17 Burst results for "Genomic Data"

"genomic data" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:02 min | 2 years ago

"genomic data" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"But also other other aspects of what he's done, so please and you allow him to speak without interruptions. And so Dr hey explained the details. Lulu and Alana's genomic data. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis. Fun to PLA sites. Wong was burn any fringe shift lockup, which should Sautin the uprooting. Similar to the natural protective variation? It was creek institute's Robin level batch who chaired that session and lead the questioning which followed he's on the line from Hong Kong. Now, Robyn, I'm no expert. So I couldn't really make much of Dr Hayes data which I watched online. But did you see enough evidence from his presentation to persuade you that gene edited babies actually have been born? Because even that wasn't clear to me. It was certainly very difficult to examine the details during his presentation it was all a bit too fast. But people have been pouring over his presentation subsequently and there's some nervousness. There's some well concerned that perhaps it was claims that he hadn't done it. But for what we heard there was nothing to say it hadn't been done. So I think we would expect to some have have more proof that it has been. But that's really only gonna come from some independent validation of not just the data that he showed. But I say really for someone. To be allowed to see the the babies and get some form of DNA samples from them. The fact the two babies were born, and he did say that they have that got delays samples from from court blood, basically from around the time of birth that the edits were there suggests that actually probably they are if they're not then he must've been mixed up DNA samples off fake something. But I think we have to accept moment. Face value that he has indeed done it. But we won't be certain until some independent lab. Tests are done to to actually prove that. Now, this kind of experiment would not have been tried. I think anywhere else in the world. Because despite the fact that crisper is this molecular tool, which is meant to do designed, Indiana at specified places, the experience with human DNA is it it's more complicated than that. Patsy. Could sort of just take us through what we do know about crisper editing in humans. Well, it's been tried in human embryos in different ways in different contexts. So my colleague Cathy nine one one methodology to specifically made mutations. And she finds that sometimes she gets what he wants. And sometimes he gets other things where she doesn't particularly want. So she's been trying to make small mutations in the, gene. But occasionally, she gets very large deletions that particular method is unreliable, and as he really that was the method the doctor was using in his work. And so there is a concern that he doesn't quite know what he's got. That was already in place, a kind of volunteer. I guess moratorium on this kind of experiment on potential babies. Clearly, it has not worked in this case. And there was a lot of discussion. I think about the ethical violations of doing this. I don't know what your thoughts are. Well, we're told that there are in fact laws in China, which said that this was a legal. So he should not have done this. So he somehow managed to do it without it being noticed or with you had local ethical approval from the hospital where it was done to carry out the work and and to implant the embryos into the mother apparently that was illegal. So the problem is not necessarily having read. The problem is having proper oversight and people knowing what's going on the main thing that we were all horrified was that he's been doing this sort of largely in secret without bringing the community with bringing the scientific community people ethics people concerned about regulation. So he's he's done this sort of on his in secret. And that was so foolish because first of all he has no great publication record in using these techniques. So people are doubting as you mentioned earlier, whether he hits actually able to do this. I think you probably can. But he has no published the experience of doing this and then to ignore advice. But generally hide away from getting vice was so foolish in the UK. You could not do this the such oversight that, you know, the rotary authorities the can account for every single embryo used for either research for clinical application rubbing, you mentioned his poor. Application record one thing..

PLA Robyn Wong Hong Kong Dr Hayes Lulu Indiana creek institute Alana Patsy Cathy UK China
"genomic data" Discussed on The Personal Computer Radio Show

The Personal Computer Radio Show

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"genomic data" Discussed on The Personal Computer Radio Show

