19 Episode results for "Geno Auriemma"

Swin Cash

That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

40:15 min | 3 months ago

Swin Cash

"That's what she said was Sarah. Spain is presented by coors light. The beer made to chill celebrate responsibly. Brewing company Golden Colorado. Hey It's Sarah. It's the week of the NFL draft. And if there's one podcast to get you ready for it its the meantime show featuring lenny. This week mean is going to full first round mock draft with Mike Golic junior complete with analysis and rationale for every pick. You can find the meantime show featuring lenny wherever you get your podcast autozone. They're all about giving you more choices to help you get what you need and get it fast if you need something for job that has to get done today. Just order on auto zone DOT COM and choose free. Same Day pickup. You can pick your order up in store at more than fifty seven hundred locations nationwide or if you prefer you can have. It brought out to you with their curbside option. Your choice autozone also offers next day delivery just order what you need auto zone dot com by ten PM and they'll bring it to your front door the next day. It's great for those jobs that can wait until tomorrow. That's how autozone helps you get your job. Done easier. Restrictions and details at autozone DOT COM. Get in the zone autozone. That's what she said that's what she said that's what she says what she says. That's what she said. Welcome to. That's what she said. Conversations with interesting people from the world of sports music comedy and more talking about their lives careers successes and failures. Hi I'm sling cash in my dilemma. As my son usually takes his nap between twelve and one and unfortunately I have a standing leading of conference call zoom whatever. You WANNA call it now every Monday at that time. So how can I fix this dilemma? Okay well this is a tough one Is there any chance? Your husband can just handle putting him down for a NAP and remember. This advice is coming from someone who has zero kids. Could you just like adjust bedtime or breakfast or any other notable daily occurrences by like a half hour or so and then he'd be ready to nap and fast asleep with time to spare like before the call starts of course any might wake up earlier? Interrupt the call along to kidnap for. Anyway I don't know I think we found an area where the commission just leave it to the experts. So MOMS DADS PEOPLE OUT THERE. Who Know what they're talking about tweets. When give her a hand tell her what to do. The commissioners spoken my guest. Today is Swin cash legendary college and Wnba player who has won two titles with Yukon and in the member of one of the greatest starting lineups of all time. She's a three-time WNBA champion four time. Wnba all star two time WNBA ALL-STAR MVP a two time Olympic gold medalist and at twenty twenty inducted into the women's basketball hall of fame now in riposte playing career. She's the vice president of basketball operations team development for the New Orleans. Pelicans we had a great conversation about her title runs at uconn. Her relationship with legendary coach. Geno Auriemma the early marketing efforts for the WNBA and how today's wnba understands and represents the players much better much more true to them. Why issues around race and sexuality effect the acceptance and support of women's basketball. How a chance conversation with David Griffin led to a Gig with the PELICANS. And what it's like to be a part of a franchise when Zion Williamson arrives. Why she's talking to Diane's Mama. This is a great conversation. I think you guys are going to love it. That's what she said. I'm so excited to have my girl. Swin on the PODCAST. She is incredibly busy and she just launched a new show so she's even busier than ever even though the show is sort of ironically called. She's got time. I don't know how much time she has. So we're going to try to get to as much of this as we can because we've got a massive basketball career to talk about and new GIG with the Pelicans as well swindlers start at the beginning when you were growing up. Was it clear that you were going to be told that you were going to be a basketball player? What were you into as a kid? It was clear that I was definitely going to have height Both my parents were tall. A lot of my family members are tall so that was going to happen. I was into a lot of different things as a kid From a sports standpoint baseball was my first love but I was into cheerleading. Dance drill team shot to the Black Baratz in a mckeesport Pennsylvania. So step in. I loved a lot of different things But basketball kind of stuck with me more so once I got to like seventh. Eighth grade did eventually went on to high school. So you start to realize that you're pretty talented. At what point did it become clear like? Oh I'm going to get recruited. I'm going to have some of the best of the best trying to get me on their squad for college. Yes so I think can I hit me early? I would say after? I believe it was after my freshman year and think you can had won the national championship and we were doing kind of are similar similar workouts. My High School coach came over to me and he said hey look over there in the corner you see that guy over there just in all black. And I'm like yes. He's like he wants to way to you and I waved and he way back now all right cool. He's like. Yeah so you know. That's coach Geno Auriemma. They just want a national championship at Uconn. Obviously they're trying to recruit you but he wanted to make sure you saw that. He was here in a gym and I was like okay. Cool seeing them in. This went back to Canada playing but everybody else the my teammates who were obsessed with like. I Guess College basketball the time and then obviously Rebecca Lobo We're filling me in and I was like. Oh okay well I guess. That's kind of impressive. Right like the header gear in a. I guess as word started for me roll and I love that. He wasn't allowed to talk to you yet because the rules so he wanted to make sure that you saw him wave like I'm here on walking. I've got my eye on you even though I can't talk to yet so you end up at Uconn and they obviously had just won a national championship. There was certainly success there but many argued that your starting five at Uconn when you were a senior was one of the greatest in the in the history of of college basketball. You had incredible teammates. I'm curious over the course of years at UCONN. What your relationship with Gino was like because there are some people that can't stand his style of coaching others. That's sort of begrudgingly. Admit later that he got the best out of what was it. Like for you Yeah it was. Kinda like the the gift and a curse I would say with both of us I'm strong minded. He stole line did he. His approach I would always say is He tries to because he has so much talent you literally. He tries to break you before he can build you back up. I didn't realize that until I was a senior but every single thing was a test it was a test to get to the to the water found. It was a test for free though sampling. Everything was pushed you outside of your comfort zone when I say from basketball. Iq standpoint how to manufacture a team to play at a level for each other He's one of the best the best personality wise. You've other level. Hate him like one of those things where people we'd have a glass of wine win them where they want to throw the wine on him. I mean that's kind of how it is and we saw that obviously early on but I think for me. It was really respect factor. We both come from Pennsylvania Obviously he comes from eastern the east side of the state in the west side of the state. But I think that hard nosed mentality haven't to grind everything you want. Come from humble beginnings he understood for me. It was going to be a fight every single day to prove not only that I belong but I wanted to be my best the best version of myself so I think because of how hard he me how hard. The other coaches pushed me. It definitely helped me become the player that I wanted to become. Yeah so you were an all American there. You won the title in two thousand and two thousand and two in two thousand and two. It was a thirty nine and no season leading up to that title. That was that starting five that people still talk about to this day. Talk about what? It's like to play with the Subaru. Diana Tarazi you know these these other women that become greats in their own right when you're all still college players obviously are atop the country. But how do you balance the EGOS? How do you balance everybody? Wanting their own their own. Shine yeah yeah you know. I think one day. We'll probably all down indefinitely. Tell the story not only of that team but I think this is my senior class because it was four of us obviously than we had the two thousand two starting lineup but I think. It's just a selflessness. Everybody was very selfless. Were committed to the goal and it wasn't just a goal of a national championship. We wanted to show everybody that we were the best of the best and so we wanted to dominated from start to finish in It's really like one of those things when you're ever whenever people talk about when you're out hunting you have people were hunting in this like the. Keel writers either cubic yield. Like that literally was our mentality. You take it into Canada that form and I think with that team. The one thing about it is people look at it nowadays longevity of our careers and immediately go to kind of talking about sewer. Diana myself but the reality is is that we had two pit bulls in skirt and that was to begin Asia. And when I tell you like there wasn't anybody in the country to make shooting in Costa seventy percent from the floor because she took shots only around the basket eh wasn't like she was going to Miss Asia with defending people. Six five six six. It didn't matter like she was just she was probably the smartest out of all of us from the IQ standpoint in the classroom and also and also on the floor like she was that bright. So I think we don't. We don't have that same team of all those pieces don't work together and I think we all have that level of respect for each other's game and that's why we'll always you know talk about that team as a whole in a unit. Yeah Jain atrocity a sophomore that season. So she stuck around. But you talk about a starting lineup. Soubert went number one to the storm. You at number two. To the shock Asia went number for Asia Jones to the mystics and to make a Williams number six to the links all in the first round of that same draft so an incredible starting five an incredible accomplishment sort of part of this incredible legacy for uconn women's basketball all the different titles and undefeated seasons. Tell me about what it's like for you. You're retired a couple years ago. You've settled into a front office. Gig watching someone like sue bird. Who is still playing contemporary at Uconn? Who still out there? It's amazing you know. We talk about it all the time. Her and I just joke a little bit because I you know. I was so bummed whenever Tokyo Olympics didn't happen share you. GotTa Keep Grind. You got another year. Then we'll go back. We'll take his year by year right now but Suicide you know as she has matured in not only in s herself as a woman. She's also mature when it comes to like how she takes care of her body a really looking at it from a holistic standpoint and not just a medicine standpoint in and she'll tell me she'll tell you about that and I love to see that approach her mom in that space because I think it's so helpful for younger players that are going to come in because you know back in our day. It's like Oh something's wrong right. You take this medicine in. Your fine will now about sustainability in holistic approach in I think that's why she's been able to continue to play us into high level. Yeah and you know. It's remarkable to even just to think about the things that have become common practice. That weren't back when we were in college. Were about the same age so like foam. Rolling is like the thing foam role in college right. Ask but we didn't. We didn't have a lot of the same things that have become common practice. Are you know coaches weren't having us do yoga regularly which I think would have been huge for any number of other athletic endeavors to mix that in so It is funny. You know the ways that athletes are able to extend their careers now. You get drafted by the Detroit shock and the two thousand two draft. What did it feel like at that moment to realize you were playing professional basketball? You were getting paid a salary and you were part of this. This thing was the WNBA. It was amazing. I mean honestly I was four four and a half hours Max From from Pittsburgh Detroit to know I was going there The city reminded me of home because it was blue collar Into thinking that I was going to be playing at family friends in our country for money like that that to me was just mind blowing because I grew up before the WNBA only watching the NBA and having to think about an ideal a bike being the first woman to play in the NBA Bena. I WANNA PLAN NBA. That was all talk growing upright. And then you get to this point in high school and it's like all the WNBA in. I don't have to be the first. We have our own and that to me was probably the biggest thing is like. I never took for granted one night running out on the floor. I didn't care if there was a thousand thousand fans of thousands of fans or only one fan would matter to me was that we were doing something that I knew One day either my children or their children my nieces they would have an opportunity to be proud and have an opportunity to look at something. The day could eventually get to yet know it's interesting at. Espn W WE TALK. A lot about. If you can see it you can be it and there is a generation before the WNBA. That would say I wanna hit a baseline fadeaway like MJ. Or I want to have a hook shot like Doctor J. Right and you wouldn't have female counterparts that you could say. I want to defend like this player. I want to be as versatile as player and then the WNBA opened up people's eyes for first of all something to push towards in their own careers but also women's games to model themselves. After that. You know you could do it with college players but it just feels different at the professional level and I'm curious when the WNBA when you were just getting started in there. It's interesting how those early iterations pushed for players to fit into sort of this idea of. I'm a beautiful woman who also plays basketball. Here I am lying on the hood of a car here. I am in lipstick in it and a halter tap like I'm going to the club right after the game and for some people it felt like it didn't fit it all for others. Sure you KINDA got like this. This is the woman who's both of these things but We've unearthed some old ones particularly of folks like Sue Bird Dine Tarazi have posted them and said okay. This is so far from who I am what it feel like to be a part of that early marketing campaign and was it was it palpable from the inside that it was kind of pushing something that wasn't real or did it feel like okay. This is what it means to be a professional. Well you know I was always the rogue one and so I think with me I always had questions and sometimes it irritated people and sometimes they just didn't understand why I asked. But you know like you said for me. Yeah I liked model and I'm modeled in you know in high school so being in Yoga Pants and being on a car and doing these different things like. That's fun to me but I will look at friends of mine or colleagues of mine that I knew. That wasn't who they were naturally and I didn't get why they need to do that. And so I I think early on like everybody was just trying to do whatever it takes to save the League to have the League here. So you're going to just go with what people are saying. This is best practices is GONNA help. And so there really wasn't a collective voice to make that change whereas I felt like this should be about. Baugh like yes we can sell. We should be able to sell who we are and I never felt like early on that we were doing that. And we were so far one direction and then few years past Swung so hard to the other direction. It kinda internally one of the things I didn't like it. It started creating kind of resentment where there were some players who didn't care too. I don't WANNA be dressed up in feminist. That's not what I do well. They started having certain resentment towards players delete pushed the league with pushing them in. It's like why are you mad at her? That that is who she is. But it's not you know. It's not her fault that they're getting pushed in. You're not so it was like a whole toxic for a few years it was toxic internally. I think what the players until the players realize. I said this a number of times at our union meetings to other people's like until we figure out how to speak as a voice collectively like this huge umbrella in and realize it's okay to be who you are under that umbrella then we're not going to push forward. You know so whether you have people under that umbrella who has some have faith and believe in this some people are Jewish or some people are Buddhist like even from a religious stamp when you also need to be able to care. Put anybody under that umbrella and so I always say like we talk about diversity and inclusion in. We're the ones that want to fight against it. You can't go against your own principles while you're doing that. So that was kind of the biggest thing and I think we finally now there I can say. Is that a lot more players taking ownership of this league of the collective brand in wanting to be in the conversation and also the League's listening. There was a time when I don't think they were listening as much as they should have been To the players who represent the body in our the product for the League. It's remarkable just in the last ten years or so how much our society has opened up to allow people of so many different types weather that's religion sexuality identity gender identity but like visual appearance. I was watching these old bowls games and thinking how ahead of his time Dennis Rodman was. I mean obviously he was trying to figure himself out and show who he was and unique ways but we thought it was so strange then and now it's kind of like whoever you are as mostly cool now. There's certainly some people who are going to push back but I love that the WNBA now embraces. That a lot of its fans are queer or a lot of its fans are people of color instead of trying to say. We're we're trying to fit into this little box and everybody has to be the same. They're pushing out. Here's all the different. Wnba fits right. Here's the drop of the day and why they look cool because they're representing themselves instead of Trying to appeal to whatever that stereotype is but I think even as that's changing and acceptance is growing when we also still see that the most popular and accepted sports for women are the ones where the athletes are. The sort of girl next door traditional step slash diario typically acceptable aesthetic so tennis and soccer. And I wonder when you look at something like the Olympic team. You are a multi time you know Olympian. What it's like to to work as hard as you have to be as dominant as the. Us Women's basketball team is and maybe not have the same appeal to people or the same acceptance as the US women's soccer team that's made up of majority white players the smaller more physically less imposing and until very recently less outwardly queer. Yeah I think one of the things for me is that. It's all seems back to this idea that we as a country have not dealt with well racism inequality and the more that we don't deal with it at the top level. If the harder it will be for everyone else around. So whether that's in corporate America not having a social responsibility and understanding of who you are and who your consumer your fan base is. That's part of the problem right. Because like for instance Olympics come around every four years. People want to figure out you know who want attach my brand while for so long. They only wanted to attach their brand to what the idea of what. Usao what America looked like rides you you get to a situation where how dominant. The women's Olympic team is an. I obviously like you say one. Two gold medals. I hadn't more kind of sponsorships had more sponsorship in different things since I stopped playing and when I wasn't playing then when I was playing in that to me is like unbelievable because you talk about how social responsible a lot of the USA. Women's basketball team is how they're getting back. How the next morning holiday fight for different causes and you can't tell me you WANNA put your brain behind somebody like that. I think that is part of the problem and even still today I even more WNBA players continue to get certain deals and certain marketing. Your you still see the undertone of racism. Like let me give you. Let me give you a small example and I know we have to continue on like look at Tina Charles. Charles is one of the biggest the biggest market in New York City playing Went back home to her hometown. New York Liberty has an amazing amazing a foundation. The work that she has done has saved lives. And besides just I know Nike what other sponsors of said. That's my girl. You're talking about a girl from Queens. Grew up family You know background from Jamaica from Trinidad Lake. How does she not be? How do I come into New York and I see somebody else another wnba players up on a billboard in New York City and not? The one is playing here for your hometown. Roy Like so. I look at Tina Charles. Manson Charles is African American woman. She's Dr Skin. She dreads in our here. So is that not as appealing and I love soon. I have these conversations Well but sue. Regardless of sue is is gay or not. Sue was also still very appealing to the is in regardless of suit doesn't speak. She can still advertise for you. Because that's what they feel. America wants to see and that in lies the problem for me which people don't want to address or speak about but you have to acknowledge. These names have dialogue in order to break the system of systematic racism down. And until we do that that is part of the problem. Yeah and it feels like it happens so much more with female athletes. There's this idea of not only to be the best at the sports. You play but you probably have to figure out what kind of career you're going to have after you're done because you're not going to walk away with millions of dollars the way most male professional athletes are going to. You have to represent the sport while you can't get into trouble. You have to be charitable. You have to be a great spokesperson. You have to be extremely charismatic. You have to be beautiful. You have to look good while you're playing and off the court. Meanwhile most of the guys. It's just like didn't even graduate got to leave college early. Enter the draft because millions of dollars. Were waiting for them. They don't have to be particularly nice to the media or their fans. They don't have to cultivate a personality outside of sports now the best of them do and plenty of them. Have that but it's not required. What is it feel like to be one of the greatest athletes ever in your sport and also know that you have to promote it? Help sell tickets. Be a part of the marketing for the team and be a role model beyond just being great at what you do. Sarah everything that you just said was so exhausting to even listen to now think about this. Think about having a live that out. Everyday everything you just said is so exhausting to even listen to because your brain trying to process. How can you do all these? Things will try living out every single day and that is where a lot of women in especially minority women. What we have to do and what I know personally. I've had to do for years throughout my whole career. And in the back of your mind you keep saying. I'm pushing forward on pushing Har- I'm going to make change. I WANNA leave the doors open because in your mind you keep hoping that the girl behind you the family members coming up behind you. They're going to have a better. So that's why I was so whenever the WNBA got their deal this year as far as the new CBA and everything. I was happy I was ecstatic and I was telling every girl to hit me up and saying thank you know for last time. I understand how hard it was now going this process. Thanks for everything that you guys did. I say look. It's even before us yet. We were inner fighting for ten. Plus Years Catch Ruth myself into Megan. Jiang yeah we were fighting but you have to understand there are women and make sacrifices they will never get the reap the fruits of anything from the WNBA like big about the NBA. Like we have girls right now. Who are dealing with breast cancer in different stuff like that this. Cb didn't nothing for the former players. Right look how long it took the NBA even the NBA. A unions even do sound for their ex player that laid the foundation down so now multiplied by million. Because it's GonNa take the women a lot longer to even get there so that's the reality. We live with every single day. So when people tell me swing. Why are you always on your soapbox? You gotTA chill. You GotTa do this. No I don't have the we don't have enough time to be chilling like that's the promise so exhausting. But if you're GONNA fight you better be on the frontlines fighting everyday because when I walk outside my door I realize whether I M Olympic gold medalist whether I work in front office whatever the case may be people still before they even hear me say a word would judge me by the color of my skin. The fact that I'm a female and have to already have to ideas about who I am before I even say a word okay. I understand that I'm not using it as an excuse but what I do know is I can take that motivation and continue to try to make life in the world better for everybody else. Even if I don't get to see how it all and that's what we have to live with. Every single day is exhausting. Health exhausting most people couldn't do it. That's why right now in his pandemic and everything is happening in people were going crazy. There's a lot of people that are like. Hey this is what I do. This is what I've been living. This is the type of things that I have to deal with. You know. So it's it's it's amazing but like you said women are resilient women we care and we've been fighting for a really long time. We'll continue to do so. Yeah you know. I didn't even mention throwing in there if they have family at home to take care of if they have kids if you know if you. WanNa play until you're forty you gotTA figure out. Am I having kids during my playing time? Do I have to wait till my career is over? And you add that on top of all the other responsibilities. It's a lot I'm curious. You know now that you've gotten into the NBA side of things. You had this incredible career three time champ before time all star two time. Mvp A two time Olympic gold medalist. You achieved everything you possibly could in addition to doing social activism and speaking out about causes that matter to you while you were you know had the agency and the Voice of player you you get into the media stuff and you start you doing. We need to talk you work for Turner sports do some stuff for ESPN. And now you've ended up with the PELICANS VP basketball operations and team developed. I can you let us know quickly like what does that mean. What does that job entail? On a day to day basis that job entails on a day to day basis interacting with our players their agents The business side as far as our marketing our players. How we're pursuing community outreach. For them making sure that it's aligned with our business I'm helping create in built the ecosystem alongside Griffin Trajan. Langdon for me. The biggest thing is making sure that we're operating on all cylinders. Were looking at everything from a holistic view as we continue to build. We've been very young team. It's a we have to cultivate culture every single day. How do we drive culture as part of my job my team and I have some guys that alongside me but every single day we are building culture while building family in order to make sure that when the time is riding we get an opportunity to to be a championship into hoisted trophy? That it's all the groundwork foundation is already for many years to come tell me about David Griffin and how he was a big part of the reason end up working there yes Griffin. I worked at Turner together media and we were covering everything NBA. Obviously I was covering college basketball as well. And we are working at Tournus so anybody that knows Turner you. Sometimes you'll see Kinda like in a pit there where everybody's talking come together. It could be shack air. Charles Griff me Isaiah one night. We were talking about college hoops. And then after that I was about the lead Griffis about the goal instead in group hit me and he said hey he said you know if I get one of these jobs. I'm talking about right. He's Alma. I'm GONNA call you. I Want I want you to come with me. And I'm like okay. Cool Mula and I didn't think let them of it into my phone a couple of weeks later paying from ESPN and it's like David Griffin is now New Orleans pelicans advantages. It went really quick from there. I give it up to gris. Because he didn't ally he definitely. He believes in a lot of the things that that I believe in I told him when I came here. Look I'm GONNA come here. You told me to be exactly who I and bring you know everything that I have to the table to offer. But I WANNA learn from you because I want to know if I come on as much as possible that needs to be learned whether it's through draft in through this scouting everything of how we built an organization to be one of the best in the world because he's won a championship with the Cavs and he was like of course. So part of me being here is not only fusing kind of what I do and how I can call today culture here but it's also learn as much as possible to see one day I would ever want to be president of of an organization. Wow it's so How much of yourself are you bringing to this job? Are there ever moments where you think? I'm a woman and I have to act differently or you able to walk into every space every room every court regardless of the the front office people are the players or the coaches that are there and be the same person. You've been all along Usually I can except for. I definitely duck and dodge from our locker rooms and we'll we'll road. There's always something where I felt like. I had to be more than the guys do. Because of just kind of a be like everybody's used to everybody being around we're one of the guys so just making sure that you know I keep everything is as close as possible as far as being there for but also Kinda give them their space when they need to do things and not feel that somebody didn't have to tighten up like they need that space. I would say from the standpoint of being a female. I think there are times whenever you're in any meeting. You know that things will come up and because we think of things differently it may take people sometimes it kinda process it and be like okay. I didn't think about it in that capacity. So that's happened to me a couple of times and I think I think the other thing is is that a lot of times when you're new the great thing about being new and having so many people that are new is that you're not surprised when somebody's speaks up a Lotta time when you work for Organization for a really long time you kinda get your ways and people know who talks in. The meeting doesn't end for us. Like griff is like we come into the meetings. It's like everybody you know. It doesn't matter if you're a basketball ops in your intern he may ask you a question and I love the fact that he lets people have that space and understanding their part of the process for sure what's been like watching Zion Williamson. Have this delayed entry to his. Nba debut and then take off and then of course have it put on on hiatus. What's he been like behind the scenes? He's exactly what you guys see. As far as an interviews and any media studies done I to be honest with you. There's been times when I've just his mom. No like you and Lee. Have this done an amazing job. He generally like cares. He understands the process into have as much has been thrown on him and then to have the injury early on and have to deal with. You know I was at times. Why would have to tweet something and say nobility? 'cause I noticed is going to go by road. No because you know you WANNA protect because people don't understand And people are coming. I am left and right and I thought he just handed that like a professional like a champion to be that mature and nineteen is as. He's beyond his years and he definitely cares about the city and I have. He's a joy to work with But not only him to kill and Jackson Hayes. A call him rooks all the time because they came into this thing together and they really. Kinda just took New Orleans by storm. They just really are great young men. Yeah that's great to hear. I love that you're calling his mom like good job. You nailed it. Yes tell me about your new show. She's got time live. Where can people find it? And what is it? Yes every Wednesday night and nine central ten PM on the East Coast seven pm out west and it is on my is Eli. You can go to add swing cad. We just have fun you know. I just felt like there were a lot of parents. There were a lot of people out there struggling trying to work all day long teaching cooking doing all these different things and I'm just like we need a place to come to bent to talk in. I also wanted to go live with random people. They may follow me and have questions and I said let's do this. Let's let's have time because we definitely uptown right now. Literally and so that is the biggest thing is come the Mogae. Last night we will be there and every Wednesday life today is kind of a lot it forces us to always be on but every now and then it's important to just stop crack open a mountain cold coors light and chill so when you choose to turn off choose the one beer that's made to chill coors light mountain cold refreshment made to chill. Coors light is brewed a three step cold process cold logger cold filtered and cold packaged. So it's actually made to chill the mountains. Encores light cooled activated bottles and cans. Turn blue when chill to perfection born in the rocky mountains of Colorado in nineteen seventy eight coors light is refreshing crisp and only one hundred calories. That's why coors light is the one to choose. You need a moment of chill when you want to reset reach for the beer. That's made to chill. You can have course delivered by going to get dot coors light dot com and finding local delivery options near you celebrate responsibly. Cores BREWING COMPANY. Golden Colorado. And finally. Before I let you go you have to do the one thing that everybody does. Nobody expects an expert kind of Spanish inquisition. Nobody expects the Spanish inquisition. It's the Spanish inquisition question. One what's your desert island album you can only have one Probably would be real love. Mary J. Blige who good. It's Nice Mary J. Kinks can't do wrong number. Two what habit or quality do you think has contributed most to your success? I would say SESA obsessive behavior off spun it as a positive number three. What would you consider your biggest failure? My biggest failure not starting a company that I wanted to start and then seeing somebody else go out with the idea. Yeah number four. Have you ever been in a fistfight? Yes usually administering the blows or taking them Usually ministering. I've taken a couple of shots. My Hands Five. If you could switch lives with anyone for a day who would it be if I could switch whereas with anyone for a day a probably be living or there have to be living know anyone for day I probably would say Christ? That would be interesting. A lot of pressure pressure. They're number six almost embarrassed you've ever been the most Been probably not in the moment but afterwards yes definitely probably have to be in college shooting the wrong basket making it insists sportscenter and saying it was season of giving on Christmas time. Yeah you know what though that just tells you anyone can do it when we've got like women's Basketball Hall of Famer who is like achieved at every level. We've all been there. Everybody makes mistakes number seven. What's the thing about yourself? You'd most like to improve. I would probably say right now. The thing that probably most likely improve is getting more sleep. Well how old is your son now yet. Two and a half. And I'll do it for sure number eight if you could play commissioner of life for a day. What one rule would you enforce that all of society would have to adhere to? I would say that All of Society for day would have to be kind. Another guardless been going around yet. Feels time for for that. Unfortunately it's on the top of everyone's mind number nine. What's the most scared you've ever been The most scared I've ever been probably would be a hearing that I had assisted was cancers in two thousand seven. Oh Wow Super Sherri. Yeah for sure but you made it through. It sounds here. You're blessed and highly favored number ten. What three words would you most hope people would use to describe you? I would say Fearless Confident and selfless who? I love those. Those are good ones and finally who should I have on this podcast to someone that you love talking to or that you would love to hear from doesn't have to even be sports related. That's a good one. I think The I would say David Griffin. Okay I would love to have David Griffin on. If I know somebody who can who can set it up. Listen I know somebody? He's I know you're so busy. Thank you so much for doing this. I appreciate it anytime Sarah and good luck with everything. That's what she said. It's time once again for south pitch sessions where I rant about something that bothers me and I fixed it this week. It's people that are using this last dance documentary about the nineties bulls as an excuse to get into that whole Jordan versus Lebron debate. Man We have that in our back pockets all the time. We can go back to that whenever we want. Let's stay focused on all things. Bulls the greatness of Mike and Scottie. The intrigue that Rodman provided the behind the scenes contract drama with Crowson fill all good nineties nostalgia even those terrible giant suit pants that could fit like three dudes in them. There is so much more to get into with the last dance than that old tired. Mj versus the Brown argument. One day if I snap. It's probably going to be about this because it's just going to the well with no new facts. We've seen all this stuff before the Games we've seen Michael Play. We know how good he is. We've seen Lebron and he's not playing right now. We've done this debate to death and I'm sure we'RE GONNA go back to it a million times but let's not miss out on all the great little details and stories packed into these five weeks because we're rushing to get back today for no reason today sucks. Twenty twenty is a bitch man. Just stay in your warm ninety s bulls bubble all right. I feel good about what we accomplished. Today M J is better than Lebron there. I fixed it. Thanks as always for lasting about an hour. That's what she said.

WNBA basketball uconn NBA PELICANS David Griffin Sarah Olympics ESPN Geno Auriemma League Swin Mike Golic autozone Pennsylvania commissioner Sue Bird Dine Tarazi Dennis Rodman Canada NFL
Maya Moore

Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

44:00 min | 4 months ago

Maya Moore

"Hello this is Dan Libertad. Welcome to South Beach Sessions. We've been trying to get this woman on with us for a while now more stories kind of fascinating and somehow undercover. D- where she left her place at the height of women's basketball to go to a social injustice that she felt was tearing apart her family and she decided to help get out of prison. Someone who had been wrongly convicted spent twenty three years in prison so I wanted to talk to her about how that choice was made why that choice was made how it is someone left behind. What was their excellent identity to find a cause like this one that would basically martyr her basketball career. After working the way she had to work to be excellent at basketball so this is her story and I'm glad she decided to share it with us. A reminder that south sessions are brought to you by Ziprecruiter. Ziprecruiter is the smartest way to hire. Here is my more. Her story is pretty incredible. It's worth listening to listen to this. Maya Start I can't tell you I'm sure you hear much of this all over the place. I don't know if it makes you embarrassed or not. But the nobility of what it is that you have done here is fairly amazing. And I'd like to get to the bottom of the story of why and how you took this up and what it is that formed you to make you this person who would make the kind of sacrifice at thirty years old where you're leaving behind this. I'm best in the world at basketball. And you're saying no. I need to work on criminal justice instead. I need to help somebody so let me before we even get started. Just express my admiration to you. I'm sure you're getting a ton of that and I'm sure it's not the reason that you do it but it's just staggering in breathtaking in. Its nobility that you would take this kind of 'cause Oh man thank you just for acknowledging that like you said What I'm doing in in the decision making how I'm trying to to live my. My young adult life is definitely due to help from so many others in just being rooted and grounded faith in I'm just grateful to have really the privilege to be walking in the throat and But definitely something that I didn't anticipate being here a couple years ago but Really glad I am well. I'm hopeful that you could sort of tell the audience that doesn't know your story instead of having me give the journalistic facts about it sort of explaining to people in your own words why it is that you chose this particular path of. I am an exceptional. Wnba basketball player. But I'm going to give up my career seven eight years in at least put a pause on it because someone has been wrong in our criminal justice system and I have to have a purpose larger than basketball. I can't let basketball be the thing that defines me. Yeah sure you know it's It's been nice to be able to. I think get to tell people you know my story who may be haven't heard my story or kept up with my career but I even before basketball became what is known for publicly. Just I just wanted to give credit. I my family and the kind of the organic nature of the story. Just just growing up in getting rooted and grounded in Christ at a younger age around Middle School before I became. You know by more the basketball player but mike were mentioning earlier about how you know what formed made it to get to this place but I was going through my basketball experience as a young person in just continuing to get opportunities working as hard as I could was able to be successful at the high school level had an amazing college experience under Geno Auriemma and then getting drafted number one going to the links in Minnesota playing all over the world playing in China playing in Europe winning championships in being a part of Olympic gold medal. Teams and Mrs Ridiculous the amount of disfavoring opportunity and and work up put in teams that have been a part of coaches and teammates in It's really been crazy whirlwind but behind the scenes you know. I'm I'm a person and I have family in. I have hometown and I would do my best to stay connected with my extended family that I grew up with Missouri. I was born in in Missouri in at age. Eleven ended up transitioning to Metro Atlanta. Which is where I graduated. High School in But I have a relationship with my family and Missouri and so When I go back to visit one of the Times I went back right before I started college. I saw that they were connected with this young man named Jonathan Irons. Who had been wrongfully convicted for a nonfatal armed burglary when he was sixteen outside of Saint Louis in so they started getting to know Jonathan Through prison ministry opportunity and I became interested in his case when I learn more about the facts of its case how he had been wrongfully convicted. There was no physical evidence tying him to the scene there is no adult president when he was being interrogated other faulty eyewitness procedures practice. There were just really ridiculous elements in facts to his case. That just really drew me in and so over the last decade plus my family. I've been just doing what we can to to help free Jonathan and about three years ago I think after the getting some momentum from the summer of twenty sixteen to really use our voice in our platform is athletes to to give voice to the people who don't have a voice particularly black and Brown bodies who have been experiencing violence over the course of this country's history unfortunately and one of the ways that we still fill the ugly effects of our human trafficking passive of American slavery is Mass incarceration in just starting to educate myself in getting connected with. Who Know a lot in this in this area and start to use my voice to try to help show people my journey in Jonathan's fight in just the general cause of criminal justice reform. So are you looking at do? I have the time line right. Are you looking at? What's happening with capper Nick and then saying like is it an instigator motivator or did you have some of this in your past before that I think the timing of you know when when Colin was starting to use his platform in the the bold way that he he did in the just the timing of my teammates wanting to to use our voice to say you know change starts with us. Justice and accountability during Are Links season in twenty. Sixteen I think it was You know we were aware in watching but I would say. It wasn't a direct connection to Colin. I think just the timing of the momentum of of everything going on in what he was doing was definitely a part of the momentum of what was happening. But I can't say I saw Colin and then got motivated. That's not exactly unfolded. Okay how did it unfold then beyond beyond the motivation of it right because it's a big leap from I'm interested in this cause to I'm going to give up my best in the world type of career for four this? 'cause I think you know in the course of me trying to tell the story well explain this journey. I've tried to be careful about trying to paint an accurate picture because when I first made my announcement of stepping away from the game back in twenty nineteen I was wanting to be not make a book long explanation but enough so people could understand the heart behind why he was stepping away. Which I said my priorities. I wanted to shift my priorities and focus on family in ministry passions that I have so Jonathan situation is a perfect merging of both of those things of ministry heart And he's family you know he's he's been a part of our family. He's essentially been adopted into our our family for the past fifteen years plus so. I don't want to make the sole reason that I stepped away. I don't WanNa communicate that that was the sole reason but because I stepped away from the game and shift at my priorities. I've been able to really invest in show up to the different things that Jonathan is needed. In his case in the causes needed in I feel really good about being able to show up more fully to these things that are required so much mental emotional in a Showing up to things matters a lot so I have no regrets about. You do realize maybe you don't realize they're think of it this way that not only. Is there obviously a book here in your story But you chose martyrdom in in a way or at least career martyrdom basketball martyrdom like you chose something here that in the history of sports not a whole lot of people are choosing in your choosing it. Because you're deciding to leave sports in order to do God's work so me and my conviction to shift my priorities as attractive explaining a course Talking about spiritual things or faith things when you have a limited amount of time it can be Kinda hard to fully go into a how it all works in my motivations in my journey but the more grow. I'm thirty years old in just becoming an adult in in just growing into the person that I'm I'm becoming in trying to figure out what is important and you know being a person of conviction I can't live if I don't live with conviction and so as time goes on and on syncing what's important to God is what I want to be important to me. In one of the ways that shows most obviously is. Have you treat people in how you see people and I think just learning more about the state of our criminal justice system? It's becoming so obvious to me that I think one of the best ways to measure where a society where culture is is how they treat the least of these in their in their society and our criminal justice system is a great litmus test of of where you are in how you see people who have messed up or in this case. Been wrongfully convicted How do you deal with that? How you deal with justice. How do you deal with humanity? Do you humanize people already dehumanize them so that you can throw them away and so I'm just getting more and more conviction in wanting to You know speak out so I think that's the motivation for why started speaking out more publicly about three years ago but a stepping away from the game in the rhythm That I would want it to have in my life to have the space for the people in my life to be able to show up to things and you know the grind and the chase of being the best in the world it costs and so I had to Kinda shift from paying that cost for this season So that I could show up in. Pay a cost in another in another place that had more direct relationship to the people in my life man but sports are supposed to make you kind of selfish that way right like you can't even be as great as you were. Unleash your selfish right. I mean it's not possible because you've got to take care of yourself in order to be that kind of great because everybody's coming for yourself. Yeah it's a it's a wild place Sports is at the professional level so tricky. Because there's always this this voice or this this narratives that that you said you know if you want to be the best if you WANNA be on top you have to be self self-focused and you have to be Just very putting all else aside for the sake of striving for that for that top spot. I've tried to carry myself in that SORTA teammate. That does the best that I can show up and be responsible in. Do the best. I can to help every team that I'm on win but I but I also try to maintain my humanity in realize sport isn't everything and even right now. It's just so ironic how we've had two. We've been forced to put sports down and to really get a chance to see what I've been seeing. I think over this last year plus that when sports is put down the chase is put down. you start to see the things that that really matter in that that are going to last in that are gonNA mean the most and so. It's tricky because sports offers do offer some really inspiring things in some powerful things but having a chance to kind of put it proper perspective While also you still using it to draw people together. I think is has been something I've tried to do. This might be a dumb question. Was this a hard decision for you? I think it was like I said earlier. I'm somebody who I really have to have conviction if I commit to something. I don't commit to very many things because when I do commit to something I'm all in and I do it with conviction and Once I had conviction that this was the right move. I have peace about it but of course when you make such a drastic shift in I knew it was I was gonNA. It was GONNA be sad. You know not being with my teammates this last season in in my coaches and the people again the people that I miss and just go in every day to a group of really inspired women and men who worked for our club and you miss that but you know what I gained. I feel so much of your second. You're saying no you're saying no. It wasn't a hard decision getting to that getting to that place took time in in wasn't easy. This live in life in growing in in trying to figure things out but once I had clarity conviction on it. That's the goal life. You WANNA have clarity and conviction you. There wasn't there wasn't a moment of a piff Unie right. There was not a moment of clarity. It's not touched by the hand of God moment of clarity or was there. Well I think there was. There was a time for me when you know over the last you know through that twenty eighteen twenty nineteen time where you have clarity I had clarity on it. And so just trying to figure out how to how to best navigate. Something like this which wasn't expected. I wasn't expecting This because when you're when you're playing in your your grind in a near in this this pro sport world you you just. You're so used to going from one thing to the next the next in the predictability in the the rhythmic the rhythm of being in season little bit outta season than in season Now I don't have that and so it's definitely been hard to adjust. But can you explain? I'd like to get into the the adjustment in a second. But can you explain to the audience? The nature of all in because it sounds like you poured all of the substantive. Will that made you great at basketball. And Good Lord is that a cutthroat ecosystem that you poured all of that into an even more cutthroat ecosystem. It's let me go see if I can attack the social justice system like give me the details and the important things for people to know how. Ocd Your Life had to be about this singular passion. What all in meant. Yeah took a question man. We we need to have like four more podcasts. But this is a good question because For me going through my basketball experience one of the things that I am proud of appreciate is the leadership that I was. I was able to have from a basketball sense. And from faith family. Church family sense of Working hard investing putting in the time. There's no shortcuts. I was in the gym. I was the last one to leave. I put in the work but I also didn't. I don't think I made it my everything. I've tried to be a person I in basketball on something that that I do. It's not who I am and so the all in aspect of it's not my identity but it is something that I'm committed to and I want to invest in in. Its in. Its it's always about the people in the experiences in the relationships and who were becoming very blessed to be in environments in having the work ethic and the way I invested in it to be able to win which is I. Think sometimes rare but I've also now that I'm off the court. Try to invest in show up and give what I can but with limits. I can't do everything and so I let people leave who have expertise in certain areas. But what I can do I pour myself all in. I think more than anything. This time away shifting to the criminal justice reform space has been more of an emotional toll. Because you're dealing with such darkness and when you look into a dark place and you can't fix it all at once. It just breaks you because you know people are suffering and so I haven't necessarily been more active in like a in a physical sense but I think I've definitely been just as invested in I think for foremost my family. The people that that end in that. I'm around like you know my my immediate and extended family and my friends. My Church family and some of the ministry things have been able to get connected to but also criminal justice reform in learning and China's speaking in help people Understand that this is about all of us in that they're human beings at stake. It's not just a system it's a it's a people issue. It's a human issue and so that's heavy too because plumbing the whole thing the whole thing is heavy all of is so all of it is so dark that you're sitting here and you're choosing again and again as an angel for God's work you are choosing to walk into something daily. That feels just totally hopeless because the entire system is stacked against you. Yeah that's that's been Something that man you know? You don't know until you get in here of what it's going to look like That's why I'm just so grateful that I have hoped that I have hope beyond the system. Hope beyond this world rooted in faith in people that I'm walking with who are fighting alongside of me too when it when it gets dark and we see how we treat each other in this system that we know that there is hope because there are people who are stepping in showing up staying anchored praying through fighting through and there are changes that are happening. Yeah movies like just mercy coming out with Bryan Stevenson in his crew. And just telling those stories and showing giving light to the people who have been showing up for people and so it's changing. It's moving but I think storytelling is so important in that something I want to try to do with my my platform and my is you know making a documentary about Johnson's story end. Just what we've learned about good as our good is that GonNa be good. God Are you making that? I hope you have good help on that because not that you couldn't do it yourself but just if you have the right help on that The story that you're telling Isn't getting told well enough and nobody can tell it as well as you can. Yeah absolutely assembling the best team that I can to to really tell the story. Well I've been journaling and writing and just making sure that I'm a communicate and share what I've learned inexperienced gone through as well as Jonathan and so we are Trying to take it bit by bit because we're literally still in the battle There will be time to really dive into telling that story At an even higher level. But you know we've been trying to keep the public informed in an updated You know here and there with with the progress in in what's going on. How can people help you? Yeah I love the question. I appreciate it You know right now I have a nonprofit called win. With justice I started a few years ago with the help of another organization. Called athletes for impact and win with justice is about ending prosecutorial misconduct so prosecutors in our justice system literally are the most powerful actors in our Justice System. And when you see injustice. It's happening wrongful convictions. Over sentencing kids being tried as adults. Some of the major issues like that are direct linked to prosecutors. Not doing their job. Well and being more worried about getting the conviction in putting a win in their in their category as opposed to what is actually best for the community and the people that are being impacted so Going to win with Justice Dot Org Is a good way to to to make make me feel like we're moving forward because with justice is an educational platform right now. You can give And you can learn. Learn who your prosecutor prosecutors are. Don't just only vote for your president. You know find out who your prosecutors are because those are the people who are charged with ensuring that justice is taking place in your communities in so right now where I'm at with my journey in what I've been learning. I think the thing that I want people to do the most is to learn is to try to see someone in your community who isn't exactly like you look beyond your house. Look on your friend group in to see people in humble yourself in and just learn. Someone's story who isn't exactly in your socioeconomic class That's it organically happened from our family. I COME FROM A MIDDLE-CLASS BLACK FAMILY IN JONATHAN. Grew up with nothing you know. He grew up with the love of his great aunt and some friends in in some family but he didn't have a lot of money and so. I wouldn't have probably run run into Jonathan any in any other context but because I got inspired to my family who looked into his situation were here today and so you don't have to necessarily become the next prosecutor but pay attention to your prosecutors are. Because they need to be held accountable. Things can change and things will change when we pay more attention in in with justice and other other organizations are passionate about helping people do that in educating people on how to knowing what to do when they figure out that they want to do something. I I have been remiss in not telling the audience that you're 'cause here was just just recently acquitted. Correct after how much I haven't told people the part of the story. Some of them. They know it but that you gave up your career to choose an overturned conviction and this actually happened recently. He owes his freedom to you. This happened how long ago. And how long were you fighting for that? Yeah this is. It's really a miracle story Jonathan when he was arrested at sixteen in Metro Saint Louis. He had a choice in. He chose to fight and to try to be a better person and to try to lean into being the best person that he could despite his crazy circumstances in the danger of that he had a sixteen imprison. Unfortunately he made it. He's been making it through and he's been able to to to protect himself and to take advantage of opportunities to learn to grow he he got connected with some some some guys in there in himself law over the last fifteen plus years. He's been wrongfully convicted for. This is his twenty third year of being wrong convicted in. He taught himself law. He's he's brilliant at law and so I've learned so much from him and so have taken his leadership actually in coming alongside him to invest in in in his legal help in so through his his his legal help right now we were able to go through the process of getting his habeas petition filed back in December of two thousand eighteen in. It's taken a year and four months to finally get his conviction overturned and so it has been the longest hardest grew most grueling thing. I've ever been a part of because unfortunately the attorney general in Missouri every step of the way was opposing the facts of the case. It was just mind blowing to see how ridiculously awful Jonathan situation was in. How if you just look at the trial transcript you look at the evidence in his case. It's it's just so disheartening. But to see the state who is charged to protect its citizens seem to fight in delay in push things out at every step of the way even even now his conviction was overturned and the assistant attorney. General is challenging. That ruling in an appeals situation. So why is this happening? Like what the nature of a year and four months. You're pouring all in your pouring Maya Moore's champion all in into the last year and four months. Why are you being opposed on nonsense at every turn nat? Is the question that if I asked myself too often I will never sleep. It has been banging your head against the wall frustration of. How can we treat each other like this? And how do people who are charged with protecting its citizens somehow think that the person behind this case doesn't the facts could actually be fax and if we looked at the facts than we can do the right thing but it just seems like they're just trying to protect the convictions twenty-three-year-old wrongful conviction? And so it's just been very frustrating and disheartening. But we've been trying to carry ourselves with respect and dignity and be just pursuing the truth at every turn because the truth is on our side. It's if you just look at the facts and so this is loaded language but my. I understand how you would arrive at that. Feeling of this is twenty. Eighteen to one thousand nine hundred twenty twenty that this is. What mass incarceration is that? We're going to keep the system is going to keep defending the wrong Which is you know something that disproportionately jails African Americans. Disproportionately jails them for often. Very minor crimes. Never Mind in this case. Not a crime at all wrongful conviction but like that. It must feel like that. Even though it's loaded language that it must feel like you're bumping up against the modern day system of injustice. Yeah it's it's one of those things that until you let yourself see the ugly. You won't even believe that it's happening. You won't even believe Israel. I didn't know this was happening when I was eighteen years old and I was connected with my parents in the nate told me about Jonathan Situation. My mind was blown. I'm a black woman in the US. And I had no idea it was this was happening. And so if you don't have the same ethnic background as me. How much more are you not going to know how our history is still has its claws in our time now and so I started to learn that our criminal justice system it systematically setup to bury people and once you're in even if you're innocent it's almost impossible to get out because the system has flaws but also because the hearts of the people involved are broken in an half flaws in or not caring about the people but caring about their status their position in trying to cover up the ugliness that we come from that is still happening and so. I think it's been cool from me that when I share. What's going on what I've learned? There are a lot of people who once they see it actually care. Don't want this system to continue. So I think that's that's been encouraging to see people raising their voice to say everybody should be treated fairly in so it keeps me gone to see you know people responding but at the same time. It's hard work and it takes persistent and you have to show up but yeah. The ugliness of our our human trafficking past is still Is still alive and well and in and we can do something about it and and we will do something about it you you say that. It's hard work. I can't even imagine what the daily weariness must feel like to go through just injustice after injustice hitting you in the face like what do those look like when you're all in. Yeah man when I tell you I can see just over the years like the combination of my of my basketball experience in just my walk with the Lord. End just being grounded in In the truth of of God's word combined with my basketball battle experience I feel like I was made for this time. Actually because you have to know how to respond to injustice you have to know how to respond to something not being fair you have to respond to going up against somebody who might have you know more firepower than you you you have to know how to to fight into persist in the hang in there to bounce back. I just think about you know the La series that we would have a in the finals with with L. A. Over the twenty fifth. Sixteen seventeen years and just back and forth and up and down in. Just the emotional. How emotional those final series. Where it's like that time ten you know with with Jonathan's case is because there is a man who is in a box every day sharing a bedroom toilet kitchen. It's all on yourself for something that he didn't do and it just it's not right in so I understand. It's a hard thing to look at. You can't stare at at twenty four hours a day. Because you'll you'll go crazy but we do show up. We do care in We stay hopeful in. Jonathan is one of the most inspirational people. I've ever known. Just his heart in his will stay in it into even encourage us when we get discouraged. So we're doing it together. Forgive my ignorance on this because I thought I was reading a story that had already come the happy ending when the conviction was overturned. I thought I was going to be able to then soon thereafter. Speak to a free man. This is still clogged. Even though he's still he's still doesn't have his freedom. This is this is a story that gets wilder and wilder at every turn. I'm learning you know I've never done this before. So last December eighteenth when I started this journey of the actual legal process. You know I didn't know what I was doing. I was. I was trusting the experts that people that we've put around us But every turn. There's a month here two months. Their comeback here come back there and we finally got tomorrow night. The twenty twenty few weeks ago or the conviction was finally overturned by Judge in Jefferson City Missouri and so after the conviction is overturned. The state has to make decision. The Attorney General has to make a decision. Are we going to let the ruling the judge you know? Stand and not oppose it or we're GONNA take them to an appeals process in saying that the judge didn't have the right to make this call not talking about the facts of the case just purely trying to still get this win and so there's appeals process going on so Jonathan is still in prison so once. This appeals process. Were trying to get him out on a bond. That's the next step to try to get him out of prison. While the appeals processes is dragging out on. This is infuriating. Though you must like you must be sitting here pulling your hair out like it's unbelievable you've won you've won but you're not allowed to win. Yeah we'd one topic Jonathan you know. The first week after his conviction was overturned. You know he just. He could barely sleep. He was so excited that it finally happened in the next week. He was just sad because he he he was he was saying. I'm supposed to be free but I'm still in prison in just I couldn't imagine like knowing the truth finally is out there. It's finally been officially terminated after two and a half decades twenty three years of his life from sixteen to age forty and because of a broken system that emphasizes winning all costs instead of looking at the facts of the case in doing the right thing it still dragging on. It's costing taxpayers dollars. You know these are were paying for people to do their jobs at the highest level. And it's just it's the most disheartening thing. I've I've I've witnessed apart but at the same time the most inspiring thing because you know justice will prevail the people there. There are enough people who will see the truth. Do the right thing but in our situation our particular assistant attorney general did every single thing at every. Turn to oppose the facts of the case. So what does that person's name can we like? Is there something the audience can do in terms of like sort of pointing this out to people? Like how can they legitimately help you? How can the voice of this podcast help reach this person so that you can have this freedom that has now been earned that there's no reason to stand in front of them like I think that person should have some shame placed in front of them? No you know I believe in justice. I believe in accountability in taking responsibility. But I also want to be Poised in in control and I don't want to dehumanize him but I also want to make sure that the messages sent this is absolutely unacceptable in the person who is in charge of the Attorney General Office in the State of Missouri. His name is Eric Schmidt. I wrote him a letter several months ago expressing my concern in several people called in you can call in to the Missouri. The Attorney General's office you can email. I have a link with justice. Dot Org where you can find that information But making your voice heard call in e mail in in the end. Let him know that. This is unacceptable in that the people care about the people involved in these situations. And so what do any good would it do? Any good if everyone. Who's listening to this? How to telephone number to call or an email. If you gave them an address to be hostile about it to do it with poise but to be like. Hey you know this is not good with that. Actually be helpful. Because I think anyone listening to this my as they see the sacrifice the nature of the sacrifice that you have made anyone who's frustrated by the current climate of facts not mattering anyone who is listening to this and saying well. This is as unjust as anything. I've heard because I have no experience with the criminal justice system and I don't think it's unfair because it hasn't been unfair to me like there has to be a detailed way that we can move our audience to help you through. You know just decent phone calls. That are raising awareness and giving the voice a little more sound. Yeah I have a phone number to the Missouri Attorney. General's office It's five seven three seven five one three three to one That'll that'll call-in we've had friends and family call in before and they have to pick up. They have to to to document when when when citizens call in. If you go to win with Justice Dot Org you can find information about emailing but unless nothing like a phone call you know hearing the Voice of people who are concerned about another human being and other human beings who who were involved But it's it's it's something that Will be telling for for a long time like. I said the story is just is just starting to to be told but mining who your prosecutors are seeing what they stand for conviction integrity units or something that I learned about through Jonathan in through Bryan Stevenson with equal justice initiative. In how? There's no checks and balances right now in the prosecutor's office We need to have conviction integrity units. That are empowered. That don't have red tape wrapped around them so that they can't do their jobs. Conviction INTEGRITY UNITS. Make sure that the convictions have integrity in that. They are Basted falsehood or other motives. And so that's one thing we can do is we. Can we can push vote for prosecutors. Who empower their conviction integrity units across different cities and so you'll see cities Indifferent prosecutors around the country Doing things to implement More integrity more accountability George Gaskin somebody that I got to meet several years ago. He's out in in Los Angeles example of a prosecutor who inspires me and just learning from him and how he sees. People are examples of people who were were practising walking out these. He's accountability steps so once he's free. Then what for you like? Do you pour yourself into something like this elsewhere or something. New Does basketball in any way. Tempt you create questions in honestly. I've stopped trying to figure out what's going to happen next. Just because is far as exact details of how things are GONNA unfold. I've literally been trying to go month to month over the last year. Plus because this roller coaster has been so unpredictable at times and just up and down but but at the same time. Of course I've thought about you know what this year will will hopefully look like in in my mind. I know a lot of people when I stepped away from the game. Thought I was just going to rest and and not do anything. But I literally felt like I've spent a decade of playing basketball in his one year of diving into this case. And so I'm actually GONNA try to get some rest now. This thing has been harder right because this is more of an emotional drain. You said times ten. You said it's Times ten all of the all of the everything that you had to pour into basketball. You said this was times ten so I got to imagine. It's felt like all ten years in this one Yeah it's it's It's again it's like when you when you're going through a season and the grind it's crazy in in your drain and it takes everything out of you but when you get to the end you know like it's all worth it and so we are just trying to get to the end to where we can say it was all worth it and and continue to all but you're gonna be able to say that you know that my like you know that right like you're going to the next step on this is whatever it is when the content business gets flowing again telling your story is something that anyone's GonNa WanNa tell you for you free to wrongly convicted man by giving your basketball career over a great basketball career over the 'cause it doesn't have a lot of precedent in in sports. Yeah it's it's a story that I'm hoping to continue to help people because I know that we won't be able to dive into someone else's story immediately but maybe through telling the story and equipping people can continue the the momentum in Enact that would that would mean a lot to know that Jonathan Story. Our story is going to help more than just us. So that that means the world to us and That's what we want to continue to to do and So story tell. Try to try to Stewart this story well and but also at the same time trying to get some rest in be still allowed in. Kinda recover from Is Twenty Twenty Year Battle. That my family's been involved in okay so the telephone number again. Just to be clear. Do I have this right five. Seven three seven five one three three two one during the pandemic during all of this. Someone's going to pick that up or should should the audience wait if they want to help you and what you've dedicated your cause to until a until life gets a little more back to normal. You know it. It doesn't hurt like you said this is. These are unusual times. Different cities have different practices. If I'm not mistaken I think there was. There was away at some point to leave a message. And there's also an e mailing option on my website win with Justice Dot Org but that that number is goes directly to his office and his. You Know Eric Schmidt's office you can find out more information at A. Go Dot Mo Dot Gov one more time a G. O. That Mo dot Gov is also the website that can take you to more details about how to contact the Attorney General in Missouri and in any state. You can find out who your attorney. General is And feel good about that. I didn't know who my attorney general was few years ago. And now I do so. I feel like I'm growing as citizen. So any little thing can build momentum to the next thing of you becoming more connected with your community and who your leaders are so it's an intimidating thing and. I know I'll be the first one to say. I was intimidated as an athlete. I just was focused on ball in just trying to win and I didn't know much about politics. Sometimes it's just overwhelming and discouraging but learn and engage in if anything you know with the people who you might not necessarily have seen before so my I'd like to catch up again. I hope that you can make the time in the future. Because I don't want this to be the last time that we talk about this sort of stuff. The work you're doing is important. I appreciated weekend can definitely make that happen. Thank you so much. Thank you thanks to my more for sharing her story with us during this pandemic we've had some time to connect with some people and we ask you if you're supporting what we're doing here on. South Beach Sessions. And you wanted to stay free. It need to subscribe. You need to Ray in need to review and you have to support the things that are on the menu here. We don't expect you to listen to everything but there are a lot of different things worth listening to and you can grab the things you like mystery crate. That's what she said. Marty Smith's America the Mina Kimes podcast with all of these stupidity. Of course they're all things worth supporting also outside the network as excellent as anything you will find in podcast sports. The right time with Bomani Jones is something you should also look into if you're looking for content during these times and you need stuff that's different. There are a lot of different people providing for you. Lebatardshow and friends and beyond. Thank you for listening Mitch Albom next week.

