17 Burst results for "Geography Department"

"geography department" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:03 min | 3 months ago

"geography department" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Of these variables is the one that is most the fact of at? Being related to to people's pain is if the pressure is the temperature is. Humidity is a combination of these right now. We've just kind of treated him. You know kind of. You know they're either. They're either as a whole part of the weather system, or you know they're more or less, we're treating them independently of each other, but I think this next analysis will be really key, and if that's successful. I think that's that's the holy grail. What we're after right because if it's if it's the temperature that affects people while then that tells us something about how people can ease their. Pain? Even for people who maybe aren't sensitive to weather and pain. Again there may be may be mitigation effects. To the people can employ to to do that. And of course people always say we'll go to Spain. Go to Florida. Go to Arizona whatever if you want? To ease your. Pain and You know so so the something about being in in kind of you know the the warmer climates the that has something to with the law and that's that's actually why ask that question because you, you often hear anecdotally people say Muka warmer climb climates. It'll workout with your arthritis chronic pain, and so it'll be interesting to see how. That revolves in your follow on her. That's one thing we can address in our study. Because we just focused on the UK, we would obviously WANNA do this. Sit in Barcelona or something like that, so then we could, we could do a comparison between what are people who live in Barcelona's feeling 'cause obviously they may, or may not be sensitive to weather affects well gals, thinking as for putting on your all this by degree in Geography Department fifteen years now, so I was. Putting on my geographic hat and thinking about sort of sort of the interesting..

Pain Barcelona Muka Spain Geography Department Arizona UK Florida
"geography department" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

05:31 min | 3 months ago

"geography department" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"You ever heard someone say that they know. A storm is coming because their joint start to ache. And they have a Migraine well. There's a scientific basis to that, but what about general pain receptors during calm, weather patterns in past decades it was difficult to answer such a general science question, but not anymore. Today's guest is Dr David Schultz from the University of Manchester to talk about this study, and how smartphones help his team complete. The research Dr Scholtz. Thank you for joining us on the weather. GEEKS podcast. Thank you for having me well. First of all, let me just say Dave Schultz is one of the sort of in my opinion, giants of the Field of meteorology I've known of him and had a chance to interact with him. For many years now, and followed his work and people who know me, your Gino his name, so it's not or have you on the whether podcasts. Let me just give a little of your background just so people will know what I'm talking about. He's a professor of synoptic urology at the Center for Atmospheric Science in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences and the center, for Crisis Studies and mitigation at the university, in Manchester, England and he's been there since two thousand nine has won multiple teaching awards at the institution cheese, a chief editor of the monthly weather review, which is one of the. Most, significant and important journals in the field of meteorology. He's also the author and I. Hope to talk to You more about this of of really nice book called Eloquent Science, a practical guide to becoming a better writer speaker in atmospheric scientist, there are more things that I'm going to sprinkle in throughout the podcast day, but before I do that day the question that I ask everyone on the podcast. Right out of the gate. How'd you get interested the urology? I think as a child. I was always interested in sciences the outdoors. I enjoyed. Hiking around in the woods, walking around into streams, turning over rocks, see what lives underneath it, and so it was. Natural that I would take some kind of. Earth. Science or natural science that is is my career. To talk to my mom says. That she recognized. Meteorologist an early age building Whether instruments with my dad and I grew up south of Pittsburgh, so we had. We've listened to. Bob Kuzma on Katie K. and. My mother ran into him in the grocery store, and so he sent me a letter invited me. Down to the studio, which never took the took him up on that offer, but it was. It was very nice and so. I ended up going to mit for undergraduate and. At the time I thought I'm going to be meteorologist, but at the time MIT didn't have a lot of depth in terms of their undergraduate program, so I kind of dabbled around for a couple of years took the required courses. For Generic degree within your Science Department and I made a decision. Okay well. Maybe I should not just dabble, but but take a pretty consistent. Curriculum and so I I did a lot of geology courses and graduated with that, although by the third and fourth years I started taking more environmental science courses, hydrology carry manuals, introduction, damage, feerick, science, and and those kinds of courses and so When I started applying to graduate schools. Doubts that background I think. Has Helped, and certainly it's been quite. Now in my career, because I am in an earthy environmental science department, and and the fact that I know what a difference between a solid and a granite is. I think sometimes. You know. The ears in eyes will pull up a little bit among my colleagues when. I can. I can talk to them about this stuff. It's interesting to hear some of your background sin some ways very similar to mine, because I was always that kid curious about what was going on in nature, building weather instruments, my sixth grade science. Sixth grader predictable weather. Building weather instruments, but now I'm also a department. That's not a traditional meteorology department. Although that's what I come out at Florida state, but myself in your couch. We both know very well John Knox. Geography Department are Home Department at the University of Georgia. Though we also have an atmospheric sciences program, talking with Dave, Schultz now to continue with some of his background, two thousand six to two, thousand, nine, hundred Professor Experimental Meteorologist University of Helsinki and Finnish Meteorological Institute, and for Ten Years Nineteen Ninety six to two thousand six. T worked for Noah's national severe storms. Lab is a research meteorologist in. He led a field campaign called Which is the Inter Mountain precipitation experiment has the speed as you heard from MIT master's from university Washington and a PhD from University of Albany, all very sound a major atmosphere. Sciences programs, a small correction I Chola the becks okay. They don't want to take away the credit of the other side room. We will make sure that our colleagues understand that now just a curious question because we want.

professor Dave Schultz Dr David Schultz Dr Scholtz University of Manchester Center for Atmospheric Science Department of Earth and Enviro Migraine Professor Experimental Meteoro Field of meteorology University of Albany Katie K. MIT University of Helsinki Manchester Geography Department England Inter Mountain Florida becks
"geography department" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