"We've had countless instances where. Routers and doorbells are just left wide open to the world to come in and do whatever they want. Fortunately, people take a lot more care with medical equipment. So we have a lot of medical equipment that can connect to the internet to share information. So we're pretty well protected there. Right. Joke. Good Lord. I wish that were the case. But as as we have seen, thanks to Hollywood, we've seen the sort of terror this I will take over control of your pacemaker. None of that was built in it. It's not. It's all a retrofit, and I think the most troubling aspect of this is unlike all of those other previous examples where the damage in this instance was you could lose some money. This was going to cost you five dollars, five hundred five million, whatever it was in the case of devices and the medical profession. This doesn't cost money. This cost lives that is absolutely an awfully unacceptable and designing without the concept of securing that information and securing that communication and end end to end and especi-. In the context as you say, I think you can if you couldn't imagine it, it's hard to build for it and secure against it. I think that's fair comment. But in this instance, this isn't imaginary, we know this. We've seen it. You see it on over and over. Again. Healthcare has the biggest target on its back because it's such a rich data source and the idea that we continue to ignore security and privacy of information. And this in only when it impacts is just it's plainly on acceptable at this point, as we say, closing the barn door after the horse gone. Exactly. And that's currently the process. The tragedy is an expands across everything, and you know some of the response to this. Well, we don't need to connect the let's say insulin pump. So the internet. Well, yeah, you do. We've just determined that actually this really good reasons to do so. Positive impact not just to share for that biofeedback mechanism that essentially creates closed loop insulin treatment from the glucose measurement. But imagine if we share that Dacian the context that you're sharing genomic data for learning, gosh, when offer its insulin pump triggers and we see, but we see different reaction. Why is his data showing different reaction? What can we learn from that? The so many reasons that we want to share data, but we need to do so in the context of privacy and security that is appropriate to the individual and secure that individual from home. Yeah, absolutely. And you talk about hospitals, healthcare, having the target, look at all the hospitals that we're the targets of the ransomware. You know, I mean, they're they're wide open, fat and happy, and. I know enough about Healthcare's, they're struggling just to keep up. You know, they're too many mandates, not enough funding struggling to to make it all work. And so it's it's tough to put it all on them to make the change. I think it boils down to security appears to be a cost as opposed to it investment. Right? And I think the mindset has to change that instead of thinking about securing this data as this costs that I wish I didn't have to spend anything I can avoid to do. We see it as an investment. It's an investment in the health. It's an investment in the safety. It's an investment in good.

Hollywood five dollars
"genomic data" Discussed on The Personal Computer Radio Show

The Personal Computer Radio Show

04:43 min | 2 years ago

"genomic data" Discussed on The Personal Computer Radio Show

"I think it was well intentioned, but think about when it was created, I account dated precisely, but it's pretty old, an intent, nickel terms. Anything that's than about two or three years old is out of date. Right. So. So what are the choices either surrender and play or or go play. Well, I think the good news is I think the some potential for new technologies, new innovation too potential to create an environment that is more individually controlled. So I think what most individuals would say, I'd like to control my data and how it's used. Most people would say, I don't care who uses my day to and you'll really sick or your catastrophically sick. You'll give up anything for the support and help. But that's not an open ended. You know, revelation that says, hey, his all my day to use it. However you like, I think it's still with an expectation of appropriate use. So you know, I have some hope around technologies that competancy allow us to secure and control our data, but I'm still a little bit trouble by the specificity of the data that's out there. I'll give you the one specific example that I have, which is genomics. How can you possibly anonymous genomic data set if it contains genes. Right. We use that in a court of law to prove that you did something so exactly and recently we discovered that can have a long tail. Yeah, I, I have to say I was deeply troubled by the impact of this and you know, I've seen lots of conversations online the killer that was identified through genomic data, and you know, they had. Samples of the DNA, but they had no matches and had no leads in what they did was they used essentially the matching technology that exists in some of the familial sites that allow you. And if you'll, if you've ever given data up to twenty three me or any of these other organizations, you'll get the emails from say, hey, we found the following close relatives, you know. What does is it creates a network of people and they sensually loaded up what they had and use data that people that submitted to identify a relative. And that allowed them to focus in an identify this individual and catch a killer while love the idea that they caused a killer. But I'm not sure that all the people whose data was used actually consented to that in an informed way. I'm sure they signed off on it on some form that was twenty two pages long that they had to click before they could do anything, but did they know that this was the case, and I pretty sure most people, well, I don't know. I, I've seen people say I happily give up all of my data to catch a killer. Yeah, I'm sure there are very few of our listeners tonight who have read and studied every software terms of service and licensing agreement. So it makes a lot of sense that you're just gonna. Click through and and go for it on a side. Note of that the is actually a website that you can send the use of policy, the UP or whatever. It's called in the instances. And it uses AI to essentially tease through these pages and say, here the highlights, which I think is a fascinating concept of AI. If you can send me that site? Well, I if we can't get it up on on the website someplace I would. I would tell you right now if I could recall it, I will definitely send trigger that so. So what's your. In light of all this, what's your view of the all of us study by the national institutes of health? Are you aware of that one? No, help me. Okay. So they're looking to enroll one million volunteer participants. Two, eight. All you need to do is eighteen years or older. And fill out some enrollment and consent forms, and then you can share your health history with them and what they're going to do. They're going to make this entire database available to vetted approved researchers, but rather than each researcher having to go out and find their own hundred or two hundred or five hundred subjects..