basketball Jonathan Missouri attorney prosecutor Eric Schmidt Bryan Stevenson China president Wnba High School Ziprecruiter younger age gold medal Dan Libertad Mrs Ridiculous Jonathan Irons Geno Auriemma
#82 - Carla Berube

The Her Hoop Stats Podcast

34:25 min | 2 months ago

#82 - Carla Berube

"The names behind the numbers. The stories behind the names. This is the her hoop. Stats podcast with John. Little very difficult? Taps loved the people there nineteen players, and it really has take a special place, a special environment for me to to to leave and Princeton stats. The biggest news makers the best storytellers. The her keeps snouts podcast. Here's your host, John Little. Welcome in to the her hoops downs podcast I'm your host John Little. It's good to have you here. What A PAINFULLY TRAGIC WEEK! In our country and just like I've been telling you with corona virus. How do I say this the death of George Floyd? But more the anger surrounding it. And trying to work through that anger. It is. Something that. We as a country can be better for. On the other side somehow I just believe that. I believe that on the other end of all of this. There is going to be a better tomorrow. And yes, it takes each one of us doing our part just like any other national tragedy, and this is a national tragedy that affects every single person in this country, and it is yet another, and like we needed another one yet. Another wakeup call, and yes, until the problem of racism is radical, which I hope and pray, we can do one day. There are going to be moments like this, and we've got to lean into them in some way rather than run away, and that certainly a challenge for me during this time I'm not a great orator on this subject, but just no, it's my commitment. Personally to continuously. Get better itself evaluating. How I can be an ally. To everyone. No matter their race, no matter their background, no matter their age, their disability, whatever the case may be, it's my human responsibility to be an ally to all, and I'M GONNA keep self evaluating as long as I got on this earth. That's just something I wanted to say off the top of. Thank you so much for sticking with me through that I, think the women's basketball community as a whole has done a really good job of trying to further the conversation. This week and I'm confident that is going to continue. Carla? Ruby is joining us this week. She is the head coach of the Princeton Tigers We continue the Princeton theme after talking to Bella Alary a few weeks ago and it wasn't Bella Awesome. That is episode number seventy-nine, so if you want to scroll back and listen to that one, it is well well worth your time to listen to what Bella had to say. That was a great conversation and in-kind. This is an awesome one as well with her head coach for her final year in college, and we'll talk about a lot of things related to Bella the top, but there's so much to talk about with Carlos Ruby. Ruby as well because she was the head coach at Tufts University for Seventeen years. What are the challenges of leaving a team? Even when you're going to a team that has so much potential in Princeton in leaving team in tops after seventeen years in making that leap from D Three d one, and of course we'll talk about eight Yukon and what she learned from Geno Auriemma as her head coach back in the nineteen ninety s when she was playing. The Yukon Huskies, a lot to get in with car, looked ruby the head coach of the Princeton types coach. Thank you so much for your time today. Really appreciate it. Pleasure looking to it I've been looking forward to it as well and I'd be remiss if I didn't bring up our podcast that we had with Bela alary just a few weeks ago, just a pleasure to talk to her. What was it like to coach? Valery this this past season at Princeton unbelievable I'll just a real pleasure to coach, but more importantly just to to get to go to be around she's. Just really like a high character, person A. Student Great. Ashley Great Leader. You know just loved having. Her around learning from her. You know there was a lot for me to learn in my first year at Princeton and she really. Helped out in in in the transition and then you know just being able to. Watch her every day on the court and see the kind of You know the the motor. She has the way that she. Makes people around her better and. you have to drive you know I. Just I'm looking forward to to watching her at the at the next level. What she can she can do. It was really interesting to talk to her about that switch being flipped after she came back in her junior year after hurting her wrist, and I know that was before you got there, but it sounds like when you got there. You saw player obviously going into her senior year that was very very determined in already knew exactly what she wanted and how she wanted to get there. Oh, absolutely first and foremost. She really wanted to have the best senior year that she could she and her best friend. Taylor Bauer were both senior captains. To loves her team you know. She wanted to to make history whiz with her teammates and that was. That was the number one goal and she knew that you know if chips fell the way they did. She also be in a really good position to to be drafted into the WNBA, but she really. worked. Extremely hard from day one that I was able to to coach and be around her and into. See just you know come to fruition in. The draft night was was was pretty awful. You mention the girls wanting it to be an historic year in twenty, nineteen, twenty twenty, you close the year on a twenty two game winning streak an excellent year by every measure, you can possibly put out there and you were headed to the NCWA tournament, and then things get cut short. How will you try to encourage members of this year's team? You know maybe down the line when you're talking. Talking to them about this season. Have you thought about how you'll try to communicate with those players and how much they meant yeah I mean I don't even have to communicate you know they know what happened the season. How it how it ended. And they are. You know the returners are are so incredibly. You know hungry in determine to to keep this this ball rolling and to sort of play for for Taylor and and Belen on. Their their careers being you know cut short. They WANNA. Play for them, and I know that you know this summer this spring this summer, that's in the back of their mind the the the story. Wasn't you know we never heard the finish the finished on ending to the to the store in so Yeah, it's a brand new team new freshman coming on next year, but there's still a lot of just loving and pride of this past season. and I think it's. Just got them Hungary to work really hard until always play for her. Bella and hey, you pride yourself so much on defense, and those are two the better defensive players you had there in Taylor in Bella, and you know everybody says the best defensive player on the best defensive team, but at the same time it felt like going into the draft. A lot of people were talking about her ofensive game and. And her versatility there inside out. Yes, how could you not drool over that? But at the same time? What are the wings getting as a defensive piece for hopefully the next ten years or so first and foremost? She's a really smart player like just a really high basketball. IQ On understand the game. I'm sure a lot of that. You know come from her dad and and just throughout her career. Playing with USA basketball and. Being, coached by on. Push back hard on. You know she's. She's had some great coaches along along the way. So Smart Smart Player on on both ends of the floor on. You know defensively she's. It's the same sort of versatility on the offense end. She can play You know she can defend a a guard, she defendant. She defends taken roles really really well. I think that translates to the to the WNBA gain where you see a lot of the pick and rolls on, you know she's. She's got quickness. She's got lateral quickness. She's got that great length and athleticism. And then she you know she's long enough in. She's getting stronger and stronger that she's not going to get pushed around in the post either. and. great help defender on sees the play happening before it. It's it's happened in in just a great shop locker with great timing Also you know defenses such. You know the rebounding defense is so vital in the you know she just you know her length in the way she should gets afterwards. definitely translates. So a great great defensive defensive player on, and I'm sure she's got still to learn, and and I've I've known coach Adler since he was a coach with Columbus question. I played in AB also I know. How hard you know his his teams get after on the defensive end and show love playing for him. We're speaking with Carla Ruby. She is the head coach of the Princeton Tigers, and just such a pleasure to talk to you coach Maruti here as we sit not even a year after that you got the Princeton job. Can you believe how much has changed in a year? And you know all of us you know in the world are like. We've never lived through anything like this, but then same time for you personally after spending seventeen years in one spot, how do you reflect on the last eleven months? And how your life and the life of your family has changed here? Yeah a lot has gone on in the last eleven months. My wife and I we had a baby three days after I got. The job. And then yeah had this amazing season and then yeah, what's happening now? So it's it's. It's been a whirlwind. You know the silver lining with with all. This is that I'm unable to be home with my three young kids. My wife and You know it's been. It's been kind of a blessing, but you know I couldn't be more. Proud and fields so fortunate to be at Princeton in this just incredibly supportive environments in university with a great president in Athletic Director and you know I I feel like we're. We're really well taken care of I know. You've been asked this a million times, but even case nobody's ever heard answer. How difficult is it to leave a place where you've been there for seventeen years? You know it's in the general vicinity where you grew up as well. You build something. To such an extent and how difficult was that to pull away from? Gary very difficult Yeah, I'm. Born and bred Bostonian and you know just loved. Tops loved the people their loved. You know my my team. I players and you know we were. You know right to to win a national championship there so it you know it, it really has. A special place a special. Environment for me to to to leave on in. Princeton was just that you know. I I certainly did my homework, and you know May a great fit for her. My family and myself and you know in reflecting after a year even though it's been crazy year like I said I. I could be at a better spot and I'm so glad that I I did make this This jump in and. You know I jumped in not knowing about my players, really and and I knew how successful and talented they were on the cord, but just Who They are off the court I've just been so lucky. To be every day as well as my my stashing reflecting back I'm I'm really happy to be. It sounds crazy in New Jersey. Because when you're when you're in Boston you, you know New Jersey's not really the place you're thinking of, but it's it's Princeton, and it's. It's just a fabulous place, and when you have a a friend mentor, cheerleader, a coach like Geno. AURIEMMA say yeah, this is perfect. This is something you need to do that can't that's not something you can ignore, is it? You've never probably been able to ignore his voice as much as you. Know in a n I. You know there's been some some other opportunities down You know last few years and you know when I. When I asked him about Princeton he just jumped right away. Instead make making a phone. Call Right now. so yeah, I i. absolutely you know whenever. I need him. He's always there to help out and give. He's always giving his his opinion and and He's been just a great mentor and you know friend, and and really helped out distance while. What's the best advice that you ever got from him about coaching? You know I think that it's not specific words from from hand, but just everything things that stuck with me over the the years and I. You know it's all about communication and relationships and he he in CD both do an incredible job of being great communicators where they're. They're players. just cultivating the relationships on the team. In getting their players to play at the very highest level on. You know you really trust you. Trust him and you because you feel like he trust you on. You know I've. Since Day one at Uconn, I've always felt that way, still feel that way and. I certainly have brought that to to my teams, and I think it's a big piece of life you know, I've been been successful is tough, even with I know you recruit both at Tufts and at Princeton, incredible young women, who you would probably trust with your life, but at the same time there eighteen year olds at that time, and you know whether it be you or Gino, or whoever whatever great coach is. Is it sometimes? Tough to force yourself to trust somebody that young. But I think that that's that's what it's all about is is. Eighteen year olds are are are learning and maturing, and you know it's not easy. It's not always pleasant, just the the level of expectations. But but once you are giving it all. To the team on the court off the court, and really just just giving everything you have, then you know that that trust is built. It certainly doesn't happen day one, but it does take some some time you know it's. Sometimes it it happens easier with some than than others, but it's gotTa SORTA. you organically and it can't be. It can't be rushed in push but but once the. Head coach and player hand that mutual trust and you know great things can can happen. It sounds like you're saying it's pretty impossible to have a great team a great coach you know without without having that trust, but if you were to, you know, give a coaching talk today. You're getting in front of a group on zoom like they like. We have to do everything these days and To a group of coaches that his having trust issues. What what's the one place you would start to help them? Start Building that trust with their players. Yeah I, think you need to be I. think he needs to be honest and transparent. You need to you know. Get to know your your players on a on a personal basis like get to know their their their goals, their your their likes, and and and yeah, you can't be. You can't be fake. He really needs to You just put yourself out there and take the time to to get to know You know your your players on a thank. You know. At the end of the day you're gonNA. You're gonNA feel so much better about them, and and enjoy the the both the lows in the highs with them so much more when when you really know them, and you know what makes them tick, and you know what Just help them through I. think that the the tough times, and also the the great time, so I think I think just getting to know them, and being being you know up front and honest. You were a part of one of the greatest teams of all time. Nineteen ninety-five Natural Championship team thirty five. For you graduated ninety seven from Yukon so you've seen a really good period of women's basketball. Sometimes I get a little nostalgic and just want to know what we can do better in nineteen ninety-five five. What were we doing well as far as recognizing women's basketball? How far have we come where where we where are we? And where do we need to be yeah? We've come so far from from that era It was amazing at that time. 'cause before sort of ninety five. You know, and I don't feel like women's basketball was really on the map at all in then with you know with our ninety five teen, and you know the ninety six Olympic team, all of a sudden like I think women's basketball took a really big leap, and the was there and the sort of the the start of the the W WNBA. It was a pretty amazing time. I was heading into. You know playing professionally at that time, and it was very very. You know exciting, and then over the years I you know I, think. you know I think the WNBA had a had a good product. Decent product. Now it's just it's come so far. It's incredible basketball I don't watch a ton of in the summer but I. Certainly last summer did a lot more because it was just so much talent on that floor to great coaches, going against each other and teams in Washington Connecticut of Great, Great Basketball Yeah, and then with the collective bargaining agreement, and now they're getting paid more and having more benefits can be. Can it be better apps absolutely armed if we if women's basketball keeps putting such a great product on the on the floor, in the community I think Hopefully it'll just keep getting better and better on. The women's basketball is come. You know just so far in. It's you know it's just amazing to see. How many more girls are in the stands watching college basketball and Being you know having role models and heroes and. As as women's basketball players on. Back when I was a kid, it was Larry Bird. You know what kind of Heroes Dad, but I'm. That's all I had to look forward to and or lick till and And now we have just incredible product, and just really strong women, really dedicated women, and yeah, there's so much to look forward to, and you're exactly right. That nineteen ninety-five team I was thirteen at the time and I live in Dallas. Cowboys obsessed and all that sort of thing, but I told repair. Rebecca Lobo a couple of months ago or like last month you are the first women's basketball player. I remember I I. Mean It's it's seriously the case in so that Nineteen ninety-five team. You guys are the first women's basketball team that I really remember that came to my consciousness so i. just think that's really cool and I. It's great to be able to talk to you and and Rebecca's well and kind of reflect now twenty five years later on. You know where things are, and how things continue to to step forward. It's just really really neat, so thank you and be out for. Cherry any rebecca was such a great ambassador for for women's basketball and and UCONN basketball and She still is to this day it's it's awesome to to was into tour in watcher both in the the college game in the WNBA. She has just so much knowledge of the game and and impassioned too so Yeah, we were. We had the bus leader. We could ever think of you know in nineteen, ninety five to to represent us. and she still does that to this day so still a very good friend, so she's. She's been amazing Carlo Ruby is with us. She has defense. She will travel and she. Built Tufts University on some great defense and I love what you had to say there about tops is yeah. We got. We rolled the ball out in November I. We'd better. Be Able to. Defend I. The offense will come a little bit later. How much different is it at Princeton? As far as how much more time you have a as compared to D. Three and Will ever change the way that that you run a preseason program. I did it the same way this past fall. Because I wanted to make sure we knew how to play defense in the way, we wanted to play it right away. So I. You just practices even workouts. We were working on her on our defense. Yeah, I think that's that's gotta be. That's GONNA. Be Our foundation, and then we can build from there, and you know I, think offense just misses takes a little while chemistry. Wise how it's GonNa flow, and and you really need to you. Can always you know go against your own teammates? But not until you know you, you, you're playing against. A different opponent can really see how the offense works, but defensively feel like you can always be prepared for anything a a team really throws at you and and the team does in right away excited to work and Yeah it! It ended up pretty pretty well. You know with one little slip up at Iowa. I think it was a sort of a a blessing to to two loss there because I. think it it really. Just showed that we had a lot of work to do still. That was in November. And yet, they they did a great job in exposing us, and so we yeah, we learned a lot, and then you know when are run from there, but we'll always make sure our defenses is strong to to start off the this season in coach. Speak when you hear coaches speak about the other team. It's all. Eighty percent of the time. They've got a good defense. I got a solid. They're solid on defense. I play the coaches, really good defense, but eighty percent of the teams can't be really good at defense, so what makes what takes it from a good defense to a great defense to a number one defense in the League? What are the things that the absolute must have to have an incredible defense like you? Guys had at Princeton last year the foundation is communication. I feel like it's the foundation of a lot of what are our team is? Stands for and so it's great communication on it. Is You know just playing really hard and playing around with great toughness in And you know having your your head. Up in seeing everything nets that's happening. and. I mean you just you gotta get down and get after it. It's not I always say this is not really rocket science. What we what we do, it's not there. It's not gimmicky it's just a great communication with great great toughness, and just a willing to to give it everything. You have on that end at all times whether we're in practice or are engaged on. And so that's that's really that's really it i. you know I think that with games I think preparations is key and I. Think it team is always well prepared on on. You know what our opponents like like to do and and then it's about executing that that game plan in. Our team just did an amazing job with that. And and you know they're. They're smart. They know in their driven and and once you're totally bought in and you. You'RE GONNA. See a great a great product as far as the dedication to the off the court, the education portion of it and I. Hesitate to you know to break up the too because you guys have that standard there at Princeton, where you talk about education through athletics when they put it in that kind of context that you know, education and athletics are truly group together like that. How how much easier does that make it as a coach to facilitate that vision when right at first off the top of? Of the Athletic Director says this is what we do. Yeah I, mean they they care. They care about the experience you know They're not mutually exclusive. Right you you can have, both you can have the best of of both worlds in it's it. You know it's not. It's sort of at a at a pinnacle. It's at the at the top having having both the. And Yeah I mean just that the education athletics that comes from our president down to our athletic director into our our coaches and I mean there's just so much to learn on the court you know with with your with your teenagers and and it's an easy. You know it's kind of an easy sell, and now here is the greatest you know. Education the best degree you can. You can get in this country, and then also you know, play a really high level of of basketball on its. Yeah, I mean it's A. It's an amazing amazing place. To to work and to be into represent you know every day I. Know My my players. Are you know they? They love Princeton earn? They play very hard and together for their university and. And I know that they're learning as much on the court as they are in their classrooms and they're being taught by. World renowned professors, but but I love that you know that Princeton just believes in. You know that that the athletic experiences is very important to their their four year experience, and when you're casting that recruiting that for Princeton I mean, there are a certain. Number of people that are just I. Don't WanNa say excluded, but they're just. You know they're. They're not in that. Mindset of education is at as equally important as athletics. So how do you cast the the appropriate broad net? Find the players you need to get, but at the same time so many of them we themselves out. How does that work? It seems like a challenge, but at the same time it seems like it works kind of done for you as well. We're this half of people. It's not going to happen for them anyway. Yeah, and the other pieces that we don't. Have you know full athletics absolutely. Bring that up. So your your pool is. It's getting smaller and smaller, but but you now it's it's Princeton, and you know I think that that you know the right student. Athletes are looking for this. You know this experience you know it's not for. It's not for everyone and you know it just takes getting out in making a lot of phone calls to to a you. Coaches programs It's falling with every. You know potential recruit that that contact us You know it's just getting the word out and You know I feel like we're always sort of in a conversation. When you say you know I'm from Princeton. You Know Oh okay? That's we know about Princeton It's a really great school on, and just you know, and just talk about. What will you know what the expectations are in the in the standards are in see if it's the the right, the right fits on, but Like I, said I I love being able to to represent this. You know mazing university and talk about You know what what we have here. You know it's it's very. It's different. It's a different on the different world than than a power five and but it's it's a special place in so yeah, it's a smaller pool, but it's a unique pool in and again like I love coaching. These driven talented student athlete, so just gotTa keep trying to find those and keep trying to enhance our our program and finally coach. I've seen you say hey. I'm not a finished product as a coach. I I'm still a work in progress so to speak I can still get better. Where do you think that you can get better? Where do you work to get better in? And what's your mindset about that? As as you move forward in the year two at Princeton. I think there's so much more to learn. There's so much about this game this game as as ever changing and I'm competing against some of the best coaches you know in the world end so. I need to be just ready for you know. What's what's accidents offensively? It's end of game situations. It's you know defensively. What can what can I get get better at on. In, even just like leadership. How do we keep you know cultivating leaders with which social media and like everything is always you know it's ever changing, and so you know I think if you just sit back and not try to to enhance yourself and get better. You're year doing a disservice to your to your teen in your in your program and your university so always trying to just. Get better. And you know this. This is a good time to be doing that. You know when when we're not at at work or were not on the road recruiting and you. Can you know just keep developing your yourself well coach? It's such a great pleasure to be able to talk to. You have talked to Bella a couple of weeks ago at to learn about Princeton and then. Then the Ivy. League is a whole I love talking with Mike McLaughlin a few months ago as well I'd love love to be able to come catcher game someday in person because I just think it's. It's one of the coolest things ever, so thank you so much for taking the time and and best of luck, because you guys continue to build off what you just did. John Thanks, thanks for having me. That is Carla. Ruby the head coach the Princeton Tigers. Really appreciate her time. She was just awesome. Note Madeleine Kenny was on with the unplugged version of the podcast the middle of last week and that is an awesome conversation. I am loving. These twitter live periscope conversations that. Aaron and Megan are having with different people in women's Basketball Madeline Kennedy from the Chicago Sun Times was their cast this past week, and they're going to have another one coming up this week as well so be on the lookout for that, not only the live version of it, which you can watch on twitter, but then also it will be out as a podcast shortly thereafter as well and that one is going to be worth your time to remember make sure to subscribe to the show wherever you get your podcast. We're bringing one or two new shows every week. That way you're alerted when they come out at I'm really excited about some of the conversations. Conversations. We've got coming up here for you. You're GONNA like him a lot. You're going to want that notification also, if you're on apple PODCAST, make sure to rate and review the podcast that always helps other people find the show. It means so much to us, and it means so much to the other. People are going to listen to the show because you rated and reviewed. They get the executive producer of the her hoop stats. PODCAST is Erin Barzilai. Suzy, so lease is our announcer and Jerry deck with TERADATA MUSIC DOT COM does our music. I'm John. Little reminding you at the her hoop stats podcast. We are locking better insight about the women's game. Two stats.

Princeton basketball Bella Princeton Tigers WNBA Carla Ruby John Little Carlos Ruby New Jersey Ashley Great Taylor Bauer League George Floyd Uconn Rebecca Lobo Athletic Director coach Adler Bella Alary Geno Auriemma Hungary
Episode 15: Andy Bessette

Holding Court with Geno Auriemma

48:39 min | 2 years ago

Episode 15: Andy Bessette

"MGM Springfield is going to be your go to destination for all your post game celebrations as a proud partner of the university of Connecticut. We invite fans to keep the fun going by checking out all the entertainment n. g. m. resorts has too often by visiting MGM Springfield dot com. Talent batters. It always does and and scouting for the best talent is never easy. Trust me. We should know that. We spend months crisscrossing the country, my coaches, and I and we work countless hours watching game film, analyzing thousands of players to find the best talent. But if you're hiring for your business, you don't need to do all that. You just need are presenting sponsor ZipRecruiter. They do all the legwork for you. ZipRecruiter's powerful technology learns what you're looking for. Identifies people with the right experience and invites them to apply to your job. ZipRecruiter scouts talent for you. You need a stat back it up eighty percent of employers who post jobs on ZipRecruiter, get a quality candidate through the site in just one day, and my listeners can try for free at ZipRecruiter dot com. Slash Gino. That's ZipRecruiter, dot com. Slash Gino. ZipRecruiter is the smartest way to hire and the official job site of college sports fans everywhere. This is Gino Auriemma and this is holding court near to. You're more famous in China than liangelo ball. I mean, and he just became famous you away. We're famous than we were on runs. Undefeated runs, who was I call it? If you don't want to know how do I keep the. Your mom. Hello, I gotta tell you, you know, she's still watches you on TV, but she said that she said, Charles, I like you. I like you a lot and you were, but then she said, but I love the shack. Yeah. Okay. Welcome back ladies and gentlemen to the next installment, latest and greatest installment of holding court, which you know Auriemma this is Gino Auriemma here in stores, Connecticut, basketball capital of the world. You already know that what you may not know is arguably a Goth state people in Connecticut, love their golf passionate about GOP. We have some of the finest golf courses in the world within an hour and a half, two hour drive from stores. One of the biggest events on the PGA tour is the travelers championship held TPC river highlands in Cromwell, Connecticut. It has become the number one tour event as voted by the players. And it's the direct result of the work of travelers vice president. Andy beset a former uconn athlete. And Nathan group the tournament director. And I think you'll you'll you'll be interested to hear about what goes into putting PGA tour event together and the challenges from day one when they took over the tournament when it was dead in the water to today where they were voted last year, the number one tour that by the players enjoy it. Do you remember when travelers? I made a decision. To get involved with the PGA tour at at the Hartford. At the Hartford venue, yeah. Yeah. I, I've been a part of it from from beyond before day one. I mean the the Gulf it travels is really a long history back in nineteen sixty. One. We started is one of the few couple of sponsors of the masters and bleed archives. We still have those huge reels of movies compares. We used to send them out to our agents back in the sixties and seventies 'cause TV wasn't what what it is today. Obviously these huge reels. We'd always have four for every year for every masters. Then we ship them around from one agent to another agent to agent, and they would host like masters Ewing parties in the evenings and their agencies for their customers. And so we started out with a master's way back in sixty one. So then fast forward, we were part of it right up through the nineties, and then city group took it over. But but then we travelers were involved through our different companies that we've merged with and bought acquired over the years with the west coast swing. And so I was working with the PGA tour from two thousand two on word up till two thousand six when we decided to take a shot at the travelers championship. So so the PGA tour relationship is really long when here travelers, but in two thousand six, Jay Fishman, our chairman and CEO of the time, and I had a question and had had a lot of conversations around what we wanted to do and around golf. So back in five, we had a consultant work with us to go back and study about like do some research and find out which sport most aligned with insurance and insurance agents. And you can imagine the study came back for overwhelmingly golf. So golf is the number one sport of the insurance industry insurance agents and. Tennis was never to forget it. Actually hockey. I think it was number three, but so we said, you know what? Okay, so we've got to pursue golf. The PGA tour was trying to get involved is one of the proud partners of the Players Championship, but it's based in Florida where where not where the northeastern Connecticut, and so that didn't have much interest. And then I remember the days Pacific -ly when eighty four lumber announced that they were no longer going to be title sponsor in the PGA tour. They had to terminate in Pennsylvania, the eighty four lumber championship, and we decided in when they decided they were out the tour clause and said, hey, we may have an opportunity the week after the US open for you to take over the, you know what was then? I think the cannon, no, it's a Buick, and and and so we had the chance to take that over and for three months, the event was off the Buick and announced in late five that they were done. They were not gonna title the term anymore. And so the tour took it took this event. This really story event off the PJ to a schedule for three months. And then in early two thousand six, we negotiated a deal with eighty four lumber coming billable that weekend and and put together the travelers championship and signing the deal in the first quarter. I would say of two thousand six. You know. Obviously living here for thirty some years. You know, I've been part of. When it was the canon g. h. o.. Yeah, Sammy Davis, junior, I think was still involved thirty some years ago. And you know cannon was doing an awful lot for the tournament. And then you know, Buick got involved, and there was a point. The, I don't think I'm being overly dramatic. There was a point where that tournament was going away that it was over and traveler stepped in. And what was what was that like when you when you you're, you're very first year that you knew you were going to be running this travelers championship and you had no idea like, how will this be received. You know, it was very interesting because we, we, we, we signed up for this in early two thousand six in the first term and obviously wasn't until June of, oh seven. So I had over a year to start working with Nathan group and getting our teams together and figure out how we're going to do it. And so we went Nathan and I went, he what was running it, but I went in and did a lot of homework at the two thousand six championship to try to figure out like what we could do to make this world class and what we could do to to make it as good as it could be. And I never forget. You know, we had, I had so many conversations. I had lunch meetings with a with a group of golfers, Brad, Faxon, billion trade Stuart thing. I mean, all of the guys back then we're all really, really helpful to say Andy gonna do this, this, this and this. So I had no pets filled with pages. I talked to caddy I talked to players families and. Wife, I talked to the sponsors I talked to anybody would talk to me. I talked broadcasters. I talk one day. It had a one conversation with Mike Tariq. Oh, which I thought was really cool in. And I said, wow, this is really good. Thanks Mike. For meeting with me, he goes into, here's your list. It gives me a list of ten or eleven things that we needed to, and and you know, one of which was a new practice because if you remember the old driving range behind the clubhouse into a net was it's not very PGA tour like, and so Mike said, here's your list his. So I left to talk to gymnasts a little bit. I talked to many people who talked me and and then we went to work and man, I'll tell you the first year we were getting ready. It was like, I went to talk to Jake Fishman about it. I said, Jay, here's three people, I think who could do this, run it travelers and and he looks at the list he goes, yeah, no, no, you're gonna do it. I said, really? Okay, fine. I said, I'd never. Does before basically you can do it, you'll do great. Okay. So I tried to get out of it for the next three or four years. And every time I went to ask him if I could give it to somebody else to run it, he goes, no, no, no, you're doing a good job. Just keep doing it. So it was really funny start as to how I got it. But once we got going, you know, for the very beginning from my days in athletics, I knew that one thing had to be one both had one rule had to apply, and that was that we could never accept the status quo that every year we would make this better than it was last year and and in, you know, it gets tougher every year as you know, only too well, but you know, you keep trying to make it better. But yeah, I remember those early those early days. I mean, it was like I was like, it's like, Mike, you a lot of days like, hey, let's see if he'll eat it because if he eats it, then maybe we'll try it and it's always a rough beginning in and you know, year one, we went out and we had a pretty successful year and we had a great chance. Pierre one hundred million and there was a playoff with Jay Williamson who now lives out Saint Louis, and he's continued to be a good friend in in. And we said, well, you know what? Maybe there's something here. So every year we tried to make it better and more interesting and get better players and work to make it a better experience for everybody involved. But those are the early days. But like really days we're pretty pretty gloomy. I mean, they're pretty stressed filled because here we are as a title sponsor of this event. PJ tour. Nobody wants it to sell and Andy's like carrying the ball along with Jay Fishman. Jay was with me every inch of the way in our team, her travelers. But whereas some of those days of scary days, some days you'd get up and say on man, at least be so kid so many elements to it county fair. But, but but even bigger about making sure that you have the players best food, the best acuity the you name it. And you know all that is well, but, but that's what the early days. But like. Well, you know the people around the country that that might listen to this. You get, they don't have any idea how big the tournament is how big it's become and what it means to to Connecticut, you know, and not just the, excuse me, the Hartford region, but the entire state of Connecticut is becoming. Is a beneficiary and enter part of that. Like you. You said is the way the tournaments been run the the, the crowds, there was a there was a time before excuse me before you got involved where the crowds were so fanatical. And that not to the level that they are today. Terms of numbers, but it's and the courses. So small, the everything was small about it was cramped that when I was playing in new programs, a lot of the names, you know was Greg Norman, Fillon Mickelson, you know, all those guys that used to play here on a regular basis. They, they felt like John Daly, confined. They're like, I, I don't know, you know, like it it, it became overwhelming and and we lost. We lost a lot of really, really good players there for a stretch. And now you in the last four or five years, you've gotten him back. And then some this year we had one of the best fields in in the entire in the entire summer swing. How did that come about and tell people how how hard it is to get people to come to to a PGA event to come to your event? It's not automatic that they have to play in every event. No, not at all. I mean, it's interesting to that being really every PJ to a pro as an independent contractor and they have over forty tournaments to pick from every year an at an average. I probably they'd probably played twenty twenty five tournaments a year. So it's a war out there competitive battle. You're you're, you're recruiting. I sometimes I left because you like you, you do recruit in and you really recruit, I'd have to keep learning from you, but I keep recruiting, right? You're trying to figure out every year. I sit down with our team and we try to differentiate what each player needs wants, whatever to get here and and then we started contacting them their agents. But you know, at the end of the day, it's all about building relationships and, and you know, I, I buy this story after story that I won't boy with those. But like even this year Bubba in Angie and their kids Dakota. In Ogata says, name him slipping, but Kayla, Kayla and they, they came out and I brought them the Sunday before the term in two of the yard goes game, and I asked Bubba if he threw out the first pitch. So he and his son went out the first pitch and it was terrific. We had more fun. We had had dogs hamburgers in two pathetic kind of stuff. I know the bubble likes to have fun and either to. So we just had a great great time. Tim Tiba was playing. They were playing the team playing. He was playing on the two of them are friends. So we've down the field talk at Tim tebow for a while, but it's that kind of stuff. Did you do individually with these players? You know, I have taken Kevin streaming out fishing in and we we do something unique every year to try to to build relationships. That's what this is all about. And that's how you get the best players in the world is show up and you know this year we we had all four raining major champions. Our field. Did I set out to do that? No, we we, we, we just set out to have you know, three or four of the top ten in the world, but to think that we had Brooks kept good. Patrick read Justin Townes the speed, all the reigning major champions that are field just blew my mind. I, I actually stood back for a second and said, but I only allowed me to I will I only loud myself to do that because the status quo can't stay, but I by myself one second to say, oh my God, this is unbelievable. We have all four raining major champions in this field, and you know, and the rest of the story is is great. With this your, we actually raised a record two million dollars as you were talking about, and they're to go. Gino for for for local charities and two million dollars for over one hundred and thirty. Local charities is just phenomenal for us. It's a record of all time and it it. It just speaks what this event has been since nineteen fifty two that two million now since nineteen fifty to re, we've raised over forty million dollars forty million dollars for. Hundreds of thousand charities. And so you know, with this term it does 'cause there's no profits. There's no rich owner for this tournament it a hundred percent of all that profits go to charity. So that's why we build the feels we built because you know, you wanna go see the best players in the world. You wanna watch, you know, Jordan speech chip out of the sand trap and a playoff to win. It might guy this day. I still remember the ground shaking under my feet. I'm like home, my goodness, this is happening. Cromwell, can I get this? And that was so like conic. I mean, people still talk to you about it. You know, surely talk to you about it, but, but that's that's how we do it. We work hard. We recruit, we try to individualize each player. We don't. We don't look at them as a group. You look at them as individuals and we put together a great field and get their wives and kids to come out. And you know, like even this year we had kids trophies for Kayla been for Dakota when when Bubba one. And they just thought that as a coolest thing. So it's a little touches that you do. You for the rest of the pack. Now talk about the challenges next year when the US open is in California, Pebble Beach, and then you start that following week, what? What kinds of things will would you have to do? You know? And I mean, I'm volunteering to be on that plane to help you recruit just as. Probably you probably you probably need. You probably need something. I'll bring some wine or something, but telco talk about the challenges of of getting those guys now ready after the biggest tournament that they're playing arguably, and and then there the, you're asking them to come three thousand miles. You know. You're the master recruiter. So you're always invited to come with me because if I can make something from you, I'll be better. So. I will take you. I'll take you any type so. But I think that you know last year in twenty seventeen we were terminated the year, but we were, but more importantly to us, we were the players choice award. And so the plan and that was the first time to tour has ever done that where they had the players vote on their favorite tournaments. And so we wanted to players choice award, which to us meant the world to to Allen Schnitzer. I chairman CEO and I, as we look around if he's saying, wow, that's an award while the that's that is really cool. That helps us so much because the players look at that and say, you know, I've got to go play travelers because they're doing something there, and I don't know what it is, but I wanna go see it. And then the guys come for the first time and they look around and they see it and it makes the recruiting element of it much easier now in order to accommodate all this before we've done for the last ten years or eleven years is we've. I've always had a charter fly from the US open to to travel and even this year when it was out on Long Island, we had smell just chartering pl- bringing the players over from Long Island to make it a twenty minute trip. And so we had people join the field who we never thought would join it because of that the ease of getting. So we will have an Airbus three nineteen sitting on the runway at Pebble Beach airport where they call that and we'll fly them out here the morning after usually when it comes to west coast, leave Monday morning early and get everybody gets their families and kids in the planes and they fly out. So we're going to do that. The players know we're doing here we're trying to do and and I don't wait until next year. I'm tomorrow. I'll be up at del championship in Boston. The second playoff event to the FedEx Cup recruiting in talking to Bubba, to Jordan, to Rory to Brooke. Kapka all of the guys who played this year and you believe it or not, but I shouldn't say believe it or not. A lot of them have already expressed an interest in next year and being here. So I don't think the west coast is big, a challenge. It's a little bit of a challenge. I should say it's a challenge in the sense that when it's on the east coast, it's so easy. 'cause if if they wanna come over here, they can get two years not next year in twenty twenty. It's down at, I think, winged foot. That's even easier. That's the right side of Long Island Sound. But no, that's who we're gonna do continue to relationships. Talk with the players providing making things is easy as we can for them to come. And you know a big traction next year which is going to be really interesting is the brand new clubhouse the the clubhouse is they'll clubhouse was book like quite yours at my house or something. I mean, okay, I house, but it was tiny. It was like twelve thousand square feet. This new one is forty thousand square feet in state of the art, everything. So the wow, the players have said, hey, listen, we can't wait to come back and see the clubhouse and and they love our practice to. So they love the course now with all the changes that were made a couple of years ago and. It's a way think we're to. We will have another. I don't think I know we're going to have another great field next year at the tournament. I just don't know who's going to be in it yet. Well, you know, one of the things that that you've done is you've given young players who people don't know yet an opportunity to play. I remember one year when I was in the pro-am I gotta meet, I got to beat the kid from UCLA. Patrick can't lay, and, and you said to me, go see that kid right there. He goes, he's a freshman at UCLA or sophomore, whatever he was or juniors, I don't even know if he just graduate or he's just leaving UCLA's going to be on the pro tour. You know, he stolen, amateur, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. And the kid play really, really well. I think one time he shot sixty. Yeah, you know, and now you watch them play and you go, those are the kind of kids at then they remember that. And then when they become, you know, household names, they, they remember there who gave them their start, right. They do Patrick. I talked to all the time. He said a record. He said. Shot the lowest round in a fischel PJ tour event of any amateur ever and how can I remember the Friday night? It was so cool. Oh my gosh, it was. It was almost like Feerick sixty eight people running around the course to the media cynical. You have to go out wacky teeth ho because Pak can't go. She'll be. I'm like, what he's talking about. And the. Been about this stuff that just incredible. But you know it quick story. So Bryce brazen de Shambo right? Just won the first playoff event. I dropped him a note and they said, hey Smith, so proud of you because twenty sixteen I remember you. Thank you meet for the for the exemption. We gave you. He was not on tour. He needed exemption to play, and I just don't forget about us when you when you're famous and you know what? He goes on to win last weekend. He's wanting put three times on the PGA tour gray young guy, twenty four years old. And in he said to me, this is this term. He said, Andy, I will always play the travelers championship because of what you guys did for me. And you know the story after Webb Simpson, same story when the US open right in two thousand eleven to twelve. And in he said to me, he always says to me the, I'm gonna play by play you as much as I can because of what you did for me in two thousand eight. And I said, I kid them to, I say, yeah, I remember you just this little kid and I said, you came up and said, hey, thank you so much to any place. Don't forget me get famous. You know, we both kind of snicker and inherited his famous and he has not forgotten about in basketball accuracy can be the difference between winning and losing. And this is also true when it comes to your health. The genes, three d. mammography exam is a more accurate and comfortable mammogram for all women. So why not find the facility that offers the genius exam near you? Visit genius three day near me dot com to learn more and make sure your next mammogram is a genus exam. Is your retirement game plan a well executed play or wild shot at the buzzer Johnson. Brunetti has helped over twenty five hundred Connecticut families prepare for financially secure retirement, and they are proud to be the wealth management partner of the Yukon huskies, visit them Johnson Brunetti dot com, and see how they can help you with your retirement. Johnson Brunetti, retirement and investment specialists go to Johnson Brunetti dot com for free books and financial planning tools. I just discovered something that's pretty extraordinary. I'd heard about it from some coaches and pro athletes, and now I've experienced it for myself. Mizzen a main. Dallas based company. Is the maker of performance fabric dress shirts. Now you say, what's performance fabric? Well, you know this stuff you work out, so you get all the benefits of workout gear, but you wear it with a suit. You can dress it up. Dress it down. Put a tie on, don't put a tie on. So if you see me on the court lately, that's what I'm wear. You don't know that it's a dresser if feels like a casual shirt, but it looks like address shirt. Yet it moves around you like workout gear. It's revolutionary. You can check out WWW dot mizzen and main. That's as e e n n Maine m. a. I n. dot com slash Gino see some of my favorite shirts. Take a look. You'll be impressed, give it a shot, husky fans. I know there's no one more loyal than you, and I appreciate that. You know what else? Afri sheets, loyalty, AAA, so much so that they'll reward you for like how you get savings on AAA auto insurance just for being a AAA member and the longer you remember the more you could save have both AAA auto and AAA home insurance. You could save even more. Have you been loyal to your existing insurance company for a while? We'll though we ward that too with a discount when you switch the AAA loyalty gets you more than saving. It gets you comprehensive help from an expert agent who gets to know you because when you're triple AAA expert agent knows you better. They can help you better for insurance. That's not just insurance. Turn the AAA. Standing in the clubhouse actually just just in the locker room just getting ready to go downstairs. I was so standing at the top of the steps and Webb Simpson walked in on Wednesday for the pro-am and and I and he said, hey, coach is doing and I went over and I said, listen, you're too young. Maybe to understand this. I said, but you just won the US open on Sunday and today's Wednesday, and you're here and you probably don't even know how much that means to to all the people here. Because someone older someone more jaded would say, why don't need that? The fact that you're here says a lot about you and, and you know what, that those are relationships that you guys are so good at at at at establishing at a young age. Yeah. Brooks captured this year. I mean, he wins the US open and he comes over and plays us. He, he loves the course. He likes being here and he's handy. I wanna play this. I wanna play your tournament lot more so, but you're right. I mean the that kind of conversation with web Gino. You're, you're, you're, you're phenomenal coach and you have them all teams and you know that when you do things, does it make you feel good when you do things for a special kid and the kid grows up in appreciates it, it feels like you've, you know, I'm sure that's like fulfilling part of your job DV you must feel good. So many times, see these young women who grew into ladies who are just they're tremendous people. They're so appreciative. What you've done doesn't it makes you feel good. Rasi last night put on a performance that was just absolutely incredible. You know, down the stretch the last minute and a half of play. You know, she made three straight threes. One of them was clock was running out to send the game into overtime. Yeah, you know, it's it's, it's pretty amazing. And I'm, I'm always, you know, I'm always fascinated by what goes into putting a great show on. You know, the TV people have to be taken care of the the sponsors have to be taking care of all the hospital. Tents have to be taken care of, and and you know, talk a little bit about Nathan and what isn't what isn't entailed in his job year round. He, you know, you know this, you know he's t t is the best term director of the PGA tour and what he does. He's, here's there's so many elements to his to his job being that it's it's facilities. It's of course it's the practices forty, it's it's all of us shows that are going on throughout the week and it's Gulf term to, obviously, but the the, the, the work that he does make sure that Women's Day comes off well to make sure that operation shower comes off well, that our whole military effort comes off while that all charities are are being taken care of the week. I mean, the list goes on and on I said to him, you know, you're more than the manager of a ten ring circus you'd like the manager of of this massive, massive effort that has can take you from hiring bands for the concerts on Friday and Saturday night to recruit helping recruit the player, top players in the world to me, he's all over the place to stuff not not not. Get about his primary job is none of this would happen unless he and his team were successful at selling sponsorships to people. So the sponsorship sales are critical because if there's not if you last year, our gross revenue from sponsorship, sales was like over seven billion dollars. And obviously you have to pay to build all the tents. You have to bake tofu. So that stuff, that's how this thing runs in in all been then proceeds again. That's how we get to two million. Why would bubbas help of two hundred thousand? We were at one eight and Bubba came up in Nathan down tonight at the trophy ceremony and said, hey, you know what, you know, one point, eight net worth of what you've done here. He said, I'm gonna rounded up to two million and we're just like what you what you gonna do, what and and so he the guy has a heart. He hit of an angel. He's the, he's the, he's the most generous person. I know we never been a tour is very generous, but Bob is what's special guy, but anyways, so so that's how. How we get two million. We give back with to sell a lot of sponsorships and we're always out there trying to, you know, in every year you have some sponges that don't come back to this continual turnover. So anybody that thinks it needs is jobs done for next year when he saw seven million, he's gonna lose them. So he's gonna go sell more and PJ tours. I've always counting us to do her and grow and be bigger, and so he Nathan is bananas in great young man. He's got a great team, but Tara Gerber would Kevin in other the team do Kevin Harrington, would they do as part of that team is middle and and it shows I think, in in what we do in on the outcome, that's the only way that we get to the point of being able to give. We've given like sixteen over sixteen sixteen point seven million over the since two thousand seven since we've been tiles sponsor. So that's a lot of money in in in the last twelve years. And to think about in the early days, we were not cracking in the dose, so to speak to give a lot to charity think the first year we might have given three hundred thousand eighty to charity. It was a low number and we're all looking at that going boy, every looking at us like we're Mikey and if Mike, yeah, but Israel years, we're stressful with tell you. The, you know the the, the purses have gone through the roof. Obviously, you know, since you guys took over and I think the purse now almost like the average person a PGA tour is somewhere around six million or something like that. Yeah, we're, we're over seven now. Yeah. Yeah. So now what happens in the does every year, does the PGA tour expect you to raise the purse every year or is that something you know that comes from them and and you know, how do you guys establish what it would be? It. Established forest actually be the people. Four tells us what the press will be every year, and then we have to be have to go in and back, fill the the, the sales and everything to fill it. I mean, obviously we pay a title sponsor, see, but every sponsor pays a sponsorship number, right? Whatever it is ten, ten thousand a hundred thousand a million, whatever. And all that goes into this massive financial model to come out to net than the number for charity. But I think we're up to seven point two. I have to go back and check, but I think we're about seventy two. And so that puts us in the top forty percent because I said to the tour that I always want to make sure that the reason that that that that player won't use the processing excuse the purse has to be competitive. It doesn't have to be the best because the person's at the play offs at the majors at the world golf championships. Those things are all crazy me. We went out there, but we're not bad. We're very respectable over seven, nine hour known, not at all. I mean when when you do look at it again relative to where where it used to be and. Talk a real briefly about the tiger affect as he's come back on tour and what that does to the TV ratings. Oh my gosh. It goes through the roof every week. You watch it. I mean, everybody's intrigued with what tiger is. Gonna do, right. It's a great unknown of the greatest. The greatest golfers ever making his comeback and everybody pulling for him and watching the excitement of it. It's great. I mean, it's so good for the game. I think what's interesting as an observation is that so many of these young players have gotten so good. I mean, and and and still good from skills perspective from competition. But the the what always blows my mind is how they can focus. Hey, listen, I was a hammer throw in track and field, right? And I competed the world level. And so I understand focused and getting ready to competitive edge and being excited. It's like for the competition, but I look at these guys were always both. My mind is that big a while they they, they focused watching, kept go play, continued, blows my mind. Bryson d Shambo this past weekend blows my mind big what the totally focused and concentrating for four or five hours a day for four days in a row. I never had to do that. I mean, I had a concentrate for three seconds. Well, I had to get ready so it took an hour before to get ready to our after, but but you know what I mean, right. It's the sure how they stay still focused on their efforts and all that. And the competition is so fierce. Yeah, water to miss putts on Thursday and Friday is the difference between making the cut and having a chance and they're going home, but these kids are also good. And so I think with tiger, the tiger affect is really, I think it's much better that it was just my perspective when tiger was running away with everything and playing so, well, it was really cool to watch is great. But I think what's very, very good now is that tiger's playing, I think really good golf, and and he's got a lot of other guys around him were playing at the same level and competing that with the great part of golf is that that that's, I think a lot to do with that too. And I think that that helped us all with the feels we have with the the excitedly, Jordan speeds, Rory McElroy in your field and and Brooks can't you keep going down the list of the guys who keep coming back Bubba. That's helped the whole game. It's helped PJ tour. It's helped the travelers championship be able to give, you know over. Two million dollars last year. Sixteen point seven since two thousand seven forty million since fifty. Two bet if that's all helped us. It's all be great every by the BJ toward by what Tigers done for now. I just read something yesterday. I think it was that the FedEx championship is going through some restructuring, the try to Levy eight, some of the confusion or some of the the try to make a little more drama on at the tour championship where one guy wins the tour championship, but the other guy wins the fed ex prize, you know? So one guy wins the tournament. The other guy wins the ten million. And he gets the trophy. Right, right, right. So this idea, you know, it's pretty. It's pretty interesting. I, I'm anxious to see how it works because this whole FedEx thing is just it's just taken off. I think the the, the great part of that is that near the FedEx Cup of season long competition. Obviously, the points to win the FedEx Cup get greater in the playoffs. But at the same time, it it, it, it incense, the players to to play more tournaments to play better. Right? And it's a season long kind of reward as opposed to just a single term reward. And you know, I think there's a lot. I think that the tour wanted to finish before football NFL football started. And I think he'll cutting it back from four to three events, though the Northern Trust going forward in nineteen will will go between New York City and Boston every other year. And then the mid west of will still continue in the tournament Chit down in Atlanta will continue. So it'll be three playoff events not for, and then they're flipping the p PJ championships till may the players for made a March. And so the interesting thing for the travelers championship is that now we will have three major reigning champions in the current year before us. We'll have obviously the masters what have PJ championship in the US open before us and only open. British Open will be after. I think it's gonna be. It's gonna be fabulous. I mean, it's just going to be amazing to see how this whole the whole thing plays out when. When they do make all these changes in, you know, Hartford being such an not just hard for, but I mean the the state of Connecticut. You know, being such a hotbed for golf, I mean, you know to think that basketball's big in Connecticut, but I know for that one week in the season when that travelers championship is here. Oh God, it's like, yeah, it's like the Rolling Stones, the Beatles, and you know, Jay z, and you name it or all you know or all coming to town. I, it's, it's. You have to really be there to experience what at Saturday and Sunday feels like at TPC river highlands. And you know, the two elements to to come to mind is, and I'm not just saying this because I'm talking with you Gino, but we're what three real celebrity pro-ams left on the PGA tour. Couple be Johnston get with authorities, but but we're, we're, we, we pride ourselves and what we do have you play and the other coaches that you could, but also this year and have George Lopez back with to have Chris Jackson from Hamilton. Nuoro Donaldson CB. I mean, the list goes on and on. We keep getting really great celebrities to wanna come out the part of this to help us raise the money, and I'll tell you this year Nathan and I were so amazed. We were watching this crowds around the slutty pro him. The proud this year on Wednesay was big as they are on like Friday. There were huge crowds for the celebrity pro am which. I thought it was really cool. I'm standing there going. Wow, Nathan, this is pretty good. This is like almost better than the Gulf term nano. Forget it though. But all that helps add to the, you know, we determined now brings over sixty eight million dollars of annual economic impact to the state of Connecticut sixty eight million dollars a year in hotels food, and you name it. Everything that people buy in to us. That just means world because Connecticut's a great state and it's a great place to live great place. A families has great basketball programs that you kind of schools. It's just a phenomenal place to be, and we're proud of Connecticut reprised of what's happening here with this trend. We're proud of what you do for the state with basketball with the, but then head women's basketball, does it. You can't, but you know what? We don't have the Yankees. We don't have the Red Sox here, but but what we do here with vendors, basketball in what we do here with golf is pretty special. And and look at over sixty eight million dollars of economic impact in the state to have the support that we have from the community here. Chris Berman has been with us day one. He was with us when nobody else believed that much would be happening here, and the list goes on and on. And it just means the world to us travelers and it means the world I think to to to citizens the state of Connecticut. I still have my last one for that. That question was I still have people. This is twelve years later. I walked down main street, Hartford. People stop me and say, Andy, thank you so much for saving the travelers championship. We're so proud to be in Connecticut, and it's like you does bring tears to my eyes. It's like, wow, that's really cool. That's like, that's really cool. You know, it's. What's amazing is that it's it does belong to the entire state of Connecticut. It's it's not, you know it, it's unlike anything you know around the country. I mean, this is it's become pretty special. It's to have to have the best players in the world come here and and perform at a at a level on a very difficult golf course anymore. Yeah, it very difficult. That back nine, the TPC river highlands is is pretty. It's pretty amazing. Those last four holes are just tailor made for television drama around those four holes is incredible. But. I can't wait to see the new clubhouse, my friend, it's it's, it's only getting better. Like you said, the object is to keep getting better and better every single year. And I, I'm so thrilled to be a part of it in such a small way, but that you and you and Nathan in your entire team. Nobody does it better than you guys and and Olica what you heard on the street. You know, thank you for that. Thank you to you and travelers for for saving an event that that was on its last legs that was about ready to leave the state of Connecticut, and and now it's a fixture. So thank you. And I look forward to seeing you real real soon. And that's. Let's keep making it better. I will. I can the promise I can make everybody is that the status quo will never be acceptable as long as I'm here and we're going to keep driving hard to figure out how to be better at how to make it better. And and I thank you Gino for your friendship and your partnership because you play a bigger role than you'll ever know and it's really critical to us to have you as involved because players love seeing you and in talking with you about basketball. It's amazing how many players asked me what I'm on tour those Gino playing this year. I'm like, yeah, yeah, yeah. I don't know the answer. I say yes, but I, I appreciate the overseas. You got it, right. You're so thank you very much support. We appreciate it. Well, thank you in these really allowed a pleasure for for all of us and we'll we'll check in with you again. Maybe when you. You start announcing the field before to it. Okay. Thanks. Thanks. You too. Bye-bye. Well, there's your Goth fix Andy beset vice president of travelers located here in Connecticut, talking about TPC river highlands. The travelers championship talking about pass champions Bubba, Watson, winning for the third time this past summer, Jordan speeds knocking one out of the bunker on eighteen in a playoff last year, and what goes into getting the best players to come here, not an easy feat. Hope you enjoyed it. Join us again when we do our next podcast until then Gino Auriemma saying, hit them straight.