08:10 min | 8 months ago

"geography department" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"As Weather Geeks we know that the earth is changing and climate is changing as human beings. We also change in our bodies in mind have needs. That need to be met as well. Both of those sets of needs cannot be ignored or else there will be ramifications down the line. Scientists who are tasked with tackling in researching climate change are starting to experience mental and emotional health issues. Because of all of the pressure that this monumental event brings my guest today is Suzanne Moser who has shedding light on these issues along with the personal challenges. That being on an on camera meteorologist or scientists brings in this current era. Susan thank you for joining us on the weather geeks podcasts. It's great to be here. Thanks for having me now is it Susan or Suzanne before I get started as we go forth. Suzannah's fine okay so we'll go with Suzanne. I actually called you Susan there and I want to make sure I get your name right. So Suzanne Moser is Has a lot of credentials that I want to kind of establish before we get started. She's director and principal researcher of Suzanne Moser Research and consulting an affiliated faculty in the Department of Landscape Architecture and regional planning at the University of Massachusetts CIA Massachusetts Amherst and a research faculty and the Environmental Studies Department at Antioch University New Antioch University New England. So she's clearly a leading expert on Climate Change Adaptation Science Policy Interactions Decision Support and communication for social change. So I'm very happy to talk to you about this topic weathering the storm. Because it's something that I see emerging quite a bit in the field that I operate in. I'm Dr Marshall Shepherd from the University of Georgia and let's get started but before we do that you're human geographer and I. I actually am a tenured faculty member in the Department of Geography at the University of Georgia. Though I'm meteorologist by degree many people that are listening to the weather geeks. Podcast may not know what a human geographer is. So can you talk about what a human geographer is and how you became one? Yeah it's really interesting. You know I started actually in your field started with climatology meteorology and physical geography and then. I got really interested in this question of. How does this affect humans? And Lo and behold geography is actually one of the key disciplines that we have that look specifically at the interaction between humans and their environment and with particularly emphasis of doing so with looking at the spatial relationships. How do we connect with each other? How does information flow how to people and goods and processes flow over over a space? And so you know it was just simply an interesting thing. I studied the impact of Storms in Massachusetts for a master's degree elevated state response to level rise. So it got pretty quickly and what I learned over time and what I find is so fascinating. Is that what we call environmental problems? Actually PEOPLE PROBLEMS. You got to manage the people more than the environment to you know to get to better conditions that we benefit from that. We don't get harm by. And so that's what got me interested in what's fascinated me ever since. Yeah this is an interesting point because I find also matriculating geography department. People just don't know what geography as they think it's maps and atlases and the types of things they're exposed to but I think increasingly with more. Ap Human Geography courses in high school over time that will change because geography is much broader than that it's composed in the physical geography Gee I sti science and human geography and many other things as well so. I'm glad you gave that little one on one. I WANNA now pivot to The topic of weathering the storm as a climate scientists. And also as meteorologist. We DEAL WITH INFORMATION. That can be quite stressful because at times it has implications lifesaving implications like taking applications if you will or even longer term impacts on society and human beings and I think increasingly. We've recognized that that's tough on people and so you know. Climate scientists deal with this ongoing crisis What are your introductory thoughts on the intersection of sort of mental health weather and climate? I WanNa have a very deep conversation here but I WANNA get your preliminary opening thoughts. Yeah it's a great question really glad that you actually are making that topic of you know one of these podcasts. It's it's Emerging wherever I go people are saying. Oh my God. I'm so depressed. Some you know really worried I've anxieties. I'm grieving over what we're losing with climate change but of course mythologised deal with these extreme events very often right. It's not just all sunshine or a little bit of rain. It's oftentimes hurricanes or coastal storms or wildfire. Whether or whatever the case may be and. What's interesting is that it's both a challenging issue for the people who are providing these forecasts and it's a challenging issue for the people who receive it and let me talk about both for moment for the people who receive it. Of course it is. You know what will happen to. My home is my business. Going to be disrupted is the community prepared and can deal with it. Can we recover quickly? I mean most people. Well I wouldn't say most people who go through disaster experience what we call. Ptsd post traumatic stress disorder. But many people actually do and that is a set of emotional responses of overwhelm in grief. And you can't sleep and you just you know hopeless. After an event have anxieties every time. Another storm comes on edge. Kinds of things is what people experience who have gone through one of these events. Now for meteorologist. Interestingly enough they have to deliver that news so they're the messengers of bad news. Bad things coming and very often. They live in the very same cities very same towns where those things are going to be experienced so while they're on air giving you the latest their family might be at risk their family might be impacted you know and so they're supposed to be cheery and or at least professional about giving you whatever this important life saving information at the same time. They may have to cope with and put aside on a shelf their own worries about what's happening to their own loved ones. So it's the combination of the two and one that is happening increasingly more often as climate change fuels many of these extreme events. That makes them worse. I want to sort of follow up on that because I remember a couple of years ago Hurricane. I believe it was. I can't remember the hurricane now but There was a hurricane approaching key west and I had a classmate of mine from Florida. State University Department of Meteorology. These in the National Weather Service there and as everyone was evacuating they had to stay. They they were. They were there to key west sort of right as the storm with approaching. I couldn't help but think about them and their families. That things very much mentioned On a job ad for meteorology position I saw earlier last year it talked about the high stress environment and so I appreciate that you point out. I often see after these weather disasters. I see people thinking the first responders in the emergency managers in rightfully so those people are right in there. I but I always remind people that. This is pretty stressful. For the meteorologist. Scientists this delivering information impacts people's lives. And so I am pleased to hear that this is something that you have kind of focused as well. Let's talk about climate change. I and then I want to circle back. To the stresses on meteorologist. I've seen some writings that suggests that people kind of from a psychological perspective oftentimes don't see climate change is an immediate threat. Is something off in the distance so sort of psychologically.