researcher eighteen years three years
"genomic data" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"genomic data" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The baby goes home right on time Suddenly you've got a new. Life in the family and, while but then about fifteen percent of newborns will go from the delivery room to, an intensive care unit that's a lot. Fifteen percent of infants and of that set of infants some are born prematurely probably. About half and so they just need to grow but the other half's about seven percent? There's, something going on, they might have a congenital anomaly like congenital heart disease they may have other. Things going on these babies require urgent attention They, require speed like any other. Area of medicine where there's high acuity I mean the things that people will be, immediately aware of or things like the management of, a heart attack or the management of a stroke or the. Management of bloodstream infection and their, physicians talk about. The golden hours that you have a couple of hours in which to implement the right treatment and if you do so comes, or good and if you don't do so outcomes or, bad answer for many of these babies they're in that same predicament they're borne nobody had suspected prior. To delivery that the baby had a. Genetic disease believe it or not. There eight thousand genetic diseases and there are three or four percent of the. US population so in many of these. Babies it's an emergency. It's a race to find which of the eight thousand. Does this baby have because until you. Know which they have your Lucked into treating them based on their symptoms and the symptoms don't necessarily lead you in the right direction And so many of these babies they're either getting a sort of a. Trial of treatment while they wait for. A diagnosis or indeed to get misdiagnosed and get the wrong treatment so we just felt that was wrong and could we solve that problem for all eight thousand genetic diseases amongst all babies Well I found you Through through looking at actually, advanced computation a chip which is the dragon. Chip from etiquette genomics that processes. Genomic data so fast it. Analyzes it's so, fast it's it's amazing which, is not a, number but a factor but it's orders of magnitude faster. In very specialized cases and we had often talked that there had been a newborn experiment about how rapidly, could they with newborns analyze the whole genome because it would in cases. Where, it was important obviously this is just part of a whole string of technology that has to be put together, in a turns out you're the fellow, they..

US Fifteen percent fifteen percent seven percent four percent
"genomic data" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

CRYPTO 101

03:35 min | 2 years ago

"genomic data" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

"And their challenge right now is to be able to obtain these images in significant quantity to be able to drive the AI. And, and we immediately thought about, actually, you know what this, this is a great opportunity to use blockchain to facilitate a, not just a sharing of research around the world, but to create the Konami, for example, using the open as an incentive to incentivize people around the world to share the MRI images to for this particular project company so that they can use it to drive. Now, obviously, people would not share the images very often incentives to do that just purely food cloud itself. So I'll ID is actually able to use our blockchain technology to facilitate this type of sharing, and also the token, this my contract token to be able to incentivize people to share this data. So that actually this particular product company in the Hong Kong grow on the back of this increasing amount of data that they're receiving. So this is one particular aspect that we've seen. We have had a biotech companies who are performing. What we call a genomic research sedate study of DNA for disease prediction. For example, again, it's they have a specific intellectual protective protocols that they actually a run on the back of genomic data DNA to actually make disease predictions. Now, this is always IP Salvi is actually protected. So the portraits south is closely guarded secret in incense. However, the actual data input from a from genome perspective is extremely significant and the more genome data that they are chain, the more predictable and accurate that disease model would become so and they've, they've come to us and said, look, you know, can we is there any way we can obtain more data? We have limited financial resources. We concerts go out to the market and buying in one hundred thousand of this genome data, but other groups out there who have. Got this data sitting on their server that's not doing anything would be able to share this data to help us grow. So a very specific sample. And we've seen this as we take further into the healthcare industry is saying this on a daily basis. And so it's not other than just intellectual property protection is also around data collection. And right now I can tell you, Erin is in this in the industry in the healthcare industry, there's no blockchain per se that actually focuses on research share it to be able to facilitate and incentivize people to share their research. Could be in the form of imaging gay. It could be in the form of a genome data. It could be in the foam of scientific papers that they are producing a moment, and there's no such thing in the world right now to actually facilitates this and blockchain to the smart contra capability will be able to solve a lot of these issues already come and come on the occurring on the databases. That's a fantastic use case. What's the function of the token? Exactly? You just touched on it. So I took it has a multidisciplinary use it actually Trafford across both the financial industry and also the medical utility perspective. We to classify them as the as a financial utility, as well as a medical utility token, there are much on the our IB solutions are prime solutions and outsmart cap solutions..