Connecticut Gino Auriemma Nathan group US Bubba golf Andy basketball TPC river highlands Hartford Mike Tariq partner Hartford ZipRecruiter Brooks chairman and CEO Tigers FedEx university of Connecticut Webb Simpson
Episode 20: Sheryl Crow

Holding Court with Geno Auriemma

57:57 min | 1 year ago

Episode 20: Sheryl Crow

"MGM Springfield is going to be your go to destination for all your post game celebrations as a proud partner of the university of Connecticut. We invite fans to keep the fun going by checking out all the entertainment and GM resorts has too often by visiting MGM, Springfield dot com. In sports. There are smart moves and not so smart, moose like making sure you get the practice on time. That's smart parking in the coaches spot. Not so smart and the same is true when you're hiring. There are smart ways and not so smart ways to get things done like job sites that overwhelm you with tons of the wrong resumes. That's not smart but posting jobs on ZipRecruiter. And letting them find the right candidates for you. Now, that's smart. Ziprecruiter's powerful matching technology scans thousands of resumes identifies people with the right skills education and experience for your job and actively invites them to apply. So you get qualified candidates fast. Which is why it's rated number one by employers in the US based on trust pilot rating of hiring sites would at least one thousand reviews and right now my listeners can try ZipRecruiter for free at ZipRecruiter dot com slash. Gino. That's right free. Just go to ZipRecruiter dot com slash GE. An so if you're looking for a smart way to find the right talent for your team. Go to ZipRecruiter dot com slash Gino today. Ziprecruiter, the smartest way to hire. And the official job site of college sports fans everywhere, this is Gino Auriemma, and this is holding court your to your more famous in China than liangelo ball. I mean, and he just became famous you way, we're famous than we were on runs undefeated runs who was calling if he'd. Twenty one to know. How do I keep this? Your mom. Hello. I gotta tell you. You know, she still watches you on TV. But she said that she said Charles, I like you. I like you allot and you were doing, but then she said, but I love the shack. Okay. For that. Well, you probably heard the little jingle there. You know, you wondering why holding court which you know, is a little bit of familiar music. That's show crow famous singer songwriter. Shell is going to be our guest for a few minutes when talk about her career low bit challenges of being an early pioneer in the producing world. Former high school track star and her battles with with breast cancer. And then some some ramblings from myself. It's all of you my opinion. And if you don't like it off, it's my show. So hope you enjoy since your famous former track athlete. Yes. I really love the sport. Since your famous track athlete. But low hurdles. Yes. The lower so long ago that it the raises were measured in yards. Not meters. How about that? That's how how long ago it was. What made you what made you what made you pick that? Or did it pick? You how did that happen? Oh, you know what I was. I was a kid and and still. Never enjoy going to gym and working out or getting in a car driving to the I love sports. I love the sport of sport. I love the competition. And I was Bill. To run. I was skinny kid was really long way. And I'm still asking person long leg. That's just not a kid, and I just I just like being out and nature and the sunshine and running it's like, tennis, and swimming, and I love water store than so track is an obvious. May I always ran as a kid, and how that he wasn't sporting sports that wanted to participate, and we didn't have chemo basketball team didn't have soccer or anything like that. So tennis and track were kind of the thing. The Bank sports. So I loved it. And I could run fast, but I could also leap so I've gotta say to hurdles. Whenever you didn't win where you pissed. Yeah. Absolutely. It was motivation to work harder. And actually, you know that has really through Serbia well in my career, you know, every time I feel like I have a a mediocre. So I, you know, the next time I walked at a state, it's more prepared than ever. And it is it is it served me. Well. What you know? I think the the average person out there that doesn't understand female a female mentality in terms of competition. In the past would always assume that. Just by nature. They would not be as competitive as as men, and I've learned over my all the times that I've coached that. There's a certain side of women that is way more competitive Dement. Have you seen that? Yeah. And you know, it's interesting to watch, you know, and I'm also feel where women really have to fight through their position and not necessarily competing with each other. But it just competing with more in sports. I think there is a in most women there is this feeling and a commitment and just an underlying motivations to be the best that we can be. But also to be better than we were the last time we did what we were doing. And that's something. I think that is. It's it's you it's not necessarily unique to women. But it's definitely a great asset to have in, you know, in any area, whether it's a business or sports, and that to you know, to to weigh yourself against yourself. And and and it certainly creates I it creates a great motivation. I think I know it's great to be the person that you're running alongside. But it's also great to better your time as yourself for. When you when you got into the to the music business. You know, it's not all it's not all peaches and cream and. There were there were setbacks in there were. Times when you had the really like you said when you were an athlete you have to fight back, and you go how bad do I want this? What am I willing to do to get this? You know, I I actually talked to young people that they can it is different. Now, obviously fame was not a giant motivating motivating factor. When I got started not like it is now where it, you know, you're you're one of a brand than you are an artist. I always tell kids that you. Being a musician is sort of like being an athlete you have to work at it. And you have to take take pro. Toward the end goal. My aunt goal was to write music that I felt like that something that had a place, you know, documentary history and not history literally. But you know, thing it's time to place on who we are in our humanity. And I always like. More right. That are. More practice. The better player. I become the more. I study other records etcetera producer become and putting in the hours and being into the joy of the work as opposed to excitement as the outcome. And it's you know, it's similar to sports in that. There's a lot of a lot of work that goes into it before you even hear the starting gun go off, and it's the preparation sick at you to the starting blocks. And then what happens after that is where you know, fear. It comes in and motivation, and grit and determination apathy, and all of those things that create the ones percents a greatness. But it's it's all the preparation that goes into it before you ever get say that you know, that creates that creates the outcome and being into the process. So they has always been. What has been the thing? I can look at. And I could I could Mark on timelines I've gotten much better than it was in nineteen you know, ninety six I started. And that's you know, that's you have to be that. Otherwise, there is there is no great reward. Even winning the awards. It's difficult to own those words that really intrinsic Elman unless you know, what you put into it. That seems to be. Almost a metaphor for, you know, your whole life, you know, reading your history. And and obviously, listen to your music, you know, comes across. That, you know, you're telling stories, but it seems like, you know, your life is all about there's a process to get to where you're going in the processes as you said that ends up becoming the focal point rather than than the end. I was lucky I grew up in a small town in the sixties and seventies. I I was born in fifty two so times war different than that mom and dad that were just, you know, they were they raise us with what we used to refer us a good spirit and work ethic. And they believe this. And that if you work hard that you'll get where you're where you're wanting to go you work hard, and you do your best and things happen. And you know, the music business is sort of anesthetic to that. Well, maybe not necessarily totally go, but you know, for for a woman in the music business, particularly business that's run by. Predominantly by men. The record stations are predominantly run by mail music programmers. You know, it's just women have their place, and it's been really it's almost like what Billie Jean King went to the idea that we'd actually have to fight to be treated as real artist. Like, what she did as, you know, women getting paid for their athletic ability, like men, do it's you know, it's been slow going and attitudes have been. Have been sort of behind the times, but it's all catching up, and I'm glad to see that happen. But yeah, you know, I I think the struggles it's the time that you fall down, and you get back up at your your drive, and that that sort of fortify, your perseverance internationally. And it also gives you that story. You mentioned something about catching up, you know. And you know sports in America. I think women have earned a certain place in the sports world earn being the the key word they've earned it. And now, you you you look at you know, when I was a kid, I'm just a little bit older than you are. But the the music on. There was very few women that were prominent in the music world. And now, you know, you look at whether it's, you know, pop or rock or jazz or. You name it hip hop that. It's unbelievable. How many women are at the forefront of the music world today. And you feel like you were part of like the beginning of of that wave that happened. Think. Well, I think I was at the beginning of producing as a female. I was probably one of the very first females ever produced a record on her own that was a commercial success and one of the I think one of the first one actually sees opportunity without the support of. Record levels or anything else? I just basically went in and started making my record and. And now that it's much more commonplace. Which is a good thing. You know, it's not like men more than women do studio. Nor do they know more about how records to be produced or what they should sound like for them to get played or be popular or the artistic. So it, you know, those little things just a little cracks in the glass ceiling takes a lot of women to finally best through it. But I like to think that I put a little crack where production is concerned for sure. I just discovered something. That's pretty extraordinary. I'd heard about it from some coaches, and pro athletes, and now I've experienced it for myself. Mizzen and main Dallas based company is to make her a performance fabric, dress shirts. Now, you say what's performance fabric? Well, you know, this stuff you work out in. So you get all the benefits of workout gear. But you wear it with a suit you can dress it up dress it down put a tie on don't put a tie on. So if you see me on the court lately, that's what I'm wear. You. Don't know that it's a drescher if feels like a casual shirt, but it looks like a dress shirt yet. It moves around you like workout gear. It's revolutionary. You can check out WWW dot mizzen and main that's Z E N N, Maine, M A. I N dot com slash Gino. See some of my favorite shirts. Take a look. You'll be impressed. Give it a shot, husky fans. I know there's no one more loyal than you. And I appreciate that. You know, what else appreciates loyalty AAA so much? So that they'll reward you for like how you get savings on triple AAA auto insurance just for being a AAA member. And the longer you remember, the more you could save have both AAA auto and AAA home insurance, you could save even more. Have you been loyal to your existing insurance company for a while? We'll though we ward that too with a discount when you switch the AAA loyalty gets you more than saving, it gets you comprehensive help from an expert agent who gets to know you. Because when you're triple A expert agent knows you better they can help you better for insurance. That's not just insurance turned the triple. Across. He's the cat certain sense of this is who I am. And this is what I do. And if you don't like it, you know. Tough, whatever and. Yeah. And I know one thing that's been really important in in your life is when you were when you were hit with the diagnosis of breast cancer. How did that? How did that go over? I mean, you you think that you know, people think that famous people handle adversity different than the average person. But when something like this happens, the Beena celebrity be famous that doesn't change anything. Right. All right. Doesn't ain't has a very humanizing variant. And and I am forever. Change pilot in the best of ways not that. I was a bad person before. But you know, I went into my diagnosis as a very fit person. I was, you know, eight pretty healthy. I was riding my bike up out do as I was running. You know, it's was just a really fit person. And what I consider to be a good person, you know, not somebody who. I mean, I just felt like I was you know, on always on a spiritual journey, and then suddenly all the things that I felt I'd had control over my whole life were basically saying, oh, no. Oh, no. You don't have control. You know, you have you have cancer and all those as as a good of a person as you strive to be and it's healthy is extracted strategy. This can strike anyone and that is the common story about disease, but you know, none of us are exempt from being handed a diagnosis or something or a very unfortunate event in lives. And it's what we do with that event that basically defined to Yar and refined our live and in my situation. And I think a lot of women will attest to this that you know, we come into the world. Being able to bear children and being able to nurse them by our bodies. And our our self appointed. And rightfully so a rolled or bond with is to take people to be nurturing. The last people that we'd take care of ourselves typically. And I was just really I perfected that I had perfected putting myself last on the list of people. I take care of. I never wanted to disappoint. Anybody always really showed up for things always volunteered and just never wanted to ever let anybody down. So I said, yes, the pretty much everything. And there was a lesson in my diagnosis. Which was you know, with the flight attendant comes over and says you have to put on your oxygen mask before you put on your child. You know, otherwise, you know, you can't help someone until you helped yourself, and I learn how to say no I had to learn. But people. Helped me, and and also that just that lesson of knowing that not everything is in your control and being able to sit back and accept the things that are uncomfortable, and to be in that moment and holding the emotion of fear, and sadness, and grief and all those things that go along with the transitional moment in your life. And so yeah, you know, while I would never wanna go through it again. I I'm I'm glad that I went through it. And that the changes that it making my life or ones that I can directly look at and see as being positive. How did you? How did you come about being involved? Then and saying well now, I want to you know, you work your work with the logic. You know with the genius mammography exam and how where where did that that giving back? I think that feeds into. Yeah. I got help finally allow myself to get help. And now here I am right back to my old self I want to get back and help others. Yeah. I mean, I, and I do really have to keep that exact 'cause I spent every day all day long trying to fix everything in the world. But the one thing that I do know is we're breast cancer is concerned is that there is no, cure and. It's been a long long. There's a long history of research that's gone on. And the good news is that the technology is more and more sophisticated every day. So until we have a cure, obviously, the best technology is going to render the best Satistics and early detection is definitely going to be our our best weapon, particularly against the mortality rate, and and also against the level of treatment. And so one of the things that was attractive to me about the whole logic three D mammographies. It's it's a three D machine. Whereas when I was diagnosed fourteen thirteen years ago, there was only the two D And. I went and just for my yearly knowing mammogram, which everyone dreads, and when I left there. They said, look, you know, we see something that looks a little, you know, maybe a little questionable. So come back in six months, and let's take another look at it. And it was my my GP said, but there's no point in waiting six months. Let's get another look at it. And it did turn out the invasive cancer. You know, and had seen on encouraged me to go back in you know, I might have had to have chemo or worse. You know? It's you don't know how fast a cancer is growing at, you know, at the six month, Mark and with a three D at least we're able to see cancers at an even earlier stage it eliminate eighty five percent of the false negatives. Where you go back in like what I had to do. With my situation. I went back in and it wasn't basis. There are a lot of situations where you go back in. And it's a newest do you have to go back in and you find out that it wasn't anything. And it's you know, it's trustful. So with a three demon fee, at least the false negatives are much more or less but down what we're learning is. He's me. Many of us fifty percent of women have been for us, which is what I have. And it's not dense breast as in, you know, perky athletic breasts. It's a genetic trait where it makes it more difficult to see cancer cancer shows up as white on a mammogram is so do the dense areas of abreast and also the statistic goes up the limit of does breath and having breast cancer. And so the whole logic three D mammogram is the only one that's approved by the FDA as not only minimizing false negatives being able to read dense breast mammograms first period superior that other memo Gacy's, so you know, there's a lot of great hope that goes along with the technology. And that's why I was tell women, and it's, you know, it's lovely to be on a podcast where I'm sure you have a lot of females who listen to this or athletes who obviously have mom sisters. Brives where the good news is that wraps. We don't have a care, but we do have even more highly sophisticated technology that that's helping us. It's taking a long way. And as you're going through your treatment. That's another form of competition. That's another form of the same challenge that you went through, you know, growing up whether it's track or whether it's the music industry now, it's just another challenge and. You attacked it. Yeah. I mean, you know, I'm sure all of all of your girls here seen have gone through obstacles that they felt like there. Daunting, and maybe insurmountable, you know, whether it's having to have surgery, or you know, whatever it is that becomes your heard at all it's what you do with that. I think that can really define whereas you go and how much burger you go when you when you've lived something through something that has really made you face yourself. And and look at the things that in your life that don't serve serve the purpose of becoming your, you know, your best self and. Mine was breast cancer. We all have something, you know, we all in our lives, go through something that will basically make meet ourselves. And and it's what you do with that that I think is the most important lesson in in all these obstacles along the way. Well, you come out of it on the other end. Amazing, you know, better than ever, and, you know, still still going strong and still doing what you love to do. And what's next what your next project? Wow. Well, this is going to be a really interesting year for me. And then I've I've just completing my last album, we are not it's it's a an out of that very collaborative. I've asked so many people that I've loved since I was a kid to people that I feel like are taking the torch and and running it forward in my line of work. I've got people on here from Stevie nicks and Keith Richards, all the way to Maron more than brandy Carlyle, and it's just an album that filled with love and joy and a lot of hard work. And it's just going to be a great for me. A great final statement of an album. I've always loved albums. I've always made. Often sort of at a point in life. I feel like people don't listen to albums anymore from top to bottom, and you put a lot of heart and soul and time into putting together a body of work. You feel like makes the statement and yet people want to hear but you want song. So this is my final statement as a as an album maker. I'll continue to make music and write songs, but I think this will be my last album. So that's what I'm doing. Then we're gonna score it and cool minute continue to to have the job that I love the most. And that's raising my belief, and and then after that who knows. You know, I've always said that we're missing something in that regard that I remember when albums used to come out to things that were really cool one. You can wait to see what the cover looked like, you know, because that was a big deal. Yeah. The album. No. That was that was a huge deal. And then to God forbid, if you didn't listen to the album from number one through the end because it tells a story song one two three four the way, they're laid out. And as you said today, it's like, yeah. I want to listen that's on that song. That's it. I'm done, and you do miss out on the story for sure. Yeah. And you know, I'm I'm a bit of a dinosaur when it comes to music, and I love that. I love the the community that went along with buying a record. If you were the first one to have it everybody can't here. How did you listen to a top to bottom two or three times you read the album credit and look at all the pictures and kinda dreamed about what these people were like, and what kind of life they were leading. Now, you know, everything is last across social media. So there is no mystery. And you know, I I can mourn that and feel melancholy about what was but it is what it is. And so I feel lucky that I was around when that was still the norm. And whether people will listen to this out of my baking from top to bottom. I don't know. But I do feel like it's it's a great body of work to go out on. Listening. I wanna say to you is that your boys are really lucky because I. Boys that boys that are raised by their mom that have a strong mom influence, and I think they grow up to be like really really cool kids. They are. Be they're going to be awesome young men for sure. And they're going to be growing husbands. There you go there. Well, good luck. At all that. I thank you know. I appreciate it. Thank you show. Thank you care when it comes to the college basketball season. The only team that matters is the Yukon huskies, you got that with the Wells Fargo uconn women's basketball debit card, you could show your husky pry with every purchase you make head to your local Wells Fargo and ask for your new uconn women's basketball debit card today. Wells Fargo is the official retail Bank partner of uconn women's basketball in basketball. Accuracy can be the difference between winning and losing. And this is also true when it comes to your health the genius three D. Mammography exam is a more accurate and comfortable mammogram for all women. So why not find the facility that offers the genius exam near you? Visit fine. My genius three D dot com. To learn more and make sure your next mammogram is a genius exam is your retirement game plan a well executed play or a wild shot at. The buzzer Johnson Brunetti has helped over twenty five hundred Connecticut families prepare for financially secure retirement. And they are proud to be the wealth management partner of the Yukon huskies. Visit them at Johnson Brunetti dot com and see how they can help you with your retirement Johnson, Brunetti retirement investments specialists, go to Johnson, Brunetti dot com for free books and financial planning tools. Well, there you. There. You have something a little bit different Sheryl Crowe. You know? I'm old enough to to remember. Her early early early music. But it just just the one of the things she you know, she mentioned. Going from, you know, Keith Richards to dealing with Johnny cash music, if you if you listen to her music and read about her and being on stage with Mick Jagger, and Don Henley and. You start to get a sense of how what a small world that is. And how musicians study other musicians, and it doesn't matter. What field? Whether it's you know, the Eric Clapton wanting to to learn what's going on in the world of blues. And and then having to study and going down to. Whether it was Mississippi and New Orleans in Memphis. And having you know. Guys. Like, Keith Richards, saying I wanna I wanna play with you. You know, Johnny Johnson on you know, the piano. It's it's incredible. How much? These these people believe in each other and wanna work with each other. You know, people that are great wanna work with other people that are great. In a greatness is is is defined by the people you surround yourself with. And and the however good you are if you find people out there that are as good if not better than you are at what they do. And you're able to incorporate them into your life. It's. It's the one way that I note to elevate yourself. The other thing that I thought was interesting was. You know, Cheryl mentioned the couple of things in in reading her background this idea of. And it's been in the news a lot lately that you know, this celebrity's getting involved in social causes. You know, you hear both sides of it. You know, there's this the one that came out in the NBA where somebody said, you know, somebody from TV told LeBron thinks shut up and dribble. And then I think he went he ran with that did a thing with it, which I thought was really good to then some athletes being criticized for not saying anything. Not using their platform. It's an interesting dilemma that great athletes, really famous athletes, or it could be, you know, musicians actors actresses you name it. It's it's it's a unique situation. Do I do I use my platform for my personal views or do I stay in my lane? I've always I've always wondered why it's not okay for a great athlete to have a political view. Or a a great songwriter, a great musician to have views on anything other than their music, as if they're not entitled to have an opinion. Whatever that opinion is. That's like saying, you know, that stockbroker shouldn't have an opinion on anything other than. Buying and selling stocks that truck driver shouldn't be allowed to comment. Which if you take that they say, well, you know, those people on TV that comment all the time on what's going on. This should not be allowed to comment on anything other than. How to be a broadcaster how to be a TV person? They should be talking about anchorman, and we'll pharaoh not about politics sports or anything else that that's out there. So it's kind of ludicrous that just because you have a platform, you should only be allowed to talk about your particular thing. But people have opinions. You know, if you're listening out there, you have an opinion. The only difference is you don't have a place to express your opinion. And that's not anybody's fault. That's just is what it is. You know, and you may agree with some things that you know, Sheryl Crowe says, you know, women have to work really really hard harder to men to achieve the same level. You could say, well, you know, I find that to not be true or you could say I great. But you can't say she shouldn't have the opinion. She shouldn't have that opinion. I mean, that's to me. That's crazy. Right. And that leads me to another thing. That's funny. I do a lot of speaking things. And I also speak to a lot of companies, and you know in the audience. It's going to be a mix guys women older younger middle you name it upper management middle regular people. And and it's funny when when you when you talk to them, and you know, and you're you're the, you know, your women's basketball coach, and, you know, oughta Mattie, you know, some people like, wow, that's really cool. Coach Amies won a lot of games and some women, you know, in the audience who like, wow, that's really cool. You know, we got somebody. That's a champion of women's, you know, an advocate for for women in a lot of ways. And then you've got guys in audience that are like women's basketball. You know that I can't believe that. I listen to this which is would again, it's everybody's got an opinion, and everybody's entitled to their opinion. But one thing that I find that's crazy that I hear this all the time. I wish I had a dollar for every time. I hear you know, when someone would come up and say. Well, you know, your team couldn't beat a really good, Mitzi. Well, that is might be the dumbest thing that anybody could ever say. Doesn't matter whether they could or couldn't they don't have to. You know, the that that's like saying Serena Williams couldn't beat Roger Federer stupid. She doesn't have to. Or that a woman's accomplishment accomplishments against other women is less than a men's accomplishment against another man. So when these guys are talking, you know, the one thing I try to remind them all the time is, you know, guys like, my more and sue bird, Diana Tarizi? And you know, Sylvia, Fowles you name it all these great all these great players or Serena Williams, or you know, you name it Simone biles, you know, that you you you. You look at these people, and you say, well, they're accomplishments are what they are. And they accomplished more in their world against their peers, then you ever did or ever will. And they don't ever look at it that way, I think I think they would they couldn't function in a man's world. Will they don't have to? They don't have to. You know, that's that. I think is what gets lost. I think you have to measure yourself against your peers. And where are you relative to your peers? Are you are you at the top of your profession among your peers? And if you are then that means you're one of the best at what you do. And you don't look across the aisle there and say, well, you couldn't do that in my arena. The the that that to me is. Is is refusing to acknowledge greatness wherever it exists. You know? So listening to you know, listening to celebrities stars whatever you wanna call them famous people. You know, listening to them talk about normal things that that everybody goes through you realize they're normal people. They have a life that goes above and beyond. What you listen to one on a C D what you see on television or at the movies. You know, what you see on a basketball quarter football field. So. I enjoy I enjoy bringing people on on our podcast that are a little bit out of the norm. I think we're all connected in so many ways, there's just a a tolerance that I think we're losing some of that this ability to appreciate. You know? In other people. What is their opinion? Was there feeling what's their what's their situation? There's there's either my way or the wrong way. I think we're seeing a lot of that. Whether it's in sports or politics or business or anything else is either my way or the wrong way. And I have never understood that. And. For for for me. I'm trying to teach my players that there's a lot of different ways to be successful. There isn't one way and your way is necessarily the best your wages works for you. And and just because you're you're good that doesn't mean the other person has to be bad. You know? You talk to young people today. And I love these arguments, you know, and then the people that have to live it. I think are are constantly amused by as well, how many times you think the Brian James is heard were who do you think's better? Lebron James, Michael, Jordan. At that. That's just for the people that yell at each other on TV to to create news to create interest. Hey, let's have a debate. Who's better, Michael Jordan or LeBron James? Whereas the the really good sports fan was sit there and go who cares? You know, who cares? No, or you know, Hyo here. Young people talk like this to you know, there's no way Babe Ruth could play baseball today who cares? You don't have to. Or you hear people my age some older people go. Yeah. Well back in the day. A guy that hit two forty in major league baseball isn't gonna make fifteen million. Well, who cares? The bottom line is. That's what that's what a week hitting pretty good. Fielding shortstop can make maybe league baseball in today's world. Your talk. You know, you'll talk the Charleston. You know, Jose guy was the eleventh man in the NBA see on the bench making ten million a year. You know when the best player in the league wasn't making ten million a year. Maybe when Charles was flying. But who cares? It's the world. And I think we have to accept it. You know, I think we have to accept what is today is let's compare today with today. Let's now compare today with yesterday we're last week or last month or last year or ten years ago. You know, so we live in we live in this world where whatever's happening today. It's gotta be the best ever. There's no way that anything that happened before. Here can be as good as today. And I I hear all all the time. You know instant greatness. Instinct greatness. Win two national championships. You're the greatest thing ever. You know when to NBA championships your dynasty? The greatest hitter in the history of baseball. Why? Because maybe you you almost win the triple crown. It's it's to me. I think we we've gotten to the point where you're either the greatest you're the worst the there's there's there's this. There's this missing of like, it's okay. It's okay to just be really really good without saying the other guy has to be bad. It's okay to just celebrate that you're good without having to demean someone by saying their lousy. I've I've always had always had a struggle with that. Always. And it's just manifesting itself everywhere fans. You know, a games people watching TV politics. This the greatest movie ever, you know, my son's famous for this as I'm sure, you know, a lot of people like this movie comes out top five movies of all time you go. We always have a fun thing with. Okay, that is like the forty fifth top five movie of all time. You've ever mentioned, you know. Oh, that's the greatest song ever see that guy. He's the greatest ever. Yeah. So quick to put labels on things. And we're quick the judge when really we should just appreciate it. Which just go out. That's really really good. Without having to then relegate somebody to something else and and taking the body of work. Like right now, we're getting ready for the Super Bowl. Right. And there's this. Well, who's the greatest quarterback of all time? And then Tom Brady's one of the greatest quarterbacks of all time. No. Well. Tom brady. Tom Brady's a great quarterback. Bill bell checks a great coach. Yeah. But is he is good as Chuck? No. It doesn't have to be. He doesn't have to be. He just has to be known as a great coach Tom Brady is he the greatest quarterback of all time while I don't know. He's not as good as you know, Dan Marino or he's not as good as Terry Bradshaw. Joe Montana, or you know, name all the guys that that that are out there. Now, he's not as good as Peyton Manning. Then you go. I it just for argument while he has X number of titles. He has five the other guys have five bub-bubba. They threw for more yards. You go into all these crazy things and you start to realize that we've created a world where someone has to be the greatest. Which in and of itself is fine. But then. It's always followed by that other person's sucks. And and I think we've lost a little bit of ourselves in sports. I wish we could. I wish we could just appreciate. Sports. For what it is. Without having to. To constantly judge in constantly compare. But, but then again, if we did that there'd be no reason to have half the people that are on TV talking about sports because that's all they talk about is to tell you who's better than everybody else. Which I've always which I've always found interesting. You know now that I'm sitting here with a headset on. That people who are sports writers for a living. Then go on TV and tell you that the experts at football. And they're experts at baseball, and they're experts at basketball when really they just have an opinion. But if you would've voiced that opinion, you'd be an idiot. You don't know what you're talking about? But what makes them experts? While they're there sports reporters. Okay. That's their opinion less. They're giving you facts, which anybody can find the facts to giving you their opinion. And then you get to decide whether that opinion matters or whether it doesn't, but for anybody to tell you your opinion. Does it not? For anybody to tell you that your opinions, the greatest opinion, ever the worst opinion. You know? So I find these things interesting. I thought I'd throw them out there for and now the hall of fame. Baseball hall of fame Marian Rivera. Unanimous. You magin it. Some people are not unanimous. You know, some people not being unanimous hall of famers. Is about as bad. As voting for some of the people that have been voted into the hall of fame that have really lowered the standards of the whole thing. So to be surprised Marian Rivera's unanimous. It's crazy. Of course, he's unanimous. Of course. To not be unanimous. They should stop the voting. Anybody that didn't vote for Marian Rivera should not be allowed to vote anymore. It's like those people didn't vote for Hank Aaron unanimous. You're kidding me. Right. The first unanimous player that means there was some knuckleheads didn't vote for Mickey Mantle. That means there were some guys that didn't vote for Willie Mays. Why what's their opinions? So they're entitled to their opinion. But their opinion wasn't based on their baseball ability was based on prejudice their own prejudices. Whatever the prejudice might be, you know, they didn't like the guy whatever the case may be. So it's interesting, you know, as we're talking about this. I'm you know, just throwing stuff out there about opinions and judgments that people make. And the latest is the greatest. You're that you're the you're the greatest of all time. Until when until you're not. You know, what's was it that down Hanley song the new kid in town? Your everybody's favourite until somebody new comes along. That's the way it goes. So for those of you out there that are listening. We coaches we take a very humorous look at all this. We just sit back and smile, and and listen to all the stuff that's out there. And we watch and we have a great time. We love listening to people's comments. We love listening and reading. The stuff people sent into us. Anytime we're sent in. Hey, you're not gonna believe what was on this chat room. Yeah. What was it? Let me say and people describing what's going on on the team, you know, at practice or what went on in the huddle. Or you know, what what the coaches are thinking. That it's so ludicrous. And and it is it is again, it's people's opinion. People making judgments. And. That's part of the this part of the fun of of coaching. It's part of the fun of watching sports as part of the fun of reading about sports. You get to have an opinion. But remember this all of you that are out there? You know, everybody has an opinion. Everybody has an opinion. Everybody's entitled to opinion. You're just not entitled to say that your opinion is the only one that matters. You're not entitled to say that your opinion. Is more important than someone else's? Or that because you're right. The other person has the worst opinion in the history of opinions. You just entitled to your opinion. Stupid. Is that opinion might be you're entitled to it? So anyway. Super bowl. Baseball fame. Lots of stuff going on. Patriots Rams everybody here. In New England's Gaga patriots. The standard by which all other pro pro football franchises are measured. And up eagles fan. And then living up here for the last thirty some years. I gotta tell you. It's never been done better. In your. I'm a big. No Green Bay Packers Vince Lombardi fan. Dallas cowboys. Pittsburgh Steelers forty Niners. All the great great great franchises that have been great for longtime. What's happening here? This point in time is never never been duplicated. And now here I am doing the same thing. But I'm just stating facts. I'm just dating facts. And given the world that we live in how hard it is to repeat. In pro football. How the deck is stacked against you. The following year when you win and you get the tougher schedule. And you keep going back keep going back and keep going back and you change turnover players turnover player, but three things have remained constant. Robert Kraft, Bill Belichick Tom Brady. You can have your opinion and think that somebody's done a better. And I respect your opinion. But in my opinion. This is the best that anybody's ever done. It. No one's ever done. It better. Then these three people have done it. And we're very fortunate to grow to live here in New England and be able to experience it firsthand. So. Good luck to the pats in the Super Bowl. Will. We'll come back. We're in our season. So we'll come back. With another podcast soon. But hope hopefully, you enjoyed. No bit of Sheryl Crowe. Hopefully, you're a fan of music. Maybe you understand better. Now her history a little bit and. Her fight with breast cancer and her thoughts on. Music in general, and where women fit into the music world. And my ramblings. Haven't had a chance to do that. Hopefully, I didn't put anybody in a tizzy. Maybe I did. I did. So until until we get together. Again, this has been Gino Auriemma. Holding court. We'll see you soon.

breast cancer baseball basketball Gino Auriemma Tom Brady football partner Sheryl Crowe Lebron James NBA Keith Richards chemo tennis Charles Ziprecruiter cancer ZipRecruiter official US
Episode 16: Mike Stanton