Suzanne Moser Susan Hurricane Suzanne Suzanne Moser Research Department of Geography State University Department of University of Massachusetts CI Massachusetts University of Georgia Suzannah Department of Landscape Archit Lo National Weather Service Antioch University New Antioch Dr Marshall Shepherd affiliated faculty faculty member
"geography department" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

Monocle 24: Midori House

10:01 min | 10 months ago

"geography department" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

"Welcome back this house you it Sunday. The twelfth of January two thousand and twelve and to go through the weekend newspapers. I'm delighted as I am joined by the the journalist broadcaster and communications expert. Simon Rick Kelly and welcome back to To the second half of the program right even doing the heavy lifting with some pretty decent newspapers today actually but dominated by the enormous fall out of the imminent departure of Meghan Harry from the from the senior ranks. Thanks for the Royal Family here in the UK. Something that in many ways is a story about celebrity. And it's the story about a family that is having difficulties and as someone mentioned a few days ago over Christmas who wouldn't want to resign from their family once or twice in their lifetime. This has much bigger ramifications. Doesn't it if you're a royal it certainly does doesn't it. Yes and it was interesting is All of the newspapers here continuing to pour over this issue and Look at the the effect it's having on the Royal Family The Sunday Times looks west towards the US Inevitably given that. That's certainly the Harry and Meghan probably going to live in Canada row Pepsi the US we understand L. A. was one of their homes one of the places that it's been mooted that they might not relocate to but the story here in the Sunday Times suggesting that That they will be looking to the a bomb in the Clintons For advice and support support We know don't we that they That Harry and Meghan get on well with the OBAMAS and As the Sunday Times pointed out Barrack Obama was very supportive of her is invictus Games initiative and the piece is basically about the money that they could earn and end pointing out that the Clintons and the obamas have been very successful in monetize ing their assets their position in the world but of course this is the real problem. Isn't it that the fact is that when it comes to the fun at the Royal Family. You're either in or out and certainly when it comes to money the idea that using mule royal status Enjoying Royal accommodation. You know wherever you might live Getting money from the civil list. Whatever it might be doing that? And then also during the financial saying sort of the the the entrepreneurship The the other deals or whatever when you just can't do the two together so it's interesting thing that the abomination the Clintons might help Howard and Harry and Meghan on this but I think that they all need to understand that. They've got to be very careful. When it comes to the clash between the royal and the celebrity entrepreneurialism some people have said the the The OBAMAS involvement has been In the commercial commercial world actually has been a masterclass into how to keep your hands clean to do it with a little bit of dignity they are. The struck struck a deal with Netflix. Which I think? A lot of people raise their Their eyebrows about but the likes of I think it's an American factory which is which is a program which seems to be doing so well And the and the fact that they seem to be committed in in in engaging in You know positive. Things charitable things is something that clearly megan and Harry are going to have to take be inspired by. I think the the thing that a lot of people are worried about if you actively seek cash that Even you know having been a president or for a prime minister or any head of state that to actively look greedy makes you look pretty grim. Doesn't it yes. You'd be very careful about that avenue. It's one thing to raise money FA charity or to You know point out where funding should go or something like that but you gotta be very very careful in the way that you do to raise money. Otherwise I mean the Sunday Times pointing out that the bombers and A record fifty million pounds joint advance for a to book a deal of member two book deal pair of memoirs And that's probably acceptable. Also points out. The Bill Clinton pocketed eleven. One and a half million pounds for his two thousand and four biography and Hillary Clinton actually interestingly got nine million sightless in two thousand fourteen. So there are Sort of legitimate acceptable ways in which ex politicians and people can can And some money but then as I say you've got to be very careful if your royal it will be interesting to see. If they're bombers in the Clintons can help them raise money or deal with financial aspect of their new situation in a way that doesn't offend the public that doesn't look like they're exploiting individual ingredients super brand of about thirty seconds of. It's all happened. We'd invented the method that just made me hoot Right let's move on to an article in the in the weekend edition of lemonde. It's it's a two page spread on the influence of airbnb in French cities and French towns and it makes it very very serious. Point Ain't is written by a researcher the Geography Department of the University of Bordeaux which I find absolutely refreshing given the fact that the in national newspapers lead article is written by unacademic It talks about how AIRBNB has has thrown us. It is upside down. It's meant that the rent rent rates have gone through the roof. The middle classes of left cities while retaining their apartments in the center of Paris or Bordeaux for example. They've gone out a little bit into the into the suburbs pushing out those who are less wealthy even further out of their cities and it's led to a huge imbalance in the way that the way that French cities operate. It's one of those things that starts often. You think Gosh is just an innocent platform. A little bit like Uber. In fact they'd call it. Uber is Asian. It's an innocent isn't platform which which has profound socio economic effect. I think it was interesting. Yes I mean false alona another city which which saw sold demonstrations in the streets against this. Didn't they both from People who can't rent flats because owners are now doing through ebbing also People realize that the apartment next to them which used to have the family or the couple who were very quiet lived there for many years is now seeing Party party goers Loud noisy tourists. They would say turning up every week so I think there's obviously real concerns here. I think what's interesting also about this. Especially in the morning story is that it's part of this division we're seeing aren't we can imagine a lot of older people paps working class people who live in Cities who live in parts of the world which are very attractive to tourists that might have beautiful historic histories. Whatever but They're suddenly being invaded by these digital digital digital natives if you like so pe- you know people who are embraced the web who reach for their phone to everything A suddenly Exploiting their cities and and their parts of the world as they would sit so. I think it's an interesting example. Pastor this divide between more traditional People in places people traditions in places. That haven't been quite soon touched by the you know the The the the the digital world as say clashing with people who just think that the whole world is there as as as they tapping a few details into the phone also has a profound effect is at the city he becomes a transient place. That you no longer have a neighborhood An all you do is on a Friday and Sunday you here Suitcases being rolled down the pavement. And you never never meet your neighbor because you don't know who your neighbor is because they're going to change every week they're going to hit for the weekend. I really do wonder what the effect of that is going to be on our cities when actually we become more isolated aided in communities. Don't feel as if there's anywhere to live if I go out tonight. See Tourists and they say nice place for lunch whereas in last place for dinner. It's great that I still still know that. There's a locality to go but if you have nothing but visitors where is that sense of community. Where is that sense of in there somewhere decent? Go and have a glass of wine and so that can recommend to your neighbors it. I just wonder whether anybody thinking about what's going to be happening in four years time with this. You do wonder I have to say. There's a very interesting book By David David Goodhart WHO's Originally from the left but But now seems to be Perhaps disillusioned with some of the the ideas that he wants embraced the the road to somewhere Looks at the fact that You got to tribes really not much left and right these days but you've got the the the anyways the people who live in different cities it is have worked around the world who travel without thinking about it who have moved away from where they were born on the other hand you got somewhere as the people who Probably probably live in more or less the same place. They were first that they were born in fact that accounts for a huge number of people in in all kinds of countries certainly in the UK. And I think what's interesting say. We're getting this clash between the somewheres And the and the other problem it speaks to as well is as we've seen with inventors for instance since recently is just the problem of tourism. I mean we all love to explore a beautiful city like Paris or Barcelona Venice or whatever but at the same time we know the easier we make it the more horvath do it the more we're damaging the city's instable thing isn't it. Although in reality I stayed in London over Christmas and I was just GonNa Tori a survey where I can't do anything and I suddenly another bringing his money but they're really irritating me. I think it's probably it's probably quality. Not Quantity isn't what people to travel less but to embrace the culture more and spend some more money to help us locals. I wonder how anybody's ever GonNa tell me to stop getting trained GonNa look at something else is is pretty much important. Simon break..