Konami AI IP Salvi Hong Kong Trafford Erin
"genomic data" Discussed on GeekWire - Geared Up

GeekWire - Geared Up

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"genomic data" Discussed on GeekWire - Geared Up

"History one that affects tens of millions of people every year stay with us support for health tech comes from seattle children's whose pioneering research institute is not only changing medicine but creating lifesaving therapies for pediatric diseases such as cancer type one diabetes sickle cell anemia and many more seattle children's hope care cure before we start talking about revolutionizing medicine we should agree on some definitions and to do that i've brought an an expert my name is heather medford and i am a researcher and physician at the university of washington the also the deputy scientific director of the brodmann beatty institute for precision medicine which is a newly launched initiative the brockman beatty institute is very new it's a collaboration between u dub medicine seattle children's and the fred hutchinson cancer research center and it just launched in december the institute is a fifty million dollar project that is trying to take advantage of a new age of genomic data to make precision medicine a reality those were a lot of buzzwords so what is precision medicine actually mean precision medicine is really an approach to try to take individual information about the patient either healthy patient or patient with disease including genetic information family history health history and environment and really try to tailor their either prevention or treatment of disease based on the integration of all that information so in other words precision medicine is a new approach that takes all the information a doctor has about a patient and uses it to tailor their healthcare right so as taking all that information and making better choices for the patient to decrease their risk for side effects for example to maximize the effect that the therapy that you give them as going to have that either treating or preventing particular disease and kind of making healthcare as officiant as possible for the individual now this sounds like it should be easy in fact it kind of sounds like something your doctor should already do use information about you to keep you healthy but precision medicine goes way beyond that and one big factor is data thanks to new technology we can take blood samples or other.

heather medford researcher director brodmann beatty institute brockman beatty institute fred hutchinson cancer researc seattle university of washington fifty million dollar
"genomic data" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"genomic data" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"People in one arm of the trial and eight hundred people in the other room trial and that sort of clinical trials framework no longer really works so that the modern approach to cancer i think has to be somewhat different so the things i thought the ncaa should folk on our focus on our training the workforce so that we have the right kinds of cancer researchers so we need cancer biologists you really understand basic immunology because excessive immunotherapy and we need cancer research is your understand big data because we're aggregating data such furious pace to try and use that information transformations we need to recommit to basic science you know it's not enough to make progress against some cancers we really have to make progress against all cancers and that requires a basic biological understanding of all cancers we need to fix the problem of clinical trials is this this destruction clinical trials in cancer is led them to become smaller and we're fragmented and much more expensive and so we need to rethink how we do clinical trials are very interesting development there is the match trial which will be presented this this year at meetings about how we sequence patients identified mutations in their tumor and then allocate them to therapy based on genetic driver personalized event that makes their cancer relevant and then lastly i we really need to get serious and cancer about organizing our data and aggregating it and linking it so that we have the genomic data the radiology data the histology data the clinical information we have that all available in a way that safe and secure available to the research community so we understand what mutations caused what patient respond to this drug and why they live that long and really really get a clue a handle on these sort of these bins of rare cancers that we have tree i was out at fda not too long ago they had put a cancer team together i know you're aware of kind of looking at all they're doing and the thought in that discussion came up within the foreseeable future they're just maybe a something that.

ncaa cancer
"genomic data" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"genomic data" Discussed on Freakonomics