Holding Court with Geno Auriemma

1:05:16 hr | 2 years ago

Episode 16: Mike Stanton

"MGM Springfield is going to be your go to destination for all your post game celebrations as a proud partner of the university of Connecticut. We invite fans to keep the fun going by checking out all the entertainment and GM resorts has to offer by visiting MGM Springfield dot com. Talent batters. It always does and and scouting for the best talent is never easy. Trust me. We should know that. We spend months crisscrossing the country, my coaches, and I and we work countless hours watching game film, analyzing thousands of players to find the best talent. But if you're hiring for your business, you don't need to do all that. You just need are presenting sponsor ZipRecruiter. They do all the legwork for you. ZipRecruiter's powerful technology learns what you're looking for. Identifies people with the right experience and invites them to apply to your job. ZipRecruiter scouts talent for you. You need a stat back it up eighty percent of employers who post jobs on ZipRecruiter, get a quality candidate through the site in just one day, and my listeners can try for free at ZipRecruiter dot com. Slash Gino. That's ZipRecruiter, dot com. Slash Gino. ZipRecruiter is the smartest way to hire and the official job site of college sports fans everywhere. This is Gino Auriemma and this is holding court near to. You're more famous in China than liangelo ball. I mean, and he just became famous you away. We're famous than we were on runs. Undefeated runs, who was I call it? If you don't want to know how do I keep the. Your mom. Hello, I gotta tell you, you know, she's still watches you on TV, but she said that she said, Charles, I like you. I like you a lot and you were so, but then she said, but I love the shack. Yeah. Okay. Welcome. Ladies and gentlemen, sports fans, non sports fans, boxing fans, non boxing fans are in for a little bit of a treat today's guest on holding court with Gino Auriemma this Agena worry. Emma. Today's guest is Mike Stanton professor of journalism and investigative reporting at the university of Connecticut and author of two books. One is called the prince of providence. The rise and fall of buddy CNC America's most notorious mayor, which is New York Times bestseller and his latest book. Unbeaten. Rocky Marciano is fight for perfection in a crooked world, those of you that may or may not know the story. Rocky Marciano, the only undefeated unbeaten heavyweight champion of the world. Forty nine. Oh, great story. Some interesting tidbits. Mike, Scott, a lot of lot of history in the New England area, Connecticut, and working for the Providence Journal in Providence, Rhode Island, hope you like your involvement with because I'm I'm fascinated by your involvement with. Providence, the city of providence. You know, a lot of people may not know, but you know, providence at one time. He's been through a whole lot. You can tell me more than I know. But I think the people in Hartford now, envy providence, you know, they, they don't want to say they don't want to admit to it, but. T- tell me how long you spent their what it was like and the transformation that you saw the city go through during your time living and working there? Well, I have a good perspective on this Gino because I grew up in Lynch law and you know we'd go. My parents would take me into downtown Hartford to g box and go shopping, and you know one of the real vibrant city. And then you know, I went to Syracuse and journalism major in a reporter, and I went to work for the Providence Journal in nineteen eighty six or eight nineteen eighty five sports writer. I covered the big and. You know, it was a theme park for journalists in about five years after my sports writing career started, I got transferred over to the investigative team, and then I went to covering what was really Rhode Island leading sport at the time, which was political corruption. And we also were the center place of the New England mafia and just a very rich interesting, historic city, you know, as a real interesting place in American history, it was founded by Roger Williams on this, you know, tenant of religious freedom when he was cast out of Massachusetts by the puritan and he's found to displace he called divine providence, and that really became model for America developed with in terms of religious freedom. And then the industrial revolution really began in Rhode Island. And if I backtrack, Rhode Island was also a hotbed of the flake trade, you know, leading shipping port providence in Newport, the Brown family that gave Brown University, it's name or a big slave. Traders and then the two brothers done and Moses Brown had had a falling out. Moses wife died and became a Quaker and renounce slavery and actually had got his brother who was a congressman prosecute per continuing to trade and flav. And then he took his money and he poured it into the first factory. Textile Mellon took Rhode Island. So the industrial revolution was born there. And you know a lot of the immigration that was, you know how America developed began there with a lot of the Irish and talian and other people coming over. Incredible. When you think about. You know, the role that. You know, New England played in in this country. History also put science major in college, and I was a avid, avid, avid history buff, and you know, growing up. In Philadelphia area, you know, studying the the, the birth of America in the revolutionary war and the founding fathers and Independence Hall and everything that goes with it. And my mother became a citizen in one thousand nine hundred seventy six to two hundred anniversary of our country in Independence Hall in this great ceremony. And then I moved to Charlottesville Virginia, and it was a little bit more of that. But then you know, Thomas Jefferson and then it was big civil war. And now I live in New England. So I feel like I've had the holy trinity of of how this country came about. And most people think of New England as yet the Mayflower and the pilgrims and Indians and thanksgiving. And you know, John Adams and and now they make. Now they make. Boston lager. You know the, the founding fathers founded. Yeah. Coonass that you go Sam Adams so that what you brought up about the slave trade, the industrial revolution and the the melting pot that it became. When did providence go into decline where it became of, you know, viewed as a less than desirable. Place to to to be it really slipped back and just sit back about a little over a hundred years ago. Providence was the Silicon Valley of America you had leading, you know industries. Fruit of loom started their cordless steam engine was central exhibit at the Chicago world's fair, and it was one of the wealthiest cities in America and you can still see the best is that, well, if you go back to providence and look at the architecture, the old building and what happened was the industrial revolution, and then the wave of immigration in the early twentieth century came in and as the immigrants wanted more power because it was also, you know, Rhode Island started with this great idea of liberty, you know, that was the basis for our country, but then by the early nineteen hundreds, it was very uneven. I mean the wealthy, you're talking about the one percent and in, you know, immigrants couldn't even vote. You couldn't vote unless you on land, you know into the twentieth century. And finally. Tide started to turn. And yeah, Lincoln Steffens the great Muckraker came to Rhode Island and he called it a state for sale and cheap because they would buy vote, you know, the, they would tell people how to vote. And then the Republican boss got outraged because the Democrats would throw him an extra five bucks and have them vote, Republican vote democrat. And so he said that an honest voter is one who stays bought. But eventually that immigrant tied, they started to exert their numbers and they started to take control. Labor unions became more powerful. And so ultimately, by the nineteen thirties, when the depression hit all the textile mill owners, the move south in North Carolina and places like that for cheaper labor, and you know, World War Two and the liberty ships in the seaport shipyards kept the city going through the war. But after the war they went into real steep decline. And that's when the mafia really, you know, moved in and it was a pretty wide open city, and there's a lot of gambling and racketeering and political corruption. And you know, the fight scene was at the center of that too. And those are real guys and dolls kind of town after the war. And that's when you either worked with the mob or you work for the government. And those were the kind of two primary employment opportunities back then in the city went into a long steep decline. You know, just thought of something as you were talking about that, you know the old Biltmore hotel right. And. You know, the built more has been used in a lot of lot of stories, a lot of songs and you're right. It Providence's. Has had a history. With the Italian's. Good Embiid. Which. Leads me to my next question about one of the favorite topics in providence for the longest time still probably was buddy CNC. Already give give our listeners a little bit of a background into the the former mayor. Of providence did you ever meet him. I did. I met a one time and I made the mistake, Mike, you'll love this. I was getting an award. By the Rhode Island talion American hall of fame sports hall of fame, so they have this dinner. So I'm there with. Jeeze. One of the one of the Red Sox guys, a guy, a kicker for the patriots Adam been Kerry. Yeah. Yeah, and and member, the other guy Gino was Gino cappelletti capillarity. Yeah. Yeah. There's an another guy. There was a boxer might have been finishing pass. That was Rocco. So. No, I didn't see him. So I'm there with all these guys and next thing you know. But he walks in and it's like an hour forty, five minutes into the into the show, and he walks in. And you know, obviously there's a table right in front of me. Would all guys that looked like my father and all his friends who were on when I was growing up and buddy works in and comes up on the stage, and he makes a quick comment congratulates everybody, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. And. Hey, guys, love to stay, but I gotta go. Out the door was air, not ten minutes, and I got up. So I got up to speak and I go, I, it was great buddy to come, but I'm sure he's got to stay on the move these days. You know, he's got to be busy and the two seven guys sitting in front of me deal. Italian guys gave me a look like, that's it. You better not say another word. I just buy up in places to be that night. He probably did he. That's what I meant. I didn't mean he was running from anybody. Well. That could have been also so tell our our listeners, the buddy Arjun of buddy buddy. Fancy was is one of the great political figures in American history. He was, you know, the judge who often we sent them to prison called Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde. And he really was one of the most brilliant politicians. You would ever find any level. He was the longest serving mayor in the country for awhile, and certainly in providence history, he was the first talion American mayor. You know, he came in the Irish ran city hall, and and he was a Republican to in this is when the Gerald Ford was president and he became a darling of the White House because he was, you know, rarity this, this ethnic urban Italian who is a Republican and he spoke to the Republican national convention in nineteen seventy six and some dolls that he was brilliant enough politician to go to Washington. But he stayed in providence and eventually got swept up and all the the city hall corruption. And you know he. Was mayor twice. He had a, he reigned from the mid seventy s to the mid eighty, and he went down. There was a major scandal, but what knock him out was he lured this man to his house who he suspected of sleeping with his ex wife, and he held him prisoner with his police driver and tortured him for a few hours and stabbed him in the eye with a cigarette and eventually pleaded guilty and and had to resign and five years later he came, he came back and was reelected, mayor nineteen ninety, and he served and till the early two, thousands and city underwent this. You know, remarkable renaissance, they moved the rivers, they have water fire. They have a lot of great cultural amenities and new life. Downtown providence Bruins came the, the theater was mandated and buddy was like the showman and he was a national figure. And then the f. b. i. came calling again. And they eventually, you know, planted wires and city hall, and they wired up some of his top aides and caught him taking bribes and but he was. Actually convicted and sent the prison. You know, we used to, we used to kid that he got more votes when he was in jail than the actual people that were running. Good, and that he probably could have been elected and served. While he was while he was incarcerated in that for those of you don't know, Mike. Wrote a great book called the the prince of providence, the rise and fall of buddy CNC America's most notorious mayor. Yeah, the whole thing going on the cover shot is him putting in a Venetian gondola that he brought in from Italy, why the rivers of the providence river during water fire hire the gun, you can't make you can't make this up. You know this. I think you're white part. Even today. You could hire a gondola, get a picnic and debt or out yet. Part. Parts of Prantoso part wise guys. Yeah, park goodfellas. It's yet. It's all true. True to life. Yeah. And he had to be people, the city hall aids at nickname, like buckles and blackjack and Bobo, and they went to prison. They were stealing manhole covers off the streets and city garbage trucks, and it was just a it was the wild west, and buddy was they were all sitting at that dinner I was at, I think they were all sitting in front of me, say, might have been. That's right. Wallet. I found myself underneath one of those manhole covers if I kept talking. So Mike latest book on beaten. The rocky Marciano story, call them beaten. Rocky Marciano is fight for perfection in a crooked world about three quarters of the way through the book. I don't. I don't want to. I mean, obviously, I know the ending, but I, I want to go and take my time with it. You know, being in the talian immigrant and coming over from, you know, from Italy and growing up, you know where my mother and father spoke hardly any English throughout their their lives, and my father passed away. My mother still alive. She's eighty seven, you know, the way we ate at home and the way we dress and the way things were expected of you reading Rockies early childhood. It just brings back so many memories, and it's funny that we were talking about providence which is big part of your life. But providence played a big role in Rockies life, didn't it? It did, and that's how I got onto that. It was really buddy. CNC leading need a rocky Marciano because when buddy was a boy growing up in providence, his father was a doctor and he used to take into fights at the old, Rhode Island, auditory him on north main street. And this was an arena, the Boston Celtics and Bob Cousy played. Their icecapades came in ROY Rogers and trigger to Rhode Island reds, hockey team. And the big attraction was Monday night fight night and providence was the biggest fight city in wingless figure that Boston and in the early in the late nineteen forties rocky a headliner there because he was from Brockton about thirty five miles away. And he was just knocking people out and the local, especially with his talent heritage, loved him. They loved the night, the knockout punch. You know, they had this ritual where he would hit a guy and a guy would stand there. Poise and then collapsed and everybody in the crowd with yell timber. So, yeah, so rocky fought twenty eight times in his professional career, there of his forty nine fight, and it really launched him on the past to the title. Well, as you're doing, you're doing your background on on rocky. You know what, what struck you as. That moment where you know you're like, wow, I would have never guessed that. And people won't believe it. But this is what happened or this, you know, this is how it was there a moment when. As much already knew about rocky. Well, there were three. I mean, the one just understanding how vicious boxing was and just getting really in depth about reconstructing these fight and what it was like and what it reflected about our society at the time for working class people, and then the celebrity nature being the heavyweight champion fifty years ago, you were household name, boxing baseball, where the two big sports in America, and I really wanted to reflect that as well as you know, it's not aimed at a hardcore boxing fan audience, but you know rocky was and what struck me was I learned about his friendships with a lot of celebrities like Frank Sinatra, Jackie Gleason, Jerry Lewis, Marilyn Monroe, Joe DiMaggio, and I get some great stories from his nephews about encounters he had with them. But the other thing was the mafias entrenched control, boxing, and how this kinda hero immigrant on his only way out. You know, the cliche Horatio Alger story is through the ring. But he has to contend with all the corrupt forces run boxing and ultimately help do it in as a mainstream American sport. And that's why I called it. It's fight for perfection, crooked world because he goes on to histories only unbeaten heavyweight champion. You know, he's like the New England Patriots. I mean, and and your team. I mean as many titles as you've all one, you know, wasn't always easy, and there were some squeakers and he has some real close calls. And so those things all surprise me and amusement. But one of the things that really struck me was maybe it goes back to how we idolize their sports heroes back in that kind of golden age of the nineteen fifties when he was camping. But I was getting his military service record because he served in an army engineer unit during World War Two. And I covered the, he'd been court martialed for along with another TI for salting and robbing to British civilians in England when they were supposed to be on base, getting ready to go to Normandy for the. Invasion in the spring of nineteen forty four. And you know what really struck me, not that it makes rocky a bad person, but he's a flawed complex interesting person. And you know, he made a mistake and it was kind of swept under the rug. And I was getting his files from the national archives and the librarian said, well, we also have this other file. It's not digitized. It's his court martial transcript if he's like that. And I said, what? And you know, I had heard he'd had some problems, but then I got the file and there's mugshots and fingerprints and a and a whole trial transcript, but not only illuminates what happened, but also kind of, you know, there's a lot of details about his early life than struggles. While it. It's an interesting part in the book. Where where you see rocky as not so much this heavyweight boxer whose destined for stardom, but just a regular street kid who's now in the army, and you know he's doing what normal street kids in your your. He's trying to find a way to get. You know hustle this also that get an advantage in this and you know, and it, it kind of really humanized them even more I thought than you think. Yeah, it did me and it also you know, if you look at, you know how the domino theory of life. It really to me, led him into boxing because he was sentenced to two ultimate originally seven years in prison. It was reduced to. And so he stayed in the army after the war ended. So he could come out with an honorable discharge. And after he served his military prison time, he goes out the fort Lewis in Washington state, and he serves the through nineteen forty six. And when he's there, he starts the box on the prison, boxing team. I mean, not prison the army boxing team, and that's his first real formal boxing experience, and he makes it to the finals of the national junior AAU championship in Portland, Oregon, and he's obviously very raw, very clumsy fighter. And in the semi's he punches a guy awkwardly on the top of his head, and he shatters knuckle, and this is a career potential career ending injury, and he goes. Back to the army hospital, and there's a Japanese American surgeon who performs an experimental operation on him and saves his career. And when interesting about this union, you know, talk about your immigrant stories. This man family was, you know, Japanese American tour interns in those camps during World War Two, as you know suspected enemy, and he was spared that this back your Thomas Takeda because he was in medical school at the time. And then later when he wants to serve his country, they won't let him go overseas. So he's at fort Lewis. And in fact, if you months before he operates on rocky, Dwight Eisenhower comes through in the family, shared a photo, Dr Takeda Dwight Eisenhower and several months later, he saving Rockies career. You know few years after that rocky will be in the White House and Dwight Eisenhower, there's famous photo, Joe DiMaggio standing watching our measuring Rockies fift-, the one that repaired in basketball accuracy can be the difference between winning. And losing. And this is also true when it comes to your health. The genius three d. mammography exam is a more accurate and comfortable mammogram for all women. So why not find the facility that offers the genius exam near you? Visit genius, three d. near me dot com to learn more and make sure your next mammogram is a genus exam. Is your retirement game plan a well executed play or a wild shot at the buzzer Johnson. 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It gets you comprehensive help from an expert agent who gets to know you because when you're triple a. expert agent knows you better. They can help you better for insurance. That's not just insurance turned the triple. Contrary to public opinion whence Vesta Salone did the movie rocky. It wasn't a a take off on rocky Marciano. It wasn't. It was Chuck wapner. But rocky did have an important influence there, but you're right? Yeah. So you're doing, you're doing the book and you get to the park. It was a great line in the book to where who are you're describing, what? What is trainer. Charlie Goldman you? Yeah, Charley Goldman you, you describe how he how he described rocky know someone like my, he don't, you know, he, he don't move so good, and he got two left feet. Yes. But the other guys don't look so good either when they're lying on the campus, I thought that was a great line, but you know. You know, we see boxers today. Well, you know, we grew up with Mohammed guys like Mohammed Ali and Sugar Ray Leonard, and you know, guys look amazing in the ring and and just their abilities. Incredible. He was anything but athletic in the ring. Right. Scrapper. I mean, he was five foot ten, a hundred and eighty five pounds. So he was often outweighed outreached by his opponents. He was very clumsy and awkward, but he had to things he had this punched that his trainer nickname the Suzie. Q. that could probably is one of the most devastating punches heavyweight history. Some scientists tried to measure the force of it and concluded that it had more force than a bullet fired from gun. And the other thing he had that I think is really a lesson athlete in any sport is his discipline and his tennis and his training, and he trained like a monk. I mean, I love this idea of boxing in the mid in the mid twentieth century where the the fighter goes off to the mountains to train, you know, for the big fight any away from all the temptations of the city and and rocky would go up to the Catskills. So the grossing resort. And he would train for months and he loved training, and he was kind of ahead of his time in terms of. You know, some of the train athletes today. He avoid fried foods, the green, he, he believed, you know, not lifting weights, but doing a lot of stretching exercises to increase its flexibility with you. Certainly not the most flexible guy and he could take such punishment. And you know, some of epic fights where you know, he persevered through some amazing versity and punishment that other lesser men would never do it. So that's what made him a champion. Yeah, I've been trying to figure out who's the who's the guy on the cover that he's bludgeoning right now. That's rolling with stars in their second fight. Okay. In that isn't Square Garden. When he's the champion. And that was one of the few times. Rocky rocky was a real as much as he was in fasten in the ring. He was a very gentle soul out of the ring and very high pitched choirboys boys. He didn't really take fights. Personally, he, he had a lot of respect for his opponent. You know, especially black fighters who he identified with because immigrant roots and persecution but rolling the stars at ticked him off. Because before that fight, one of the things rocky was always terrified about was he would see these drunk fires with their brain scramble the no money, you know, leaning on the bar and he was petrified becoming like that as well as being poor. And before his second fight was with stars, the stars was quoted in papers thing that rocky takes too many punches. He's gonna wind up, punch drunk and rocky was so ticked off about that. He just, you know, hold with stars all over the ring and you know he hit him so hard in the armed that you first blood vessels. And that's the thing about rocky. He was cleansing might not land the punch where he wanted it to land, but wherever it landed hurt, you know, one opponent said that every time he hit you, you saw flash of light and let stars afterwards. Rocky was in a cab with a guy I talked to, and I guess I learned the college boy a, so yeah, that's a great picture that I loved the photos from that era. It's kind of black and white. Yeah, film the warrior era. Yeah, just great. Great pictures. When. When he when he really really hurt. The other Italian fighter? I think karma and bingo. Yeah. When he really heard him and sentiment hospital and he might die and rocky went over to the hospital and sat with him. I think that speaks to what you were saying about what a gentle, caring guy he was after he tried to tried to kill you in the ring. Exactly. And that was a really big fight. And that was one of his earlier bites that didn't get as much attention and I spent whole chapter on it because I was so fascinated by it, and I thought it was such a critical Lincoln in Rockies history and and turning point because he and bingo, we're both young, you know, relatively unknown but hard hitting unbeaten, Italian heavyweight. You know, rocky from Brockton bingo from the Bronx. They each other big Italian following and they were fighting at Madison Square Garden, their first fight in Madison Square Garden, and it was the night before New Year's Eve nineteen forty nine. And these two guys came out and they fought at the, you know, the speed of a couple of lightweight. New York Times writer said team that they, they went on until human endurance could stand no more and rocky said that it was the hardest he ever was hit when bingo hit him in the chest in an early round in rocky blacked out, but stayed on his feet and fell into a clinch and recovered. And he eventually knocks thing go out. And then bingo's head kinda snaps and things on the canvas and rocky celebrating this big win, and then they have to carry then go to the hospital and he puts into a coma and there was a really, you know, gripping story that things will later wrote for the Saturday Evening Post where he recounted, what it's like to be a boxer and you're in the ring with a guy who's your friend and then suddenly you're just pummeling it and you got the blood loss, and then the fights over and then he's your friend again and you worry about it. And this is an era that just like today, people talk about the damage of NFL football and whether it's worth it and the same debates. We're going around boxing at that time, and there were people being killed in the ring. There were few dozen people killed in the ring that year nineteen forty nine and nineteen fifty. And these guys, all these great dreams of being the champion having wealth and fame. And then the flip side is, you know, being carried out on a stretcher and bingo did recover, but he never thought again, he was blind in one. And he walked the length and he had a pretty pretty tough life. You know, he worked on the docks as a night watchman, but and he doesn't remember the fight to his desk. Never never fight. You remembered walking up the steps to the ring and the garden. And then he remembered waking up. Being mother was down at a hospital. You know, I remember my one of my earliest recollections grown up in Norristown which is kind of like a city like Brockton factory town, and you know, both of my parents worked in factories, but I remember going into barbershop and there'd be boxing pictures all over the walls and was always taken back by the one picture of it was rocky Graziano who killed a guy in ring. It might have been. Yeah, I am trying to think. I mean, he had some great fights with what was it Tony sale. Yeah, but there was a there was a picture of a guy laying on the campus and and the guy told me, you know, see that guy there he died, you know, in the ring and I thought, wow, and you heard about that and and to be a boxer in those days, the the duress, they weren't so quick stop fights where. No. And that was well, here's the problem. If you stop the fight too quickly, you are suspected of being in the tank. You were being paid off by mob guys gamblers to fix the writing. So there was almost like this hands off approach, and then there'd be criticism and there'd be times that you know people would be screaming at the rest of stop the fight. And sometimes they did the son of an old, boxing referee and fighter from providence who rest a lot of Rockies bite his son you've been on, oh, another great providence name. But Sharkey son also named Sharkey who of course works for buddies, Nancy providence, city hall inspector of weights and measures. He gave me a photo of a fighter that was lying, you know, flat on the ring on his stomach and the doctors attending him, and you could see the, you know, black and white photo. You can see the black splotches of blood on the canvas, and that man died. And you know, the other thing that really fascinates me about rocky is he was very. He was more complex guy than people realize Layton his life. You know, he's been retired for over a dozen years and he's holding court and his how tell Sweden London. And he starts to say that, you know, I'm worried about my kids and grandkids, watching the fight film fight of me and thinking of a brutal ruffian. And he says, you know, forty fifty years from now, boxing gonna fade away. It's just too violent and you know, it's gotta go away and all his friends say, oh, no, Rocco and he's like, no, that's the way it is. But he, he had this vision, I think. And to me, the other thing about boxing is it's a window into the immigrant struggle. Because when you look at boxing through its history, it's always the people on the lower Rhone who are fighting because you know one of their only opportunities and then the working class. And then you've got the Jewish fighters in the Irish Italian, the black and the Tino's, and now you're eastern European heavily involved, and they're all looking for a way. And then there people are going to the fights. And there's this. It's a source of ethnic. Pride, it's a way for working class people to assimilate into America and to feel the sense of pride and individuality. And this increasingly industrialized world where you're chain to a factory. But talk a little bit about the the, the fractured relationship that that rocky had with his trainer, Charlie Goldman and his for lack of a better word. His owner. The guy that you know you talk about two. Yeah. You talk about today. You know. Pro athletes getting half of the half of the gate. You know, meaning, you know the, the NBA signs it, you know, a billion dollar deal, the the NBA players. Again, fifty percent only players who get screwed in major league sports or or NFL players. The ones died, the ones that die every Sunday. Today, exact dirty guys that get screwed in the baseball and basketball players have have a pretty good, but talk about the relationship that rocky had at that. He didn't really appreciate that he he had to put up with, but. These guys didn't always do what's always they hardly ever was best for rocky. No. And that that was the other balancing hack has with his manager. Al Weill. When rocky was, you know, starting to fight in some amateur fights around Brockton, Massachusetts. He, you know, his father and his uncles, and there was an old retired boxer Joe Monte who had fought max Schmeling and knew the fight game and said, look, if you wanna have a career in boxing, you've gotta go to New York. You gotta get a manager. You gotta get a big time guy. New York is the capital boxing, and so he goes down to New York and he meets l. wile and l. wile is kind of the preeminent to manager. He's also going to become the matchmaker for Madison Square Garden and the International Boxing club, which is the cartel that controls boxing, and he's gonna. He's a puppet of the mob. You know, the mob has its fingers in boxing, really deep and so l. is a guy who you know he's an immigrant from, you know, I'll say speech in France, Germany. He comes up as a ballroom dancer competing against George raft in, you know, New York, and then he gets into boxing great, you know, making Nassar's, but he's also really ruthless and he controlling and you're right fighters were pieces of meat, and one writer wrote a profile of out calling. He Hitler Mussalini Stalin and silent agree all rolled into one and this is a complimentary profile, but he's you fight. He could get you to the garden and you did what he told you. He ran your life. He owns you, you know, he would tell you where to eat, what the eat, where sweep you know where to go, who you could date when you could marry. You know, rocky was dating his future wife, you know, Barbara for a few years and they wanted to get married and they had to wait for blessing. And then at their wedding l. gives this toast any basically reminds rocky in front of, you know, a few hundred people that you know, you belong to me and Barbara, you need to, you know, let me. We haven't, and I'll get you to the title. So rocky was very humiliated by that kind of treatment, but he's also shrewd enough to know that needed out while to get to the title. And as he became more successful and started to certain self more and become more confident in the world, he saw some of the things that I'll doing now was getting money off the top always taking half earning officially. But before they would divvy up, you know, they were deduct expenses. Our put all these bogus expenses are, and there was one fight in San Francisco. The second to last fight, and there was an investigation of boxing, and they discovered a ten thousand dollar check that while pinned off the top of the purse. So that was also, I mean that two things to rocky that heightened his paranoia about money and dealing only in cash, which really, you know, dominates his life in retirement, and it also prompts him to walk away from boxing when he's still has placed him. How. How pervasive you obviously have touched on it, and it's a big part of the the essence of the book. Just how crooked. Also, you know, everybody saw raging bull. Everybody knows about Jake lamotta and you know, you know, talk a little bit about guys are being told you have to throw this fight in order to get the next fight. How how did the how did the fight game work back then? Well, the mob has always been around. I mean, it's shadowing characters. There's the action, the lifestyle, gambling. You know, in early fighter who Rockies trainers hung out with out rocky camps was able to tell who the bag man for the nineteen nineteen World Series paying off the Chicago black socks. So you know when Jack Dempsey face gene Tunney in Chicago in the nineteen twenty Al Capone is rooting for Dempsey and the Philadelphia mob is rooting for Tunney. So you've always had the moderate boxing, but what happens when rocky becomes fighting for the title after World War Two, the country change it, and everybody gets. Television set and the two big things that are selling TV's early on our boxing, and I love Lucy and suddenly you know, the mob go there like water, they'd go where the money goes flow in that direction. And you know, after the war there flowing to the waterfront and docks with all the shipping, you know the story of on the waterfront and they're flowing to boxing because suddenly go river TV money. And so- boxing kind of take systematic control of, I mean, the mob, Texas medical troll of boxing and Frankie carbo and the Torius mobster whose implicated in at least five murders with a hitman for murder, Inc. Bugsy Siegel, you know, was prank fellows leading hitman work with Meyer Lansky leeann gangster. He becomes the underworld Commissioner buffing. He's pulling the strings behind the scenes. He's, you know, getting Jake lamotta to take a dive so that he can have a shot at the title a year later, and he controls how while. Rockies manager. And so you know, there's an incident where rocky is coming out of a restaurant in New York, and while says, oh, Frankie's over there, go making feel good. And so you know, he was the underworld Commissioner, boxing, and he would, you know, fixed fights. He would, you know, have people post. That's for him. There was one fight manager named Hymie. The mink wallman who was a three year and he would go place messenger for cargo on fixed by and he would clean up. Everybody had a nickname back then how might. The great ones in Philadelphia. One Frankie's rain hasn't been a blinky Palermo blinky Palermo numbers king blinky Palermo he was the numbers Philadelphia, and he was behind jersey, Joe Alcott when they fought rocky him for the title in Philadelphia in nineteen fifty two. And the reason if I was in Philadelphia was because Walcott's manager who is also a guy connected to blinky couldn't get a manager's license in New York today, the fight right elsia idiot, brotherly love, and they might have fixed tried to fix the fight. When you talk to Rocky's family. And obviously. You know back then it's it's much harder to to to go find records, but but. How much money that rocky make in his in his career will would guesstimate. Well, his biggest purse was about half a million dollars which of course you you get half of. He probably made one or two million dollars, which you know multiply it by the, you know what it was worth then versus today. So he, you know, he made us Stansell amount of money and you know he was a commodity in terms of marketing, you know, heavyweight champion was the most man in the world. He could get all kinds of deals business and loved him. One of his early financial advisers I spent I was Charlie Finley, the insurance managed Chicago who later. Yeah, the owner of the open date. And so he had a lot of, you know, he never wanted for money, but he was. He was, you know that depression era upbringing and then seeing a while steal from him, made him very paranoid about money and e only Bill with cash in retirement, and he stashed it and all kinds of weird places, you know, carry it around and paper bags and stashing toilet bowls curtain rods. And he had a wealthy businessman friend in Florida who had a bomb. Shelter on his estate, and it was a luxurious bomb shelter with carpets pictures on the wall and fast a lot of money down there and tragically when he died young in a plane crash, you know, because he didn't trust Bank. His family could never track down. Most is might. Yeah. There's another great line by sports writer in in Los Angeles. You know when when he found out about the crash and jeopardize that Jim Murray, legendary legendary writer in l. a. what was his line. Well, Rockies plane crash in in Iowa in almost with year will be fifty years ago next year, an August thirty and Jim Murray wrote start the count, he'll get up. A lot of us are wishing today that there were an honest referee in a cornfield in Iowa. And yes, three Iraqi made international headlines pallbearers included, Muhammad Ali, and Joe Louis who he has become pretty good friends with both of them after he retired from the ring and some interesting stories about their relationships that I kind of shed light on. You know his tolerance about race and you know his affinity for black fighters, even though he was kind of cast as the great white hope in the nineteen fifties. And you know he was, I white champions and you know, Joe Louis it knocked out Braddock in nineteen thirty seven, but he had a real tentative for black fighters. You know, Mohammed ALI'S wife at the time told me that the only time she ever saw him, I'll e cry was when he heard that rocky had died. Yeah, I spend a lot of time studying Lee in and he was a great student of the game, the history of the game. Yeah. What he loved to watch it. He loved the history of it. Yeah. And his wife told me that, you know, he would grow up, you know, use the kid in Louisville who got his bike stolen. So he went down to the gym to learn how to fight. And he would listen on his transistor radio to Don Dunphy the great ring announcer, you know, calling rocky Marciano fights for Madison Square Garden and hear the noise and the bell, and you know, heavyweight champion of the world and and that kind of kindled Ollie's dreams to become heavyweight champion. And he admired rocky. And he said he was the only white fighter that he really respected, and and he said he would have given me some trouble. And of course they met up in this is our phony fight computer fight. They called it right before rocky simulated simulated fight about, you know, who would land most punches. I, I remember that I remember that. Yeah, you remember that? Yeah, it was. It was very trendy back. Then you get all these sports. Writers to fill out questionnaires about the strengths and weaknesses of each fire. They feed it into a computer and they come up with all these scenarios for how fight might play out. And then this promoter in Miami hired Ali who was suspended time from fighting because of the fight over the draft in Vietnam and rocky, who was forty five years old and they hired them to go down far according to the script and they would act out various scenario. You know, right cross a Fook. You not me down on my you down and then he would edit it together and they ultimately showed it movie theaters. And so they go down to Miami in the summer of sixty nine and rocky. You know, he's forty five years old about fifty pounds overweight. He trains hard for this because he doesn't wanna bears himself and he loses like forty pounds. He puts it to pay on the covers balked bought. And you know, we are sparring and they really bond. And it's funny like sometimes I'll leave will use this. Quick jab and lick off Rockies to pay and then rocky, oh, get mad and banging on the arm. But you know, the hard rock Mohammed can't lift the salt shaker. Go up dinner at the restaurant that night. And at one point, you know, the rocky gets a little, you know, carried away and he hits them hard in the stomach, and I just kind of exiles and sits down on his stool and refuses to continue until the promoter goes to the Bank and gives them another two hundred two thousand dollars in cash. And then they get to the point where they're supposed to like each other down and neither one wants to be knocked down 'cause they have too much pride. And finally they do it and you know, I'll is winding up. And as he knocks rocky down, he says, dropped the wop and you know, rocky falls down and then spits his mouth piece out and comes up laughing hysterically. And then rocky starts imitating, I'll lease patter about you're the only one that would beat me and and they're just having a ball and when they go out to dinner and they're joined by Henny Youngman comic, which I try to imagine that trio together. But to me, one of the most enduring thing that I came across and you have to really about surprising was the summer of sixty nine, but Kerner commission report is just come out racial strife in America. Riots in the ghettos watch burning and I'll e in in rocky, you're talking about this one day during the break and sparring, and they're sharing grapefruit, and all these peeling off slices and handing it to rocky. And they start talking about this racial strife in America. And you know, rocky says, what about you? And me white man a blackmail if we went into the places, talked about how we could all get along. And leak starts to get really excited when you do it, would you do it? And they finally agree that they would do it. And then two weeks later Rockies killed in a plane crash. So they never had a chance to do it. So many so many. Great. So many great stories. Just really struck me. This goes back to the Italian immigration experience rocky identified, and he talked to ALI'S wife and I'll leave about, you know, keep your chin up. You know, you're fighting the US government the year, black, Noah, ten, and here's, this is Lana quack. Noah ten from the sixties years. Brock, you the white conformist from the fifty and to him, he's looking at leave at least going through and he's remembering his childhood when talion were persecuted. When faculty Benz Eddie were taken off the Bali, the Brockton trolley near rocky grandfather's house. And you know, railroad is per shoe factory robbery, dating, commit and sent to the electric chair. Yeah. And so he identified with that struggle, and I thought that was really interesting and showed a depth Iraqi that maybe people didn't realize he had. Well, you know, for for guys who. See sports as. You know this bigger than life thing. You know, the way we've made today, it's all encompassing. You know, you can't turn on TV now for the next six months and not have your your brain fried with NFL stuff, you know, and every minute of every day and these guys, you know, analyze and dissect it. And you know, when you think back to the fifties, forties and fifties. These guys fought because they needed to make a living. And it today guys don't play to make a living. They. They've already made enough money that they can't spend it all the rest of their lives, their their kids, grandkids, and great grandkids will never have to work if they don't want to. But back then these guys are trying to earn a living. And it's it was it took on a whole different. Whole different meaning in it meant more when you agree might. Absolutely. You know, the stakes were a lot higher for people in the margin for error, a lot slimmer, and there were no guaranteed contracts back then and you were a piece of meat. You know, you could be used up today discarded tomorrow, and it was a pretty brutal world and the fact that rocky was able to navigate all that come out, you know, fairly clean, but then you know his demons kind of caught up with them with this kind of nomadic lifestyle. He had it retirement and you know, led to his desk because he's too cheap to take a commercial flight. You know, keep you take a free plane ride on a little Festa with a guy that turned out to be an inexperienced pilot and they go into a massive thunderstorm and he crashed. But yeah, getting back to your other question, I mean, these were, you know, these are blue collar guys in the ring and it was a blue collar country. I mean. Even looking at New York. I mean, if you go to New York today, it's not what you be and you know, I really capture that loss New York when there's dockworkers and the working class people. Yeah, you know, along with the this well to go into to shores after the after the fight and rocky, you know, the other thing he really identified with, you know, the factory town. He came out of Brockton and all the people in Brockton versus that old Italian culture. They don't gamble on his fight, and you have all these poor people who are betting money on Rocky's fight than they take the winning bet it all on his next fight next fight. And you know, there's a taxi driver who's driving this old Italian couple to the the Bank to borrow money to bet on Rocky's fight, and they do it every night and he says, God helped his pound if he ever loses. And of course you never did, and there was, you know, he's knocked down by jersey, Joe Walcott losing on points and shot for the title. And he said later that, you know, I always knew that you know, these people in Brockton were. Betting on meet counting on me for them. I would always get up and you always had that affinity for Brockton, you know, the big shoe factory capital and the the football team at Brockton high with the Schuman. And you know, when he went into the ring, he wore the the black and red rope that were the colors of Brock and high school. And later of course today the team is nicknamed the boxers and there's a thirty foot bronze statue of rocky Marciano that looks out over the football stadium. Great stuff. Great stuff. For those of you out there that. Are looking for a not not just a history lesson, which it is and not just the boxing lesson. Which it is. It's it's really a an American lesson. It's it's, it's a story of America. You touch on a little bit. Mike. I'm beaten rocky. Marciano, fight for perfection in crooked world is really a America. It encompasses all the things that America was in at the time. And I think anybody who reads it can can talk to their depending how old you are parents. Great. Parents grandparents, great grandparents, and they'll be able to tell you what what those times were like, and and the history that was being written back then I think you've captured it. Mike, can I hope I hope there's another book in your. In your future. ABI, be anxious to. There is what's it going to be about. I think I want to write a biography of Raymond, patriarch, the longtime New England mob boss. Oh yeah, course based in providence it'd be my Rhode Island, my providence trilogy. There you go. He's an interesting guy. He started. He came up with the mob and during prohibition bootlegging days, and he kind of paralleled the rise of organized crime in America. You know, through the casinos in Las Vegas in the sixties and he, he was the one of the ruling commission numbers nationally. Bobby Kennedy, actually clashed with him and Senate rackets hearings. And later started the witness protection program to protect a hitman who testified against Raymond didn't get him. But there were stories that the Kennedys try to enlist wanna, patriarch owes hit-men to take out Castro. And just to kind of tie it all together. This man committed a famous mob hit that a young buddies, the ANSI prosecuted as a prosecutor. That's him in politics. Try to prosecute Raymond Patriarca. So it's all like we like to say all, and it's all one big story, but it's all connected, right? It's all it's all connected. It goes beyond the borders. And yeah, you know. Yeah, so well, it's, it's funny. I, I don't know if you've ever read if you've ever read the book. I heard you paint houses. I know about it. I need to read it, but yeah, yeah, it's coming out as a movie. And it's typical, you know, it's a Scorsese film, you know, and it's typical. It's got the Niro Pacino and Joe patchy, and you know Ray Romano and you know all the cast of characters and it's got all these characters at you talk about, you know, Lino and Patriarca and the guys in in in Philly and seem giancana and Marcello, and it's got them all and m Rhode Island's, right there. Providence is right there. And I don't know if you've got the center, but Bufalino and Bruno from Philadelphia. They pop up in the final chapters of rocky soccer. He's retired. He's dealing with the guy, and he's going to Angelo bought. Angelo. Bruno was was the guy in Philly and and and to. He had casinos in Cuba before Castro came in and rocky had offered, get an a stake in one of those casinos. And he got advice from Bruno who advised him not to do it. And this is right before master took over and shut down the casino. Well. Can't wait to read it. You're here on campus love to get together with you at some point. Then. Talk, boxing, talk baseball, right? You know any any time it's been. It's been really fascinating for those of you out there. Beaten again, unbeaten rocky Marciano, fight for perfection in a crooked world. Mike Stanton. Professor at the university of Connecticut Pulitzer prize. Investigative reporter and. I thank you Mike. For doing this. It was it was a real. It was a real pleasure in. I'm getting a lot of enjoyment out of the book and I'm looking forward to, as I said, I know the ending, but I wanna I wanna find out how we get their journey and been a pleasure talking to us. Well, Gino and I'll look for young campus. Thanks, Mike, appreciate banks, you know, take care. Take care while there you have it folks that our went by really, really quickly. Mike Stanton, again, professor at the university of Connecticut talking mostly about the city of providence buddy CNC, and then rocky Marciano, the heavyweight champion of the world unbeaten untied on challenged forty-nine. No, I learned a little bit and I'd read the book and I didn't know some of the things we talked about. Hope you enjoyed it. Find out when we're going to be on next time it'll be as entertaining and informative. As we usually are. And until then this is where we Emma upholding court, which oria saints later.

Rocky rocky boxing providence Rocky Marciano Rockies America Rhode Island Mike Stanton Rhode Island writer New York Philadelphia NFL Mohammed Ali New England Brockton Chicago Madison Square Garden Moses Brown
Episode 21: Holly Rowe