Meghan Harry Clintons Royal Family Simon Rick Kelly OBAMAS Paris airbnb US UK Hillary Clinton Bill Clinton Netflix Barrack Obama David David Goodhart invictus Games London lemonde Canada
"geography department" Discussed on Science Salon

Science Salon

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"geography department" Discussed on Science Salon

"School. But I had already been started a career of studying NEW GUINEA birds, partly because of the romance and mystery of NEW GUINEA and partly because I had been bird watcher. And so for decades a carried on the two careers of NEW GUINEA bird, ecology and. Laboratory physiological research, but at the same time developing going back to my interest in history and geography and writing short articles for nature about history geography until two precipitating events won the birth of knacks, Joshua, twin sons and nineteen eighty-seven when I realized with shot people I've been talking about what the world is gonna be like twenty fifty but twenty fifty global warming Roy's and sea level and so on but on to be dead by twenty fifty. But I really my boys can be sixty three years old, then and their future depends not on Goldblatt is but depends upon geography and history. And the other thing was being award in nineteen eighty five out of the blue macaw foundation fellowship five years. No strings attached. I got a phone call and the head of McCaw foundation program. Said in one long sentence. You have just been awarded a MacArthur fellowship replied, you so much money per year medical charts. And there are noted editor. Long sentence very exciting. But I ended up really depressed for the first time in my life. And I realized it's because to me the McCall award meant Jared people expect things of you. And you haven't deliver those things you've been doing gallbladder research, but the world will not depend on goal Batas. So what are you going to do to justify this MacArthur award that you've done and the result? Then was writing my first book, the third chimpanzee, which then evolved into other books and finding two thousand to UCLA with great effort transferred me from the medical school to the geography department. We're teaching happily of us. It's so you're not doing gall bladder research anymore. Close down close down my gallbladder land, which by then had had expanded from the gallbladder lab too and evolutionary physiology Tessema physiology, but I close my laboratory physiology. See I think a lot about how lives turn out and the role of luck and chance and contingency. You've already described some of this. In your travels, your father and family. But but Heggie got in geography say in the sixties, it could be you would not have the scientific mind set to one a test hypotheses of historical claims or geographical claims and in it's possible. We would not have had something like guns germs and steel the way I describe it as that most historians write a happens to be happens to see happens in in in a in a fairly sort of postition narrative story that makes sense in the mind their story and. Whereas you go a happens to be happens in. Let's stop and ask for moment. Why did it happen in that sequence? And not some other sequence. Let's find a place somewhere else in the world where did happen and other sequence. And then compare the two and you call that the comparative method I think most historians geographers they're not trained to think like that. Maybe that's a little bit of how you got that just for the scientific training. You got you're absolutely right. It's not a little it's central to my approach to the social sciences is the comparative method. We're I learned the I'm going the comparative method both in the physiological laboratory and in NEW GUINEA in the physiological lab Moi PHD, mental was a great physio just the university of Cambridge. And I remember the first experiment that I saw him doing. He was interested in sodium transport in muscle membranes and possible influence of potassium. Sodium transport has an under. Graduate on don't don't experiments. We do the same thing repeated six times, but but Richard. Took to muscles side by side and one

GUINEA MacArthur Goldblatt blue macaw foundation Joshua UCLA Roy editor Heggie Richard university of Cambridge Jared McCall sixty three years five years
"geography department" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"geography department" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Water in front of me. I can see a couple of seals bobbing their heads up. The thing about the fish. That's port and landed here is that they move quite difficult when you're dealing with fish, which clearly moves around could be born in one part of the sea and be caught in a number to work out. Exactly who owns it. Dr Bryce Stewart from the environment and geography department of the university of York, not everyone might agree. But obviously the biggest concerns are how it might affect trade. And in particular, how it might affect delays at the border because most of the fish that a British fleet catches is exported and most of that goes to your probably about a half to two thirds goes to Europe. So if they are long delays at the border, which seems quite likely with an ideal Brexit that could be. Very problematic for something like seafood, which relies on being fresh indeed sometimes alive with things like show fish, perhaps a situation where the deal does go through Brexit in general, leaving the European Union. How do you think that would affect the industry there were claims of sort of taking that British fish and controlling water? Some people went so far as to say that would kick out all the foreign boats and all this whole thing. Now, I don't think that extreme scenario is either desirable, a likely because one thing that is really obvious is that we need to share the management of our fish docs, fish. Don't see the borders between countries you could say we'll that were born in France, French will you could say they grew up in the UK the British. But actually, the European fish. You know, there was this big hope that through Brexit. We could claim back all this extra cards. But of course, to do that somebody else has to give up Corrie test, and they're not that happy about. As you might imagine the standard position from European countries. As being we do not want to change the location. Of course, if Britain attempts to do that, then we will put barriers in place for trading with us, you know, it's a bargaining chip. You can think of us as being part of a club at the moment, which is the European Union. The most clubs you have to pay a membership fee, and you have to abide by the rules of that club to gain the benefits from it. So if we want to be outside that club, and we probably going to have to make a few sacrifices. We don't catch all produce enough. Fish to sustain what the UK ages the nation. I think people the general consensus on the market think people are just absolutely fed up to. And if we conducted our business, the weather conduct themselves. None of us would be in business will Clark is what's called a primary processor..

