrong United States Twelve Thousand Five Hundred D One Hundred Million Dollars Two Thousand Dollars Seventy Eight Year Nine Square Miles Forty Years Forty Days
"george armstrong custer" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"george armstrong custer" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"Vancouver's berg body was found in his skagal county ditch in a wooded area off parsons creek road december twenty fourth she was sexually assaulted shot in the head the cook family van was found the next day and abandoned blue diamond parking lot and watkin county they after that cooks body was found in snow holmes county along crescent lake road near school snoqualmie river he had been strangled the dna evidence detectives collected during the investigation did not match any profiles in any law enforcement database the homeless county sheriff's office in the skagit county sheriff's office worked with parabak nanno labs she's very recently in the last few months dna technology company in virginia to create an image of the suspect using a process called pheno typing predicting physical appearance in an ancestry from unidentified dna evidence they released a series of images of what the suspect may have looked like at the time of the deaths then from there the digital file containing the dna gino type data derived from the crime scene was also updated ged match promising matches were found for two of talbot's relatives and those relatives led police to william earl who actually closely resembled the the projected description and then they collected williams dna from a cup he used an another suspect is behind bars thanks to vary brand spanking new technology got an and investigators predicted a lot of cold cases are going to be solved in a similar fashion this is very very fucking cool alright couple gs k you may have heard taunted victims and authorities with phone calls and letters i mentioned a few calls yes he quite possibly did or others did impersonating him we still don't know if it was him or not he sent a poem to the sacramento bee in december of seventy seven slang shitting boring and we just had fun with poetry on friday so not gonna read it basically just goes on about how smart he is how they should make a movie about him and about how sacramento deserves what he's giving him cespedes shit investigators also found three notebooks near one of the crime scenes in danville that they believed to be from the gs k the first notebook contains an essay on general george armstrong custer so weird like from childhood.

Vancouver van snow holmes county school snoqualmie river virginia talbot danville george armstrong custer skagit county parabak nanno william earl sacramento
"george armstrong custer" Discussed on War Stories w/ Oliver North

War Stories w/ Oliver North

01:52 min | 4 years ago

"george armstrong custer" Discussed on War Stories w/ Oliver North

"In troy team be see carthage in general hannibal used thirty seven elephants to cross the italian outs it remains one of the most remarkable feats in military history it was the horse that dominated warfare for the next thousand years the dogs were also there is sentries messengers in his companions and joining them on the battlefield was the low lepage they will use the century as messengers sought to send messages a victory messages of he calls for held and they were very very effective when the police was defeated at waterloo in june of 1815 it was the pigeon the brought back the news with a camel held at edge over the warsun desert warfare in the 1860s in america the horse again proved its worth in the bloody civil war robert fat grandson of world war two general george patton is an acclaimed author and military a story the horse cavalry ed in the united states military probably reached its peak in the civil war in one thinks of of some of the people that we all know of george armstrong custer on the north side jeb stored on the southern side there's a kind of literal rising above the muck of the battlefield simply by de on horseback that i think he has cavalryman rightly or wrongly a sense of glory and romance in a tradition of military history you're looking at vic juice won't uelzen horses straining to move heavy equipment mired in mud dogs late telegraph why he was a time of chemical warfare and gas for men and beefs cavalry where the impact group they were the ones that blew open the enemy lines these are the forces that attacked and had the the banners amendment flashing in the sunlight.

carthage lepage waterloo world war george patton united states civil war george armstrong custer cavalryman troy america thirty seven elephants thousand years