Holding Court with Geno Auriemma

1:07:22 hr | 1 year ago

Episode 21: Holly Rowe

"MGM Springfield is going to be your go to destination for all your post game celebrations as a proud partner of the university of Connecticut. We invite fans to keep the fun going by checking out all the entertainment and GM resorts has to offer by visiting MGM, Springfield dot com. In sports. There are smart moves and not so smart, moose like making sure you get the practice on time. That's smart parking in the coaches spot. Not so smart and the same is true when you're hiring. There are smart ways and not so smart ways to get things done like job sites that overwhelm you with tons of the wrong resumes. That's not smart but posting a job on ZipRecruiter. And letting them find the right candidates for you. Now, that's smart. Ziprecruiter's powerful matching technology scans thousands of resumes identifies people with the right skills education and experience for your job and actively invites them to apply. So you get qualified candidates fast. Which is why it's rated number one by implores in US based on trust pilot rating of hiring sites would at least one thousand reviews and right now my listeners can try ZipRecruiter for free at ZipRecruiter dot com slash. Gino. That's right free. Just go to ZipRecruiter dot com slash GE. An oh, so if you're looking for a smart way to find the right talent for your team. Go to ZipRecruiter dot com slash Gino today. Ziprecruiter, the smartest way to hire. And the official job site of college sports fans everywhere, this is Gino Auriemma, and this is holding court your to your more famous in China than liangelo ball. I mean, and he just became famous you way, we're famous than we were on runs undefeated runs. Who was I calling. If Vido went away. The know how do I keep this? Your mom. Hello. I gotta tell you. You know, she's still watches you on TV. But she said she said Charles, I like you. I like you a lot and you were studying, but then she said, but I love the shack. Okay. For that. Hi there. Everybody. Welcome to the newest addition of holding court with Gino Auriemma that would be me. And today, we're gonna be talking to Holly. Rowe who if you're a college sports fan, college football, college, women's basketball, college men's basketball, volleyball softball. Women's World Cup running of the bulls swimming, track and field any sporting event that you can imagine you've probably seen Holly Rowe involved in bringing you that game. Fascinating woman. What a great story. Some personal tragedy that she's overcome. And I think you'll enjoy it. First off. When you were let's say in high school. In the lovely state of Utah. What were what were some of the things that preoccupied your life? What were the driving things that every day? You felt like this is what I have to do. This is who I am. This is my this is my direction. Well, I was a classic overachiever. So when I was in high school, I was a student body off there. I was in magical choir school, play president of the journalism. Something Key Club, girls states. I was on this date championship band and rifled gorlic team where I was the captain, and then I would play sports like track volleyball the part of the year. And then I was a practice player for basketball. And I was too busy to commit basketball fulltime, which is probably the regret of my life. But you know, I I was like just pre title nine enough that I didn't know you could go to college on a scholarship, you know, like women just we just were kind of messing around sports in my life. And I wish I'd knew I wish I could have been in softball player volleyball player. In college. I think those are my two good sports than I just regret it to this day. But I did a lot of interests. And I I was like multi-facetted which I like because I learned a lot of bills and did a lot of good stuff. Did it ever? Did it ever occur to you? That. Well. Sports is. Sports is a hobby. It's not something that I think I could pursue. Fulltime? Was that you're thinking or was it more of? While I'm doing it. Because I think there's a future in it. No, it was more of a hobby. So this is you'll appreciate this. When I was recently cleaning out my garage. I found a school paper I wrote when I was twelve years old and it asked you to write about yourself. And this sentence is I love everything that has to do with sports. And then I go on and list, all the sports I like, and I just. I don't know if I thought I could ever do it as an athlete or a participant. But I spent a lot of my time watching loving, I had Sports Illustrated. I would read it covered cover like even the letters to the editor unit all the letters in the beginning every week, and I would wait for that Sports Illustrated. And then I would watch literally everything, you know, boxing was really big back in that time. There wasn't hardly any women's sports on TV. So I would obsessively read about like Mary decker was one of my early heroes in my choose the distance runner that has some tragedy during the Olympics and could never win a gold medal. And I would read about people. So I think I was obsessed with sport. And I went to a lot of sports with my dad, but it never occurred to me that I would be doing anything in sports, really. How is your family? Okay, amused. You grew up at a time when. Girls playing sports. Were treated more as a novelty, or isn't that cute? You know, as opposed to a serious athlete. You were just a little too early. Well, I shouldn't say that. I mean, you know, you I was on the. The. A little bit early. I just didn't know no one in our school went to college on scholarships. You know that just wasn't Arlene scaping Utah at that time. But my dad was best with sport. I think he lettered in high school in something like nine or ten things like boxing jockey football basketball, wrestling, like any possible thing you could let her in. My dad did in this little tiny town called Mantar Utah where he was also she purred her in the summers, I'm not making Matt. And he went to the university of Utah sport out of sport and Utah that they have like the middle. She earning competition. I I wouldn't beat the bribe. You know, he was a jockey. And you know, he was a little tiny man who's by three, but he played everything. And then he went to the university of Utah and boxing scholarship so much three you know, like the piper. Yeah. Wow. Wow. Yeah. He did everything. So I get my love of sports for my dad, but our family was really active, and we would go every every Saturday of my life. I went to the desert Jim in Salt Lake City, Utah. We would play pick up basketball. And my dad had the misfortune at the time to have four girls is it took him a while to get his I was sixteen when my brother was born. But so he made all of his girls his fourteen, and I will never forget it would be me. And my and my sisters my other sisters, and we're all short people, and you know, when you're playing pickup at a big, Jim like that you have to win the down the court, and I was never girls and my little tiny death playing. These giant men, you know, and it's like the the the noon lunch crowd that comes from their losses. Their insurance off to play basketball. And my dad would yell at us like if we box out, or you know, what I think I learned to be competitive from the. The pickup games at the desert Jim in folly city, 'cause we had to win this down the court and my dad would get after us if we didn't win, and I just think there's probably meant somewhere in the world that are like wonder what ever happened is those crazy girls that they're definitely. Well at that time. No. I think. I got. I got the job here at Connecticut in the spring of eighty five. You weren't even twenty one yet. Graduated from high Kuhlman. Yeah. So I got the job in spring of eighty five. And. You know, socially. You and your sisters. How how were you viewed socially in school by the other students because of your love of sports? I mean, were you able to just have a normal relationship with the other girls the boys the everybody else or was it like where I went to school? Whereas like, all right, all the jocks were over here, all the car heads that gear heads were over here. And all the pot heads were over here. All the grease were over here. So in a small town, sometimes all of those. Yeah. Yeah. In a small town. Sometimes that happens. You know? Yeah. I was more. I don't a lot between groups because I had so many different interests. You know, like I wanted to sing and be in the choir. And I wanted to be in the school place. So I was involved in the department, and then I wanted to write bows and both will newspaper and I wanted to do student government. So I was student body officer. So I was then I was also the wrestling manager for four years. I loved wrestling. I know I I'm so weird. But I say stuff out loud. What a weirdo, but I loved wrestling, and I was wrestling manager. And then I was the football team manager. And then I would work on the track. You know, like I had so many interests that I did everything. So I don't think I was I about among almost all the groups except for I was a goody two shoes. I never was was the pie for the drinker. You know, I was a grip very strict strict more. Men, and I was very that. He to she's kid, but in it, but in a fun way like we would pull prank there. I remember getting trouble in highschool for stealing one of our cars. We still his parents Mercedes and parked it somewhere where he couldn't find it. And we thought that was funny and tell the. You know, I'm listening. I'm listening to you talk. And it the whole time you're talking. You know, almost listening to so much of what I experienced in that. You didn't you didn't finish school where you started. And you kind of had to go back the story, which I did I left school. And then I had to go back. I had friends who. I went to spend New Year's Eve with this girl who I knew who pay 'em. We were babysitting for this couple that was going out and they had this little kid, and I was a senior in high school junior high school. Maybe I Don I remember junior, maybe junior senior high school, and when I came out my car was gone, and we call the police, and I was like devastated. Oh my God. My car is gone. It's the only car we have in our family. My god. I'm in the doodoo. You know, what am I going to do? You know, I'm panic the cops come they look all over the place. They can't find their we follow report, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, and. Next thing, you know, the policemen drives away and he comes back like two minutes later, and he goes getting a car and getting a car, and we drive a couple of zits your car, and I go. Yeah. And he got mad at me because he thought I was pulling a prank on wall. Turns out some of my guys my friends on the on the basketball team, stole the car and moved it. So that when I came out they were stink they were in a car parked where they were laughing their but off watching this whole thing on fold so people like you who steal cars from their friends and hide him. I have a I have a new vision of you now. So when I talked to you for now on during games, I'm always going to have this smirk of this is the kind of kid that tormented me when I was in high school. Well, let me just clarify one thing though, is I only did that after they still Mike car, and I was afraid it was. It was. So I did not initiate it. I it was. Adagio retaliation God. Yeah. They were kids, but I like four and we were called pump way back then I was asking for she still politically correct, brace tomboys. I don't think that happens. There's nothing wrong with that. Right. No, no, not at all. Yeah. But somewhere along the line some women would find issue with that. And some people would you know would rail against that. That's the world that we live in. You know, how so interesting when you when you when you left when you left BYU. When you weren't in college after you had been in college is I want to see if it was like mine, what were what were you doing? And what did you think you were going to do without a college degree where where did you think this was going? Well, I left with I left to earn money to go back to school. So I would stop working like I was one of those kids were my parents supported me and a lot of ways, but they didn't just give me money to go to college. And so I would stop and I would work for semester or work for almost a year. Save up enough money to go back to college and pay for semester. And then I'd take time off and work. So I had really random dog. I worked with the Republican party as a secretary for a long time. I worked at the Utah state legislature as a secretary, and I had worked for my father who was an attorney as a legal secretary for every summer of my life. So I was a pretty highly skilled person, and I would I would work as a secretary to work as an administrative assistant and then earned enough money to go back to college. So I finally got out of politics. He when I was almost twenty four years old. I got out of college and graduated and then the first thing I did was go back to New York City and doing intern. Ship CBS sports, and that's kind of where my life ticked off. Because one of the very first things you kick out of this. My boss did not believe that is interns were there to make coffee is a guy named Linda Luca. You might know. Lenny should absolutely. Yeah. He was the vice president of programming would be a sports at that time. And I was and I think yeah, I think I was the first introduced ever hired from outside of the tristate area. And I think the way I got the internship was I told him a story about me. And my dad left out we've gone to the holiday bowl watch BYU play. And then we got me scalp ticket and drove up to the Rose Bowl and me and my dad's left out on the parade route for the Rose Bowl in our car watch the parade and then we walked over to the game. And I, you know, and I was just explaining to him how much I love sports. And so I got that internship moved across country from Utah. And I remember being too scared to get out of the subway. I came out of the port authority bus station. And I I was like I'm so scared. I get one around. So that was kind of the start in my life and being brave trying to stuff. Just discovered something. That's pretty extraordinary. I'd heard about it from some coaches, and pro athletes, and now I've experienced it for myself. Mizzen a main Dallas based company is the maker of performance fabric, dress shirts. Now, you say what's performance fabric? Well, you know, this stuff you work out. So you get all the benefits of workout gear. But you wear it with a suit you can dress it up dress it down put a tie on don't put a tie on. So if you see me on the court lately, that's what I'm wear. You. Don't know that it's a dresser it feels like a casual shirt, but it looks like a dress shirt. Yet. It moves around you like workout gear. It's revolutionary. You can check out WWW dot mizzen and main that's Z E N and main M A, I N dot com slash Gino. See some of my favorite shirts. Take a look. You'll be impressed. Give it a shot, husky fans. I know there's no one more loyal than you. And I appreciate that. You know, what else appreciates loyalty AAA so much? So that they'll reward you for like how you get savings on AAA auto insurance just for being a AAA member. And the longer you remember, the more you could save have both AAA auto and AAA home insurance, you could save even more. Have you been loyal to your existing insurance company for a while? We'll though we ward that too with a discount when you switch the AAA. But your loyalty gets you more than saving, it gets you comprehensive help from an expert agent who gets to know you. Because when you're AAA expert agent knows you better they can help you better for insurance. That's not just insurance. Turn the triple. Talking to me, I've known you all these years. There's so much that obviously, I didn't know about you. And it's like, you're. You're describing when I left school same thing. You know, I was paying my way through college. And I said I'd rather make money, you know, and I figure this other stuff out later, you know, so I'm I'm driving a truck, you know, for this guy. I'm working in the steel mill building houses. You know worked in a paint store selling paints. I was a fuller brush delivery person delivering incentive. Yeah. Delivering crazy stuff to you know, he's really fancy neighborhoods, and and the whole time, you know, you know, I've got these coaching jobs in high school. And I'm thinking that you know, I really liked this coaching stuff. So I'll just keep doing all this other stuff because it's fun coaching never thinking like, well, you know, where's this going to lead you to? And I had said I have no idea. And then you realize, you know, I gotta go back to school, and I've got to do this. And I've got to do that. And as you said that time away me start to really enjoy coaching. And and then it took me to where you know to where I am today. So for you. That journey to New York City and being with Lanny who you know, me put that put the first uconn Tennessee game on TV. In one thousand nine hundred five. Where I that's where I fell in love with women's basketball because I you know, being in Utah. And I guess it was just Howard TV network worked at that time. But I never saw women's basketball on TV when I was in college. And when I was growing up, I just never saw any women sports on TV. I'm except for the Olympics, and I would seek nasty and track and field. So I was best with any woman. I thought TV doing sports I became like, I would obsessively read about them. And you know, anything I could the when I was doing this, internship BBS sport, you know, sometimes I would have to lug videos to make sure that the commercial sponsors ran in the right place and give the list to my boss. And then I started I think it was on Saturdays Sundays they would have a women's team on. And it was the first time ever saw women's basketball on TV. And I'll never forget it was the year that Don Dailey Tammy reflate Virginia. And I fell in love with on like, I had never seen a woman this'll sound politically, correct. But this is how I thought at the time. And this was you know, back in the early nineties. I was like man she plays like a guy. I is the toughest she had handled. She would go right up in your grill. You know, put the ball on the dick. And Anne, I fell in love with that Virginia team. And that is probably where my true love is there. You know, I covered some games when I was in college. I would write for the school newspaper. I would cover. Elaine Elliott was the coach at Utah. You don't I'm art of moon, but I would cover that game. And and go to games and stuff, but I'd never seen a level of basketball like that Ginny team before. But that's the first time I ever saw you on TV. That's the first time. I ever knew anything about you. That's the first time I ever knew anything about pets summit. And I just think of I. I don't know if you appreciate, but that can the uconn rivalry back in the early nineties. How that transformed women's basketball for the rest of us? Do do you ever think about that? I do I do at times, especially when people bring it up like, you know, like we're talking about it. Now. You know, I think back like you a little bit. You know, we played Virginia in hundred ninety one in the final four New Orleans, and it was at this real tiny arena lakefront arena. There's eight thousand people there, and you know, the semi finals world Saturday in the finals were on Sunday. We lost Virginia. And I was nineteen Ninety-one, and you know, ninety two ninety three ninety four everything was the same that nothing. There's really not no big change. And. You know, when we got really good when that ninety five season came there just seemed to be the perfect storm. You know as word that everybody likes to use these days, but you know, CBS and ESPN and the New York Times, you know, places they're really warm paying that much attention before even though there were still good basketball out there. Because of where we are. And the way it kinda played out the right people started paying attention to people that could get the message out to the rest of the country and that ninety five game on ESPN. You know, they got the big. They got the message out. And the New York Times, you know, it's not like it's in the Hartford current it's in the New York Times every game. So every every major city in America gets the New York Times. So. Yeah. I think back, and I go there were a lot of good basketball. There was a lot of good basketball being played before that game. But because of the situation that game and that year that team really. Really spread. Around the country and. You know, and it made a lot of made a lot of things possible. I would like to think that women's sports and female broadcasters play by play analysts, you know, studio hosts on ESPN or CBS or FOX or NBC you name it. You know, they all kinda. Exploded. And I don't know that you our games with Tennessee were were the cause of that. But I do think we had a hand in all that for. Sure. Absolutely. Oh, for sure I think from me looking at it. It was to you know, once in a lifetime type coaching. But I think that we always talk about this and men tennis right now. Like remember, the old math in row Bjorn Borg or Jimmy Connors, or for sure, you know, you always have to have your arch enemy for to really transcend. And just the way you were. And the way Pat was I think we all got obsessed with this rivalry, you know, you were the bigger than life characters. And if you had I really think if you hadn't had each other in this dynamic. I don't know that you've had it since I guess you Notre Dame of maybe had it a little bit. Right. But do you think things? Yeah. I don't think it's the same thing. Because I think we played too many times. Right. Which is which is good Embiid. It's good Embiid. Right. But muffins more, you know, she's more low key in a lot of ways. And we dominated that Notre Dame. Series for so long that it was too one-sided to become bitter rivals. You know, I saw thing recently the North Carolina men's rivalry that like I dunno after ninety games or one hundred and twenty games. I forget what it that. At one point last year the year before they each one the same exact number of games. They had each scored the same exact number of points. I mean, it was really interesting. How razor thin? Yeah. Where whereas I think I rivalry with Tennessee was like that. You know, it was everything was bitter. Every it was bitter fought the players were there weren't necessarily friends. It's not like today where they all text each other and talk to each other like buddy-buddies. It was you guys were always meeting with bigger things on the line for the most part when it comes to the college basketball season. The only team that matters is the Yukon huskies got that with the Wells Fargo uconn women's basketball debit card, you can show your husky pride with every purchase you make head to your local Wells Fargo and ask for your new uconn women's basketball debit card today. Wells Fargo is the official retail Bank partner of uconn women's basketball in basketball. Accuracy can be the difference between winning and losing. And this is also true when it comes to your health the genius three D. Mammography exam is a more accurate and comfortable mammogram for all women. So why not find the facility that offers the genius exam near you? Visit fine. My genius three D dot com. To learn more and make sure your next mammogram is a genius exam is your retirement game plan a well executed play or a wild shot. At the buzzer. Johnson Brunetti has helped over twenty five hundred Connecticut families. Prepare for financially, secure retirement. And they are proud to be the wealth management partner of the Yukon huskies. Visit them at Johnson Brunetti dot com and see how they can help you with your retirement Johnson, Brunetti retirement investments specialists, go to Johnson, Brunetti dot com for free books and financial planning tools. You know, I look now and I've seen doing the games, you know, and and it used to be that women did. You know, they would wheel out by let's get our token woman to do a woman's game. And that would be the only time you would see them working on television. And I I would say, you know, I mean like who was back then we are. Lesley Visser was doing a lot of stuff back in those and. Who was the girl? The woman. Yeah. But even before that during them even before that. Phyllis George was doing the NFL around and that was a while back. So it was rare. And it was almost like a a novelty, and you know, and then I think all of a sudden, you know, you started to see. You know, Robin Roberts is doing the she's on ESPN. Sportscenter person. Now of a sudden she's doing play by play. And now of a sudden, you know, you go in and you see a woman doing play by play and doing the color commentating. And doing the sideline. So the the world that you're inhabiting right now is so much different than the one. I grew up in. And it must feel good for you. You know, people asked me, you know. Hey, look. You know, you've done this for women's basketball. But don't people look at you the same way like say Holly, you know, you're you're. A household name. If if people say Holly road, they all know who who they're talking about saying, oh, yes, she's the one that does women's basketball football player football fans. No, you baseball fans. No you softball fans. No. You, you know, track a feel fans. No you. I wanna give Leslie visitors some credit here because I I was an internet. I was telling you for CBS sport. And I met Lesley Visser, and she was really nice to me, you know, I'd just gotten out of college at inching work city. And they have this talent seminar to get ready for the March madness for the tournament thing this was in ninety one or ninety two probably ninety two and I'm passing out the binders, you know, I'm like the low level in passing stuff out. And she's really nice to me. We ended up coming friendly. And she says maybe ever thought about five nine reporting. And I thought about being a reporter and an inker, but I didn't know what by reporting what? So so I really credit a lot of my career success to lessen Visser. She's the first one that ever said that me, and then I started really watching her and she set up a meeting for me with guy named Marty Glickman. Do you know who that is? Marty Glickman used to do the Yukon men's games. Now. Did he yes, yes? He was the voice of uconn basketball. Yes. I did not know that. So he was obviously, very famous. He may have been one of the first play by play people. And he has fascinating. Like, he was a Jewish man that was athlete, and he was banned to go from the nineteen thirty six Olympics in Germany what they'd also learn. So he stayed back and started and now things sport. And then went on to have this legendary career in commentating. So as she suggested I get together with Marty Glickman. And so he took me to breakfast on a Upper West side cafe and he talked to me about his career in about what he thought it took to be a good broadcaster. And he said something I'll never forget. And I've really patterns my career after that is people should watch a game and think oh man what a great game. Like, oh my gosh. Did you know about that Jean Horia, and you know, coming here from Italy at, you know, seven years old that does that they should remember the game and the stories and. Not the announced you should not get in the way of the broadcast should not ever be about you. And and that was really advice I took to heart in this, you know, meeting with Martin mcminn. So he became kind of a mentor of mine, and we would write letters. I wrote many letters through the years, but I really credit Lesley Visser, and Marty Glickman that was kind of my start. And then I went back home to Utah after that, internship and started doing game. And I started doing you'll appreciate this. So there were no games on the radio or TV or anything for women's still back in that time. So I did a time by on the radio. And I paid for the time. And I went out bowled all the commercials. So that I could afford it because I was pretty poor. And I got the first ever BYU Utah women's basketball game on the radio in Salt Lake City, Utah buy me pink. And then later that year. I got the Texas Tech Utah women's basketball game on the radio, and that was the year that she'll poops went on to win the national championship and Utah beat Texas Tech that year. Shirl soups in the Huntsman center. And I got those games on the radio. So that I could give myself a chance to be the announcer. How about that? You know, I really hustled back in those days you make opportunities for myself. But I credit Lesley Visser for for, you know, giving me the idea and motivating me, and then when I got back from New York City, I you know, I was really fired up after that. 'cause I could see what was possible, you know. So I would work for and five jobs, and I I remember working an overnight shift at a radio station for trucking show trucking across America. And then every twenty minutes, I would do a sports update. So I could practice because I was like my boss is aren't listening. They won't know if I'm doing sports update. They're not. That's funny. Because I used to work basketball camps for one hundred bucks a week. Night. Talked about being, you know, fuller brush salesman and coaching here in here. But what when did you think was your first real job where you were like, this is what I'm gonna do whatever. Oh, God, not Tila. I would say. You know, I was still in school. And I started coaching ninth grade girls. So I was twenty maybe twenty one maybe I was maybe twenty one and the kids I was coaching where what fourteen fifteen fourteen ninth graders. And and foster was the head coach Jim foster was the head coach at this high school. And I was coaching ninth. Then the the freshman team, and I was his assistant and. And I thought I'm I'm just doing it to do Jim favor. I'm this is crazy who who who does this for a living who coaches women's basketball for a living, especially, you know, girls high school basketball who does that. So I think it wasn't until I started working with Phil Martelli. At at a Bishop, Ken, Rick, and we were coaching the boys, and I was his assistant that I really started. The thank you know, what? I think I could be pretty good at this stuff. And that that's that's kind of you know, that time lime for me. I was like twenty five or twenty four twenty five or twenty six maybe. In at the time. You know, I I didn't know where it was going. I had no idea. I just knew that. I enjoy doing. And I sometimes I would have to go right to practice or write to a game depending. Because I was I was stocking shelves in a supermarket. So I was there from like eleven or midnight to like six AM. You know, the radio blast in, you know, all these boxes, and you gotta put frosted flakes over here in the, you know, the tuna over here and the uncle Ben's over here. You know, you're doing that for six hours. And then you're going to have a job as a Stocker. So you could afford it to be a cook. Is basically what great absolutely right. So, you know, but you know, you you fall in love with the game. Like, you did you know, you fall in love with that aspect of the game. And. I'm curious. How did? Maybe Landy, maybe Leslie. How did the ESPN thing come about? Okay. So I'll be quick about this. But I was working at the sideline reporter after I did bed internship. I went back to you got a job working for the blue and white sports network. They did BYU and air force games and syndicated them during the week. I was the affiliate relations coordinator, and I would be in charge of getting stations to carry the BYU football game and then on the weekends. They would let me be the reporter for do the halftime shows the one one week ABC came in and took our game. So we didn't get to do the local broadcast ABC took the game and they didn't have a sideline reporter listed. So I called the fourteen formation guy. And it was like, hey, why don't they have a sideline person? He said, oh, this is a b level game at too low level. They don't travel five hundred four hundred two. So I called the producer of ABC. And sometimes I look back, and I'm like, I cannot believe what a brazen. We like what was I thinking by call the producer? And I say, hey, I normally do these games for BYU. I'm already prepared for this game. You know, I went to the university graduated from the university of Utah. I'm very up on this team. Can I do this game? And I can't remember if I said X Tim taper like a resume tape for someone else. Just vouched for me. But they ended up letting me do that game. And it was in nineteen ninety five BYU Utah. And I did the game for ABC sports. So I started figuring out that if that game didn't have a reporter then their game the next week that was a D level game wouldn't have a reporter. So I called the producer and said, hey, I can get to San Jose's. I can do your game next week. And you know, he didn't know it. But I was like taking a train or you know, like, I I was really poor. I was young mom. My son was I think he was four months old at this time five months old, and I was breastfeeding, and I was still hustling, and I would take a train to Fresno or take a train to San Diego. And do these games for ABC? And what I didn't realize is the games were on satellite. The boss is back in New York City were the game and someone back there like my work on my work in the next year. They offered me a fulltime job with ABC. Doing these games? And they offered me a full package game will bat gentlemen, who offered me those games that summer was killed in a plane crash. Remember the plane crash that a lot of people going to the French Open from New York City. And the plane just exploded over the ocean. Yeah. Yeah. He asked this executive and his family was on that plane going the French Open. And so I didn't really know what to do. I didn't know if I should call ABC and say like, hey, this guy offered me this job. And you know, I just didn't know what to do. And obviously it was such a tragedy. I wanna do anything inappropriate, but didn't do anything. And then the next year. I sent my take to this guy mode Davenport at ESPN and knee hired me. And that's when I started kinda fulltime. So I did games off and on ninety five ninety six and then ninety seven ninety eight I got kind of fulltime football work for U P N, but I was still four I would only work like fifteen sixteen for bugging. And then I still have to work my regular job at BYU. And then I still work at the radio station. And I you know, and I had a baby. And baby. So I was doing all this with the Brennan bathing bird. Well, you know, most most people who work in television. They have some downtime to kind of rejuvenate. You know kinda. Study up a little bit Galloway of the land for what's coming up next season. You do you ever get any time away? I mean, you're doing college basketball, women and men you do college football. The whole season. The now you're getting ready to do volleyball and the whole I'm sorry softball and the whole softball World Series, which you know has. Kind exploded big time. So you got the whole season. And then you got the the World Series. And then before you know, it football sees, you know, starts in August. When Wendy you have some time to for yourself. Well, one I I'm aware that I have issues I'm aware of it. But my downtime is in a summer like June, July, but that's when I worked WNBA, and so the WNBA my down time, and and I don't mean any disrespect by that. But that is my passion project hobby. So like, I do the WNBA, but I never feel for one second like working like that's my summer hobby and project, I they're going to the NBA game the very first season. I'm you won't ever remember me. But I actually was stage manager at a Utah stars game. When you came out with. I think Robin Roberts. Maybe did you do a who've been announcing with Robin Roberts. Yep. You, sir. I would hand you the like the first two year. Yeah. That that's the first time ever met you. And you know, I was just some dumb production person handing you the card. They're telling you. Hey, we're going to a commercial break or can I get you water or anything like that? So so I think doing the WNBA for literally since the first day, and it's just important to me. And I love it. And so that's what I did. My downtime is says the WNBA because that's my passion project. And and I really love it were you heard it here. First all our fans that are listening. Holly. Rowe has gone from asking me if she can get me water to now ask you what the hell's wrong with your offense at halftime when we can't make shot or asking me request. Or asking me in gain questions. Like are you going to do anything to stop these guys from scoring? What's wrong with you guys? I liked it better. When you said would you like some water? 'cause you know in Las knowing and in Salt Lake City after the game's over you can't get much lease back in the early. You know, nine days you probably out there. I was dying out there. Nine ninety seven. That would have been ninety seven. Yeah. Yeah. So then I I get so I worked my way up work my way up and I'm trying to work all these games. And I get cover your team for the very first time in two thousand and first and second round. Now this was on campus. This is the first round of the ornament, and I came to the U contract is I'll never forget because it was like Yukon versus Hampton. I think was the opponent. It was like one hundred thirty eight forty two was score. It was like literally the worst broadcast. I've ever been a part of my life. I'm like avenue. Do you? Remember that? Do do bird. When Taylor cash will never forget when pay I love that name shea Rowden that long and that hold route, and I came to your practice and to this day, and I'm not just saying them talking to you. I've said this many people through the years to this day. I have never been to a harder more competitive practice, and the reason it was competitive with the players held them stuff to this standard at the that the hair on the back of my neck with up. The only ever practice. I've ever been to rival that was two thousand eight Kansas men on their way to the national championship. They wanted that year. And I'll just never forget the cutting and the drill work and the then screaming at the walk on like if the walk on didn't hit the shot in the drill. The players would just be on them and yelling at each other. And I've just never seen women practice or play like that in my lifetime. And that was the first time I really got exposed to you. What was the Yukon machine? And it was so cool. Yeah. Those are the good old days. It's it's hard to give players to do that stuff today. I wished you could put them on. You have any old films of those practices? All your guys never take those practices. I wear to got if you would play those tapes. I just have never seen anything like the personal accountability that those players held each other too. You gotta show that your team like that. I think that you can't send a good job of passing down the intensity. And how you practice your pace and play. But some of it Lou the you know, it's like the game of telephone. You don't quite get it, right? By the end. For sure. Days of those women would rip your zeroed out? They would. Yeah, they went it was it was it was a different time. It was a way different time. Wh when you were, you know, now, you're you know, you've got this thing going and things are going great. Everything's on the right trajectory. And then all of a sudden, you know, you get this incredible news. That you know, you're gonna have you're gonna have to deal with the cancer thing. What what was that? Like when you know in the middle of your going, great in the middle of things are great. You know, I've got a really great gig going. You know, I've got I've got things the way I want them. And then that that pops up what happens. Well, I think I was in denial for a long time. I don't think I understood how serious it was. It was melanoma. It was contender tensor. I thought they would just take it off. And everything would be great. And then it just kept spreading. And you know, I've had a new tumor, and then I had a tumor in my lungs, and and you know, it just kept getting so serious than I didn't. I didn't understand that. I guess and I never forget one day. The doctor was telling me you need to start thinking about how you're spending your time. And I was like what you know. 'cause I always thought I would beat it and everything would be fine. Like, I was just so optimistic and it'd be great. And he said, you need to tell your son what's going on got new tumors in your lungs, and you know, I I didn't know this at the time. But I guess if you get tumors in your lungs that are inoperable, you know, you probably gonna be dead within about a year. And I didn't I didn't realize this very. Eighty any of this. And so I kind of close my eyes went home from the doctor that day close my eyes. Like, what would I doing? If I only had a little while to live. And I realized I was doing like, I I'm really close with my son. I love him. We hang out together a lot. And then I go and watch sports, and I'm pretty much doing everything I would want to do maybe I would travel a little bit more go to Italy and drink wine or something like that. So it's been really weird because. One. I don't think I really processed how series it was. But I think that was good for me too. I've just had like your team. I remember blaming a bed at home. I just had surgery and the first game. I was gonna miss was Yukon, South Carolina women's game. I think this is two years ago. And. That was the first game. I was gonna mitt and your your team did something really sweet for me and stuff. Carolina. Do we who is you know, was still shy? At that time was like took the microphone was talking to the crowd about Holly. Rowe and I was just laying in bed with drain hanging out of my body. Just come out of surgery, not meant a lot to me. Like that really really meant a lot me because I was I was hurting. And I was the first significant work. I was missing and it was hard. And so I set a goal to get back for the AA tournaments and to get back. So I could be there for I think that was doing final final season. It's like I gotta get back. I gotta be able to see this this possible for P through. Play. You guys helped me in a very dark dark time. Well, I appreciate that. It to the average person, you know out there. The picture of you. Doing games? You always have a smile on your face. You always seem like you're. You're the happiest person in the arena, you're enjoying it. More than the players more than the fans more than anybody. There's this just happiness about you. So for you to all of a sudden be going through something that isn't going to necessarily make you smile, I think the hard for people, you know, in our business that see you so much to envision you being down because that just doesn't go with with who you are with your whole being, you know, you've never been like that. Never ever. No matter. What was going on? You've you've always been the same. You're the happiest person in the gym every day. So I think it it affected a all of us in a certain way. And you know, we took it we took a personally as much as as much as you can when it's not happening to you. So we're glad that you're back. We're glad that it's you know. Kind of business as usual. So to speak, and you're. You're back on the sidelines. You're you back asking questions you back commenting on. What you see what you hear? And and and you're still smiling. And you're still having a great time. And every you know, sometimes we make sports so serious. And I it's one thing I've always been mired by you. Don't take yourself too. Seriously. Don't you think people in sports take themselves through seriously? Yeah. I mean, this is so funny. I'm pretty sure it's called the game. Right. I mean, this is the game. Right. You said that I was listening to your resupplied cast. And you said something that I've repeated several times then of you guys lost your first regular season game in four years. You know when other teams lose it's in the sports section. You know, you might read it in your local paper. And when you come on. It was on the CBS evening news like I could not wrap my mind around that like it so news worthy for your team to lose that. It was on the maybe as evening news. Yeah. Now, let me ask something before we before we kind of wrap it up. Have you done? Any or a number of Alabama football games? Oh, yeah. Yeah. I have done. Oh my gosh. Probably fifty. So your take on Nick Sabin before? Doing any of their games? And then after. What right. What should what your which will take on it? So the Knicks statements me is one of the most fascinating. I get fascinated by coaches, you know, I've had a long held fascination with you. I think I've studied you like a specimen in a you know jar. I I'm I'm interested in people, and what makes them special, right? Like, you know, you know, I best you million questions about why you're good at what you know. I'm very fascinated with you, and I have that same nation with Nick Sabin. He when I very first met him. He was coaching at Michigan state, and I remember going in his office, and he was so shy and socially awkward. He couldn't really even get up from his desk. Ingred us properly, and we've got there and had this very awkward meeting preparing for their game and the one I'm really proud of how he has developed and forced himself to become better at the things. He wasn't good at. He's always been a good coach. He wasn't always good with people and being the forward facing person. You know, you're naturally gregarious. Listen terming, and he he does not have that. But he's gotten better at it. The thing that he's very good. At is. He's been most consistent person on the planet. I did his radio show one time. And I said what when is the last time you did something spontaneous. And I'm not kidding you. You know, he literally could not come up with an answer. And I look out in the audience and his wife is shaking her head. Never. He's never done anything on. Right. Like this skill. It takes to come in and do your job at the same level and have the same expectation the same practice of thing. You know, like it is hard to be consistent. But I really I admire and respect him. You know, they lost this year in the national championship. And I was so annoyed with the headline that come out of that. Oh, it's the end of the dynasty at the end of the air. It. They lose one game. I know that feeling. Yeah. Yeah. Like he's now lost two game in four years in the regular season. That's not normal. Nobody does that. And so really irritates me. When people are like, oh, well now, this guy is falling right. Well, it's the first it's now, it's funny. It's the first time we've lost. Regular season games or any games in regulation since two thousand thirteen I think something like that. Yeah. Nine though, we got to wrap it up. But let me ask you this. You're the only coach like you were literally the only coach. And this is something I admire about you. That is willing to lose a game to send a message. And I can think of a handful of times that I've seen you do this through the years. You did it once with Brandon Stewart, I think when she was a freshman or a sophomore you sat her in a key moment, you did it with Gabby Williams against Notre Dame last year you sat her in Meghan half. You did it with Kristen William against Louisville this last week in the second half. She didn't play much is why are you willing? Why is the development and growth of your player? Be most important thing. Well, it may not be fair. And certainly, you know, you can argue that it's dumb, you know. And you're taking a chance that that player may react negatively, and in today's world, you know, you don't know what they're getting from their parents or their handlers, or they're, you know, in social media, whatever the nonsense, but. To me, I want I want my players to feel what it feels like to play great and to feel like they're getting better and to feel like they earned the respect of their their teammates. I want them to feel that when they play great. And when they do great great things and at the same time, I don't want to gloss over out of want. Then that just go my bad when they're not giving you the effort that you know, they can when they're not playing at a level that you know, they can. And it's not just that they're struggling it's just their whole being right now during this particular game is look I'm checked out. Like, I I don't know what you're talking about. I don't really believe what you're saying. And I think they have to experience the pain of what it feels like the sit there helplessly and not be able to do anything because that's going to stick with them. And they're going to remember that the next big game that the rain, and they're going to go do I really want to sit there and feel like that at the end of the game. And you know, the guys that are great competitors. They they react from that situation and going I'm never put myself in that. In that in that place ever again. So what's a loss in in the big scheme of things? What's a loss? Compared to what this kid is learning. That's going to help them not just the rest of this year. But next year in the after in the year after so, yeah, it's a short term sacrifice for long term gain. And I've always been that way. One game lesson CNC tournament one game. Doesn't mean anything to me? To me. It's so what are we going to do long term? You know, you talk about long-term we were interviewing, and it's Rasi this year for the WNBA semifinal and Phoenix and Seattle say this epic five-game failure. And winter's going to the championship and to bird and dinas Rasi are playing against each other. And I asked the Diana before on the show. Yeah. Oh my God. They those to put on a show, but I sat through and dying. I can't believe looking back that they let us do this. But I put soon Diana together in the pre game interview. And they sat there together and talk about themselves together. It was like the coolest TV moment for me. But Diane, we asked about you know, when was the last time, you didn't feel you know, like when was the last time, you feel in control in the basketball Ford or something that affects and she talked about sitting on the bench crying. She's like, oh, I know what it was. We asked her why she wins. All these close games why she can hit this last second shot and be so good in those moments. And she said because I never wanna feel like I did sitting on the bench crying and tear against Notre Dame back in college ever again. I mean, my God that was twenty years ago. Right. How long ago was that? And that memory they'll so fresh and so painful for her. But that's what's. Driving her to be the greatest of all time is she remembers that feeling on that bench. Crying against Notre Dame moving that game. Yeah. It's a weird thing. It's a weird thing that, you know, people remember pain, and how much it hurts a lot longer than they remember, you know, the fun part, the U fauria of something great. It's just human nature. I think pain hurts and hurts usually last a lot longer than things that make you feel good. So the great great great competitors. They don't ever forget. They forget nothing. They feel everything they hold on to everything they look for every single little thing that they can use to kick your butt next time. And that's what the great ones do the guys that are just average. They complain about it. They they shrug it off, you know. And that's what I worry about. You know, when when you watch games, but we'll talk about that another time. But. Listen, I know you got a lot going on and you're off to the races again. But hopefully. I don't know if you're doing our game against South Carolina. I don't know if you're doing anywhere NCA games. But hopefully, you'll be at the final four. I'm sure. And hopefully, my team will be there. And we'll get to redo it. Our annual our annual tradition. I think it's become an annual tradition and. Look forward to doing it again. And I. I said it during during the podcast, I'll say it. Again, the smile on your face the way you bring which you bring to the arena. No matter how you feel when you walk in soon as you have to interact with you, you just automatically feel better. And I I can't say that enough times. Thank you. I think that are being at these moments and getting beyond that stage with you and your national championships moments. The great treasure, and you gave me a bottle of wine about a year and a half ago when I was in the worst part of my cancer treatment, and it's a mount brave, and I've been dating that bottle of wine. And when I get my all clear that I'm done with all this cancer stuff. I'm saving that mounts brave bottle of wine, and we're going to have a glass the thing for for all that you've given to me as well. I've got a bunch of those where that came from. And that's the first thing I thought of as who better represents this mount brave, then then you so we'll enjoy it. I promise you still there. Perfect. I'm still there. Make me choke that I'm trying not to talk. All right. All right. All right. No choking up. All right. I'll see you hopefully in a couple of weeks. Okay. Okay. Okay. Thank you so much. He's just absolutely dating. I could talk to you forever thing. You know? I know I know I'll see you Holly. Thank you Bye-bye. Well, there you have it. Another addition of holding court with Gino Auriemma, you've listening. You've been listening to Holly. Rowe you've seen her. You thought you knew where is a lot more tour, then just another voice behind a microphone. Hopefully, you got a better understanding of where she comes from what our history is what she brings and how passionate she is about her job. So thank you for listening and be on the lookout for. For our next and fishing in court. But, you know, thank you.