European Union Brexit UK Dr Bryce Stewart Europe university of York Corrie France Clark Britain
"geography department" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"geography department" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm standing by the harbour at Peterhead pours looking out in the water in front of me. I can see a couple of seals bobbing their heads up. The thing about the fish court and landed here is that they move quite difficult when you're dealing with fish, which clearly moves around and could be born in one part of the sea and be caught in another to work out. Exactly who owns it. Doc, the Bryce Stewart from the environment and geography department at the university of York, not everyone might agree. But obviously the biggest concerns are how it might affect trade. And in particular, how it might affect delays at the border because most of the fish that British fleet catches is exported and most of that goes to your probably about a half to two thirds goes to Europe. So if they are long delays at the border, which seems quite likely with the no deal Brexit that could be very problematic for something like seafood, which relies on being fresh indeed sometimes alive with things like show fish, perhaps a situation where the deal does go through Brexit in general, leaving the European Union. How do you think that would affect the industry there were claims of sort of taking back British fish and controlling out water? Some people went so far as to say that we'd kick out all the foreign boats. And all this whole thing. Now, I don't think that extreme scenario is either desirable, a likely because one thing that is really obvious is that we need to share the management of fish stocks. Fish don't see the borders between countries you could say well that were born in France, they French will you could say they grew up in the UK and the British. But actually, the European fish. You know, there was this big hope that through Brexit. We could claim back all this extra cards. But of course, to do that somebody else has to give up and they're not happy about that. As you might imagine the standard position from European countries. As being we do not want to change the location of if Britain attempts to do that, then we will put berries up in place for trading with us, you know, it's a bargaining chip. You can think of us as being part of a club at the moment, which is the European Union. The most clubs you have to pay a membership fee. You know, you have to and you have to buy by the rules of that club to gain the benefits from it. So if we wanted to be outside that club, and we're probably going to have to make a few sacrifices. The fact we don't catch producing fish to sustain what the UK nation. I think people the general consensus on the market. I think people are just fed up to and if we conducted all business conduct themselves. None of us would be in business will Clark is what's called the primary processor six years ago. Hugo..

fish court European Union Brexit UK Peterhead Bryce Stewart Europe university of York France Clark Britain six years
"geography department" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"geography department" Discussed on KCBS All News

"KCBS. Forecasts KPI x five meteorologist merrily? We'll see scattered showers this afternoon and this evening with increasing wind tonight daytime highs upper fifties, low sixties inland. Mid to upper fifty s for the bay and low to mid fifty s for the coast. Heavy rain moves in late tonight into tomorrow morning. Turning breezy to Wendy in an isolated thunderstorm is possible tomorrow, so rain scattered showers tomorrow, a few showers on Thursday drying out after that the atmospheric river will stay to her south that means central and southern California. We'll see the heaviest rain for us will see the rain, but nothing like what we saw last week. So major rivers will stay below flood stage with these storms so forth Thursday in the afternoon drying out, and we will stay dry Friday into the weekend. Fifty four degrees right now in San Jose, Mountain View conquered an Hayward, it is fifty three in Oakland and Livermore San Francisco. Ios dropped down to fifty two. Same thing in Redwood City, San Rafael, and Santa Rosa, traffic and weather together on the eight on all these six nine AM, seven forty KCBS. KCBS news time twelve twenty west winters in California, no longer promise relief from massive summer wildfires. That's the bottom line of a new study that examines the historic link between heavy rain and the reduced risk of a huge fire during the summertime and early fall for more. We're joined live on the KCBS news line by professor Alan Taylor from the Pennsylvania state geography department. Thanks a lot for talking to us today. So why will all the rain no longer bring us relief. Well, it's it it gives so warm in the summer now because of recent warming in the last several decades that it.

KCBS California San Jose Livermore San Francisco San Rafael Redwood City KCBS. Santa Rosa Alan Taylor Hayward Pennsylvania professor Oakland Mountain View Fifty four degrees
"geography department" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"geography department" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Removes the all that moisture from the vegetation, which would have accumulated in a wet year. And so it earns like it was a dryer. Wow. Okay. So and this is the new normal. It's we looked at that relationship over the last four hundred years and between sixteen hundred nineteen hundred there was never a relationship between a high fire here and a high wet condition, and that's what occurred in two thousand seventeen with the fires in Napa in October. So that's a an unprecedented sort of situation in the last four hundred years. All right. And and and we're pretty certain that this would be our future. Then that's right. It means that we can't depend on moisture necessarily reducing fire risks like we have in the past. And that means we have to be more diligent and and watching out for fire hazard and fuel vegetation. Yeah. It's going to be a real challenge. But it ends up being the worst of both worlds because we have these burns and they scar areas. And then we have heavy rain. Yep. That's right. And the the rain increases fuel production, and so that can actually exacerbated, and so we have to come up with a way to sort of manage that increase of you, and where communities are so that we can reduce the risk. It just means that the relationship between moisture and fire just probably. Isn't gonna hold in the future, particularly as it gets warmer, and that would suggest that we're looking at more floods and more mudslides. That's right. Yeah. That's that's. And if you look at what's happened in the past couple of years with the the mudslides that were in Santa Barbara, and that sort of thing, and what may have happened this winter up near paradise because of all the bare soils, these extreme conditions are are something we don't want. And so we need to try to keep them from happening. In terms of the only thing we can manage vegetation. We can't do much about climate or weather. Is it time to start rethinking where we build houses. Certainly that should be part of what we're thinking about in a people who might live there already probably need to be thinking about what's around the more. So it's you know, there's a lot of people who are already embedded in vegetation in near wild areas. And then we're people move in. That would be something that a lot of people think we need to try to keep under control because it just puts more people at risk. Yeah. I mean, 'cause you move into these places you have a beautiful Woodhouse would roof wooden deck and the forest right outside your back door. That's right. And and you know, wouldn't roof wouldn't decker all things that are would catch fire pretty easily and so one can reduce risk by using different building materials, for example. Metal roof tile roofs. Great on Vance, and that sort of thing. So there's there's a lot of different things people can do to try to reduce the house depending on where they are. All right. Well, thank you very much for talking to us. Appreciate it. That's professor. Alan taylor. Pennsylvania state geography department..