"On the health side to measures of educational attainment and socioeconomic position on the social science side so we finally have big data sets with lots of genetic markers across the entire set of chromosomes and we're now actually making robust discoveries that are withstanding replication and seem pretty solid and i think that's the start of the revolution but warning it's still early days that's right so humans are very complicated in the amount of data we're talking about is in the millions or tens of millions of locations on our genome so what does this mean for technology like crisper gene editing i think that's going to be very exciting for a limited number of single gene diseases diseases like cystic fibrosis and sickle cell disease and huntington's disease but most things we care about in today's world heart disease alzheimer's i q height body mass index diabetes risk all of those things are highly polly genyk that means that they're the sum total of many little affects all across the chromosomes and that probably means we're not going to be doing gene editing in a thousand different locations in the genome least not anytime soon but with all the genomic data that are being accumulated scientists have been devising a system to make sense of it all we have a tool that's emerged called the politics score so you take all the small affect sizes that you're finding across many many many genes any add them all up in the new created a summary scale of your predicted likelihood of doing x where excavate smoking or getting dementia we're going to college but those scores aren't predicting very well right now so before anything drastic happens socially i would think that those scores would need to get a lot better when they really start explaining a lot of the variation in society then i would start worrying.

huntington alzheimer
"genomic data" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"genomic data" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"So i've been an entrepreneur ever since i was a little kid and i mean i love this story because what you guys have done with it and so maybe you could talk a little bit about what alex's lemonade dot org does we predominantly give out grants for research so we funded it out eight hundred research projects since we were founded and that's pediatric cancer research all types what we really try to do is focus on the gaps in the research so for example we noticed there weren't enough new phd's and doctors going into pediatric cancer research so we created a grant specifically for people who are at the very start of their career ideas if you you can spend less money than and get greater return because then they might spend the next thirty years of their life working on that problem in other thing we do which we started doing a few years ago is we call it the travel for care program so with a lot of types of pediatric cancer they're very rare and this goes back to how we can get the most impact for our money which is really important to us and a lot of times they'll be treatment in one city for a particular type of cancer and health insurance might cover the cost of the treatment but if you are a single mother and can't afford to take a week off of work to drive and stay in a hotel there the treatment might as well not exist so we pay for that as well and then the more recent initiative we started in the past year we call the childhood cancer data lab we really wanted to find a big data project kind of in right now and there wasn't a lot of action going on so we decided to hire phd's developers and data scientists in house and we've got a team in philadelphia where we're based and they are harmonising genomic data sets from tissue samples well this is amazing again if you want to donate you can check it out at alex's lemonade dot org alex's lemonade dot org this founding member the brother.

alex phd philadelphia founding member thirty years
"genomic data" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"genomic data" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Body mass index uh diabetes risk all of those things are highly poly genic that means that they're the sum total of many little affects all across of the chromosomes and that probably means we're not going to be doing gene editing in a thousand different locations in the genome least nightime soon but with all the genomic data that are being accumulated scientists have been devising a system to make sense of it all we have a tool that's emerge called the polish jennings score so you take all the small effect size of the you're finding across many many many jeans and you add them all up in the you've created a summary scale of your predicted likelihood of doing acts were accidentally smoking or getting dementia we're going to college but those scores aren't predicting very well right now so before anything drastic happen socially i would think that those scores we need to get a lot better at wednesday is released are explain a lot of the variation in society then i would start worrying worrying because why the use by external authorities and companies of this information that's definitely scary at i think the other dimension is going to being in the marriage market where people just take it upon themselves to wanna know genetic information about their potential mates i mean if you knew that you're potential mate was i've high likelihood of developing early dementia you might think twice before getting married i mean you know fina types or for hookups but gina type is forever so the technology for that is here now you could be using infertility clinics it could be used on dating apps where people could put their genetic profile linked from 23 in me.

Body mass index genomic data jennings
"genomic data" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"genomic data" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"All of those things are highly poly genic that means that they're the sum total of many little affects all across uh the uh chromosomes and that probably means we're not going to be doing gene editing in a thousand different locations and the genome at least not anytime soon but with all the genomic data that are being accumulated scientists have been devising a system to make sense of it all we have a tool that emerge called the polish jennings score so you take all the small effect sizes that you're finding across many many many jeans and you add them all up in the new created a summary scale of your predicted likelihood of doing acts were x smoking or getting dementia we're going to college but those scores aren't predicting very well right now so before anything drastic happens socially i would think that those scores we need to get a lot better at wednesday is really start explain a lot of the variation in society then i would start worrying worrying because why the useby external authorities and companies of this information that's definitely scary at i think the other dimension is going to being in the marriage market where people just take it upon themselves to wanna know genetic information about their potential mates i mean if you knew that your potential mate was out of high likelihood of developing early dementia you might think twice before getting married i mean you know fina types or for hookups but gina type is forever so the technology for that is here now could be using infertility clinics it could be used on dating apps where people could put their genetic profile linked from 23 in me to okay cupid selection of course is something we all do every day so we choose our friends our.