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Episode 22: Terry McAuley

Holding Court with Geno Auriemma

1:08:50 hr | 10 months ago

Episode 22: Terry McAuley

"Hugh way more famous than we were on runs undefeated runs who was I calling. If you don't WanNa know how do I keep this is Gino Auriemma and this is holding court more famous in China Liangelo Ball I mean he just became famous years ago and now on Sunday nights the referee up in the booth that approach and the game as it was played then back in the middle of football season here Terry mcaulay longtime NFL official Crunchy Three Super Bowls and bottle gate you'll hear about I love the shack okay hi everybody I've had whether be Charles Barkley or tiger or you name it Kobe US stars like Sheryl Crowe TV business leaders Media Ernie Johnson we try to cover a whole lot of different things on this on this podcast away the college game is being officiated but it does seem like as the NFL has has his take on this and welcome to year three holding court is the name of our podcast and it can accomplish anything sports figures that we there's also you know awful lot of money that comes into play that I think is is is certainly having some effect on in college for a long time as a supervisor and as I said longtime NFL and now NBC lots and lots of Oh to win there's a challenge on the field for Sunday night football on NBC without Michelson Chris Collingsworth List and hopefully things that you don't hear about read about quite often from people certainly on on the structure on the culture of of the game itself I mean what five versus g-5 and and and and and game the way it's played now the college game let's start with what have you seen in the evolution of the game itself and all of that the you know the Commissioner's Kinda Kinda their territory they're really focused on it seems more about you know that Ah that magical dollars all those dollars that are coming in rather than and and this is the officiating world talking about rather than really focusing on Wenchuan in entertainment sports business whatever the case may be today we have since its smell action it does seem to be more of a business than than it's ever been before I mean you know it's still a a a a terrifically great sport that we all love but great stuff coming up on football and a lot of other topics as well hoping back to when you were doing what's right and what's wrong and and I guess by that I mean I get concerned where they're looking at the entertainment Aspen Act or or how it affects their piece of the world for forgiven conference as opposed to you know our the officials doing what they're supposed to be redoing on on any given play and then letting the chips fall where they may and kind of as an example now as as when I was a coordinator in college you know if a call if a call went against you know a team in it didn't affect the bottom line it did have an impact on a particular team getting to a particular place where where the dollar figures you know were what we there's lines was that was the replay was the review of the play what they wanted then there was a half say almost held to pay you know during the off season dealing with with that aspect of it I wished the long-term bottom line of of the conference then oh well aright we'll we'll we'll let this one slide but if it did affect it all of hey let's make sure we get it right or and you're like you're saying the business of football is to be and living and dying with it and if it's a human error it's just a human error well what even replay is often in the eye of the beholder and what is right and what is wrong so you know I think we've gone way too far in in in all sports in the subjective arena of using replay and using technology to get it right as as opposed to we could go back and and and and certainly some of that in there forever but but not the extended his now I wish we could go back to officials you know making a call reviews of replay and get it right but now as it's developed in in in in many people predicted this would happen it is siding Colorado really a game impacting call affect the outcome of the game that was the original intent and that is always going to be a great intent in any sport get it right at any cost and that's critical and you know the any cost aspect of it because first of all getting it right getting it right as well we have technology now we've we just gotta get everything right at any cost that's the crowd that's winning both in the college level and the NFL staying with the object did step on the line or not who touch the ball last clearly touched the ball last was his knee I will Kind of digress a little bit I thought the greatest abusive replay I've ever seen was in the men's national championship game where we stopped big to let human error be a factor that would now we need to bring electron equipment in and how the I union there's an official I never wanted to get on the plane knowing I made a mistake that could have been corrected through technology through replay through objected the impact the way officials do their job I think originally the it's the former it it was let's just make sure we don't have a gain a game in under two minutes for two minutes to decide a ball knocked out of bounds but uh of the dribblers hand may have touched his pinky for the history of the game on the ball break the plane You know those objective things that that if you have the right angles you can always say yes or no Goes back to the offense and nobody says a word so I I mean I it's one reason we're doing this podcast because I wanted to get that every in every sport that that's using replay has has got the learned there it's still sports it's still human error human successes where the guy from the rams wipes out the receiver on a pass no call I've coached sports I've been around examples out I think it was in the women's World Cup and I don't know the rules very well but I guess the goalie on a penalty kick her her heels were off the line maybe a quarter the bottle there that ball goes he didn't reach for it it didn't go off as me it touched his pinky maybe I'm sure it did but anyway fit two minutes looking at and and and to try to get it right at any cost has has damaged the game already and if you continue down this path it's going to damage games even more for an answer half an inch really use replay to to fix that what are you fixing so again this is something that the powers that be out there I think it was the greatest replay that changed the game right there you know that changed the game of basketball ever in my mind and I'm not sure they can get the genie back in aw that that really understands the game that's what you're supposed to do and football is certainly headed that direction as well it's been that way I'll give you another example just don't call it when it's that close and just you know just just aired you know too far the other way so I don't he did most times and I don't want to comment on the person that was involved in this because I don't know is that a case in most times the guy just didn't see it or he it's all my life so of you and we've all seen officials on both sides of it get it right get it wrong why did they miss it why did they see it is that a case where the kid double dribble the backward right and you go okay so we had the replay and the ball went off the guys Pinky Ah the guidance they have they're they're they're trying to in real time implement that that philosophy in that guidance and those rules so in real time that that everybody in America saw had huge impact on deciding the game no no action of play the no one saw happened had to make a judgment what does what does the League one called on this play and he didn't make the incorrect league does want that called but he did make I did see it and just said that's not a foul which would take I think it's the latter I think we're going to we're going to dismiss the fact this helmet to helmet well to your point then to follow up on that human error what the that incorrect judgment and I I think it was just a human error when when it came in the final analysis in real time he didn't get it right time this play it while it's clearly a foul is a lot closer than than than people give it credit for the ball is not that far away from the receiver and that's not that's not sports and that's not how you want the game played I mean nobody thinks that that's the way it is league once called that's this is what they want this is how they want the game officiated soon now you come to this season and you say well there's rules there's this this is going to be called this is going to be called we're GONNA call this we're GONNA call that we're GONNA call holding different we're going to call you know the the the quarterback but that's that's that's Kinda the getting back to your question this this get it right at any cost while I think the crowd the crowd says well they got it right it did touch his pinky right it more while you know what's interesting is in in Virginia Game in the championship game I think it was maybe it was the semi finals was the championship game we have a guy clearly double dribbling in Novacor and nobody calls it and no reply so a play that gets two minutes to review and a follow up that I want your thoughts on this the New Orleans Saints La Rams and goes this is ridiculous so now you've got the officials trying to do with the League wants the players reacting saying this is stupid just going to deal with a pass interference part correct correct I think you know officials are always trying to do what their boss tells them to do what the rules committees this is in football anymore how do you rectify that how do you balance that it as an official you you don't I don't I don't know what the answer to that is particularly I know when I got in the League and and this was one of the best part whatever the rules were in regular season we and and and I think they were little too far away on this particular play and and they felt that it did meet that standard that guidance that don't the timing of it I believed all along there was no way the NFL was going to continue to allow seven offense of holds per game when the and and there was this concept of of if it's too close you you don't you err on the side of not making call so you don't make a call that you shouldn't make in basketball so the officials take it like you said and they take the league guidelines and they go okay this is what we've gotTA call Tom Brady goes on on twitter the roughing the quarterback the hits on the quarterback we're GONNA call that differently we're GONNA WE'RE GONNA we're GonNa really really do something this what the League wants and just like it happens normal average over the over the over the last many years has been two and a half two it just wasn't going to happen I mean they were hoping the players would adjust the players did adjust I'm what maybe enough where they could bring it back but it it they they they just weren't going just wasn't going to continue because it really but it would be nice I just discovered something that's pretty extraordinary I'd heard about it from some coaches and pro athletes and now I've explained dramatically different week to week then then that that that's where the frustration bill so I wish we could go back to that at some point I don't know if we can but it is a much better place right now so so there's a method to their madness with this with the use of the helmet with roughing the passer last year to work for players to make do and then if they adjust then you adjust again which which actually with the holding that's exactly what you saw there was there was some league adjustment and and officials are it's revolutionary you can check out www dot mizzen and main that's up dress it down put town don't put a tie on so if you see me on the court lately that's what I'm where you don't know that it's a dresser if feels differ myself ms in a main Dallas based company is maker performance fabric dress shirts a casual shirt but it looks like a dress shirt yet it moves around you like workout gear now you say what's performance fabric stuff you workout in so you get all the benefits a workout gear but you wear it with a suit you can dress uconn women's basketball debit card today wells Fargo is the official retail bank partner of uconn women's basketball easy E. N. and main M. A. I. N. dot com slash. Gino see some of my favorite shirts take question that I think is really an aspect of the game that I think I want to ask about is growing up you know pro football was much different sport than it is today played Eddie's these plays that that were being were not being called last year needed to be called last year the got it out of the players system they they they got the players to adjust and now back to basically normal in calling going off his holding I mean I don't think it was the Tom Brady tweet by the way I I mean I know that gets a lot of play I think it was it was official on the field you do what what the League tells you to do come hell or high water no just whatever the ramifications unintended consequences whatever I tell you to do they did see it they had a couple of officials actually clearly saw you can seem looking at it you know the person who key that is and watching player clearly sees it but in real time you know muddy fields just ridiculous conditions quarter was becoming difficult for anybody to watch and and and and I think they they did send a good message because a lot doc you'll be impressed give it a shot when it comes to the college basketball season the only team that matters is the Yukon huskies if somehow we could figure out how to do that how to get back better for players coaches and officials right fans certainly just watching his people and what have you seen the biggest rule changes that have led to so many points being scored in the NFL and then you know in this day and age maybe we can't go back to that because of the spotlight that's on it and because things happen so quickly and social media and all this other stuff but it would be better if to allow for that to to create this I will say just you know I love a defensive game and you're you're twenty seventeen I no the game have a they don't know why but they know what what it should be and and and and when they see something different week to week or something Guan they stayed that way through the Super Bowl period you whether you like it or not that's the way the rules and the guy were were the same forever I mean premium on on the on offensive you know power maybe it started with bill wash way back in the in the how is viewed as a guy throw a one hitter in baseball and if you don't get four touchdowns you can't win and college if you don't get five touchdowns you can't I wanna ask you a follow up question to that I'm not sure it's won't change is I think it's coaching adjustment that that have put up I had been the referee for it was Dallas and Houston overtime game and I think the score was somewhat close to twenty two seventeen and it was a defensive war before I was at the Super Bowl wasn't what was your characterization of the Super Bowl then offense you don't know you've got guys in the NFL you got mahomes thrown fifteen times in the first quarter and you've got a twenty two seventeen game it with the Wells Fargo uconn women's basketball debit card you can show your Husky pro with every purchase you make head to your local wells Fargo and ask for your new breath to get there because the rules really haven't changed that much with respect to the balance between offense and decent you still have the illegal backs if they threw you know twenty passes you know the packers can win the title and Bart Starr throws a fifteen times Now you tell me if I get this right or not back in back in you know people my age we were used to seeing this let's say ah just last year while you know my my new role here with NBC. Might I I really didn't miss being on the field I was ready to retire but there was one game in fact rule that you had in the Eighties and defensive holding pass interference I mean they they they emphasize it a little more here and there but nothing nothing too dramatic got so much to make the game better it's just unfortunate that we have to go through these early season games and and Nash our teeth and I it to get there risk Cisco in in those years really opening up the game to to allow for where we are now it's going to kind of been a gradual process illegal contact rule came in I think it was sometimes in the seventies they may have been the eighties but there was a time where you could do that absolutely and then they wanted you know they want take Jack Tatum and he's waiting for him at the five five yards away and he just whacks him all the way down the field and then the balls in the air with with them shutting down the homes as best you can and running the ball on offense it was really a great game Frank Reich I thought a great defensive battle on offense to be able to do anything they had to make great place which which Houston did in overtime that was the one game I would've loved to have been the referee you know Harold Carmichael Pretty Eagles he's gone he's on he lines up at wide receiver he comes off the line of scrimmage and the is that really what the rule was and now you can't touch them after to go five yards or do people misinterpreted that I I don't know when the maybe maybe his strategy games as good as any I've ever seen was what underwater okay so tell me ah you're you're right about that sticks out to me yeah but I I do love great and and I thought we just knew this past weekend in Kansas City Indianapolis need to get that more often the passing game involved even more because Jack tatum fitting somebody more than five yards he he's not going to catch football no question in your mom I gotTa Tell You you know she still watches on TV number she said that she said Charles I like you I like you a lot and you were smiling but then she said but you know what and then they ran the ball to so this is almost it's funny that you bring this up now because that's almost what we saw last last fun it was the defense I think I only really one great flaw into play and that was the past a gronk about the three yard line that's that's the only thing I remember I remember all those and it wasn't that the offense is wearing out because that's a whole different story you don't want that because it's not a decent the battle battle of WHO's more inept on offense this was this was just back you know again I wish I think it was in the late seventies maybe early eighty when they did then that did open it up a lot for what bill wash wanted to do certainly you get into his route so they wanted to get their routes and and and so they put any illegal context they could open it up somewhat small defensive linemen and they run like hell and they're they're quickest hack and how you going to keep these guys out of the backfield how you going to keep them is twenty years maybe the guidance has that has has has allowed for more point chip Kelly up this year you know being on the field that much the fact that now defenses are getting I think it's completely imbalanced right now by the way in college football that they allowed him to do that blocking downfield on screens and being allowed to go three yards downfield anything other than a touch you know maybe the slightest Jersey grab they can get away with anything you know any stretch is going to be called a foul and that you know that they did so strongly emphasize holding because you know if you're GONNA call holding a lot then they're gonNA have to block legally perfectly legally so fast whereas you know defensive lineman used to be as big as offensive lineman defensive lineman just big linebackers and linebackers from getting to the quarterback if you don't hold them that that was that was that's a great point and that was one reason I I was a little surprised he came into the League and he was one of the guys that was going to try to turn it into a college game where you know we're going to know how to offense and we're going to do this we're going to get sick or he's going to have to throw it away so that was actually you make a great point that was another reason that I didn't didn't think it was gonna GonNa last throughout the year because interference in ineligible downfield rules that that that that H- that plays a great role in college football about allowing before a pass with no rather than just one in the NFL do you also have those rules that he had to deal with and and and the third thing he had to deal with I believe defensive coordinators are probably the hardest working people in football. I really believe that from what I've seen my experience now I think we're in that point where it's it's much much more strictly enforced that they really really do want receivers to run free and you know you see in that you see in that in every sport where everything is being skewed towards offense you know because the the because that that shut shut down the offense free a lot early in the season I think there were some some statistics that were out points we're way down early on the it's harder for you to to manage the strike zone and now they've got in some leagues where electrically they're calling strikes innocent and I remember reading affiliate papers where defensive players like after the fourth week like in a state of revolt going dude I only got so many years in my career I don't Wanna use them all and and and and the game came right back to where it should be I think it's really truly fascinating to watch how that happened yeah yeah you know whatever rules you come up with you know we have some really smart people in sports and they're gonNA come up with ways to to catch up no question about it I mean I mean last year we had if you remember we had all this offense early on late in the season the defensive coaches caught up with him and it got right back to normal and so there's always a cat and mouse game being played and if you're an umpire in baseball and they're making it so much obviously his worst corners and DVD played a little bit cleaner down the stretch though and it has opened up so that the while the rule hasn't changed lean dollar linemen we're going to run up and down the field college actress and the thing is the NFL is strict or on its past look this is what they want you know they got tired of watching you know three to one baseball games and they said well it's lower to mound this make the strike zone now that you can return a kickoff ones last time you saw kickoff return gale Sayers God bless him you know was the most exciting kickoff return guy I've ever seen single time and they're not gonNA stop the guys and they're gonna Gonna GonNa hit the quarterbacks and those in the star is GonNa get hurt and they're either going to get a holding foul or there as long as you didn't you know overtly reroute them you could you could you could make contact with the more than five yards but then an and is that were happening so they had to come up with something to to mitigate that as much as possible and and this is what they came up fighting to see all those points and all that offense or whatever but it luckily that didn't seem to stick at least for now nobody was say fifty something fifty something and everybody's saying this is the future of football I was mortified I saw it as just a glorified game of pitch and catch in the backyard AH along with bad and along with defensive holding you know there was a point where you you could grab Jerry as long as you didn't visually restrict somebody you could grab them ah so hopefully the rules makers and I think you know this year you know the defense you know a little tougher on holding action if it's much easier for me to just coach one side of the ball if I can have the greatest offense in the world I don't even have to worry about the other eleven guys and the defense is going to catch up you know we're going to shift and we're GONNA do this and we're going to do that one hour we're GonNa make that illegal they do what they did in the last year or so changing the rules or it was going to go away. The number of injuries was dramatically higher on that one play because of the speed and the collision because you know I it just isn't going to be exciting him long run seeing who can score the most points when you're up into the fifties or sixty within this goes to your point you know defensive players how how much stronger faster they are now it's it's the way these defensive coordinators are using using them as well they can't ever get into a situation where one has a competitive advantage based on the rules that it that that should be foremost in the rules makers question you know that's what I hope I hope we keep seeing this this ten this this rules makers really focusing on that the guy doesn't exist anymore what what's your take on all this with with with respect to the kickoff state it they have the philosophy change or whatever now short of and you brought it up short of now allowing Oklahoma and Alabama recruit certain players you might have three straight heisman trophy winners at Oklahoma and Alabama just looks like they could score on every possession for the rest of the year and Clemson little tougher on offensive pass interference has his health dome a little bit and and I do like that you know it doesn't take a lot too the reason and I think that's a that's a perfectly legitimate reason for it which you know you talk to it was funny brought out chip Kelly who could have guessed that the these these these the the the the defense I think when it comes to rules writing rules making today number one is player safety in every single sport has to be but I think some and really nothing changed in the offensive styles they just the defense caught up and they used their players differently they use the speed the US these these live differently and one of them has one loss and and your chances of making the playoff is zero just because you were not precede times where regardless of sport because it's not fair it's just the scraping it into I'll go back in let's talk about the Kansas City La Rams game last year and for a plethora of great defensive coordinator I mean you have venables at at at Clemson enables irs anyway in top four it just doesn't seem it seems like it's a cartel to the outside world anyway which it seems like a cartel to me to keep that balance and hopefully like I said the rules makers I wish the college will make rules makers would really would really start focusing on this as well they do need to make some and your six and four the five teams in front of you go undefeated or three out of the four and when you've got teams that get the best players and their unstoppable is another question I want to ask you Alan and win it skews a little bit or winter when when a team or teams learned to take advantage of a rule that they get it back the rule change or guidance chain possible for for somebody that's not Oklahoma that's not Ohio state that's not Alabama Clemson to be in the in the conversation you know since they weren't in it from the very beginning just just like you set your original original question about the play offs I I I'm surprised they haven't done it already I have a I have a I have a a a two dollar bet with the the head of the of the cartel but having the traitor legal cartel where they manage and control every aspect of how that business runs and they're not letting anybody says absolutely not going to happen which is disappointing but I think you yeah it's not it's not fair it is it is absolutely not fair yeah except you know we we have a tournament at the end of the year and you still have to win six games you know and hasn't hit their stride yet but how do you create some sense of parody or some sense of competitive balance Indian tire game they're just focusing on that offense of eat and that concerns me a little bit that that we don't see see in college anymore it's it's I'm fascinated you use that word because I have used that word in private over and over again the the the five commissioners have indeed it's illegal the College Football Playoff and Bill I can't remember the last name but I said you know before this contract's up for this this this runs at scores you're going to have to go eight changed I can't watch a big twelve game just can't ever so tell me it's because it's the it's the pitching catch it's it's not in the college football thing you being a big part of college football these years so now let's say the the poll comes out preseason top ten sometimes I and and I know it's true in the college football world that they lose sight of the number two reason you have rules is to balance offense and defense makes sense you you have what you call yourselves the power five yet one of your conference champions is not GonNa make yeah I just don't want to hear something from a coaching world I'll I'll present this to you I younger coaches and this is an all of them but it just seems to be a percent ah about the CLEMSON's in Alabama and Oklahoma's I would refer you to Gino Auriemma at the University of Women's basketball team whose you're just I'm just GONNA throw it up and were completed everytime whoever has the ball last just GonNa win because they're gonNA score last I you know I know it was it was a one time deal probably was very with an I am as disappointed is that you don't see those big run returns player safety reasons they had to do it as far as Clemson House obviously and and but but I think they're getting fewer and fewer of them but but you know in summary on you know when we don't have the ball 'cause we're going out score everybody and it just seems like the kind of taking the easy way out there they're they're not they're not focusing on the else yeah so I I'm a big fan of of moving to eight in the edge on your power rating isn't high enough compared to these guys you're not in the tournament it so if you go to eight then you take all five champions and then bring in three wildcards and now you make everybody happy including betters got more games on every every being part of the college game for so long you're the guy on the outside looking in what do you do you got sixty four teams and Butler can go to the final four M Vcu can go to the final four and Gonzaga can go to the final four because the lights everybody up the WHO George Mason did it years ago or some basketball yeah I mean that's why people love that Sunday you're the crew chief and your crew other than maybe one change here there for a specific game for whatever reason which you're together or preseason Games fifteen regular season Games what's that say right away hey listen you're one of our power five conference but what are you guys is not gonNa make maybe two of you guys are not GonNa make it often you know and and I just think that they're doing a disservice to the game by not allowing teams that are really deserving to participate in there throughout the year and you become comes your second family and most of the time that family gets along very well and does very well a two two don't make it that's correct yeah it makes no sense that's like that's like the the winner of the ACC in a men's basketball sorry your your strengths I mean that gets everybody going and you you'll you'll never have it again with four teams obviously it it's not going to happen what is the beauty of college basketball I I you know I could they'll never go to sixteen but God at least two eight so somebody has a chance you will think about this this and this nobody around it the other thing that you don't have now that you could get with you went to a you don't have the underdog you don't have the suggestion that comes out of the pack that that number one they're damn good and number two you you have to prove it on the on the court you don't get it proven by a poll and each other in a in a casual setting where we can just have fun and laugh and plus don't each other and do all that other fun stuff in basketball accuracy can be the difference between winning and losing and this is also true when it comes to your health the Genius Three D. Mammography exam is more I have each other than than than you're out there as an individual and you you can't survive so that was one of the one of the main things idea throughout you know always there's some obviously you're going to be that close to somebody for that long their issues but but that was one of the things as crew chief as the referee I did apparently what you do is you do these one off games during the regular season get your one point two million dollars and it helps your budget that's that's all I go all I say yeah that's it you go there you go there you go all right couple things when you were when you were doing. NFL Games over twenty five hundred Connecticut Families Prepare for financially secure retirement and they are proud to be the wealth management partner of the Yukon huskies visit them Johnson to learn more and make sure your next mammogram is a genius exam is your retirement game plan a well executed play or wild shot at the buzzer Johnson. Brunetti has helped don't get the Boise state that you had years ago that they'd beat Oklahoma of that now has a chance it's it's it's almost accurate and comfortable mammogram for all women so why not find the facility that offers the genius exam near you visit fine my genius three Dot Com who decides which officials get on which crew and do they take things in consideration there were people I never worked with through the course because they knew if they put Terry and this person together it would be like fire and water and they stayed as far away as since you brought it up you have a history of having in your terms that is so great that gets wrong with everybody in every situation especially with the emotions and everything involved in in in officiating and yes I stayed together all year or does it change during the year we we stayed together all year we the crews are put together in July and you stay together things to be I I might say they're probably doing the exact same thing or have the exact same path or strategy seems have yeah advise big as a postage stamp and let's bring in the the fences and as juice up the ball low bid whatever the heck they did and then all of a sudden home runs like crazy and financial planning tools indeed dot com and see how they can help you with your retirement Johnson Brunetti retirement and investment specialists go to Johnson Brunetti DOT COM for Free Books Championship and and and it is an exclusive club and they decide who gets in and it's really disappointing I can't work with that guy yes device well the vice president of officiating and the NFL puts the cruise together and and they doing details and their view of the official this guy's a pushover I can take advantage of this guy this guy always make sure we went to dinner together on Saturday night always made sure we had devotional and breakfast together on Sunday morning just just to be be with the certainly for nineteen weeks in a row so there is a lot of that going on maybe a little bit less now because the staff is so young compatibility personality types and you know past histories question one and a follow up would be we have a problem or whatever something's going on then we we we can always count on each other now and then you know that season is really really long and if you don't have everything I can from day one to to establish that familial relationship that when when when there's adversity when things when it hits the fans wearing problem Saudi how do players react when there's a call everything on the field which one of my good friends is Joey Crawford and from the NBA's family as officiated football there was hall of Fame Baseball Umpire had personality and strong strong person possible the other person's a great official you know you know I'm sure sixteen referees would have loved to have worked with this other person but Terry and this guy a strong personality you've also been described as this cocky little guy that thinks he's you know in charge of everybody because I do have a rather strong personality I'm the first to admit it would not they they just wouldn't match it would do great damage to the crew and it just wouldn't wouldn't be wouldn't be good and and they and they don't have a good feel for everybody and and who everybody's personality they don't have a track record over a over fifteen years could you know language it didn't matter because they were really upset they thought they were aggrieved and they had an instantaneous harsh reaction to it and are there some you know obviously I don't want you to name any names but are there instances in your career where there's guys that like people would say I don't want that guy on my crew now over over my career in the last twenty years or so it's Kinda Abdin float as to how strict that becomes you know is it and they just turn the other cheek tell me what goes on on a football field that the average fan doesn't see any interaction between players officials dad into account I mean their personality nobody gets along with everybody I mean and it would be I I don't even know where I wanna be around somebody that were they they can they can they can absolutely no how this person would work with this person this other person but they try to do that the best that being said obviously there are situations where they react and you know react quite harsh most things don't see is it's a great relationship the vast majority of the time I mean in in my perspective's referee I work mostly with the offensive line and quarterbacks and I often sublime or the best I think they're the smartest people in the field they just do their job and and move on on a given place hi Joey Crawford knows guys Philadelphia guys they had a reputation when those guys make a call don't say boo because you're getting thrown out of the game this other guy you can say whatever you want to him sleep two eight hundred six something that's happened and for for the most part that was that just roll right off I mean they approach me or giving the situation I had various methods of of getting them back and focused on what they need to be doing it may be just a look and it's nothing personal but nothing by it so what I did and I think most veterans do like an add a strategy giving how whatever level that behavior came at me at had a situation where where you know after pont we're Minnesota and not going to happen nobody's going to screw it up so players were comfortable with Hal Terry was going to respond to how to their behavior at then then there's going to be a problem because they watched so closely as to how how how how you how you handle it had a championship game and react accordingly you know given the situation but pretty much the veteran players knew that there was a breaking point and grew up this game and that was the ultimate thing I was trying to go for nobody's going to screw up this game today if I can help if there's if it's within my power come to me later and say Terry I saw the whole thing you did everything you could not penalised him and wouldn't let you wouldn't let you out of it and I talked to vocal and demonstrative and I I just went right back at him I mean in that particular case no I wasn't gonNA penalize but he was going I was going to let him know that I I've heard sometimes it had to be a harsh word back you know that you know and let them know that you're really you're really getting further along than you the players are watching how an official reacts to a given situation and if they sense that he he's out of control or he's handling incorrectly 'cause I had established a reputation over the years you know curious going to let you have your say he's and he's going to listen to you when you've got a problem and and a forty five players and all the coaches watching exactly how this was going to pan out and he was wrong and I you know he can be quite you know ever crossed it help you because I didn't care what game it was could've been the super bowl could have been preceding week one where I'm not GonNa let us Kinda and that's what you do as as an official and that's why when they had the lockout years the it it was it was the call we p People William and we're all good and and the veteran players notice it's it's an and I'll also give you that give you this need to be along this path of getting you and your team in trouble and they and invariably you know in these things I can so far especially that that that particular situation where we're coach harbaugh Atlanta I mean he's a San Francisco but it was at Atlanta you know really came at me during the TV timeout well I knew there were you with this is where we are right now and very forcibly let him know that and and everybody on the sidelines no we're we're not gonNA have any more of that I young player whatever was mixing with somebody and you know I mean they're breaking it up and a little bit of a bump as he breaks it up so I lit into it didn't WANNA penalize and we're going to throw in about but but I kinda let in to him and he responds with Fu well okay great though there's fifteen yards for you I veteran Minnesota player miss calls make calls whatever but it's the management of the players the game I th the players second how how they were unable to do that in in real time that that really really caused the problems they had during the lockout years that's what that's what NFL officials do so well players really really appreciate one thing we're trying to do is keep them their emotions in check and and get them back focused on the next play three plays later they come and say sorry about that revenue and I see no problem you only on the rare occasion do they did they ever really crossed the line appreciate that aspect of it yeah there's nothing better than when an official are the first ones to even though they're very upset that we we may have just missed him so we can do whatever you talk them through it and and and get them refocused they very very very much alledged to you hey look I I I think I got that one wrong you know and instead of trying to argue when when they're clearly wrong to to prove the player in his post-game conference or on twitter or the next day post will the rest said he missed that I see I see that happening add this to that here there's a problem with that now that used to be really we used to do that a lot more right right what happens now is when you do that media this week it's not good at all yeah I I don't know anything worse ships poured the end of my career I was being very guarded in what I was saying because I was just basically assuming it was gonna hit the media tomorrow that is really really hurting the game as much as anything at least the relationships that are going on out there that you really need to have between players and you know you you try to protect that individual's integrity and they're going to protect yours and I think than than going to the media and relaying something that happened between you and an official regardless what I've learned over the years is that and someone said this one supervisor said this to me many years ago said on a lot of these conversations that we're having on the field that that used to never go anywhere that were awesome for for building relate point like I'm I'm infallible out here and I and I think coaches employers appreciate that you're absolutely right you know I mean David Brock Terry did a radio interview we basically told the whole conversation he had after you've been called for holding you know Green Bay this past week and and I I was well you know I I I have to have to put my faith and trust in that individual official officials to to to make sure the game is okay it's it's really unfortunate I haven't seen so much in basketball but it certainly happened to football I I just believe that the seven guys the eight guys in college the three three men and women on the court in basketball I trust them in you add to that that that Jr who's making the decision the I guess the greater chance you have of maybe somebody having ill intent licitly to to do the right thing and to not be swayed by anything on toward I know we had the Donigi city eighteen years ago I obviously that's one off I can't ever imagine it happening and certainly not in football again or really in any bet on everything and now you're going to be able to sit in your living room get your remote in a lot of states and just bet on games right through the television all this nonsense if he made that call then he made a human error and and it has nothing to do with gambling and has nothing to do with money it has nothing to do with anything other than go you know we will make a lot more mistakes during the course of the game then they will they'll get it right more times than than expect is is a call may go against you in cost you money that's just like a player or a player missing the last second shot standard then the players and coaches hold themselves to if a coach makes a bad decision coming out of a timeout for player makes a dumb ass players him trying to make the right call and just didn't in this one case I mean the more you people wanna go to replay and add more and more layers to this more people the world is going to see that with the emphasis on gambling the emphasis on everybody having fantasy things and now being able to what what's going to happen on on on a gain deciding bear call by an official that costs people a ton of money bet on sports which I would never do millionaires and in I then you're that's what's your that's part of it that's that's part of what you have to learn that officials are never as good as you want them to be but after the game when you look at the film you realize they're never as bad as you thought something that they do something it's like okay what's part of basketball or as part of the sport you know but when an official makes a bad call it which I you know I didn't like what what what the conversation entailed maybe what the officials said but maybe he thought that was writing say at the time but now it's in it's in the WHO has been his whole life getting to this level whether either major college level of the NFL level and his integrity is everything and if get it right or certainly a player a player will do more dumb things during the course of a game then official will so the officials are held to a higher the guy let God country and family down by making a call and and do you see now this is this is and I went down and he goes that's right so that's how big this thing is so with that being said that incident happen with you in Cleveland if that happened today dude tell me tell me it would be equivalent it is today the layers as you mentioned being added the talking heads on TV that half the comment on every single thing sure you don't know nothing nothing enters into the game that shouldn't that being said I trust I firmly trust the the people in the court did you know there isn't one day three hundred and sixty five days a year that one of our platforms doesn't have something on the NFL replay has to be broken down every decision has to be analyzed in pro football now is twenty four seven three hundred sixty the impeachment hearings that are going to come

NFL Gino Auriemma Terry mcaulay Ernie Johnson Hugh football Charles Barkley Sheryl Crowe US official China Eighties Brunetti Dot Com Oklahoma Yukon huskies Boise partner two minutes
Episode 24: Mark Cuban

Holding Court with Geno Auriemma

59:34 min | 9 months ago

Episode 24: Mark Cuban

"This is Gino Auriemma and this is holding court more famous in China Liangelo Ball. I mean he just became famous. You Hugh Way more famous than we were on runs undefeated runs. WHO WAS I? Call it if you don't WanNa know. How do I keep in your mom? Hello I gotTa Tell You you know. She still watches on TV number. She said that she said Charles. I like you I like you a lot and you were smiling but then she said but I I love the shack. Welcome everybody to our next podcast of holding court with Gino Auriemma. That would be me. Coaching uconn women's basketball today. Really interesting for me Hopefully fascinating for you as well. We have Mark Cuban Anybody that's In the business world knows mark As a tremendous entrepreneur shark tank star on TV. TV dancing with the stars star Anyone who knows anything about sports knows it. Mark the owner of the Dallas Mavericks one of the more influential uh-huh an outspoken owners in sports. And a really really fascinating guy. I think you're really going to enjoy this. You'll learn something I know I will here. We go okay. One question that I think everybody that I know would Would ask you if they ran into you and and had a chance. It's to talk to you which I'm sitting here going. Damn I'm talking to mark Cuban. Talk to him about you. Know the first thing I would say is when did did. When did you know that you have become someone that had a voice that when you spoke it moved the needle so to say a lot? I don't know I don't know if I've gotten there yet. Your Dude you're there you know. Honestly play I don't know I've I've always thought that no matter who you are if if the idea was good if the preparation was good at the substance was good than than people who would listen. And I mean I've just always tried to approach that way. I mean there were times you know particularly when Shark tank started to get pretty big that you know get inquiries and people like. Oh you're on shark tank and so that must have made you smarter and I don't know I just I guess people started really paying more attention to to me. He is a business person when when shark tank really got big But still you know my thoughts still is if if you don't say anything with substance and they're going to continue out very quickly quickly. Well you know talking about saying stuff with substance and I notice on Shark tank. I think when when I've watched that you're very succinct to the point and if it isn't something that's it's my my interpretation I could be completely wrong but if it isn't something that is in the technology digital e commerce. You name it all that if it doesn't really impact that platform you're really reluctant to get involved with. That'd be true you know in the early days that that definitely would have been true So you know early on. They tried to bring on a lot more technology technology companies just because they thought that was cool and hip and all that but now probably I've probably invested in over one hundred companies on shark tank And we saw the bonds have gone out of business unfortunately but I would say early on. Yes but over the last four or five years it's just been in a wide breadth of things. Everything from you know plant based dog food to to you name it right. You know lights that you use using emergency to just about anything So Yeah I you were right early on. I really broaden out but if you want to catch up coach we're on every Sunday night on ABC. Yeah I know I know I know My wife is always like come on. We gotTa Watch these guys there You know the the the cool thing though about that show is a diversity of talent and not just in what business you're in but the diversity of the people their background where they come from. What's that been like to to interact with the other sharks? Sharks are great. I mean you know we have guests. Sharks everybody from Bethany Frankel from real housewives To Alex Rodriguez Charles Barkley. You know their. It's it's funny because you know everybody's got their wheelhouse someplace where they're really comfortable. But when you get out there and you realize that the entrepreneurs you're talking to you know they're asking for an investment because a lot of cases their businesses are on the line. Their lives are on the line. They've dedicated everything that they've had. You know my body soul on finances to make this company work and here you are as a guest shark coming in. I did ten years ago. And it's like Oh my goodness this is this isn't just like a TV show. This is important according to the people that that are looking for an investment. And so you know that that kind of catches them at the beginning but then you know they all they all tend to to get in the groove and and you know they're they're they're on the show for a reason so it's fun to interact and some of them like Charles Barkley. You're just hysterical. You know a ride is all about you. Know I'm going to be a great business person and this is an opportunity -tunities Charles cutting it up. Bethany Frankel it was phenomenal now. We have this Guy Daniel Lubetzky who came for the first time this season And he started kind bars which people don't know his name after that but everybody knows kind bars and you know getting to know him because he's super smart and you know he he was some real competition for me so I like to have. I liked having somebody bang on and and to try to compete with will let let me let me just For my own for my own information to is what do you think based on your experiences both in your own impersonal business ventures which you know I would encourage our listeners. Go on on the Mark Cuban website and Mark Cuban dot com and you can see all the businesses I'm invested in. I like looking at it earlier and I'm looking at some of them right now. It's just incredible create. What do you yeah? What do you feel are characteristics? I that most entrepreneurs are missing when they come to see you that that they've missed along along the way that causes their downfall and then after that what is the one key ingredient that each an entrepreneur. Because I'm in their business you know I just bought another another restaurant. Yeah I've invested over a million dollars and that's a hard business though the mall coach a restaurant the hardest the hardest ever ever and it's it's in my. It's my town it's like I can walk there that the restaurants started in nineteen thirty three. Oh Wow and the same family owned it and the Guy Steve would just said look. I can't do this anymore. You know he just got to an age where he can't do it and I and I took the whole thing apart you know and I said Okay I gotta change everything here and you know appeal to some of the traditional people but a whole different crafts but what what. What I found is that it's not a lot not a whole lot different than than good basketball okay? Basketball players good basketball players in great basketball player. You know you know when you recruit your own recruiting people that you know have talent and when you talk to them then you get to see their work ethic first off do they work at or they just blessed physically and just you know get by based off for their basic tools you know and then if they work at it do they really try to add something to their game do they take their time Mauve and really try to get get get better you know or they always trying to improve and then if they've got you know the work ethic and the willingness to improve you've do they have the discipline to do the little extra things that most people won't those three things are the same things I look for in an entrepreneur. Lots of people have that idea idea. I'm going to start a company. I'm going to run a restaurant by restaurant. But then they don't realize how much works than balls. Is You find out in the restaurant business. There is no time off the person the people who run it they have to live it and then once they get good at it you know. Are they disciplined enough to pay attention to the little things to separate them from everybody. Everybody else particularly the competition and when you get into a very competitive environment those little things make all the difference so for me is somebody that is talented. Wanted Works hard prepares and pays attention to the little things and I and is always learning because the only thing that that certain the business is changed. You know that in the restaurant industry. What about delivery? Who'd you do a deal with you? Do a deal with the seamless and grab hub. Do deal with Uber. Eats you you do deal with whoever the other local delivery company is how much of that you know. What percentage do you pay? How do you negotiate that you know you have to keep on learning all all the changes that are happening in your industry and that applies to all industries and applies to basketball to the game changes all the time for sure you know and so I I look through for those commonalities and when I can find it you know then on shark tank you know the other thing? I'm asking myself as to the hit me over the head and make me say. Why didn't I think of that because such such a good idea? I'm going while that such a good idea. I'm mad at myself or not thinking of it myself and so you know and then at that point I say can I help them. You know like you have to Ask you know when you're recruiting the player. Do I already have a for somebody was coming in as a freshman. WHO'S GONNA start four years that already plays you know the same positions this player plays and so I'm not going to be able to put the full use and I do put that really and really be fair to that recruit potentially coming in and I do it with entrepreneurs can yeah? I really helped them. Can I help their business can I. Can I add value to them. Because I don't just WANNA be some Schmo that says I look invested on Shark tank. And you know then him or or her stand up and say well. Mark didn't really helped me at all because he could. That'd be the worst thing that could happen. I really look places where I can add value. When when when you're thinking about what's next? I hear this a lot and I hear this a lot. Well you know what everything I think about everything you know how. I wonder if people would do this. Like why aren't why are people doing this. What I got a great idea and then you realize you realize wait a minute if you're not if you're not careful you like you like me you go? You know what it's pointless every damn good idea. That's been infant. Come up with it's already been done. There are no new ideas. There's nothing nothing new that you could come up with that. Somebody doesn't already know better than that right. You know. That's my point so like where. Where are you looking now? Where are you going well? I'll tell you what story I. This is one place in the world. One place this is one space where you know what no not enough people are looking into the two different ways. I what I tell my kids. My kids are ten thirteen and sixteen my little boy jake and then my two daughters Allison Alexa. And so we'll be someplace and you know. Every Dad has stupid dad things they do right and so I'll be like just look around and see that that didn't exist one day then. Somebody came up with that idea. He'll even know who it is. It wasn't somebody famous the way that chair is somebody who designed at in you know recreating the bike to look like this. You know adding this feature coming up with Alexa for voice controls. One day didn't exist and somebody had the idea and now it's part of your life there's going to be an unlimited number of things that continue to happen like that you know one thing my dad and I you know my corny line. My Dad used to tell me that because you don't live in the world you were born into and so if you think that you know the year you were born born and comparative today. How much has changed? I mean it's just crazy and so looking forward you know mentioned Alexa. I mean now we use Alexa throughout our house. You Know Alexa. What's the weather? What time is it Alexa? What was this score? What was that game? Whatever and now if I'm traveling just out of habit I'll find myself you know talking in the hotel room just talking to nothing so ingrained and I think that's one of the things we're going to face and they call it ambient voice where they'll be Devices all around us that you can just talk to and not only will you be able to talk to them but don't pay attention. They'll be these sensors in those devices. So they'll already know it's raining or they'll be able to look things up on the Internet and tell us things that are going on around us and suggesting you know. Hey Mark don't forget to to you know where where sweatshirt or it's going to be call. Don't because you know the the the temperature dropped twenty five degrees from yesterday so don't forget to dress warmly just little things like that. I think that's going to be a big part of change. I think artificial intelligence. You know you're seeing it in basketball with analytics. Ah You know not only. We're trying to get more in depth with statistics but now people are using com. You know like the mavs and I'm sure you've got people Connecticut that are looking at using computer vision where you can just take video of a game or part of a game and have it break down you know and tell you what play was run and how often they run on it. Or what is GONNA put your defenders in the best position. Some of the stuff isn't there yet and a lot of it is just. The technology is just starting to show its way out but you know computer. Vision is going to have a huge impact and artificial intelligence. We'll have more of an impact than anything we've ever seen. You know they'll just be ways where we can take data Ada and look at it and crunch it and ways that no ten people could do in ten lifetime and artificial intelligence can do in ten seconds and that'll change the nature of work. It'll change how we do analytics basketball. It'll change you know how you prepare food in restaurants and you know you know we use it at the mavs to to help us sell season tickets from a company called no dot I o.. There's there's so many things that are going to change and all those changes are just going to accelerate so you know on one hand and it's going to be crazy on the other hand that's where our opportunities are born. You know we're there's change there's opportunity and and so I recommend to you know high school kids You know we started a program through my foundation where we're teaching underprivileged kids the basics of machine learning and artificial intelligence because we want to introduce them the things they might otherwise not see but they will need But if you're you know you're in high school if you're going to Yukon if you're going to Indiana where I went any college you've got to start taking classes and understand artificial intelligence because if you don't it's like denying that the Internet exists right it's like you know I'll I'll never use the internet and till everybody used the Internet so they don't have the same impact. If not more what do you what do you say to the to the people that That feel that that what comes along along with everything you just described which I think is fascinating You know I was born in Italy and I came to America when I was seven and I came with my mother who is thirty three at the time my brother who was Five and my sister was one and none of us spoke a word of English English and so the world that my mother was born in Italy in one thousand nine hundred thirty one you know and during the war and getting away for different and now she's living in America she's eighty eight and there's she's got a cell phone like are you kidding me. She didn't have shoes. She's got a cell phone and create she. She has me down is number four because she don't she can't read or rice she can't she can't put my name when her phone she goes. You're a number four. I'm like who the hell's number one two three so the world that. Yeah you're right the world that we grew up. But what do you say to people that go. Listen what what all this stuff. That's coming let me tell you the downside to that and how that stifles people in some other way. What's the downside? So I mean look. There's people who you don't see blacksmiths anymore. You don't you know when I was going to college in Indiana right down the street at Taranto. We're in the end of state was That was where they made. RCA made records you know and making records was a huge business until it wasn't things change and Dan you know different generations have to adapt you know my sixteen year old was around before the iphone. My ten year old. Wasn't you know. And and they're growing up so used to all this technology that they're they're not gonNA know any other way and then as things as technology advances. Don't teach us just like somebody tight. Your mom to cell phone. Don't teach us the best ways to adapt will they'll beat will there be disruption absolutely. Will it be painful for some people absolutely absolutely it always has been and always will be You know are there ways to try to minimize those things through education and retraining gene and support program. Yes and hopefully we'll be smart enough to to use programs like Americorps and other similar programs that help people who are displaced by technology. Find Job. I just discovered something. That's pretty extraordinary. I'd heard about it from some coaches and pro athletes. And now I've experienced it for myself. Mizzen and Main Dallas based company is the maker of performance. Fabric dress dress shirts. Now you say what's performance fabric. Well you know this stuff you work out in so you get all the benefits of workout gear but you wear it with a suit you can dress it up dress it down. Put a tie on. Don't put a tie on so if you see me on the court lately. That's what I wear. You don't know that it's a dresser it feels like a casual shirt but it looks like a dress shirt yet it moves around you like workout gear. It's revolutionary you can check out. WWW DOT mizzen and main. That's Komo I. E N N Main Ma. I N DOT COM Slash Gino. See some of my favorite shirts. Take a look. You'll be impressed. Give it a shot. When it comes to the college basketball season the only team that matters is the Yukon huskies got that with the wells? Fargo uconn women's basketball debit card. You can show your Husky Pride with every purchase you make head to your local wells Fargo and ask for a your new uconn women's basketball debit card today. Wells Fargo is the official retail bank partner of uconn women's basketball. Will there be enough jobs population. It'll be enough jobs. The question is what are are they. You know if if your job right now if you decisions you have to make in your job you make it under a split second yes or no you you know good or bad offer on. You're probably going to get. That job is probably going to get displaced. If you have some domain knowledge something you truly really understand very very well Then you're probably going to be okay because artificial intelligence doesn't work unless it has data in order to train it and in order to have the right data because the worst thing that can happen with. Ai Is that you get bad data because then you think this machine is making the right decisions and it's not and horrible things happen and you learn the hard and you find out the hard way and you know miserable consequences particularly for businesses and so the the way to avoid that is by making. Sure your data's correct so if there's going to be you know. Hey I for anything could be restaurant right. And you're trying to come up with the best recipes based off of what people like and tastes tendencies. Somebody's gotTa know the questions to ask your customers. Somebody's got to know how recipes works. Somebody's got to know how the equipment works in order to to teach it And then all that information goes into a process but and then hopefully you come up with the best recipes. I mean they're using it now to come up with new spices and new flavors. Then do this and that but if the data isn't right if what you used to train the artificial intelligence is not right. If it's not unbiased then it it doesn't work and so people who you know I've I've talked about this before you know over the last fifteen years we've downplayed liberal arts Degrees agrees because we think there's not a specific skill to get paid for but in an artificial intelligence driven were tells driven world having a liberal arts degree. As long as you're good at it right you can't just be half as long as you're good at it. You're going to be the the people that train the art that that let me. You're you're going to be the people that acquire the data that Make sure the data's proper make sure the data's unbiased make sure that the you know what you're trying to accomplish publishes feasible. Although that hold the decision making process is going to require specific domain knowledge. And so you know those liberal arts degrees I think are going to go up ballot now you whereas on the flip side if you're an advanced programmer and you're you know you're able to work with All the different a it platforms and advanced physics etc.. You'll be fine but if you're a junior programmer and you're coming out of college and you're writing javascript. Script or just basic languages scripting languages. Those you know maybe even python those those are going to be replaced. I think in the next twenty years I buy is because those are all just math based if then then this type decisions so you know. We'll just like we have in the past. We'll have to address those. The things will figure out ways to do it but I think you know the greatest go I think I learned it. Indiana and I think applies to college is still today greatest. Oh you can have coming out of college is just just the ability to learn how to learn and the ability to learn how to learn going forward is is going to be critical. Because that's what's going to be needed. You're going to have to have some expertise somewhere in order to really get those jobs that are fulfilling. That was a lot more technical answer than you know. But it's really good. It's really good but my question is will there always be for instance. I worked in a steel mill. And you get a break in a steel mill and couldn't yeah. You grew up in Pittsburgh. I grew up in Philadelphia. Yeah I worked in a steel mill and we made plates for battleships okay. Those guys made a lot of money. You Know Union Job Blah Blah Blah Blah and in Pittsburgh was uh-huh way no to lifeblood the lifeblood the lifeblood right so will there will always be demand for people who work in those jobs who are and then. Will there be sales reps for anything or will people just be ordering stuff. And they don't need a sales rep. They need a delivery person so people would be go ahead. Don't always be a need for people to work with their hands. Whether or not but the question you ask is whether or not robotics will take their place. So in the steel mill in you you know make plays for ship. You know. Probably there'll be a robot to do that at some point but the new jobs will be someone who monitors the robot now instead of it being gene you know however many people on the line to get the job done like when you were working there. Yeah there might just be a line of robots and it'll be one job instead of ten but hopefully they'll be a hundred robots instead of ten guys working and don't be ten jobs. Equal ten jobs. Managing and monitoring those robots and then the people that have to provide the data and analyze the data to feed those robots. They get right. So some of the manufacturing jobs is will manufacturing manufacturing jobs will change dramatically. But I think things like plumbing things like like when I was a kid. My mom was afraid that I wouldn't be able to have a trade eight so she wanted me to learn how to lay carpet. So if you're ever in Pittsburgh and you're tripping you're like who the hell late this carpet awful. That was me and so I think those this job that are not going to go away So they'll be trade where you know. People who work by hand will continue. And they'll be a real need for apprentices and apprenticeship programs grams and you know I think we still have too many licensing requirements for some of those jobs. You know I still think cutting hair. I don't think we're entrust a robot to cut her hair for a long time They don't you know those jobs aren't going to go away but some of them will change along those along those lines When you were when you were a kid growing up Did you did you. Were you you consciously aware. Did it affect you positive net negatively. Whatever that your family has a different background than? Let's say the the average kid growing up in America that you know you. You're WHA- has a history of immigration history of an. You're part of your part of different cultures other than the culture where you're growing up. Because that's how I felt. I felt like a you know what I'm one. Lucky guy man like I get to speak Italian at home but learn English. When I go to school I get the better her food than most people eat now? It's really really cool and yet at the same time you know. You're walking around God damn man. I don't know a lot of doctors lawyers. Does you see what I'm saying. Mark Yeah I mean. It wasn't a language issue so You know I was me and a kidney Michael Levitt. Were the only two Jewish kids up until I was was twelve years old and I remember being down in the playground and these two kids jump on me and start fighting me and start calling me these words Kaik and this and that you know I've fought back obviously and I had to go down like what does this mean. And why were they fighting me. You know why. Why am I getting singled out by these people And you know and that happened multiple times and then you know my dad worked upholstery on cars and my mom did jobs and and so we moved from there to probably you know have a quarter of a mile away. That's it but it was into a better school district where you know there are other kids that and it wasn't nearly the issue that it was when I was growing up I grew up under street where there were some racist racist people and I know Oh and the Pittsburgh pirates back then were the first team to be fully integrated and I remember just sitting there listening to you. Know the DADS of my friends and then to eleven. Then you know just talk stuff that I mean. I can't even imagine the word you know And then asking my dad. What does all this mean? Why and trying to figure it out but in you know and so but it was? It was a different generation. It was a different time. And and you know my dad was always very clear that you know he find World War Two and he finally Korea Korea and the reason he fought was so that you know everybody had to write to to live in American life. Everybody had a right to chase the American dream. And that's what he wanted for me and my two younger brothers And that it wasn't easy it wasn't easy for him You know I was far worse for him growing up. I I mean the stories you told me I mean I talked about being one or two Jewish kids. He was the only white get him in my uncle. The only white kids and where they live and people loved them there and it was only after he move ooh and was in a more integrated neighborhood that he started running into problems because he was Jewish and his and his parents didn't begin English when he I was a kid and and I mean he is the traditional sixty seventies immigrant story. But you know it's going through it. It taught me a lot and you know my. My parents taught me a lot that you know. Everybody's story is is equal that you treat everybody with respect Even the ones just like even the ones you hate. Because that's the example you said and and it's gone along with me you know coming when over from from Italy my my mother and father had never seen a black person. I mean you know living up you know. We lived in a village. Five thousand people like you're not GonNa see anybody that does does that isn't related some in some way shape or form so I remember when my father When I went to college and he came up because why he probably had to? I mean something happened. You know you came up. We walks in my my dorm room and my roommates is black kid from Philly and play sports all my life so I'd never you know and he says and he's he's like to me like you need to watch out man for what I like. How the hell do you know anything about anything? Well you know what. That's what is it like. You're saying that's what his friends were telling him at work. You know the clubs that he hang hung around in you know the social clubs and playing cards and all that stuff so thinking back then you know and how much how much we had to figure out for ourselves. Because you weren't always getting that you know the kind of guy and we didn't have technology we didn't have the Internet we didn't have TV. TV wasn't as big an influence in the TV. Because it took us a while to get one right I V. He was like the talk of the neighborhood. Yeah forget it right. Yeah Yeah. We didn't have a car until I was eighteen years old. That was always like yeah so so now. Aw You look fast forward to today mark in the world that we live in and with all the information that's out there and you have young children. My kids are a little bit older. I've got grandkids. That are nine six and four. So what are they hearing. What are they reading reading? What are they seeing I translate? I don't think it's as much different as were concerned about. I mean you know I remember. We're being a kid and it was always turn off the television. We don't read anymore. All we do is sit in front of the TV. Don't sit too close to the TV. You'RE GONNA burn your eyes and then we got phone That weren't party lines and it was get off the phone. Do your homework. You know. Every generation has got it. Is it technology if you will that the kids really glum onto and really take advantage of And it's no same for my kids now. I mean my son play fortnight like me and my buddies used to play poker we play nickel anti poker and we sit around a poker table for six hours on a Friday night with whatever games on. TV You know in somebody's basement that had a TV and and my you know my my young my son in particular we'll play fortnight and he'll be talking can always buddies is if they were all sitting around the table and they still play sports and they still get together and they sold you know go to games and do whatever but you know it's different but it's the same you know and we're we're his. You know our generation might have gone on the phone and talk for hours your parents you know. Pick up the phone because everybody shares the the same line in the house would have to call the house who's calling you know That's different but I mean they still do the same thing with texting. They don't talk as much and I think you know. There's probably some downsides there in terms of just personal communication but I don't think it's all but different I think every generation just adapt to whatever in front of them Because kids are still kid. You know evolution still evolution and we end hormones are still all Oromo for better or worse and you know we just try to do our best job. We can raising our kids. Well I always had this. You know The saying and and it came. It came out of you know having to deal with other people's kids ideal with other people's kids and and I'll tell tell these kids a lot of times. I said listen. I spend more time with other people's kids and I do with my own kids so I've had firsthand experience realizing in that as time has gone on you know in the forty years that I've been doing this. I've noticed that the one thing that's changed the most is not necessarily the the kids themselves but the way parents have put expectations core rate which is nuts. And that's difficult for these kids. I agree one hundred percent. I mean that's why with the NBA. The one of the things I bring up all the time and it's becoming more and more of a topic is a you know. People are starting to look at their kids as meal ticket and correct you know or they recognize that the only way their kids going to get into a college is if they excel athletically and not only does it create pressure from a parental perspective and the parents can be crazy But now kids are playing sports year round. And that's not I mean particularly for girls with their knees and everything I mean. There's just a lot more injuries. We're seeing the kids who so you thought you know had a chance to play professionally. You know they're having repetitive stress injuries. Because all they do is play basketball and they'll play you the practice one one day a week at their lucky and play sticks games on a weekend. That's crazy that's crazy and so and you know even worse. They don't develop the skills that they they need in order to really have a chance to to excel at the professional level. Well that that helps us Transfer over to to the basketball part of life here When I go over when I go overseas he's whether do a clinic or you know coaching USA basketball or anything? The difference overseas in Europe especially is they will practice Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday and then they'll be allowed to play on the weekend and here they practice once during the week and then they play five games during the weekend. It's completely screwed up. It's completely opposite so having having said that now the NBA. Tell me if my numbers are correct here but when I was a kid growing up My favorite grown up in Philly in the sixers but my favorite team was the that seventy seventy one sixty nine seventy seventy one knicks team. You know with red. Holzman coach. You know and Willis Reed Wa- Frazier was my favorite player and Monroe. Yeah that's that's the legend man. He's affiliate Philly legend and and the European influx was like one guy to is five guys ago where this guy from the weird guide it came from Europe. And now you look at the League and you go. Oh my God. Last time I checked something like is it. Is it thirty percent mark. I don't even know the exact number but it it definitely not decreasing. It's definitely increasing. Well I saw the I saw the NBA draft last year and there's sixty guys drafted and thirty of them. Twenty nine were international complex. Yeah I mean it's a right. Yeah how much is that. Changed the complexion of the game. I don't mean the complexion wide. Why not just how it's played? Yeah Yeah exactly. I mean it's become much more skilled driven game question about it You know there's less of a post president Yep there's there's more analytically driven. There's you know there's actually fewer plays run but that necessitates the stakes are higher basketball. IQ You know every coach forever as always wanted the ball to move side to side and make the defense work and you know sometimes you had to call play in order to get guys to do it. But now as as Europeans they have really come in and had an impact you know if it allowed teams seems to really just just play more flow right just play with higher basketball IQ And that's not to say there aren't a lot of great American players that have great best black US I mean. No one's basketball exceeds Lebron James and he came straight out of high school. He's just a basketball savant. You know So there's a lot of great great American basketball players but they've recognized that the best of the best of American players have recognized. They've gotta have all the above and then that's that's why American players are are still. I think better globally. Because now they've evolved Training in America's evolved once you get to the highest levels and you know Y- oh you. You're coaching them or coach K.'s. Coaching them or Gregg Popovich Ricardo's coaching The the the players who get that elite level they have they have great great basketball like us they know how to play and they have the athleticism that that is still a little bit stronger in the United States. And so you know I think both have made you know the Europeans. The the global aspect of the game have made American players better in vice versa. So I think I think it's a virtuous circle wolf because the game is so Darwinian in basketball accuracy can be the difference between winning and losing and this also true when it comes to your health. The Genius Three D. The mammographic exam is more accurate and comfortable mammogram for all women. So why not find the facility offers the genius exam near you visit it. Find my genius. Three D. DOT COM to learn more. And make sure your next. Mammogram is a genus exam. Is Your retirement game. Plan a well executed play or wild shot at the buzzer Johnson. Brunetti has helped over twenty five hundred Connecticut Families Prepare for a financially secure retirement. And they're proud to be the wealth management partner of the Yukon. Huskies visit them at Johnson. BRUNETTI DOT COM. and see how they can help you with your retirement Johnson. Brunetti retirement and investment specialists. go to Johnson Awesome Brunetti DOT COM for free books and financial planning tools. Well No no other. No other franchise probably has Benefited more and even more so going forward. Then then the mavs on the European influx starting with dark and dirk made us look really smart when he came to Europeans. You know so everything else. You kind of got easy but Yeah look it like. I said it's very very very Very Darwinian and so you know I don't care if they're from Africa Europe United States. You know where as long as they can play and and we just want to have the best fifteen guys on the roster that we can find But you know it's just a it's also just a numbers game right. You have three hundred million people living in in this country however many basketball players then you have the billions living in the rest of the world. Ambassador has become such a global sport that just the numbers that approachability say that you know as the game of basketball grows globally particularly with the education and training. That you're getting like you're seeing in Europe and that's moving some to Africa Africa To a lesser extent India and China. You know that just means there's going to be a lot of players to choose from and so we're scouting the entire our world and they kind of have an advantage overseas whichever country GE ever continent Simply because you know they don't have the limitations of of the NC you see double a cultural limitation you know. Kids can start Lucas. Start playing you know at thirteen with pros and play professionally. Get paid a sixteen. That just doesn't happen here and I think that changes how parents feel with their kids and That you know like you said that you take care of of other people's kids you know you coaches you know high in coaches like yourself in in college basketball all have to and you don't see that the low the the the elite college level you know and you see a lot more bouncing around a lot more just trying to get in And so I just I just think I just wanted to say is that you know to to be great. You know in this sport in the sport of basketball you have to adapt you have to evolve and and I think the European side of things you know pushes How kids learn the game? Globally and Sam in the United States as we get smarter with analytics pushes says and we get smarter and training people and we haven't even talked about how nutrition and you know Psychological support benefits Athletes at all levels in the United States is pushing further than the Europeans are on that front. And so you know I it all balances we all compete and you know the blessed the best players players rise to the top you know. Tell me if you experienced this at the pro level like when we're recruiting a kid let's say The kid you know the NCAA okay you can make five official visits okay. So now that Kid's GonNa take five so now this this kid's going around and they go well you know. Where do I get the live What kind of what kind of locker room do we have? And how's your practice facility and what you company are we with Radio play out so these are the kinds of these are the kinds of stuff that goes. And what's what's the weather like you know Blah Blah Blah Blah. So now we have two kids from from your kids from Poland. WHO's here she committed and came here and it never been to a mark? Well she never set foot in. America signed a letter of intent. Her first first day in America was a day. She showed up on campus. And you say to yourself why did you do that. She said well look all my basketball. We'll get life up until nineteen I've always wanted to play at the highest level and I wanted to play in America is the best program. So that's where I'm going. Well what if you don't like it there. I'M GONNA to like well. What if you don't like your teammates? I'm GonNa like what about where you're gonNA live. I don't care where I'm GonNa live so it's a whole different mentality. And and now he's like you said this. AAU thing now players come in and they had these expectations of how they wanna be treated much interactive. Yeah I mean it's GonNa get worse now because some of the laws are trying to pass where kids can get paid for their image. I mean can you imagine. How much are we going to be? How many times do we you're going to be on TV? You know how much you GonNa Profile picture me in the advertising that the universe the you know. Are you going to bring me any sponsors to pay me for my image. I don't. MVP that the situation you guys are going to be you know and I don't know how the NBA I mean the the NC Double A.. Is going to define the rules to control that because it could get ugly fast asked But for the NBA. You know because of the draft we kind of have some control at least for the first four years but once you get into free agency that matter Guy And you know what and I don't blame player Sport You know if you think in terms of being a professional coach being a business person or being a career person in any business. If I don't like working for IBM I can go work somewhere else and so I've always looked at it that I've got a rerun. Our players desire to to stick with the Mavericks Every Day. You know and that's a balance. It's not just hardcore basketball. It's gotTa be you know particularly as a player gets older when he's twenty like Luca. There are focused on one thing when they're thirty. Four thirty five. Like Courtney Lee or J J. Rey or dirk at forty forty one was is completely different and so that's on me as the owner and on the organization to find the balance that we make people want to come to work and put in the effort to be great at their the jobs and take away all all the hassles that keep them. Keep that from happening now. Kids in college kids coming out of college. Kids trying to decide the weather to get in the draft. You know impotently kids trying to side kids who are on the fridge trying to decide whether or not to go to the NBA. That's where it's still a mess. Because that's where they don't have necessarily all the best advice and there's people with best interests in them that have been with them through their Aau days and put him on this team or that team and expect something you know. We've seen all this stuff with some of the shoe company runners and some of the federal investigation stuff stuff. That's going on. You know that that in all of a sudden just go away you know. It's been there for a while and it continues to be so the shoe stuff still happen. It's just it's a mess and you know it makes it harder for us in the NBA. I know it makes it near impossible for you and and I can't even imagine at the lower levels of college basketball Tom. Men and women you know the mess that goes on there as teams try to compete universities. Try to compete kids just to keep their job you know. I can't even even Magin the message there. So there's a lot of work for all of us to do For better or worse a lot of it starts with the NCWA. They're the they're the first line of of I don't know with the Non WanNa say attack but you know the first line of impact With kids come out of high school and I told you know it'll be really interesting to the AA does next. Where are you On the one and done situation are you in favour of kids. It's coming out of high school and being able to you being able to sign a kid out of high school if you want to. I prefer not but I understand that it's coming. You know we just like you have to teach kids life skills but you have a lot more control of them because they're in the dorms you know. They're dependent on that scholarship. The you you know. They probably aren't wealthy. So you've got a certain level of control you know. Imagine those those same kids without life skills now all of a sudden and they're making a million or million dollars a year they're bringing their friends with them and we can't babysit them and we don't have near the level of control of any control at all And they're still only eighteen or nineteen eighteen years old. And so you. I've had kids that a Lotta kids actually come through the math. No idea how to rent a place. Lisa place open up a checking account. Don't get credit card Lease a car. Buy a car just things that are just basic life skills that as you get to be twenty one and twenty two you learn but when you're eighteen or nineteen you have no clue and so we literally over the past twenty years. Now that I've owned the team. We literally literally have have brought him people that you know they're unofficial title was babysitter. You know for this eighteen year old but it is nice. You know because it was crazy and I'm sure you guys have got to do the same thing you know. Get this kid to class. Get this kid to study. Gives us good with the teacher because they have to. You know they have to keep their grades up and you know we don't have to worry about grades but we have to worry about other things so to answer your question my preference is you know it's more like the NFL and they have to to get to a certain age or have so many years but it's not going to happen and I'm sure we'll go from one and done to none in done and that's GonNa create. Its own set of problems but you know hopefully we league or whatever we can do to. Yeah Yeah so you would you. Would you would say if if you had your druthers you would say okay. I want them to go to college college and I want them to be there. Let's say The baseball model or the football model. Where you know okay you have to spend at least two years minimum of two two years in college before you can come out which which obviously and I have this argument all the time with especially young people my son being one of them they go? You know what is like this take Zion Williamson. Why did he have to go to college? I said okay well because that was the role. Yeah yeah well you know I said. Don't you think that helped him while no it did I said what do you mean it I said he was on. ESPN five times a week for two hours. He was on every newspaper a guy that never even knew who he was when he was in high school. Now all of a sudden knows who he is said. Don't tell me how much would it cost is to get that kind of that kind of exposure. Now as you know is well with these new rules from the NCAA. He might make more staying in college. Ah I mean think about it he might just like just your Your freshman at Uconn and you're that good and and you guys win another national championship or menswear another national championship and the kid is looking at being drafted and to the first round. But because he's just a or she's just an incredible impact player in the NBA or or in college but might not be as big impact player in a or WNBA right. So there's a good chance you know if they're getting drafted at the end of the first round in the NBA. Since I know the numbers there He's making a million dollars a year. Well if he stays in and they have a chance to go and win another national championship and he's able to sell his image. You know sponsors. He can make more than that a lot more. And so you hopefully will get kids staying in and becoming better at their craft. Because they'll make more money from their image from sponsorship Then they would go into the NBA. which will or WNBA could be even more so you know because they don't make a ton of money in the WNBA? Yeah you you can end up. Having Kids WanNa stay longer you know six seven th year. Yeah Yeah right right right no thank you the last thing last thing since this is this is low. Obviously where where you are right now and where your team is is right now. You may have one one of maybe the top two or three exciting players in the league. If you have somebody said to me you know who are the most exciting players in the League to watch right now you know. Obviously you know Lebron's always going to be on you know in terms of excitement and what he brings and The kid from Milwaukee just off the charts. He's like yeah. I mean there's just so much fun to watch. He does so many things. And then your kid Luca you you know for twenty years old and the things that he's done already and how he does them. I mean like this is taking the game to a a whole `nother level isn't it. Yeah I mean it's crazy that he's only twenty years old is crazy that we got him Because you never know right you know the best laid plans you know any the kid girl guide. Whatever sure you just never know? And what's crazy about him or two things one. He loves the game. Love the game. It's like if if you were playing pickup and you were Yukking it up with with the guys that you were playing with. And he's firing up shots and doing stuff. You're just cracking up while you're playing and you just love and basketball basketball. That's what it's like watching him every night. That's what is his teammates. Love about playing with them and two for twenty. The patients he has on. The court is just incredible edible. I mean it's just like the game has already so slow for him. That teams just don't know what to do with them and and so you know. Now he's getting two and three guys you know pressing them just to get the ball out of his hand which you know most of the time is making it easier for the other guys but you know just those. It's two things and then like we talked about right at the beginning. He's just got that mindset where he knows that he's got to continue to work in order to be the best that you know. He's still twenty so he's not as disciplined than he's going to need to be but he knows he's got to get there Just to be that close at that age is just incredible. It's so much fun. He's such a good kid. Man I just have so much fun being around. Well he's he's he's skilled. There is in anything he can't do on the court you know there isn't a shoddy can't make Passi can't make and he's he's a tough kid he wants a rebound the ball which a lot of take recognize. How tough he is? I mean he's six seven to thirty to forty and that's not small. There aren't a lot of guys bigger. You know physically than he he is in the whole league. Yeah the worst thing that could ever happen to a young kid is they can score anytime they want because then they think I gotta do anything else. And you know he's going to he wants to rebound. He wants to pass the ball he wants. He wants to do stuff. And the the you know as I said to you on on our on our tax I was at Uva when Riccar lowers air and he was a player and then he stayed on as a G. A.. And and then every Monday night you know we we watch big Monday. You know the the Big East would be playing and it and we would have this card game you know and there was like all these crazy players playing in this car game. You Know Carlisle was there. And and Bruce Arena the World Cup soccer coach. Bob Rallied a World Cup. Soccer coach and You know we had all these. You know they're Larranaga. was there and Dave. was there all these guys you know. It was a great great environment. Armin to be in right. And you know you read the stuff in the paper and everybody wants to. Everybody has a comment. Everybody has something to say I. I can't think of a better coach for a young kid like that. Then somebody like Rick. That's like Gregg Popovich at. Let's Tony Parker or ten Dunkin being fortunate enough to be coached by pop their whole career and mb and told this is what you can do this. What you're great at? This is what you're going to have to learn and there's guidelines as opposed to being someplace where look you can do whatever the hell you you want to do because I want I want to keep my job and I'm afraid that you may leave. I think you guys got the perfect guy with the two perfect kids to build around and right coach You I am man I n you can tell you can tell you know you could tell when when things are turning and you know it. It's kind of like when we have Nash in and Dirk and Lee. You know we knew we had something good. We just had to get out there and play the Games improve it and I think that's where we are now with KP. And with Luca. You know. Tim Hardaway Jalen. I mean we've just got such a good core Justin Jackson and you know not only that we have so much depth that you guys can play thirty four thirty five minutes a game and we're okay and so you know we can. We can sustain it hopefully for a full season and then into the playoffs and that that was our plan and so it's exciting right now. I'm really fired up. Well you should be and I love watching you guys play And and you know people always say which would you rather have to really go pliers? Three really good players experiencing look. I want the best player on the court support. You guys generally speaking put the best guy on the court and have helped us out. We're GONNA come to. We're going to come to the game when we're in Dallas. I hope appear in town. You know I love the love to say hi and really appreciate you taking the time to do this. And it's really fast. I you have me on coach. It was it was a lot of fun. I really enjoyed it and Good luck to you good luck to all your ventures. Good luck to your team and Hopefully as as I said I'll see you in January I hope so and congrats and great. PODCASTS I appreciate congratulations and good luck. This season for you as well. Thank you. Mark appreciate it. Take Care Buddy. Thank you bye-bye world there. You have it mark. Cuban the one and only there isn't anything that he hasn't delved into daddy has inexperienced. There's no business that he doesn't understand there's no Amount of technology that he's not At the forefront of just it's an incredible incredible interview In in terms of what I was able to to learn today and and obviously You know he's he's got a tremendous team. He's got one of the best players in the NBA. and Luca Danni check. And I hope you enjoyed it because That was one of the more fun ones. I've had a chance to do. We'll be back for our next installment. Be on the lookout holding court with Gino Auriemma. See you next time.