Napa Alan taylor Santa Barbara professor Pennsylvania Vance four hundred years
"geography department" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

02:39 min | 1 year ago

"geography department" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"Spring like weather across North Texas in early February. But we all know it won't last long. Unfortunately, hide today near record high temperatures near eighty degrees. Yes. Eighty eight zero you heard me right overnight tonight. Clouds drizzle move into the area. Only end the low sixties tomorrow mid to upper seventies. More clouds around through the day and same thing on Wednesday. Lows in the sixties highs in the mid to upper seventies showers that will be back in the forecast late on Wednesday evening through Thursday in around noon. That's when the cold front comes to around sixty five or so by noon, and then falling into the forties evening down into the mid twenties with clearing skies for Friday morning, sunny Forty-five chilly for Friday afternoon. Meteorologist Rudolph often care really weather center man, right now, officially sixty seven degrees at KRLD, no matter when you get in the car, we're the only station that brings you news, traffic and weather all. Day newsradio. Ten eighty KRLD coming up on ten twenty Robert Mesa's with the meadows center for water and the environment of Texas State university is a professor in the geography geography department as well and Senator state Senator Charles Perry has issued a call and also has filed the legislation asking for a statewide flood plan by the year twenty twenty four what's your take on that Bill at the moment talks about river basins planning on a river basin type level, and there's a strong local representation where? Where? Each county would have a seat at the table to participate in the development of of regional plans. Flooding means different things in different parts of the state. We are so diverse in our geography so from that angle how do the different parts of the state get together because the needs of Galveston and Puerto rance's differ, perhaps from the high plains or from Texarkana. That's a great question. Every single one of our two hundred fifty four counties have suffered a federally recognized flood. The coastal areas, of course, are dealing with tropical systems and hurricanes and surges that come in. And then we have these massive rainfalls oftentimes associated tropical systems, but but all over the state, we have have these issues. To certain degree that know the floodings different. But you know, it's the FEMA that's providing flood insurance. The infrastructure is is going to be different for coastal flooding versus.

Senator Charles Perry North Texas Texas State university FEMA Puerto rance Senator Rudolph Texarkana Robert Mesa Galveston Bill professor sixty seven degrees eighty degrees
"geography department" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"geography department" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"I also want to touch on the fact that I I actually my home department university of Georgia is in geography, although I'm the director of the atmosphere sciences program. So there are meteorology programs. I came out of Florida state. But as you correctly noted if you have an interest in weather our climate there are many geography departments out there that do a good job of providing an overview of weather climate and other ask. The natural world works curious. What was your favorite snowstorms and lake fag? Is would you say that that's your favorite type of weather? Is that just what got you initially interested? Yeah. I'd probably say I love snow. I mean growing up in buffalo. You know, it's it's cold. And you know, you're ponds freeze over so you grow playing hockey on the ponds, and whether you snowmobiling or you know, you get on a board and go snowboarding or skiing. I just I love, you know, sport activities in the wintertime, and so I was brought up in buffalo is a great place to do that. But there was I remember one time in high school and on the island are high schools on on the northern part of the of the island, and then I lived on in the southern part. And yeah, it's only ten fifteen minutes away drive to school. But I remember being in lunch class and the principal came in. And he said, hey, guys, we have an early dismissal and. You know, everybody's excited and thrilled that we to leave school early and said, hey is everything. Alright. Why are we getting this early dismissal? He said well percents. No..

Florida university of Georgia hockey director principal ten fifteen minutes
"geography department" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"geography department" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"The tiny brains that we have on this rather insignificant planet to actually figure out how the universe began and how stars and galaxies evolve. So naturally, I went into Astor physics, and I was I was planning a career in astro-physics for the rest of my life because it is absolutely fascinating. When just before I was finishing my undergraduate degree. I had to take one extra course. And I looked around. I saw this course climate science over the geography department. I thought to myself, oh, that's probably pretty interesting and probably not too hard. So I went, and they took it and it completely shocked me because first of all I had no idea that climate modelling was the very same physics that I've been learning and astrophysics is just a special case of planetary atmospheres. But the second thing I didn't realize is that climate change is military now calls it a threat multiplayer. We don't care about a changing climate because it's raising the average temperature that planet by one or two degrees. We care about it. Because that incredible. Increase in the heat content of the climate system is driving huge impacts on the natural environment. And especially on us. It takes those threats we face like hunger, and poverty and disease and lack of access to clean water and even political instability in resource crises, and it exacerbates them. It makes them worse. And so I thought to myself well serendipity have all the skills, you need to study this incredibly urgent problem, surely will fix it soon. Because it's so serious. I'm gonna study climate change and till we fix it. And then I'll go back to astro-physics, but that was more than twenty five years ago. So you don't see attention between faith in God. And grounding and science and the moral core of having a relationship with the divine actually intersex well with your faith and science rather than seeing them as being two opposing forces. I see them as completely compatible because just think about this way, if we believe in a God who created this universe? Then what is science other than trying to? Figure out how got set it up in the first place where the challenges come in is when we are too narrow in our interpretation of what the bible says sometimes even our trepidation of what the science says. But I grew up with the unique perspective that we can recognize that not only are they compatible, but they have to be compatible. If we really believe what we say, we believe why would studying God's creation, tell us something different than what God actually is. If we believe that he created it, but yours is not in the United States, at least a typical response. And it's pretty well known at this point that the number one predictor for how people feel about climate change is where they fall in the political spectrum and currently in calls in the United States, at least tend to be conservative politically when you tell fellow even juggles here in the US what you do for a living. What kind of response? Do you get? Well, it definitely depends on the context. I usually get quite a bit of surprise in fed. I remember the first time I had a conversation with people at my husband's new church, which was. Over a decade ago here in Texas when he first moved to this church. They asked me, but I didn't I said, well, you know, I innocently said I studied climate change global warming. And they said, oh, we're so glad that there's people like you studying this because you wouldn't believe the terrible things that they're teaching our children in school. So by that time, I had figured out that there were a lot of people in Texas who didn't think climate change is real. So I thought to myself. Oh, this is awful. They're probably telling them, you know, horrible things like it's not real. So I said, oh, yes. Well, what are they telling them? They said, well, they're telling them that the sea ice is melting in the Arctic and that the polar bears are endangered. Can you believe they're spreading these lies? Look at them. And I said, well, I'm afraid that's actually true. And I have not seen those people again since then. But why do you think conservatives are so inclined to doubt the science behind climate change? Well, I have a conversation just about every single day with somebody who professes to the science and added up over the years..