genomic data jennings
"genomic data" Discussed on Innovation Rising, Presented by Healthbox

Innovation Rising, Presented by Healthbox

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"genomic data" Discussed on Innovation Rising, Presented by Healthbox

"Welcome back to another episode of innovation rising presented by health box upon caster we examined the intersection of innovation healthcare from variety of viewpoints in interview the leaders who are move air industry forward i'm your host chuck feerick and this week i'm joined by sam belgian bomb for the last partner series on the use of ai and healthcare and this episode recover how dr belgiumbound named the decision to pursue medicine over computer science now he then eventually a blended the to how the universe in chicago medicine is working with google to improve healthcare and what led doctor about trump to start his own company litmus health make sure to connect with health box by visiting our website and blog and following us on twitter outboxed and send me your questions at chuck feerick now let's going joys episode with active ouch amount effort hi there and welcome absurd episode of innovation rising presented by health bucks i'm your host chuck feerick and i'd like to introduce one of the new members of the health box team jessica he's going to be joining me for this podcast and our guest today is dr sam belgiumbound associate professor of pediatric associate chief research informatics officer and director for the center of research and information at university chicago medicine dr voucher mom is an expert in pediatric cancers and blood disorders and he has a special interest in shooting children with neuroblastoma a tumor of the sympathetic nervous system in addition to caring for patients dr belgiumbound studies ways to harness computers to enable research and foster innovation using large data sets he directs the development of intern of international neuroblastoma risk group database project which connects international patient data with external information such as genomic data and tissue availability the center he runs provides computational support for the biological sciences division at the.

chuck feerick dr belgiumbound computer science google trump twitter officer director sympathetic nervous system intern genomic data partner chicago dr sam belgiumbound associate professor
"genomic data" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"genomic data" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"You can compare side by side of their partner and then the cool part as you can get a preview into what the next generation or what you're kids might inherits from mom and dad said against me some examples that extract dressing attempts is that a couple can now that well certainly we can do things like i kohler haircolor heights um there's really fun things like struck goals there's things like uh athletic related potential um the genes that we're looking out as well and really were just getting started with this on there's all kinds of different traits that we can add in overtime will be pulling knows and so you'll you'd be able he gives it to see um you know dozens of things across health and wellness physical appearance on ancestry in your origins and really everything that we can get out of your dna yeah i can only imagine what gender revealed parties are going to fail as a carrot and characteristic railed fire days they're usda area thank you brought the packaging for your partner he elect yeah me about this is this that baby comes here so this is the helix dna tests kit so this is what we asked it over on save brought that packaging foresee alexia isn't it air yes so this is that you extent a test kit so when you order a baby glimpse from human code it will come with two of these for the couple so get this at home you open it up it contains a saliva to which is just a simple plastic tube be full up you send it back in and then he will processor results in their clear certified inc cap accredited labs he looks as a company base out of silicon valley that is handling all the dna sequencing and then they also a marketplace we can go discover always ops the cool thing about helix compared to other dna products is that once you've been sequenced once on looks as platform there's dozens of eventually hundreds of different applications you can tap into in your genomic data doesn't change so you don't ever need to do this again it at once and kind of like your smartphone you can out a camera you can out a sports up you can out of fitness app you can do all these sort.

partner genomic data usda
"genomic data" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"genomic data" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Um traits that were always adding to you can compare side by side of their partner and then the cool part as you can get a preview into what the next generation or what your kids might inherit from mom and dad so can't mr mcmahon falls them extract dressing attempts like that a couple can now that well certainly we can do things like i kohler haircolor heights um there's really fun things like struck goals there's things like athletic related potential um the genes that we're looking at as well and really were just getting started with this on there's all kinds of different traits that we can add in overtime will be pulling those ends the you'll you'd be able to gives it to see um you know dozens of things across health and wellness physical appearance i'm ancestry in your origins and really everything that we can get out of your dna yeah i can only imagine what gender reveal party is are going to china nato as a carrot and characteristic for help is is the answer thank you brought the packaging for your partners helix yeah me about this is this that baby here so this is the helix dna tests kit so this is what of our state brought that packaging foresee likes deputy what is inside of here yeah so this is that you extend a test kit so when you order a baby glimpse from human code it will come with two of these for the couple so get this at home you open it up it contains a saliva to which is the simple plastic tube you feel up east send it back in and then he looks will process your results in their clear certified inc cap accredited labs rookie looks as a company base out of silicon valley that his handling all the dna sequencing and then they also a marketplace where you can go to scott rawlings apps the cool thing about helix compared to other dna products is that once you've been sequenced once on helix's platform there's dozens and eventually hundreds of different applications can tap into in your genomic data doesn't change so you don't ever need to do this again you do at once and kind of like your smartphone you can out a camera you can out a sports up you cannot a fitness app you can do all these sort.