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Episode 19: Michael Wilbon

Holding Court with Geno Auriemma

1:09:21 hr | 1 year ago

Episode 19: Michael Wilbon

"MGM Springfield is going to be your go to destination for all your post game celebrations as a proud partner of the university of Connecticut. We invite fans to keep the fun going by checking out all the entertainment and GM resorts has to offer by visiting MGM, Springfield dot com. In sports. There are smart moves and not so smart, moose like making sure you get the practice on time. That's smart parking in the coach spot. Not so smart and the same is true when you're hiring. There are smart ways and not so smart ways to get things done like job sites that overwhelm you with tons of the wrong resumes. That's not smart but posting a job on ZipRecruiter. And letting them find the right candidates for you. Now, that's smart. Ziprecruiter's powerful matching technology scans thousands of resumes identifies people with the right skills education and experience for your job and actively invites them to apply. So you get qualified candidates fast. Which is why it's rated number one by employers in US based on trust pilot rating of hiring sites would at least one thousand reviews and right now my listeners can try ZipRecruiter for free at ZipRecruiter dot com slash. Gino. That's right free. Just go to ZipRecruiter dot com slash GE. An oh, so if you're looking for a smart way to find the right talent for your team. Go to ZipRecruiter dot com slash Gino today. Ziprecruiter, the smartest way to hire. And the official job site of college sports fans everywhere this is Gino Auriemma, and this is holding court near to your more famous in China than liangelo ball. I mean, and he just became famous you way, we're famous than we were on runs undefeated runs. Who was I calling veto? Twenty one to know. How do I keep the? Your mom. Hello. I gotta tell you. You know, she still watches you on TV for she said, she said Charles, I like you. I like you a lot and you were in island. But then she said, but I love the shack. Okay. For that. Welcome, ladies and gentlemen, friends to the Gino worry, we Emma holding court puck is holding court. It's almost court time. We're almost at that time when we're going to be playing, and we'll be on the court this podcast of holding court features, the one and only Michael wilbon, esteemed writer, former Washington Post columnist, and now ESPN celebrity college basketball NBA you name it Michael was one of the most unique individuals. I've come across in all my years in sports, his knowledge of not just college basketball, the MBA, but every sport and his take and his perspective or unique among sports journalists. Hope you enjoy it. It's funny. My first recollection. Of your stuff was when I lived in Charlottesville, Virginia, and you read the Washington Post all the time, and you kinda got hooked on their sports page. You guys had an amazing lineup at the post. A lot of people. Probably don't even remember. Yes, we did. Because we I mean when I was got I was in my twenties and early twenties at that. And we had got David kindred, and Tom Boswell and Kornheiser he just left New York and come down to the Washington Post you and John Feinstein yet. And we we just we had we did we David remnant who winds of going on to win a Pulitzer prize. And and just you know, then couple years later. Sally Jenkins comes and it was it was something I look back on. And I still see what those people are doing. Now all these years later, even if we have very Lord who was the best tennis writer America is. Join to read every day, and it was a lineup. He was I I look back at it. And I know there's nothing like that. Now that having navy like that in a long long time. And I was a young pup. I was just happy to be in the room, Gino. Well, when you went to work every day back, and you know, what back in those days people still went to work. You know, you, you know, you didn't sit home, you know. And you didn't do it. You know over the air. I mean, you you you went in you kinda sat down and had coffee and talk to the other writers, and blah, blah, blah, blah. And so was it was it a little bit intimidating for you? Or did they give you kind of a sense of confidence? Like damn, man. I'm with these with these stars. And that must be I'm I'm I'm really good. It was fairly intimidating because not only and and you mentioned going in every day that that's that's. That's a very important concept for for us you, and I and people Galveston age, and it isn't anymore. But I I would get off that fifth floor elevator on this for the Washington Post newsroom. And not only did. I would I walk into a sports writer rule where people had talent and work their butts off in were acclaimed and respected. But I would also I might see Bob Woodward. I might see I I would see Ben bradlee my boss you, and there's just been tire array of people who had done something. And again, I I got there twenty one. And it was it wasn't. It wasn't like they try. And by the way, he even though Shirley Povich just retired. He was still come in writing in his retirement. He was still right. A time or two a week. And so yeah, it was it was intimidating. And while nobody worked at it for tried to do it. I think it was a great thing. Because it made you work. It made you understand that you are going to be given anything that you had to earn your stripes. You to earn your way amongst these people and certain things were expected of you. And so yeah. Going to work get enough on the fifth floor is GIO. I think about it every day. I I never got over the feeling of stepping up the elevator thinking. Wow, you know, I'm pretty lucky walk in here. And I felt that way I was thirty years or perfectly round three oh years. And that feeling I think that keeps your your toes is like if you're if you walk into a gymnasium, and you see, you know, the the coaches the players who are in there and the staff and you on your toes a little bit. Because you know, this game is pretty high stakes. How they it's a good thing to feel every day of your life. I felt it got never got over that feeling. You know world. People listening. You know, some are going to be our age some we're going to be older bunch. You're going to be much younger world enough to remember Maury Povich his dad. Yeah. They only know from TV, you know, as this other guy, you know, does he's crazy shows. But you know, when when you think about the the crossover like today, it seems like people are are are kind of putting a little cubbyhole. Like, you know, you're a MBA analyst Europe pro football analyst. You're a, you know, you're the Goth guru your that? You know, you're the NHL guy, you know. And I think back one of the guys that had a an amazing show when when you were in these see with George Michael remember, oh God I worked for George for thirteen years. I know he was you know, he yes, he was. Oh my God. He was a up eight George did. Nobody likes. You're you're right. 'cause everybody's specializes. Right. So so you don't have to I can't get. Over that. Now, people don't go out to see you know, what jail is like it's like our kids. They're expected to play one thing year round, and I beat so sometimes because they don't do not generalists. They don't they don't go from one sport to another. And that bothers me it it it reduces learning. And I think some of those things are transferable. I mean, I I like the fact that when college basketball was over I had to go and he'll cover something else. And you know, the insiders in that industry. No, the coaches to know the players, and I think it helped me when I came back to college basketball that I had gone off and done something else. And now there's none of that. Of course, none which is a shame. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, George, Michael I when I was growing up in Philly, George Michael was a DJ. I wanna say w I IB g women. Playing you know spending forty fives. And then next thing, you know, he's you know, he's like a precursor to sportscenter. He's doing the highlights. The George Michael was a call sportsman. Oh, I got here and nineteen eighty as Georgia's just starting here. The bit of Philly like you said, and there was somebody like George there was no one like him. And he, you know, he did eat it a Redskins show that was so popular in Washington that NBC the boss that NBC called. Georgia's look, you do that Redskins show twenty weeks a year, we need you to fill twenty more weeks, you won't have to do summer stuff. So you'd have to do the twelve weeks in the summer, we want forty weeks. A you dominating the airwaves, George said, what are you drugs and even started doing a basketball show full court press, and I was part of that. And I did both those shows with George for thirteen years literally until he passed away. And there's nobody you're right. There's absolutely nobody like him who got start in a radio DJ. Jay, and he would have all these stories about knowing and going to deal with Diana Ross. And and and people you just like this guy is just you look, you know, this better than I do 'cause you knew the front half of life. I'll be news back half. But there was nobody like, George. I miss them. I miss them. It's been was you know, he's been gone. As he's been gone eight or nine years. Now, I missed them. Yeah. It was it was it was it was an exciting time because we did get a lot of our sports from the newspaper like you. And I still I I get up in the morning. I go out in the driveway. I pick up my paper. I get you know, the New York Times on the weekends. You know, I gotta have something in my hands to, you know, have some coffee read, the paper and newspaper writers back then were sort of like what you are today on TV you, and Tony you guys are celebrities. You guys are now TV celebrities who specialize in, you know, giving people not only sports news. But entertaining them and at the same time, we'll back then sports writers were stars. Those guys were big celebrities huh. Yeah. Yes. Yes. And particularly in big cities that have you know? Couple of impactful large circulating newspapers. And yes yet. I mean, I wanted to I look I grew up. I do you know, I never wanted to be in television. I didn't it wasn't aspiration. It wasn't a goal. I wanted to be literate. I wanted to write for nuclear I delivered the Chicago Sun-Times interviewing growing up. Now. I wanted to work for one of them. I it never came to pass that. That's what I wanted to do. And the people that are the guys that I I looked up to I wanted to being taught by one of them in college. Northwestern Bill joust who is you. Don't talk news writing program. I I read them as a kid and nobody got to Washington. It was different. It wasn't a kid anymore. But then, but still those people a lot of people, you know, I mean red Smith, and Shirley Povich, and I, you know, so many of them were still working they were in their seventies. Then, but man, they have some lives and even the other guys I mean, David Israel, and I were P m. Lupu? I mean, I I came up maybe ten years younger than some of them. But a lot younger than the most famous of them. And there was a certain I don't know standard of behavior, you expect it to have you you we certainly weren't gonna cover one thing and think you were some specialists that wasn't that wasn't tolerated. But yeah, man, I that was what I wanted to be and television was just something that came out of nowhere. I I didn't even understand what the hell is going on when somebody here do that. You know, Mike. Here's here's one thing. I find interesting, and I've told a couple of guys I won't mention any names. But I've told a couple of guys when I've seen them. That were great writers. Great read. It's like you read them, and you go to him in this guy. This woman they can put some stuff together on paper, man. And and you know, they can paint a picture for you like I remember growing up in reading Bill, Colin in Philadelphia news. Okay. Legendary sports writer, and if you didn't see the game, he could write a story that would make you feel like you were there. If you saw the game, you would read his story and go I didn't see that. How did that happen? But he because he gave you a different perspective on the game. But the thing about writing back, then tell me if I'm right or wrong, and you had to be right? You had to get your facts. Right. You weren't going to write stuff unless you were. Right. And and then at some of these guys when they go on TV, you can just throw stuff out there. And you know, what if it's wrong, it's wrong. You don't have to apologize for it. People aren't going to aren't going to question. I was as a journalist. That that's kinda troubling. Yes. Do you know? Yes. And I, you know, one of the things in it's funny that you mentioned that that is something that ideal younger less on. Our time. And you know, what the one of the things I'm always saying that they watch the game. You guys are watching the game. And I understand their new demand. The new demands were not put on me tweeting and social media during game Keno, you know, this because your they they don't want the game. Then they don't they don't look like. If I were when I was crippling, Georgetown. And if I if I didn't watch the game wasn't in tune in only was gonna throw stuff out there. There was no way. John Thompson was evening talk to me. Right. Much less be helpful. Let's be expansive much less. You know, share stories that we're gonna help me do what I did. You went to these people every day and everything is you, and you know, this you showed up you showed up now. I, you know, I tell somebody young right? I would say well, you get what you have such relationships. These guys. I'm getting. Yeah. Because I went every day. I was after practice practice opening practices off often open back. Then I was there after practice before you're there on game night. There's there's none of this. You weren't. There you missed it. You read something else and people respected your work because they thought you every day, and you had to be accountable for what you did. Yep. If you worked countable for what you did you were going to get rained, and you shouldn't get rained. And so I've met it's so funny. You mentioned that I that that is a big part of what disappoints me today. You know, the other thing that that I find interesting because I'm on the other end of it. You know, you're doing this interview. That interview this interview that interview. Okay. So you you you figure? Okay. Well, I know what I said. And you know, you, you know, some guys are going to take it and and do a great job with it. And you know, some guys are going to they have their own agenda. So I was I was reading a story a couple of weeks ago on the New York Giants football team. And obviously, they're struggling, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. And one of the writers said was making, you know, like, hey, they do this. They do this. And then they do that. And you know, what I'm not? I don't agree with this. And I don't agree with that. Like, I can live if they did this. You know, I could do I could do that. You know, like, I would be okay with that. And I'm thinking to myself since one does the coach of the New York, John. I have to do something that you're okay with. Since self they themselves right since why have the right to say. I will be okay with it. You're not the story here and see. That's that's you you identify. Of course, the place that they things break down. So now, sometimes I mean, I run into young journalist, whether I've at my alma mater, north western or if I'm visiting some other school, they'll in we'll talk about what they wanna do. And the first thing is, you know, well, I wanted to fire my own television show. I wanna spire my own column. How do I get that? Am I answer is very simple, easy to spend ten to fifteen years at least just getting it. Right. Just understanding how to cover a game. How to leave yourself out of it? You know about the time. I I got one too early in in my in my own estimating. I'd probably was a columnist a little too early. But I had learned that I wasn't the story in and you know, 'cause you're on the other end of this you also because you've been. In the times where you were on a panel or you are on the show almost hosting jail. You know, that there's a certain way to leave yourself out of something when you're bringing it to a listener or viewer that is that's that's kind of ignored now. I mean, we're talking about a small percentage of people even understand the need to do what you're saying much less know, how to do it. And do they aspire to the spire to be part of it? Because I think you know, that's what they see. That's what pays you know, there's a certain glower to it. But you know, what they ought to be a long apprenticeship. And now, I'm afraid to many people don't don't don't pay it. I just discovered something. That's pretty extraordinary. I'd heard about it from some coaches, and pro athletes, and now I've experienced it for myself, mizzen and main. Dallas based company. Is to make her performance fabric, dress shirts. Now, you say what's performance fabric? Well, you know, this stuff you work out. So you get all the benefits of workout gear. But you wear it with a suit you can dress it up dress it down put a tie on. Don't put a tie on it. So if you see me on the court lately, that's what I'm wear. You. Don't know that it's a dresser. If feels like a casual shirt, but it looks like a dress shirt. Yet. It moves around you like workout gear. It's revolutionary. You can check out. WWW dot mizzen and main that's M I Z Z, E N and main M A I N dot com slash Gino. See some of my favorite shirts. Take a look. You'll be impressed. Give it a shot, husky fans. I know there's no one more loyal than you. And I appreciate that. You know, what else a free sheets loyalty AAA so much? So that they'll reward you for like how you get savings on triple eight auto insurance just for being a triple a member and the longer you remember, the more you could save have both AAA auto and AAA home insurance, you could save even more. Have you been loyal to your existing insurance company for a while? Well, though, we ward that too with a discount when you switch the AAA loyalty gets you more than saving, it gets you comprehensive help from an expert agent who gets to know you. Because when you're triple A expert agent knows you better they can help you better for insurance. That's not just insurance turned the AAA. You know? Covering covering sports is an emotional thing. And and the fans are emotional the players are emotional. And it's you know, the pros. I don't care. What league it's a bottom line business? You know, like you don't get any points for for trying. You know, it's it's winter or this consequences. So when you were in college, though. And I am always always curious about guys who you know, guys that I've talked to, you know, at stuck to Jeremy chaplains, we can talk about being Cornell and writing for the Cornell student newspaper, so you're you're at northwestern, and you're writing for the school newspaper, and you're covering teams that suck. Your age. I know I know you're eighteen nineteen twenty years old. And you like how do I make this? How do I spend this thing? What was that like going to class with some of those dudes that will allow and then having to sit there and write GO? That's a that is a great question. And you think that it was time that okay? So first of all luck. Luckily for me, I grew up in the shadow of north western so I was thirty minutes away. But awesome. And I was only sixty minutes away from Notre Dame. So I saw man both sides. But I I knew the difficulties that north western I knew even when I was when I was a freshman at seventeen when I got there. How about this? What I got to north Western Union men's basketball coach was Tex winter. And oh my God. I forgot about that. So Tex winters the coach of the men's team. And I I knew you know, I just read up on Texan. I would you know, go back and get had to get microfilm. Obviously. There was no Google. And I was back. I don't think my God this guy before he started going through and twenty six it was I mean field and final fours. He was coaching in the NBA. And so I got to I got to be around Tex winter for a couple of years. I'm pretty sure he was two years. But also I was living on the floor surrounded by guys because we didn't have dorm. I was living around guys who were on the team. I mean the point guard Brian Gibson, you know, the the six eleven four Mike Campbell. I just thought our reunion last week. These guys all the team that would go seriously. I mean, it'd be like seven twenty something. And then you'll with them like you come home where I go back to my room to do bomb work. I'm writing my story for the daily. These guys are cutting limping in with a sprained ankle having lost Ohio State by thirty five. We did beat magic. We did be matching towards if not. Yeah. Once we'd be magic at a huge game that that magic remember every possession of we only talked about this. He and you know, thirty four years now is Louie figures forty years ago, but but I there's a certain humanity. I think Gino I learned because I those guys weren't robots. They wanted to win. They've put in practice time. They did all the things that the winning teams did. Without the result. Right. I was not. I learned the difference between criticism and ridicule. And one of the things I think I never did as a columnist. I hope I never did it. I think so was I you could you can criticize, but you, but there's there's children different thing when you're taking a dig at somebody when you're making fun of somebody when you are when there's laughter in your tone writing unacceptable because they heard. And I knew those guys I lived with them. And so that that that's one of it gives me such such joy. Now that also ball team has won ten games to last three years, and we've got huge games coming up with Notre Dame this week. And I was the next week for the right to play in the big ten title game. You kidding not the the football team. You know when I was there. I'm pretty sure the teams record was three thirty eight and one. Oh, yeah. I I'm not surprised. I'm pretty sure it's basketball team the notion of making a tournament. Yeah. And the women's team was better. Yeah. They were a little better. They were a little better at and I think I think Chris Collins did did they make the tournament last year the year before. First time ever. Now, you would think a school like that, you know? And everybody said, well, you know, Stanford has the same entrance. You quite and Duke does and Notre Dame does or whatever, you know, you although schools that and northwestern at, but, you know, sometimes when you get a reputation of, you know, futility it it's hard as hell the recruit kids there. I don't care how good the school is. And then it just takes you know, a situation like coach Burnett coming in on the football. And then just going. All right. We're going to change that. And what was what was the feeling like for western grads? The first time you guys new thing. We're going to the Rose Bowl. I often describe it it over nineteen ninety-five. Yeah. I get I I'm I was dating a young woman. Then who who for some reason decided to continue to the point where I'm getting married and we've been married twenty years, and she hates it to this day. J-? You know, what I say that January one in the weekend. That's around it at nineteen ninety six at the end of the ninety five season is the greatest weekend in my life. She says really really I go. Yes. Yes. And you know, what it is still one of the three grades. We give my life. So I mean, there's the birth of my son yet in two thousand eight and the Rose Bowl weekend. And the only thing that surpass that. I think in the way it has is the weekend we played in the tournament two years ago in in Salt Lake City hell bent to play in the tournament for the first time. Remember? So we go to the Rose Bowl. And then we have to go. Another twenty one years of not getting in the tournament. And you know, I'm a trustee of the university. Now, I wasn't. I certainly wasn't in nineteen ninety five, you know, fifteen year London. But I just remember trying to get tickets. You know, the search for tickets and the connections. I 'cause I cover college sports at that point for fifteen years for the Washington Post that I had something actions. And it seems like everybody in who was an alarm who didn't even know how to get a Rose Bowl take. It didn't know where to start was calling me. And I remember just the the actual joy every time I acquired a two tickets to go. I I wound up getting like thirty five tickets for people to go to the Rose Bowl. But I still call it. I call it the greatest we get in my life and my wife just start shaking her head. She goes where where's like our wedding in there? I'm sorry. I'm sorry. Honey, it's not it's not at that point. I hadn't known her like eight months, and so those two weekends. If I ranked the weekends of my life. My. Son's birth. And then and then the the tournament making the tournament the announcement that whole week going out to Salt Lake City winning a game against vandy and losing game in which you got completely hosed Bill. Get me started. I guess goes aga- the number one seed we have had them, you know, the play where a kid puts his hand the kid Collins who's on Portland now puts his hand up through the rim to go in charge. And and that's the key moment of the game. They don't call it. Yeah. I remember you've probably even remember that. So you can tell I, of course, remember every bit of it. Those are those are two of the three grades weekends in my life are related to those teams at a great part of it is a few Tilleke the, and and and think about the people who put like, you know, years and years of blood, sweat and tears effort for sure I thought about Texas weather. I got to I got what else crippling NBA, I walk up to Tex winter, and I introduced myself, and he said, I knew I think that you from somewhere I said, yeah. The daily from quote, I was a kid, and you know, it was great and text had a special affinity for the people went to north western, and it's such a north western medium, mafia, and you know, all of them have known much longer than I have checks owns being. We even took a group photo once at the NBA finals. I don't know whether it was the Lakers the bulls when he was for Bill. We took a photo that we have of just all of the pups who covered Tex winter from north western it's it's a you know for not having had on court and on field success GIO. It's quite a fraternity. And it's quite a lot of pride. And I think that now that both those programs are winning. We don't take anything for granted. You never gonna hear one of us say all coach ought to be fired. 'cause we went, you know, six and five or three and eight because we haven't had any of those lately. But I tell people all the time you guys think it's your birthright to go ten and two you wanna fire the coach and the Brassica. I'm you guys you guys deserve. What you got that? You have never want again since you got rid of a guy was nine three. Yeah. And so we don't have the I don't, you know, call it three college sports fans are the most entitled people on earth. No. Question. And it's like where do you get off with this? And so I I don't have any of that. I love my teams. I I love the coaches who come in work under the conditions that we have. And, but I remember those days, I never gonna forget what it was like, and those people what it was like for them to go to endure what they did and persevere and become, you know, just some of the great people that I loved today forty years later when it comes to the college basketball season, the only team that matters is the Yukon huskies got that with the Wells Fargo uconn women's basketball debit card, you can show your husky pry with every purchase you make head to your local Wells Fargo and ask for your new uconn women's basketball debit card today. Wells Fargo is the official retail Bank partner of uconn women's basketball in basketball. Accuracy can be the difference between winning and losing. And this is also true when it comes to your health the genius three D. Mammography exam is a more accurate and comfortable mammogram for all women. So why not find the facility? Offers the genius exam near you. Visit fine. My genius three D dot com. To learn more and make sure your next mammogram is a genius exam is your retirement game plan a well executed play or wild shot. At the buzzer. Johnson Brunetti has helped over twenty five hundred Connecticut families prepare for financially secure retirement. And they are proud to be the wealth management partner of the Yukon huskies. Visit them Johnson Brunetti dot com and see how they can help you with your retirement Johnson, Brunetti, retirement and investments specialists, go to Johnson Brunetti dot com for free books and financial planning tools. Well, you know, as you're talking I'm thinking to myself. Okay. Here's a kid. Grows up in Chicago and goes to north western you. You had an affinity for futility. All your pro team sucked. That's right. Longest time. You had the Cubbies. You just have constantly came up short and the bears had their their ups and that the White Sox. The the bulls had a little bit of this a little bit of that. And you're surrounded by all these obnoxious daughter Dame grads. The Notre Dame thing is still sticks in my car. I mean, you know, so we're gonna this big when Notre Dame this week football. And you know, we have won the last two games against Notre Dame the series of something like thirty seven to nine and they used to play every year, right? And the series of something like thirty seven to nine they took care of parsegian from us, airports and goes to their name from northwestern. Yep. I mean, the last time we had a great team that was ranked one it was air procedure. And then he goes to south band. And so, you know, I sit by the way my season tickets are right in the row in front of three guys played for era at north western how about that is. I mean, I it's still cool to sit with in front of those guys who were in there. I mid seventies late seventies now. But anyway, yes, they were terrible. All by teams were awful. They were awful. And you know, the the north western teams were the worst in the country the word. Losing streaks in the country. Where I you know, I saw north western when one when one game is a student my senior year while they won three games. One was at Iowa. I wasn't traveling back that wasn't covered the team that year and the other one was a game in which on my birthday on my nineteenth birthday. We were losing fourteen nothing to Illinois on a day. It was it was snowing in about ten degrees. That's what the hell with this that I got in the car, and I drove to my parents house for a birthday dinner on the south side. We scored three touchdowns and win the game. While I'm in the car. I don't even see it didn't see us win. And that was my whole life. You know, like you said the cubs the balls had some good teams with. Yeah. Nor nor Van Leer Jerry Sloan in love and Walker and born with you. We we didn't we always lost the Kareem. Yeah. We'd lose to wilt in the Lakers because we were in the Western Conference, then and the Blackhawks have few till you after Bobby Hall. We lost in the Stanley Cup finals twice in game. Seven one. Tomorrow ya'll. We were we were it was just it was Louisville, man. And even though they were great stars. The greatest stars imaginable. Gale sayers that I I got to meet all my heroes, which is another story for the time. I got to meet literally all of them from seniors two buckets to forgive Jenkins to Ernie banks. I I met all of them. We tried to help you us villi people tried to help you get Jenkins for nobody. We gave you Ryan sambergen bar yet. Yes, we are so bad here. We were so bad. We gave away the best players we ever had up to that point. You guys have college teams you have some other. You have some good. Yes. Doing on weight. They have anything going on, Gino. And it I think that changes, my perspective or inch. I think it created my perspective on how to do my job. And how to ask people about losing, you know, one of the first big stories that ever wrote because I was there covering the team that was twenty three years old the first big story I had to write was walking into Georgetown locker room and my time. It was talk to Fred Brown. Oh after that. Oh, yeah. And so. To walk in and listen and be empathetic. And you know, I hate when people walk it, and they're just oblivious. How'd you drop that last pass? I mean, are you kidding me? Right. And they must have never competed anything, they must have not gotten any. I dunno familiarity with the difficulty the agony of defeat, and it's funny you could spread Brown eye after that the over the the years where he got two more years at Georgetown, and then went onto incredible career in finance. And I, you know, I've known fed a whole adult lives. He was he was eighteen I was twenty one point two, and that was one that was of my first ones without I've I've I also stood at the locker of earnest Byner after he fumbled at the goal line for the Cleveland Browns. And they thought they were running into the Super Bowl and earnest Byner fumbled. I've known Ernest then became a Washington Redskin. I wrote about him and I stood his locker for an hour while he talked an hour and do though there there's some stories like. Gino that really I they made me appreciate sports. They made me appreciate winning. And losing. Maybe appreciate people who stand up in a difficult. I'm a bad loser. I'm a I'm a bad awful awful loser. If I lose my brother in golf, I lose the court has gone badly. I talk to anybody for six eight hours, and you guys have a ten minute cooling off ruling. You gotta meet up. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. So I you know, I had I had a lot of that. I think that I think my roots in Chicago God you hit on something. I did that really colored the way I did what I did. But, you know, somebody asked me one time about you know, fans who boo I don't care if they boo college kids high school kids professional athletes, you know, as if I have a right college kids, I have a right to boo them when they played poorly. Why because I bought my ticket. I have a right to boo a professional athlete why? Because they're making ten million. And if they don't do what I expect them to do. I can boo them. And I'm like you. I grew up in Philadelphia at a time where we one nothing. Now. The Sixers were good because we have will that one year, and we kept losing to the Celtics, and then is sixty eight we won we won the whole thing. And then we gave you Chet the jet walk chat. That's right. We gave you chat. And and did you see the empathy that you get? So you go. Okay. Well, we're probably going to lose. The eagles are going to lose the Phillies are gonna lose. Okay. Those were the two big sports at the time. Okay. So you you start to go. All right. What am I gonna do when we lose? I can either just go boo or I can have some fun with it and go. Yeah. You know, what that's kind of like what we do. You know, we kind of. And then you get you. You get disappointed you get frustrated, but you don't take it out on the players. And I remember going Connie Mack stadium and watching dick Allen whose Richie on at the time his rookie again to the White Sox later. That's exactly right. So Richie Allen was a mother, man. He would big and and he was dark and Philadelphia's one of the most racist cities in the country, you know, back then I mean, I'm sure it's better now. But and I mean, they tortured this poor guy and killed him. And they with boo and throw shit, Adam. And and then he hit a three run Homer over the coke sign and bottom tonight. They have to striking out three times. And they would treat him like. Caesar just came back on. Would sit there, and I go, you know, good mothers, you know. So I always had an an an an an epithet for these guys that. Yeah, you know, they're not trying to strike out, blah, blah, blah. So you know, when I watch you guys work. I really appreciate guys who say like it is without you said it perfect Michael this idea of you can be disappointed. You can ask questions about a decision. You can criticize. But at the end of the day. No, no, one understands what these professional athletes college athletes in high school kids are going through and could you as the guy to boom put yourself in that position? And tell me you could handle all that every day. God, I let me just you know, I have a rule is X Hispasat name that you mentioned the Boeing. So I have a real with my. I have a ten year old son Matthew who is into everything. The first thing we did the it has conscious life. We went to spring training with the cubs which was two thousand ten because he's nineteen years old. Now, that's the first thing ever went to. And then when he was three and four we go to bears and bulls games, he's grown up with these never lived the Dan Chicago's life. I mean, he hits Washington. But he's he's he's you know, he's a fan of the teams his dad is a fan of and now ten he plays basketball. He's Joe Mckee. Joe McEwen it's helped with his point because his his point guard skills. Matter of fact, he's going to basketball practice Saturday in Chicago before Notre Dame, the freshman Lindsey pull Liam who's like our it was like is a big sister to him about that. And so he's going to go to practice in Joe is he's a lefty God helped me Joe helps them with some some some lefty things being a lefty himself. Is this kid is he's grown up in his his whole life is sports. And we go to a game about three years ago, Gino, I don't remember what it was probably a bulls gay the best game. And he started booing 'cause the crowd started booing. So we get the halftime. And I go come come come here. Let's go we're gonna take a little walk. And so we walk down the concourse get a hotdog something. Here's the deal. You gotta be disappointed with sports and we just play with your home play. Give me in the teams. You follow? I said you go up in a golden era. I said you all you do. Now you cheer for Derrick rose, and you different people were MVP's you cheer for. I said, but do we don't do. There's no Boeing you're not going to boot. Right. You'd be bigger than that. I don't care what everybody around. You does. I don't care what your friends at school do. So I guess he was in second grade. Maybe she gets it. We don't boot ever under any circumstance. I said, I don't even want you born the opposing team. I I guess you. I might let that slide wheel boo. Individuals and we don't when never gonna boo the players that you come to cheer for. It's not going to happen. And so I haven't heard him do I it's it's made impression I hope because we're just I can't stand that the people who think it's their right without knowing and he and he knows too many players, you know, he too many too many athletes have been kind to him already. You know, the the date. Eric roses. And and and and she'll come no as in, you know, he's had too many players. You know, Kyle swore lives in the building. We live in the same builds apartment building in Chicago, the place I have there and sh sh Wilbur will say, hey, Matthew, come knock on my door. Anytime you come and play if you want, and he looks at me with the big is his wow data's pretty costly. Yeah. You gonna boo him at some point. 'cause he strikes out with the bases loaded. This not we do these people and you're getting the unlike most seven eight nine ten year old you're getting to see who they are in full. But we don't boo. And so I think because he's gotten to know some guys now, I'm hoping we don't have to have that. I hope that lessons have revisited. But I'm like you. I I don't do. I I don't I don't I just never did that. No, no. It's it's. Really says more about you than it does about, you know, the player, you're booing or the situation you absolutely right about that. I want one thing that I an again, you know, we keep going back 'cause I feel like, you know. You know, we met a while back you, and I, but even before that I always felt like we had a we had a connection because there's so many of my memories that you were you were a part of especially my time at in Charlottesville and growing up in a Washington area and every Wednesday. It was like here we go Tuesday. Here it goes, it's all Redskins all the time. Nothing else in the world exists. It's Joe Gibbs the hawks, and you know, Mark. And I mean, this is like this is the real deal man is Redskins. Redskins redskins. And you got caught up in it, man. Like, we became my wife, and I became great Redskins fans. You know, how when they played the eagles. It was a tough. Guy, but still. But there was a moment when I was in Charlottesville that you were a part of their very very few people may remember or know anything about it. Shaman odd versus UVA. Oh, yeah. The the, you know on except when you can lose a women's basketball game Shamanov beating UVA might have been the greatest upset. Now. They talk about UVA. They were just involved in another one. Yeah. Where sixteen a one for the famous upset. Yeah. Okay. So. For the people listening. Give them a sense of what happened that day? How it happened and the magnitude of what that meant around the sports world. Oh my God. I it's still it's up and doing this dall-. I don't know thirty eight years and that I've that's certainly in the top three most memorable top five miserable. Things I ever was around in the circumstances. I was I was in a white covering the university of Maryland who that was in Maryland beat writer for the Washington Post. I was there a cover Maryland football the first bowl game. They'd had in years. Bobby Ross's first team they were playing the university of Washington in the UAE in the law bowl was a brand new bowl augural bowl. And while I was if that week shaman, I was playing Virginia. I I already for two years. I cut my teeth covering college basketball, a lot of American George Mason, and George Washington, but also Sommese stuff and so. I had you know, which included driving down the Charlottesville. Which would produce the person I married I wanna marrying a while. But I I I'm in Hawaii, Gino, and I say to my boss, listen, I'm gonna I'm gonna go to this game. I know is not Merrill related, but you know, Virginia's number one and the three time three time think about this. Nobody stays in college and up to be a two-time anything right men's basketball. Now three time player of the year. L Samson the most dominant player in college. Yes. The dominant player. I mean, you know, I mean. People don't realize no Michael Jordan didn't win player of the year. And those Ralph did that's his accurate. And I guess what are they I guess the only overlap maybe when you're but anyway, no, look at least a couple of at least a call you. So they they did. And so over Virginia's undefeated Brank one, and I was holding hotel weren't they coming back from Tokyo coming back from Japan Japan. Yep. And the played you know, whatever what team Georgetown. They played that back then. Yeah. I think they had Georgetown with Patrick Ewing. Now that was in next year. Oh that was a phone. Yeah. Okay. That was the following year. They play on December eleven in the first game ever on Turner. That was. Yeah. That was coming up. Well, so they play they play this game against shaman hot you like who shaman not seriously in a is school. That's why when people said to me the latest loss sixteen versus one was a bigger ups. They go. No, no, no. No. No. No, no, no, no, sixteen seat is still NCW school. I was in a I. A division. Three intervention. And and someone's crazy was Gino dry. We're still in the same hotel. We're staying in the Hyatt on Waikiki beach and Ralph had a terrible cough. He had a back hold coming back from a member is Canada Japan. He's a terrible cold. And they think he he might not play interior fit. You know, we we might sit the big fella tonight. And so you go, and then I call my boss, and I said, look, I I gotta go to this. Ralph mate, I'll play and then you look around Virginia. And yes, they have some talented players. But you know, at that point you're playing in a wide, you're tired, maybe some other guys ever called why get to the gym and Ralph talks way into Terry allow him to play so Ralph's plan, and my editor George Solomon, God bless them. Somebody who gave me a chance at hired me. Twenty one years old, George says, hire me Antoni, Gino that might be blame as opposed to credit. But nonetheless, I said, George, I gotta write something. Because what are you nuts is the number one team the undefeated? We're not. Gonna write about Shamanov beaten. I said no, I'm one of those game. I'll call I'll call the night editor. And I think it was forty two forty at half time. Ego to this game. It's a little gym. It's Blaisdell arena. I don't remember what happened yesterday. I can remember Blaisdell arena fitting in their thirty eight hundred people I think the opposing coach was Merv Lopes. If all maybe it was. Yes, it was. And and and he Ralph plays, but it's forty two forty or thirty thirty. I think it's forty two forty half time. And I'm nuts. There's no computers. There's no cell phones. No, I find a pay phone. I collect call five hours away to Washington. And I stayed in my editor you you guys have to save space. And he goes we will listening to the game on radio forty or forty well Virginia scores like the first seven points in the second half. And then, but of course, that goes on to win this game. I'm the only reporter for the mainland. I'm the only guy there and they lose the game. I remember have talked about empathy. I remember having to ask Terry Holland. Although maybe I didn't ask maybe somebody else. Ask them said, Terry. Coach's this the greatest upset in college basketball history. And you know, at that point, you're taking a step back 'cause you're thinking, oh, my God Carrie might explode until you never exploded. He was he is a gentleman such a gentleman, and he he just nodded affirmatively. Like, yes. And I I never forget Terry's faces he nodded. Yeah. Actually, we're thinking oh my God. So I run a found the same stupid payphone. And I collect call to my editors and they said, oh my God. We we put the paper to bed when Virginia scored the first points the second hand. Oh. The paper's gone to bed. You know? I am sitting on the biggest story ever in sports college sports. And and so I, you know, still nobody knew how about the world at that point. There's no internet. There's nothing. There's no picker there's no crawl like so people a day and a half later. I write for the Washington Post two days later, and that was the first people ever heard of it, and I was Cocody fine. I actually coaching at UVA, and we're. And we wake up the next morning. We're like what that because. Nobody like you guys. We're going to stay up and listen to that game or watch it. What are you nuts salmon, nods NA, I this way when they get back home? And when we woke up the next day on my Allie was like he just. This is a sidelight to the story talking about learning the craft, and what you do in being places and not just being a addicted to analytics, which kills me. That's another pet. Peeve of mine night more than a pet peeve. I I just I just load them. So I walk in the locker room and there's a kid and he's sitting there, and I almost killed his name. I think his last name was Randolph. Anyway, he's scored twenty four points. He's like six four. He was there center. Six four NA. I he's shooting the ball he's rainbow shots over Ralph. What does that tell you? I'm about to walk up to this kid when he says excuse me, anybody from the Washington Post here you like what did I just hear five thousand miles away? The kids says anybody from the Washington Post here, and I looked at him. And I said, yeah, that's extending my answer might go about from the Washington Post. I said why are you asking about that? And he says 'cause I'm from DC how? How bet. How? Northern virginia. I forget, whether it's Alexandria, or Arlington, whatever he's northern Virginia. And I said, okay, we I gotta write a special story just about this kid extra story. So I said, well, how did you learn how to shoot like Where'd you get that from shooting over? And he said, well, there's a coach I played I in coach me in high school, and he would make these shoot over an extended broom because I was smaller. It was six to play center, and I had to shoot over guys who were six seven six eight. And he said he he taught me how to do that. And his name is Donald huff. And he writes for the Washington Post now how? Okay. He just got just yielding stories. I'm like are. You kidding me? Have it? So I I wrote that and I I think the kids last names Randolph. Anyway, it was just unbelievable night. I look I I mean, I I would of course, I'd much icago kid who's courtside for every big Michael Jordan game ever after the Craig Hilo game. And then no more memorable to me than that game in that situation in that. And I you know, what all did you later? I would hate to have to ask Craig little page or Terry, Holland or Ralph is become a dear friend, I marry somebody from Virginia Gino had to live through the team versus one. I didn't live through that, you know, as an in-law of the program and that was after going to so the previous game was the ACC tournament. And I my wife installing me go to Virginia. I never heard anybody else's colors. I only wear purple. I only wear the purple. I I wore I wear Virginia stuff Virginia game, we go to the ACC final in Brooklyn. And we're sitting courtside and we watch Virginia win the ACC tournament by beating North Carolina. And the very next game. They lose un-blessed as a one. And again, you know, I how do you deal with that? How do you deal with your friends and people and you wanna talk to you about it? You wanna talk to coach about it. But I feel I feel for Virginia and can't wait today. Get back on the court. So they can get onto something else. But yeah, man that Sean not gave us a defining moment in my life and will always be in my professional life. Really? That was incredible. Last couple of things one the big the big discussion among young people today. Lebron the latest integrates the greatest player in the history of the NBA true or false false. I think he has I to me as a mount Rushmore of basketball. You know, it'd be for them here for me. It's it's Russell, and I do that chronological order left to right. It's Russell magic Jordan. And the broad sorta to me that's God helped me believing all know Coby Coby and and world and Corinne. I'm leaving remark is the most dominant player in the history of the lay. Yeah. Yes, I fully acknowledged that. That is the case. But I gotta go four. I gotta go Russell the greatest winner in the history of the game. And then magic to me, you just still still you don't did the other day. I made my son is point guard guy knows he ain't gonna be six nine. But he's pretty is gonna be, you know, probably six four I said to him you're gonna go, and you're gonna watch the magic highlights you've got YouTube on all the time stop playing fortnight and dozens of watch Magic Johnson highlight tape, which is eleven minute highlighted tape on YouTube of magic. Without before he gets to a shot. It's like nine minutes before they show a shot. And so Matty to me redefined modern basketball, and of course, Jordan, and the thing I always say this, and Gino you this be a debate. I would be scared to have this debate with you. I'm happy to have the debate with all these knuckleheads who can't argue position. Like, I can't. 'cause that's what I do for a living new. I knew basketball. I'd be scared to have this debate with you. 'cause you might make me consider something else's persuasive. As you are. You're Kobe Kobe. I know but gone both talking to a Philly guys. We have to get it through why LeBron over Kobe because you know, what? Okay. The you just just asked great answer for because I think that LeBron as a teammate. Has brought other guys along in a way that maybe nobody has said magic. I know we're splitting hairs here. Because if you 'cause I on some days, you can you can make me you could make me change that input Kobe on. And I'm now knowing my not Kobe hater, I love Kobe. I love being around Kobe Bryant, I I'm privileged to have been around him for his entire pro career starting with when Tim Legler when Kobe was like fifteen Tim likely would come back from Philly and say, hey, this is a kid is going to be the greatest player of all time. You're like what he's fifteen. I know it gets full credit for for me for that. But Jordan, if you if you have a possession in a game and your life is on the line, and it's liver die live or die. Who do you want to have the ball with eight seconds left in a game? Michael, Jordan or LeBron? And we're answer Jordan numbered, George. Okay. And so yes, and yes, I mean, Jordan Jordan for sure. And so and the other thing is what when they point out and this value. This is value to me, Gino. And that's the spectators to you to knowing the consistency. The the the unreal consistency of your program. And then the ladies who play for you, Michael Jordan played every game for thirteen years. Do you play all eighty two games for the wizard when he was forty? All right. Take off two weeks now. And I listen, I understand the culture's different. Lebron go to Miami hangs out with Dwayne Wade. God bless the bride. I don't I'm not. I'm not critical of anything LeBron dot now. But I know I was I was there when Michael would walk into the locker room. Scotty loves telling his story, Michael walk into the locker room and say get the ice off take that wrap off you're playing tonight. He would throw guys out of the trainers room. Tell them they were playing and. They all played eighty two. Stacey king played eighty two. Steve Kerr played eighty two games. Three times his career only three he didn't play eighty two before. And he didn't play eighty two after he played eighty two three times with Michael Jordan, all of 'em Scottie, Pippen, eighty two. They played they every night that to me counts for something though. Sure. And they don't do it. They don't do it anymore. They don't they don't care as much about the patron. 'cause I've asked Michael, Gino. Can you imagine the phone call when he finds out what he would I find out about guys sitting out like three or four or five years ago as owner of a team with this happen phone ringing? That would just hear his voice of angry about because I would say why did you feel the need to play all eighty two? And he thinks people paid good money to come. See they weren't getting under study. They were getting me. And that to me, I have you know, you can tell I mean, I and granted I have a bias. I'm Chicago guy. But but Michael to me did things that he still did things that that no one is do it. Michael Jordan played into days rules with no arm in the back of his back. No art, no forearm. Come what he he was thirty seventy average forty five forty eight. Now these rules and guys are averaging you know, thirty two thirty. Okay, fine. Jordan, Jordan did dad with the Detroit Pistons beating him with a tire iron. That's all. I, you know. Yes. I am. Yeah. The broad. Lebron has been so kind to me professionally accommodating, it's a team knows where I am on Jordan. And we never gotten to. We don't discuss it. 'cause I always start these things I saying I feel bad because I don't wanna say anything negative about the broad because I think he's the greatest thing imaginable, but Jordan, it's me is different worlds. Two different cultures different time, different culture. I do. I sell the old man. Get off my lawn now, Gino that's right sound like, I know. That's why sound like all right, less less thing. Tell me in. This few words as possible. The best thing about working with Kornheiser. And the worst late. Old to have been asked something for first time. This is the first time I've ever been asked that that. I gotta tell Tony this. The best thing is we he thinks about stuff until he can say I was wrong. He s come at, you know, people don't even say that anymore on these shows were they bait, and it's like, you gotta say how about the sentence. You know, you got me on that. I was wrong about that. Tony will do that. That's the best thing about working with the worst thing is we are on total opposite schedule to I watch. All this stuff is you know, I watch this stuff live. I do I text and all this stuff in two and three in the morning. Tony's asleep at nine o'clock. You can't call him and say are you watching curry right now? Are you watching last night Klay Thompson? Oh, my God fifty one fifty three but like three minutes one in twenty seven minutes twice a kid takes you last night. But I can't take because he's asleep. And then he'll he'll get up at four o'clock and south TV watching TV and reading and he ain't gonna call me and stuff at eight o'clock 'cause I'm asleep still for like four more hours. So that's the worst thing that can't be shared experience. But. He he still has recover from the mean streets of Binghamton, you know. The game coming up Gene-o in which Binghamton northwestern open. Our new are redone. Jim is completely new Jim. No. Yeah. On the sixteenth Binghamton and north western Tony recommended. You know, how he would say only he can you know, I'm longer than me where he says to his AD. Listen, we're gonna take a beating from somebody. Anyway, we may get paid. Why don't we open north Western's Jim half at that? And so that's what's happening. I know Kristen is not looking at it that way and neither is being since coach. But so we open that Jim we that game opens the gym on the sixteenth November. How about this guess who's gonna do the broadcast? Yes. Oh my God. Oh on on ESPN on ESPN ES. Oh my God. Yeah. I got to see that. I talked to he talked his way into something. You know that we've that that's going to be you know, crazy, but it so the best thing really is though, I should mention this been closing. He. Tony follows everything. Like, I do what else specialist we follow everything the moment the calendar. Terms overlap with following that, you know, I can't wait to get to you know, when the WNBA is going on. And I'm watching, you know, sue bird. I think sewage thirty eight correct me if I'm wrong thirty seven thirty eight. I'm like that. You know, we we we are we take pride in having watched her whole career, correct? And and everybody's Khokar 'cause old, and I don't want to be a specialist. I don't wanna wanna just be known for doing one thing. I so, you know, you guys come to town GW or the or the Maryland wherever I wanna I wanna go for that game on take my kidding. So you better appreciate everything. We do we we're we're old. But we appreciate everything. And I you know, I hope it goes on for a while. Well, yeah, we have we we have perspective, and you can't convince that's the problem. I son thirty you can't convince thirty year old when you're sixty four that because they go back in the old day back in your day back in the day. But. When you and I, you know, it's funny when you and I talk, and and just listen to you guys, and knowing you guys, it's a pleasure to to actually listen to journalists to listen to people that take pride in their craft. And obviously we're in a ratings world, you know, you have to get hits. And you gotta get this. And you gotta get that. But you know, what is a lot of different ways to accomplish that. And you guys were ground breakers. You were ground, breakers and trendsetters and visionaries as writers. And then you went on to create a show that is still the show that all other sports talk shows are still measured against then from all of us sports fans and from me personally. I really appreciate an admire what you guys do. And what your career has been all about? And I hope hope you stay healthy. And hope you continue to do it. And let's do this again is you know, maybe in the middle of the season. I I'd love to. And that's thank you that. That's a thank you. I can't even express enough. Gratitude listen to Philly guys have been among first of all we got was our first guest in Charles because he was of course, most of us cruise fix Charles is our first guest on the show at one of our one of our guests of highest esteem, you who come on so many times with us in the middle of God knows before tournaments during tournaments and the show is not the show without the help and support and the discussion sports discussion, so great and and and being able to have access to you. And God knows sports writer decades before that. I I can't there's no way I can addict. Lately, did Tony that I can't adequately express it. And sometimes when you've been on the show, the young staffers at office will say, you guys know coach Auriemma like, yeah. With us for a long time. Now, the fascinating whenever you know, you get asked to do a lot of things. But whenever you're asked to do that, you know, say, hey, once you go on with those guys it's like man, this is like five minutes is going to be the most five fun five minutes of my day. So believe me, the feelings mutual Michael much. Appreciate it anytime. I love having this discussion with you. They got so much, Gino. So there you have it. One more in the book is our producer Michael likes to say one more in the book, Michael wilbon, Chicago fan, northwestern, grad bleeds, purple ESPN hotshot with Tony Kornheiser and as knowledgeable a sports fan as you'd ever want to meet and one of the nicest guys in the business. I really enjoyed talking to Michael he's a lot of fun. It's like having a drink with a guy just talking sports. I hope you enjoyed it be on the lookout for our next holding court. Which were AM until then this Gino Auriemma saying. Talkies?