astro-physics United States Texas Astor physics Arctic twenty five years two degrees
"geography department" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

09:02 min | 2 years ago

"geography department" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Yeah. Chilling. See for Curtis Booker. Backup backup. Seth a nice little production. That gives you a sense of nights say we can chill on the nightside to we can argue. We can disagree. We can have pleasant conversations we can reasonable people can disagree recently. That's what we're talking about. We're gonna continue to talk about this a caravan of poor people from Honduras who are heading north of the estimates are somewhere between sixteen hundred and two thousand and I'm asking you. If you're the adviser the economic the I should say the homeland security advisor to President Trump. What would you suggest what what can we do? We have these countries on our not on our southern border. We have these countries in Central America to south of us who are in abject, poverty, and folks can just walk. They don't have to try to get in a boat. They don't have to swim. They're looking for economic opportunity. If I lived in Honduras, I probably would be in that caravan. I suspect most of you would be as well. At the same time. How many people can we absorb in? And how do we absorb them if we're so inclined? There's been some interesting conversations. Interesting discussion tonight, still go back to David from Cambridge in the first in the nine o'clock hour, he talked about people who are really committed irrespective of whether they're Democrats or Republicans liberals conservatives whatever through really committed perhaps they could become sponsors. They're making their own home available and people are talking about that. Now, the other extreme I talked about the idea of you look at Honduras is not a big country. It is plagued as El Salvador with corruption Guatemala with corruption. With a drug traffickers. So the suggestion that I think I'd like at least fee to entertain his you telling me that in this day of satellite technology and on the ground information. We could not figure out where the let us say the top fifty gangs in Honduras are with the top fifty. Drug factories are in Honduras. That they are pumping poison into our society. It is clearly we we see what's going on in. Urban areas around the country. Do we have a right to defend ourselves up to an including sending in our military just to wipe it out. Obviously do go in there with the cooperation of the government. However, duly elected the government is and hopefully it is relatively duly elected. With a promise that we will protect the stone. Some ideas out there. And this story the the caravan from Honduras couple days tonight soon, that's what Dan was talking about on Tuesday night next week. It'll come up on your radar. Trust me on that. Hey, let me congratulate Julie Mahia from Wrentham. Julie, congratulations. Julia one the pair of tickets last hour to see hairspray the Aerosystems feel good show guaranteed to have you dancing. The night away. Live on stage. A Bill hanney's north shore music theatre October thirtieth through November eleventh for schedules and showtimes, visit NS. Mt dot org. When I talk about. A military intervention in Honduras or Guatemala, obviously would be surgical. It would be intended to wipe out the bad guys, and it is a protect. We're losing sixty five thousand people every year to opioid use opioid over over dose in this country. We lost fifty eight thousand people in Vietnam over ten years. We lose more than that in every year to opioid overdose. Is that not an invasion of our country? Also, give you chance if you'd like to follow up on last night. I did offer this earlier just throw it out there. If you'd like to comment on did Senator Warren shoot herself in the foot by coming out with this again, I think pretty weak DNA sample. And I think there are some people right now in the Democratic Party who are upset with her. In that she essentially had tried to upstage other potential twenty twenty aspirants before the midterm elections. So we can throw that into the into the conversation as well. But in the meantime, let's get right back to the call six one seven two five four ten thirty triple eight nine thousand nine hundred thirty meal in north Attleboro. Neil you're next on nightside. Gerrad ahead. You've been very patient. Good evening. Show tonight because I might call originated from because I thought that. Summed it up the differences between the two sides and. I wanna give my clear that if you. Someone on the left with facts. They can't answer them. All I feel this. I would you know, take someone in but they wouldn't. And and you know, the exact opposite. It's just so commonsensical. It really is. So I think what I enjoy is the differences in opinions, and you get some people who passionately feel this point of view and others who equally passionately feel the other point of view and. You know, you can look and you can assess those points of view from your perspective by listening tonight. So that's that's we're trying to do here that your comment about what a show that makes me feel feel pretty good to think that people are taking the time to not only listen, but the people will take time to call and express their opinions, and look I'll agree or disagree with them. And you can agree or disagree with him. That's it's like a Petri disavow ideas. That's my favorite word tonight. Petri dish of ideas in the thing on the on the right? We don't attack people at dinnertime. You know, when they're out to dinner would fill it hasn't happened. Right. And we don't shoot people at at softball practices. Either. So I've been a huge fan since seventy nine eighty of you in your awesome in your call has been awesome to one both sides. So you contributed to it as well. Neil. And I really do appreciate it. And please keep listening to this show. We're gonna do some shows from we're in a new situation here in Medford were beautiful new studios. And we're going to we have a we have a theater here. We're going to do some shows, and we're gonna invite listeners to come in and sit in for studio audience is I hope that they'll be one that will be to your liking the get a chance to meet you. I would love to see you. Again, I used to we ran into each other a few times on route ninety five back in years in the beginning of your career 'cause I was a firefighter for years, and we spoke on ninety five. So thank you very much for your service. I know that if we if we spoke on ninety five it probably was a nasty automobile accident, I almost remember the night. Nia? Thanks so much. Thank you. Are you retired? Now, are you retired last year in back to school at Bridgewater state to become a history teacher? Hopefully, you know, it's it's funny because I used to knock the morning else to be honest with you, and they are really intelligent, you know, it so it it's a fascinating. Dynamic. I guess you could say the second second career for you. And there's a couple of guys in the geography department from Bridgewater state university we have on offense. So you have to get over the geography department introduce yourself. Okay. I take two of those. So yeah, let me know who you get as professors because I could make this. I got we have these great guys who come in here. Call me during the day. And I'll give you the names. And I think they would be great professors to take really mean that. Mike. Professors are so awesome. They really, you know. So I will do that. Just call the main main number hold on hold on Robbie give you my direct line fair enough. Okay. Thank you, hang up. Don't hang going to. All right. We're gonna come back on nights. I give Neil my direct line. Six one seven two five four ten thirty triple eight nine nine ten thirty. That's my direct line right now we want to hear from you coming back on nightside. Nightside.