partner genomic data mr mcmahon china
"genomic data" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"genomic data" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Index diabetes risk all of those things things are highly poly genic that means that they're the sum total of many little affects all across of the chromosomes and that probably means we're not going to be doing gene editing in a thousand different locations in the genome not anytime soon but with all the genomic data that are being accumulated scientists have been devising a system to make sense of it all we have a tool that emerge called the polish genetic score so you take all the small effect sizes that you're finding across many many many jeans and you add them all up in the new created a summary scale of your predicted likelihood of doing acts were excavate smoking or getting dementia were going to college but those scores aren't predicting very well right now so before anything drastic happened socially i would think that those scores would need to get a lot better at wednesday is really start explain a lot of the various society than i would start worrying worrying because why the use by external authorities and companies of this information that's definitely scary at a i think the other dimension is going to being in the marriage market where people just take it upon themselves to wanna know genetic information about their pretensions mates amine if you knew that that you're potential may was either high likelihood of developing early dementia you might think twice before getting married i mean you know fina types or for hookups but genotype is forever so the technology for that is here now it could be using infertility clinics it could be used on dating apps where people could put their genetic profile linked from 2003 in me.

genomic data
"genomic data" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"genomic data" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Diabetes risk all of those things are highly poly genetic that means that they're the sum total of many little affects all across of the chromosomes and that probably means we're not going to be doing gene editing in a thousand different locations on the genome not anytime soon but with all the genomic data that are being accumulated scientists have been devising a system to make sense of it all we have a tool that emerge called the politics score so you take all the small effect sizes that you're finding across many many many jeans and you add them all up in the new created a summary scale of your predicted likelihood of doing acts were excavate smoking or getting dementia were going to college but those scores aren't predicting very well right now so before anything drastic happen socially i would think that those scores when need to get a lot better wednesday is really start explain a lot of the very shen in society then i would start worrying worrying because why the use by external authorities and company news of this information that's definitely scary at i think the other dimension is going to being in the marriage market where people just take it upon themselves to wanna know genetic information about their potential mates amine if you knew that you're potential mate was either high likelihood of developing early dementia you might think twice before getting married i mean you know fina types or for hookups but genotype is forever so the technology for that is here now it could be using infertility clinics it could be used on dating apps where people could put their genetic profile linked from 2003 rian me to okay cupid the selection of course is something we all do every day so we choose our friends and allies and enemies are political leaders some treats are observable others less so some are heritable others not if the.

genomic data Diabetes
"genomic data" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"genomic data" Discussed on Freakonomics

"To measures of educational attainment and socioeconomic position on the social science side so we finally have big data sets with lots of genetic markers across the entire set of chromosomes and were now actually making robust discoveries that are withstanding replication and seem pretty solid in i think that's the start of the revolution but warning it's still early days that's right so humans are very complicated in the amount of data we're talking about is in the millions or tens of millions of locations on our genome so what does this mean for technology lake crisper gene editing i think that's going to be very exciting force them a limited number of single gene diseases diseases like cystic fibrosis and sickle cell disease and huntington's disease but most things we care about in today's world heart disease alzheimer's i cue height body mass index diabetes risk all of those things are highly pauley genic that means that they're the sum total of many little affects all across of the uh chromosomes and that probably means we're not going to be doing gene editing in a thousand different locations in the genome least night time soon but with all the genomic data that are being accumulated scientists have been devising a system to make sense of it all we have a tool that emerge called the polish genic score to take all the small effect sizes that you're finding across many many many genes in the ad them all up in the new created a summary scale of your predicted likelihood of doing acts were excavated smoking or getting dementia were going to college but those scores aren't predicting very well right now so before anything.

huntington alzheimer body mass index genomic data