Honduras Neil opioid overdose Guatemala Julie Mahia Curtis Booker advisor Central America Seth President Trump Attleboro softball Bridgewater state university Wrentham Bill hanney El Salvador Senator Warren Julia David
"geography department" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

Now What? with Arian Foster

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"geography department" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

"Welcome back to now what podcast i'm your host area foster alan give special sat out to smarty pants vitamins a title hosted his sponsored as podcast so while and get them stuff get them some of them so a i have a special guest in a building today man this is this is going to be fun for me man we got alex alonzo and for people that don't know who alex registered entities i've tried to re re say them could you please list your credentials man so i don't butcher them while i graduated from the university of southern california which is probably the greatest university on god's greener i hear you got my bachelor's degree there in the nineties and i went onto work in geographic information systems there for a couple years and then i went back to grad school i got a master's in urban geography in the late nineties early two thousand ninety nine or two thousand and then i entered a doctoral program in geography and since i started the geography department shutdown so i transferred over into the sociology department and i'm currently abd alba dissertation status on a phd in sociology man congratulations also you got producing credits as well i've produced a quite a few documentaries i guess the i mean history channel hbo mtv bt tv won all kinds of programs full mostly you know a lot of network stuff i've done some local los angeles stuff published i got up here reviewed articles published a bunch of online articles published started a website like twenty years ago right and i teach at cal state long beach mass in what do you teach there now i teach actually a class call street gangs in the final let studies department perfect all right so that's that's what drew me to you in the reason why i voted you to come had his conversation with me in the first place man was because.

alex alonzo los angeles alan smarty university of southern califor twenty years
"geography department" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"geography department" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"People can come and this year we're celebrating one hundred thousand people have participated in earth you with us about twenty at a time twenty people at a time over the last ten years so the bowling building on thursday is one open to the public event another one one of our teachers asked us to by the way from nine o'clock in the morning until six o'clock yes exactly so it's there for the day and people can come in and one of our teachers of from north andover middle school s to mention it's it's a ways off but tober fourth we have an open evening with earth few and a lot of other things geographic related family geography night which we now serve family geography nights in schools all over the state about one a month we seem to be doing we'll do more and that's another chance for the general public to see earth view now if people if people would like to on the computer checkout earth you they they can go to a website is associated with bridgewater state that's all it could do is google earth view one would at bridgewater it'll come up and then from there if folks would like you actually are willing to bring this beautiful google earth mother earth twenty feet highs right to their school to the gymnasium and give kids this this wonderful experience yes so it's part of our center for the advancement of stem education and our geography department we work together so there from the website their instructions in the fees that modest fees compared to other projects like this but we have a staff that helps arrange it we don't make the appointments because we're absent minded professors that wouldn't go well so we have a great staff in case at bridgewater who do a lot of other science outreach each and they help us to manage that program so we're now scheduling in the fall because we're booked through the rest of this academic year in a little bit into the summer.

bridgewater north andover middle school twenty feet ten years
"geography department" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"geography department" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"In the private universities to be used in the bbc's as far as we know that your idea many of them used to have geography departments and uh some of them are trying to get it back in i think they see the value of okay and you think you said to be asked what would you do with the mate with your drug free major you said about a third go to teach go to teach many of them going to things like a planning transportation planning with a high always going to be agricultural environmental areas very big field geography right now so this might we may listen the real kids will listen in high school students maybe they'll uh uh you will pick up some students in generate some student interest let's go to the phones i jack as a new niche jack welcome how are you tonight all ugo engalnd grew up her hi there hello yet professor dominguin professor his bohannon and and jacko's of professors while glad jack i think on very good and geography recoverable pam collector oh yeah is as i outlined entered stamp club newton free library i don't remember draft or over because we don't even have a family club ero in newton or around a growing you know anna well why do you think that is jacket seems to me that every month every week i go into the post office 1 of i go to the post office this twenty new types stamps i mean there's a stand for virtually everything uh and i wonder if that has developed are you a i think when her bannered where were you through the internet grim lift people you know go into the post will go even add ordered company compare your join arthur you'll never have to go to.

bbc ugo engalnd professor jacko jack newton arthur
"geography department" Discussed on The Kitchen Sisters Present

The Kitchen Sisters Present

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"geography department" Discussed on The Kitchen Sisters Present

"My name is chris aboni and the novelist poet it was boring by fico in southeastern nigeria my father was the first graduate from the small town clutter scholarship to go to university of caulking island who is the first black mind in town he went from there to oxford and let my mother choose working as a secretary of the geography department it became inseparable second imagine him pink completely entrance by this small white woman who had such a big big spirit they got married in 57 in nigeria and she lived there for thirty years of her life and so he is my mother they will living in a very rural part of eastern nigeria he was the principle of a mission school one of the conditions of getting married to my father most of my mother converted to catholicism she was church of england but he was very catholic she really took accomplices and very seriously now here's mark cricket in peace be to you and this project to be discussed is grab home and words you're not very proper it at the time was as big push for birth control within their local governments on average no women in rule nigeria will have an eight nine children and the catholic church could not support condoms but the church wanted to be seen as a leader so the billings overly should method was wealthy decided to teach rural women millions of relation method used closely follow your monthly cycles so you know when you're most for tyler when you're not one not to have sex.

chris aboni nigeria secretary birth control catholic church tyler church of england thirty years