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Episode 23: Jessica Mendoza

Holding Court with Geno Auriemma

57:20 min | 10 months ago

Episode 23: Jessica Mendoza

"This is Gino Auriemma and this is holding court you'll more famous in China Liangelo Ball I mean he just became famous hugh way more famous than we were on runs undefeated runs who was I calling if you don't WanNa know how do I keep I love the shack okay and thought the world was coming to an end you know so there's always an overreaction both ways world series starting this week the Astros again second time in three years the nationals first time since Franklin road in court talking about anything anything and everything trying to keep it seasonal this happens to be the end of baseball season and play baseball played softball went to Stanford all American played on the Olympic team and now she works for Major League Baseball World it but when you know when they a woman I got involved in with NFL coverage everybody lost their mind of commentating and being analyst hope you enjoy my big thing with what you're doing is like all the welcome to the next edition of Holding Court with Gene Gene Auriemma coach uconn women's basketball savell was president she'll be interesting to great pitching staffs lots of great great baseball players and Yukon Zone George Springer Mvp of the Oh series couple years ago so should be fun and we have Jessica Mendoza to talk about it in addition to her growing up baseball coach for a dad so in a direction that you were surprised or what what's your what's your thoughts on that you know I think imagine I can imagine you're probably too young to remember Phyllis George I guess the bigger deal just because there hasn't been a female on a national broadcast like that I didn't expect like such strong reaction see that you're doing before you agree to it did you know how that was going to play out or did this kind of this kind of this you know as long as you could play as long as you could do something like we never talked about limitations and so I think I knew it was gonna be if that makes sense so people were either like absolutely this is awful we hate you more this is the greatest thing in the world which is attention that it received when ESPN announced that you were going to be doing baseball for them in the capacity the biggest thing for me I mean I grew up I had a coach's a dad and one of the things that he always taught me was just kind of brothers and sisters and was just you know it was it was neither and so to me I kinda just was like I I knew people would react okay there's a female but I never thought it would be the extent ruining the game on one end and to you know your Joan of arc carrying the banner you know for women just such huge strong reactions it still I mean honestly even five years in still happen to this day and both of those are are not what you set out to be you just WanNa talk about baseball right now exactly and but as my husband reminds me often is it's not about it's not about me there's there's a bigger picture process you know breaking down barriers and you know we face it all the time here coaching women's basketball because even more so sometimes because the game mirrors you know the men's game so much you know I think one of the biggest things I've learned is that I do I do risers responsibility that comes with that too is that in the beginning I wanted to just ignore it someone you know it's like you said I just want to break down baseball you know life like in playing softball Olympics and all that did anyone ever talked about meeting female was always about what I was doing on the field but I do understand it and you know I think it's really good when you had the fact that you're playing softball when you were playing and people view that as a little bit of it my daughters out there even more to make sure those opportunities there because he understood that it wasn't as easy as you know boys less right all over the place right sports while I these guys become these huge women's basketball fans because their daughters Wanna come to games so you know things all of a sudden it be these thirty five forty forty five year old guys started having little girls and now they get to be five six seven eight years old and all of a sudden it'd be so much more around my gender than it would be about was coming out of my mouth and you work hard to a certain point and you know I played sports to a certain point that never the kids are constantly being compared to men's players and and it didn't change until all of a sudden you know that you know isn't all of this there's a lot of women there's a lot of dads that have daughters you know that watch and listen and regardless of how I feel there is there's something bigger that he had three daughters and it just it changed him in a huge way just to see us like the way that we could play the game the way that you know that different sport than baseball even though it still baseball when you probably in basketball you know they see it as the same in your constantly being compared to men you're constantly I think it changed him to where he could he could raise us and not only be like all right girls can play but also be like we need to create more opportunities and I need to put on Justin Turner and his back foot doing all that then so much about like let's talk about the fact that I'm a female and I I think that's what I didn't anticipate was just that the conversation than just calling baseball yeah and sometimes I think it's unfair to place that on ship I been a part of that and you know one time I was watching my daughter do some stuff on the basketball court at at my house we have a little basket you become more coach and you get coach mode all the time so you're always treating your kids as your athletes rather than your kids and it does strained the relations is it takes a while to th- realize how fortunate you were to have all that right at your fingertips yeah no it absolutely I'm like I was so blessed to the occurs at the time about like but it wasn't I was blessed to have someone that could really push me and my sisters you don't WanNa say that he didn't really get I mean I think he was different like okay sure girls by sports but that's Kinda over there and his world has been sports and well when you first got a chance to play was a baseball or or was it immediately right the softball baseball and do it well and that's the thing is like I always was about more about the sport of covering passionate hat for getting into the XS and Os and let's breakdown sleep you know at home all the time because those opportunities weren't there you know all that stuff you know there wasn't a private lessons and all the specific training you see down the different I could come out to baseball practice him and hang with his college you know athletes that he coached and just it helped me so much because you watch more breakdown and her view more analytics paper metric stuff on this guy or do I want to just relax and then I'm like you know what though if I get caught on there just the way it was you know Badger being in high school I mean I like hey my dad like it was like torture you know and I look back and all that and and then I got a little bit older and it kind of became a few want college scholarship like your opportunities you know the game of softball and and I went over to her and what are you doing she said well you know working on something that you know we've been working on it at on my team help me even now just in my own approach me he created a workout thinking me that you know there was always that constant reminder like you yeah what the hell do I know so I walked away you know it just is a different dynamic when you're trying to do it with your own kids and I'm glad it worked out for some time but with us he realized he had to Kinda create some more and it helps to have a coach's a dad to even though I'm telling you it was hard house ten years old and the phillies finally had a good team and we're GonNa win the pennant and back then there's only baseball and softball the city's Kinda like I coach baseball like I want my kids play baseball and I from day one like and I don't know something I'll know that I I should have put in more work like that is instilled in me and I appreciate it so I we have that at home what did we like it or not yeah yeah it's hard to separate you know being a dad and being being a coach and then for a kid you know sometimes you just want a dad and you know some unfortunately you and we lost nine straight it was inconceivable they have printed the tickets already it was incredible but baseball was my life I lived and died with the game and we played every single day I mean that's kind of became you're gonNA learn to speak English all this other good stuff and your team cool to go to women's Basketball Games you know what I'm saying don't know that was my dad I mean he was a baseball football coach girls like not that he it's been cool to see the game of baseball grow for women cause for me I mean my dad he didn't even blink like he signed me up and I said what I I I wouldn't do it like that I said I would do it this way if I was you and she goes my coach told me to do it this way and that's how I'm going to do it serve the basis or closer the ball's coming at a different how much of an adjustment was it for you as a kid you know and so I switched over but I started with boys fun what was then I asked this because is over and you know we're up they were up six and a half games with night with ten to play go ahead no doubt good alright strike out four times this evening I wanna hear about it so you know that guilt that was always there I carry with me now as far as do I want when I came to America when I was like almost eight years old that first summer I fell in love with baseball and becoming a pitcher but it took that took a ton of work dispelled not as natural as everything else but you know it's funny I don't remember there being ever transition and I think part of it was because my and my question to you as someone who grew up like that playing baseball then when you go and the mound is closed the college world series and just college women's Women's softball has just taken off in in the last yeah 'cause I grew up in Philadelphia area so you know we're all phillies fans and it was the worst time the worst time to live in there I loved it was funny because I look back and all those teams on young age I was the only girl I never even knew that like I never even knew that I was like the only like you know bad you know we were so bad and then you know in one thousand nine hundred sixty four the passionate those kids play with You know those those young kids young women I should say so when you say pick up the ball and throw it right no one picks bars froze it with a windmill you know and so I realized pretty quickly that that that was the part that did change it was it was more than mechanics I guess and I remember him taking a lot of Fox like she's got a baseball swing she's never going to be able to hit and I did and he stuck with it and didn't you know succumb to well everyone doing it this way he's like look this is all I know you know maybe seven eight years on ESPN does a great job covering the tournament of Oklahoma City does a great job putting on its it out like we lift weights before we ate dinner like Oh we always had like Cape Review okay go over tape like watch hard time with how I played because to be honest I was still playing like I was playing baseball a lot of my style I think the biggest adjustment was gone times when your kid it grew up playing baseball too now sudden you're actually playing almost a different sport so my dad taught me so my swing even when I switch over to softball all he knew add catch the game of baseball in my mind like the approach the and the dimensions were the same too. I mean 'cause for the baseball when you're younger it's the same as softball so because I had a swing that wasn't just the same as everyone else's what you bring up an interesting point then option of contact is my benefit to I always knew I just put the ball play I I was fast enough to where I could also get on base that way too was to teach me how to still like like I was playing baseball and the sleeves now are exactly the same love the game is exactly the same but when I was a kid wasn't a people and she's doing just fine and so long as you can see the ball hit the ball this swings GonNa work and and it did and I'm grateful because I felt like I kinda had a edge up on everyone only eight teams in the National League eight teams in the American league and you either won the pennant and went to the World Series irs season ball difference is you can actually be as long as you want you just have to start earlier that reality wasn't the case so but a lot of hitters they realize okay they've been contacting short swing their whole life to actually add the power it's not too difficult thing to do your swaying wasn't a softball swing back then what was it was softball swing as opposed to what was a baseball swing short take some hack you're GONNA learn how to swing with Lake and that was always a part of the way that I did think but was contacted to try to lengthen your swing when you've always been short I guess the whole time so I from the Gecko I always had a a bigger swing and ended up benefiting me in the long run I towards the pitcher so when we picked up that he has left handed from the get-go and a big part of that was to be able to really yeah this is Mary you can check out www dot mizzen and main that's Z. E. N. that we're talking like eighteen months like you're left handed Cariseo the Bat and so we hit left handed but the benefit and main M. I n. dot com slash. Gino see some of my favorite shirts take a look I just discovered something that's pretty extraordinary I'd heard about it from some coaches and pro athletes and now I've experienced it for myself quick you just almost like pepper you just gotTa get to the ball it was all about just contact to the ball no real power whereas my dad was like Oh like you're gonna you'll be impressed give it a shot when it comes to the college basketball season the only team that matters is the Yukon huskies you got that with the ball debit card today wells Fargo is the official retail bank partner of uconn women's basketball there's no pro league over here in the United States were you thinking I can make a career out of out of baseball beyond my four years of college or I got to get the Wells Fargo uconn women's basketball debit card you can show your Husky pry with every purchase you make head to your local wells Fargo and asked for your new uconn women's basket as well like I had that in my back pocket always because unless you taught us my sister and I were both right handed and he made sure that we were right eye dominant and he was a switch hitter in college and so he always felt like he was better from the left side of the plate if you're right handed and easy actually see the ball better 'cause that's was also being closer to I which now the bases are closer with softball I could always lay down a bunt I or hitter I had yeah like when I started coaching women's basketball a long time ago after your four years in college it was over done even opportunities overseas were very limited ormuz fabric well you know this stuff you work out so you get all the benefits of workout gear but you wear it with a suit you can dress it up dress it down become kind of like the the women's version of what the men are doing in Omaha you know it's it's really cool and and you know the emotion that goes into the Games you know to schools Ucla Arizona that were like major I mean all they would national championships and not that the degrees there didn't matter but I felt like no one really thought about that all that everyone can think about a lot of dads were the ones teaching and they'd come from a sport that was so much like a link from the mound to home plate there was like this is coming so everything to go and it never occurred to me that the irony is that softball ended up being my life in the next twelve years aw missing a main Dallas based company is the maker of performance fabric dress shirts now you say what's Saturdays for years because that's it I'm done yeah so that's I mean ultimately I chose to go to Stanford was because I didn't want my life to be staying on top but everything was quick like so you didn't you couldn't have linked before your swing 'cause idea was you have to be as quick as possible all the things that you talked about for sure the priority at at a place like Stanford at St but I was so adamant that I wanted to go somewhere where the degree with define me more than just the sport I was playing you know the usual parties and like hey these are all the different athletes you can be around I was blown away by surprise winners and different students is smoke different but it looks like a dress shirt yet it moves around you like workout gear it's revolution I wanted to go somewhere where it wasn't like I was very attracted to Stanford because even get in there as a student by recruiting trip was all about just like instead of fifth year and so I know the school but like the team was awful they've never made it to the postseason I hate saying that for itself that they win national championships at a rate that's higher than probably ninety nine percent put don't put town so if you see me on the court lately that's what I wear you don't know that it's a dresser it feels like a casual shirt I mean the the interesting thing about place like Stanford obviously that first school that that because you know there's always you could play there might have been moments or maybe they're like Oh we have a groner team but soon as I can play it was like Oh okay it's just you know ages and travel the world seeing things and I wanna bat I wanted my life to be more than just being a softball player and I ended up staying and getting my masters that was so adamant I mean do you know like I I was invited to Olympic tryouts and I literally told internship in DC. After I got my masters I wanted to be a politician shifted mentality but I knew going there the softball was not a priority for even the players were there and we did change that culture about where I was going to go yeah yeah I agree with you on about the game I wanted to be able to graduate from place that I had a degree that I know that I could go on beyond softball which is such the irony 'cause I turned down we made it to the world series we changed it but but I knew deciding to go there that they're going to be players that would miss practice and sometimes games the priority was always about softball that you come here it's a software powerhouse and you will win but the priority is definitely the game and this is different and now were were actually going to be able to compete we're not just playing for fun here Oh yeah it was a game was airtime yes would impose your will on them and q remember a time when it actually turned and you felt like now this is this is work on educational reform and I literally told them like I'm GonNa go try from Olympic team probably not gonNA make it I'm GonNa take this job and I wanted I had an apartment I was ready to unfortunately was one of the prevailing thoughts about women's sports and not an easy thing to overcome and you know obviously you you were yeah we we beat Arizona at their place and you know that was at the time the biggest stadium you know in the country they had the most and I need going forward like you said there wasn't pro softball there wasn't you know all these huge opera I wasn't GonNa make millions playing playing the game so I had to be smart ah fifty percent of our game that was the goal and I was like are you kidding me like we're GONNA win every single game like if we are we set our goal is fifty percent like the who are you finally we beat him we beat them in their house and I just remember that game and it wasn't like you know they made a bunch of heirs or we just flat out played our stuff everything that they do would you know have a softball team that felt like yeah well you know but I know it I know it's there it's it's it's they had a Kim final and like you know there was the priority was never the sport and that was hard for me because my life was softball but like it was crazy to me the mindset they're like my freshman year to senior year and that wasn't because of me that was just a change of head coaches it was a justice from that moment on we just knew we could beat anyone we beat the number one team and fairly like we we outplayed them we could beat anybody and find it hard to believe though that an it's obviously is true because you found that to be that way that a school that has such high aspirations from then on there was no more let's shoot for fifty percents we're like we're gonNA kick everyone's at it doesn't matter who they are with their background what their ranked how many fans they have pick whatever some of the more athletic players and they become the pitchers I had no clue what throw underhand whereas I pitched a little baseball 'cause I mean we we got to college at any time did you think was there an opportunity that I could make a career it's still happening at a lot of schools where you know obviously they would never feel that way about their men's basketball team or their football team or whatever but that allow they were crazy the team was number one in the country we had never this tab we'd never in our program history beating them before and edible universities in America so they're able to to do both softball team when I first decided to go there it was like an and and when you when you can do that and then obviously you know I know it's not a result basic you know you outplayed so when you feel good with that better that day and beating them it was program changing like you know I can remember like literally every pitch of that game and I remember let's do this and we didn't even have I mean you know we maybe had like a bench for our fan like we had no stadium at the time we had like you know maybe fifteen people well the home runs there'd be some hit who hit after me to go ahead I remember just so many moments I remember playing center field and the fans just harassing fans like every nook and cranny were everywhere on rooftops like it was awesome and it just felt big-league and then we won and I one place where I think those kinds of passions do exist when you play for your country and it was that a goal outfielder I mean that's that was the level Dane was that right so I I didn't care that we're yelling I mean I just knew there were people yelling amazing a college sport is you know the passions that go into games like that wins like that and and but it was it wasn't I shouldn't say awful but it was you know I remember when I got there gene I mean being a competitor right like we're all like I remember getting there my freshman year the goal was to win five hundred in your mom hello I gotTa tell you you know she still watches on TV but she said she said Charles I like you I like you a lot and you were smiling but then she said but the crap out of me and I remember having a huge grin on my face 'cause like I'd never even had like fans in the outfit we'd ever even played in a stadium where there were people behind you the dot com because you were so dominant in the college game How did how did that come about the women's College World Series you know it was it was huge the the amazing thing about playing Oh and I both know like you also want the W. to go along with it like were your tail off like if you come away with the loss it's like no one knows that that that you were the game and five of them were my family like that was what we had at Stanford and it changed you know by the time I junior we had the stadium we were in a lot of times it doesn't exist in approach you know very rarely defined you know except for maybe late in the playoffs or something but It I mean I was never like a I never believed that I was a top player like and it wasn't until I believe I just started to really have that confidence that I'm sure you see it watching I mean honestly a lot of your athletes us look at even Serena Williams like that have been ridiculed right for being like very getting better obviously way way better but did you find that that now that you're covering guys all the time it's but you know I did make the team and it took me a few years to actually a great coach Mike Andrey who's ironically the coach at Arizona this is true I have found that on the women's side Women's sports women's Athletics Women Athletes Female athletes have a tough are because there's this like I don't know I don't know what it is that people you know he he really helped me see the athlete that I was and he he helped give me that confidence because he had the best players in the world it's an inherent thing that women had maybe have to a certain degree it's hard for them to walk around like I own this I own this man or time with that then guys do they have a tougher time kind of admitting how good they are realizing how good they are celebrating how good they are whereas before it always had been you know I hope I get a hit you know I hope I can come through from my team right now and I I never really believed that I could and oh my gosh it changed my whole world and from there I finally became just a better player and I wouldn't say like necessarily team and him seeing someone that could be hitting third for their team It just changed the athlete that I was ultimately like even though I had the talent and never had the success that I could have had unless I finally reached the point where I knew I was good I found tell me awards you start to get people that recognize you I've never been that person and I realized that I needed to start playing like that person and acting like and that acting like changing the person I was but just starting to approach and the bat with I'm going to be used you cannot be I going to win this the bat much I'm good at instead of being like yeah you are there's a lot of people to react like Gosh she's cocky and I can't stand her I didn't have that just the constant like am I good enough him I got enough and I think it really switched when you know you start to get like I like I got this you find that the picture oh gosh yeah I mean I feel like it's changed so much I mean thank God like I I love transition that easily I mean I got invited Olympic trials like I said and I didn't think I was GonNa make the team I thought I'd no shot I had a job lined up it on his team and he was like just you're in about third on the team and I was just like how am I even starting and so he helped close that gap with me trying to figure out how even the even like if I struck out I would walk back to the day I'll be like she she can't get me again there's no way I'm good of a player for her to get me tell you how many of you know that that didn't have the mentality it's amazing the power of that when you believe when you know it you get enough batteries box like when I was growing up I mean they're first of all they're which wasn't as many female athletes on television but the ones that we're we're humble and gracious me I try to get young girls ears all the time and women honestly even my age doesn't matter what the age of it's okay to walk in a room it's like a double whammy Jessica it's almost a double whammy guys were suck at something and they walk around like they own like I'm good and women that are really really good will be afraid to admit to themselves even and two others even I even know what they were doing and they would have confidence that could beat any and is a female like there was that feeling like if I said that like hey I could do they just I think they're raising away it's like be confident go and women are like automatically find the fault and myself you know find the thing help it because I mean you you you hit on something that bothers me so much with my gender and not that men are perfect by any means but exports Major League baseball or college football or any anything that involves you guys have to prove how tough they are and tell me and I think people listening would love to hear what what were the challenges I can beat you at this everyone's heads kind of turn I'm sorry what and I I mean now obviously I just own it I've learned how much help when all of a sudden wham you know you're you're you're there you're in the middle of it it's not you and your dad and you were a kid and all these little guys guys growing up and they were cocky is heck with anything like you know it could be like hey anyone wanted to go yeah yeah I'm GonNa Kick Your Butt I can do this what are we doing but when you look at yourself in the mirror you have believe that and I think it starts there like women inherently are trying to find the things that they don't like about themselves and oh no it's it's funny like I think for me it's the players have always been the greatest honestly a lot of the managers like playing baseball with now it's like guys who already have these preconceived notions and all that other crap what was that but if

baseball softball Gino Auriemma Astros National League China American league Franklin hugh irs Cariseo Mary Z. E. N. fifty percent four years thirty five forty forty five y five six seven eight years ninety nine percent seven eight years
Episode 17: John Sterling

Holding Court with Geno Auriemma

59:44 min | 2 years ago

Episode 17: John Sterling

"MGM Springfield is going to be your go to destination for all your post game celebrations as a proud partner of the university of Connecticut. We invite fans to keep the fun going by checking out all the entertainment n. g. m. resorts has too often by visiting MGM Springfield dot com. In sports. There are smart moves and not so smart moose, like making sure you get the practice on time. That's smart parking in the coaches spot, not so smart and the same is true when you're hiring, there are smart ways and not so smart ways to get things done like job sites that overwhelm you with tons of the wrong resumes. That's not smart, but posting jobs on ZipRecruiter and letting them find the right candidates for you. Now that's smart, ZipRecruiter's powerful matching technology scans, thousands of resumes identifies people with the right skills, education and experience for your job and actively invites them to apply. So you get qualified candidates fast, which is why it's rated number one by employers in US based on trust pilot rating of hiring sites would at least one thousand reviews. And right now my listeners can try ZipRecruiter for free at ZipRecruiter dot com. Slash. Gino. That's right. Free. Just go to ZipRecruiter dot com. Slash GE an. So if you're looking for a smart way to find the right talent for your team, go to ZipRecruiter dot com. Slash Gino today, ZipRecruiter the smartest way to hire and the official job site of college sports fans everywhere. This is Gino Auriemma and this is holding court your to your more famous in China than liangelo ball. I mean, and he just became famous you way we're famous than we were on runs, undefeated runs, who was I calling? If. Twenty one to know how do I keep this. Your mom. Hello, I gotta tell you, you know, she still watches you on TV, but she said that she said, Charles, I like you. I like you lot and you were, but then she said, but I love the shack. Yeah. Okay. For that. Hi, ladies and gentlemen. This Gino Auriemma have basketball coach at the university of Connecticut, welcome to holding court, which you know Auriemma our podcast today, the number one, legendary voice of the New York Yankees John sterling, who for the last thirty plus years has been behind the mic of every single New York Yankees game. So whether you're a Yankee fan or you're not a Yankee fan, you'll be a fan of what John sterling has to talk about. And the way he talks about his job, the Yankees, baseball, etc. Etc. Enjoy. We were talking about. You know, almost like you're talking about a culture, you know. You know, coaching here at Connecticut and the the, the number of years of success over and over and over again. And you know your comment about, well, you know, it's you recruit really good players, which is true, but having players is is not enough. And as you were talking, I'm thinking it's a little bit like the Yankees. Actually, it's a lot like the he's in that you want you set that that that that standard. And once you've established a certain culture, even when you get good player, sometimes it doesn't work. But generally speaking, it's as much the culture as it is the players that the end up being the reason for long term success you've been there long enough. What do you think. So I don't think there's any question the Aftab, a winning culture. And I think when players come to the Anki is not all now, but when players come to the Yankees, they know the tradition is they wanna buy into this is their chance to be with a winner. And if you win New York, you know that's a great place to win. Now, if you don't play well and you lose not a great place to play to lose. Right. I think it's, I think it's a great thing to have that culture going in and maybe make it easier for the players to buy into. You know, when you say this is one of the things I I love talking about. You know, when I'm recruiting kids, I say to them all the time. Look, this is like Broadway, you know, coming to connect pro. You know, if if you're freighted the pressure. So my daughter was trying to get on on the stage and she spent six months in New York and then realize I'm not good enough. Okay. You shooting? No disrespect, but she didn't go to Kansas City or Cleveland, or you know, she went to where the best performers go perform and Connecticut, basketball. If you, if you're if you wanna be big on the biggest stage, this is it if you play well in New York, everybody in America knows it can play poorly in New York. Everybody in America knows it. True. So how how if you found the players that handle those two things and some doing some don't. What do you think the differences. Second question. You know the people like Derrick, jeeter and Mariana, Robert. I'm taking the best. I think they have the ability that they're not afraid to fail as so it enables them to put their best foot forward. I mean, they know they have town so they, you know, believe they're going to succeed and they're not afraid to fail if they don't succeed. I think that's, you know, obviously, very, very important. You know, basketball is is is much tougher. I don't mean to tell you basketball, I think you know that, but basketball suffer because there you really have to interact with teammates on the floor. You know, you have to make the extra pass. You have to give up the ball. You have to not just work hard on defense, but cover for your man. If they're man gets gets by. So in baseball, it's such as. Such a selfish sport, you know that no guy goes, I say, this all the time on the air. No one goes up. There wants to make out, you know, even if the company softball games and no one wants to make out, they may swing too hard right at home, run it, pop it up, but in basketball as a team game, and you have to play together and the guys like jeeter or or Mariano. And now Aaron judge, they're very much team players and they'll do whatever they can to help their team win. And you know some people get that and other people don't. The. The interesting thing about Yankee fans one when you travel the world and I have and I'm sure you've been a lot of places the you are certain that you're not going to have to be there very long. I don't care what city it is in America or any country in the world. You don't have to be there very long before you see someone with the New York Yankees. And it's the most incredible thing ever. When you got this job, were you aware of just how big this thing is. Well, Gino I was aware because I grew up in Manhattan and I was a Yankee fan and my friends react fans, and and it was a time when the Yankees, absolutely one all the time. And so, but I wasn't aware, you know, when you're a kid when you're a fan there, your fan and you root for the team. But when I finally got the Yankees, I was nineteen eighty nine. And you know, I realized that this is a little different. You know, in in Atlanta, I was in Atlanta before during the Hobson Braves, and you'd have you know, one guy with a log should have one guy from the constitution travel with the team. Well, in New York, is that different? And so so you, you know, it's different right away without question, you know, it's different. You know, I I grew up in. Grew up in Philadelphia area, and you know you, you long-suffering Philly's fan, you know, for years and years, you know, as a ten year old, I was listening on transistor radio as the Phillies blew the six and a half game Lee with, you know, ten games to play and. And you know, you're always, you know, you're not New York and you, you just know it. And there's just something about the New York Yankees in the same thing with the New York Knicks and. And it's funny because my brother and I who's little younger, we decided to be American League fans of one team each, and he took the Baltimore Orioles, and they happen to have Frank Robinson and boo Powell and they had the great staff. Yeah, they were. They were machine and and I said, let me take the Red Sox that this happened to be nineteen sixty seven and they go on this magical run. And next thing you know, they're in the World Series. Yeahs is you know, having the the year of of of a lifetime and I become hooked on the Red Sox and. Every year every day I would check their scores. I knew their lineup, I knew everything about them and I suffer with them, you know, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. And now next thing you know lo and behold, I find myself moving the Connecticut. So here I am smack in between Yanni's and Red Sox, right in the middle, right, middle. And so one thousand nine hundred eighty six is my second year in Connecticut. I'm watching the the Red Sox Mets World Series and the wild pitch, and I go, oh my God, and then the the, the ball through the legs. I'm like, you've gotta be kidding. And I remember saying go now I know what these people are talking about. Of course, they're gonna lose. They're going to invent ways to lose. No wonder. These people are so miserable up here. They know that light at the end of the trunk is is a an all coming train. They know this. And I just felt for them, fell foot MFL for them. And then you know, when they finally won and and you know, Tito and I have become friends and, and that's the point I'm getting to is I never never ever liked the Yankees about anything. I never liked anything about the. We never got chance to see them play on TV. I didn't get to see Mickey Mantle play. No way could be as good as Willie Mays anyway. So. Embrose Robinson and Mike Schmidt. I said, you gotta be kidding me. He's right. I mean, so now for certain when we win all the time I find myself year after year after year going. Oh my God, the Yankees, we've become the Yankees. Yes. And I've come to appreciate everything that they stand for, who they are, what they do and just how difficult it is to be them. Do you? Well, there's no question. The toughest thing is to repeat, and that's why I'm in awe of what you've done it at uconn because you've been on top or so on, you have to win so many games, and then when you go to the tournament one loss in your out. And so I say, I think of you by the way I thought in the in the sixties seventies of John wooden and and UCLA. You're not playing a four at seven, born seven, you know, you can make changes. You can change this on defense and offense different rotation. But when you play one game, you have to win that that one game. So and by the aunties they have we talking about the culture before. When you think of how long they been on top, you know, you have to think of it when when babe joined the team in nineteen twenty. And you know soon, it's going to be twenty twenty and the Yankees have stayed as this big name for a hundred years, which is like, you'd have to say, really amazing, you know, because it has to do with players as you well know players win games and lose game. So it is. That's why I have so much unbelievable adulation respect for for you and all your teams, Connecticut. Very tough to repeat and you keep repeating and repeating, and it's it really is tremendous. Why pre-state that. And yeah, I mean, it is about the players. It is about the players. It is about getting great talent and. It is. It is a testament to the organization, obviously and one hundred years. You're right. Andre years is a long time and. They've been able to to sustain it for that long. And one thing the ring day in New York, you know, they're, they're fuelled. By this many years ago, invoke show was managing the Yankees. He said the fans don't come to see the Yankees play. They come to see the Antes win. So I, I think they're fuelled by that and one other thing, which is obvious thing. In a winning is good for business, and let me tell you with the Yankees businesses really good, so so it booze them, and now you can make the wrong choices. You can say, you know, we've seen a lot of players get signed for a lot of money who've been busts. And so you know, you still have to have an organization. It's still to make the right decisions, but certainly it's in their best business interest to keep on having a good team. Well, you know, talking about making right decisions, the average person out there, maybe even the die hard, New York fans. The decision to not bring Joe Girardi back. Did that take a lot of people by surprise or did. Was it in the air. I don't think it was in the air Gino I, I really don't. I mean, I I was caught by surprise. It. It wasn't out of the blue because in in the same year, as you know, the Red Sox fired their manager, John Farrell, you know, they finished first, they lost in the playoffs, right? As is one thing too about the Yankees, et cetera. In nowadays, you know, the regular season spine, but boys what you do in the playoffs. There count. That's what that's your legacy. That's what you for. You'll be remembered anyway that Washington fired dusty Baker, and he got him finished. I got him into the playoffs and the Enke's is fire Girardi. And I just think they felt which is always a danger for every coach or baseball manager that their voice isn't being listened to any more. Heard the same same voice for so long, and they figured that this was the time and. IRA Boone is a very, very good dog. He's very low key breezy going and as done a good job, but it'll be view just like Cora. We'll be viewed about what they do in the playoffs. Well, no question about that. You know, it's a, it's a win at all costs business. Like you said, you know, Terry Francona won two World Series in Boston when they had won one years, whatever the case may be. And then they. And you said he was a friend of yours? Yeah, he's a friend of mine too. He is really a good guy, had a terrific manager. Terrific back. And then they go and listen. This isn't working anymore. You think they ought to build a statue to him outside Fenway park, but I get it. You know, that's the way it is. That's the world of of professional sports. From your vantage point the the difference, not that one's better. Believe me. I'm not sitting waiting that one's better the difference in the way Aaron Boone who by the way I saw him his brothers get a catch with Pete Rose. When they were youngsters at veterans stadium, when their dad was the catcher, Phil Ryan dry. Right? The difference between the way he does his job day to day and the way Joe did it. I think Boone is more personal has more contract on an individual basis, and he's a little more open. Joe Girardi was little close, always a little fearful of what the press would find out where the broadcast would find out. So you know, one thing is really true and you can do this in any sport in New York. Part of the job is a very distasteful. Part of the job is interacting with the media and and so that's, that's that's a big piece. Now, it doesn't matter if you win nothing about is if you win, but if you don't win, it does matter. And if they don't like you, they're gonna be on you, then they get the fans to be on you. So you know, it's very tough to criticize Boone. He's such a nice guy. It's such an easy going guy, but if he doesn't win it, don't worry. It'll be criticized. You know, you would think that. Someone like Willis Reed, but you know what a hero, I'm right, and you know what? It didn't matter when he started coaching the Knicks and they'd lose. He got it just like like every other. Yeah. Yeah. That's it. Yeah. So no question, No question. As they say, a results oriented business. Well. Pledge you went in that direction. Speaking of criticisms. You know, for a guy who's kind of like a staple your like an institution in in the Yankee fans, you know, generation two generations at least have grown up. You're the voice of the aunties and yet there's a segment out there that can't wait to criticize you. Right. What's obviously, you know, you're part of the media so you, you know this better than anybody, but how do you, how does a person deal with with that kind of that kind of feedback when you know, hey, I'm really, really good at my job. Well, I first of all, we all have likes and dislikes. I do very strong likes and dislikes. So if someone knocked me in the in the newspaper, which certainly has happened. So you know, I I kind of accepted now then when I this is my thirtieth the end of my thirtieth year with the Yankees. So if some guy, there's one in particular to who is knocked me over the years. Well, have you not someone for thirty years? His personal? So you know, I, I just take. I just take it and throw it away. Everything has worked out. I never dreamt in my life. It would work out this way. If you said to me when I was seven, eight, nine, ten, would you like to be the voice of the Yankees? You know, it would have phone fame? I couldn't. I couldn't even have fantasized it, so I'm really very fortunate. And you know, again, you work in New York and. If you can't take it, you're in, you're in a lot of trouble. I can take it and I just go on the air. I get so involved in the game. I just go on the air and do my thing and hope that it works and you know it, it pretty much is worked for all these years. So you get criticized, you know, I say, ignore it, and you know, one one things, you know they've been so many articles written about me, and then every article at some point, the guys writing the articles, say, of course not everyone likes him. Well, not everyone likes anything or everything, you know, right. So so that you have to accept to. I don't think it's a big thing. There's not a big thing to me anyway. Well, it's funny you say that because I was reading an article on, you know, one of the NFL quarterbacks and you know somebody wrote to the effect that. Listen, I can accept this. You know that I can accept that. I can't accept like. So I'm like, so wait a minute. So the deaf franchise, the quarterbacks you come out every day and go, well, you know, I wanna make sure that what I do is acceptable to these guys writing like, what since when did that become the goal that you accept? It doesn't matter what you accept. This is what we're trying to do. And if we sat there and read every one of your articles and then got the comment on the quality of your writing and what we will accept and what we won't accept, then you'll understand what it is that. So everybody's got a job to do. I get that my my my my question is is, is then so having been with the with them thirty years calling the games, what I think is pretty cool is. You act like a fan. Calling the game. You act like a fan, watching the game in a bar, talking to somebody about what's going on in the game, and people say, well, you know so. And so this guy's a home or just got well, no, no, kidneys supposed to be a Homer. He's supposed to root for the team. He's covering. So you're a fan foremost also? I think I think you know, you can sound wait. I certainly do sound that way because I get excited when they do something right, but I also in the Angie's have never say anything. And I worked now for Entercom used to be CBS before that MSG and ABC never been told not to say something and believe me when they play lousy. I criticize them where they don't move a runner. I criticize him and it also there's one other thing getting back to the criticism. There are some people writing that's their life to be critical. If they are not. Do you think they're not going to grow? And then I got to criticize criticized themselves. They're going to criticize someone else, you know? So you have to accept that to understand that too. Yeah. Well, it's like going to the dentist. I'll happier those guys when all they do everyday pain in basketball accuracy can be the difference between winning and losing. 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Is it impossible to to pinpoint one, but I think the year nineteen ninety six is always been my favorite Yankee year and after they got knocked out of the playoffs on the fifth and final game in Seattle, great playoff series, ninety five. They hire Joe Torry and we have been friends in Atlanta, but I- broadcast there. And so here was, you know, buddy coming over as manager. I was very close to them. Then the the team wasn't really expected to do anything and everything they did was magical, got into first place on may first and held it all year long. And and then the playoffs they were in in the seventh inning about it every game, and they stays rally after rally. And obviously they won went onto win the World Series. They had three games as Lanta that you're in the World Series. One was more sensational and the other. So I say that was the first time, and I always wanted to ring and I was with the nets when they won the last ABA championship and they didn't have money. Roxanne's is a rain. Yeah. Yeah. So I had to wait all the time. Now is ninety six about twenty years later, and I got my first Yankee ring, and I thought that year was absolutely phenomenal. How about that? Billy milky Oni on that team. Then that, yes, how, how about that? Yeah, a lot in those days, you know, nowadays, you see eight coaches on the sidelines well, and those days it was, you know, Kevin lottery who's one of my best buddies was coaching the team. So that was why that was so memorable and Billy was like a player coach for an assistant. I know you only assist is different is different world. The different and boy is a different world in every way. Absolutely. Yeah. Okay. So that that that was a big, you know, I always been. I've always been a big huge Joe Torry fan from heck from his playing days. And I always thought he managed with dignity and he handled everything with class, and he was really the kinda guy that you would wanna play for and the kind of guy you looked up to. No question. So. Let me guess. One of the most heartbreaking moments is when the poor Yankees were leading three, nothing in the SOX came back and won four to three and then went on to win the World Series. That must've drove New Yorkers crazy. Oh, I'm sure it did. Ironically, ironically, after the, he's won two games in Yankee Stadium. They went to Fenway and they scored, they scored twenty runs. And if they had this read this break. That break, they probably would have scored twenty five runs. So they had a three, nothing lead and they lost to Heartbreakers have given the Red Sox credit for coming back. They lost to Heartbreakers and I told my booth mates my Charlie sign. It was working with me an engineer named Brian Ferguson, and I told them the answer, not gonna win the series they've run out of pitching. So actually when they went back to the stadium and the Red Sox won games three of six and seven to win the series. I, I wasn't surprised at all because you know, baseball is predicated so much on pitching your pitching and they're pitching and I knew the Yankees had run out of pitching and Boston with big Papi and Manny Ramirez had great offense team. So so that actually it was terrible for New Yorkers in Yankee fans, that cetera, but I saw it coming so it didn't. It didn't surprise me at all. The. Your favorite Yankee team. In the thirty years, not necessarily the most successful or just the favorite. Your favorite team to cover on a daily basis that you enjoyed the most? Well, without question it was ninety six ninety six. I mean first of all, they won the World Series Sangley you know, the manager, you know, Joe, is there twelve years made the playoffs twelve years and basically on the road every night after the game, we would have dinner. So I I felt like I was boy is that changed? I felt I was so much part of it and and then they had this unusual success and so but now the ninety eight team that won a hundred and fourteen games was the best team. But I think you know, my heart still belongs to ninety six. Your favorite characters in thirty years. You've been there guys that you'd say, you know what you guys would love to go have a beer with these guys. Well, the the pitcher who's who's now working on TV David Cone, he describes us as kindred spirits. And so I like him very, very much and I relate to him and get along with them. There've been an awful lot of others, but I would say the number one probably is David. How about that? When when they talk about. The the Yankee mystique, and and the the, you know, obviously built over years and years and years, and the traditions which are so important everywhere, but primarily at at Yankee Stadium. The no facial hair in today's world, has that been as easy to to to navigate ORs? Has there been any any thoughts on that. Well, I have a lot of thoughts on it. I think these enormous big bushy beards look, terrible relate to how did they time? Yeah, I, I have four kids and I've told them any chat, twos, they're out of the will. So I hate the now if you have a really well trimmed beard and it looks good on you, that's fine. But by the beers that I see, just look ridiculous and I and as hot sweaty in the summertime, I can't imagine why they like it, and I think it looks unkempt and awful. So I don't mind the Yankees every that policy. And the funny thing is it's like getting out of prison the minute, a guy leaves the Yankees. What does he do? You rose a beard. So go figure. But anyway, I, I don't mind it and and I think that look is is not a look that I would. I think tattoos at worst. You see tattoos on the arms next of all these players, hey, you know, so ugly looking, so, but you know what people would say, I he's old school. You're showing your age seventy nine. What's wrong with you? True. True, true. Yeah, we'll speaking of. Old school to dishes. What about this? You know, staring down the home runs flipping the bat. You know? I have. I mean, I obviously I'm, I'm old. I'm old school. You know, traditionalist, you know that saying, you know act like you've done it before. Yes. You know, you hit a home run those things. Really? Yeah. Yeah, those those things don't bother me. I'm not. I guess I don't really care enough. So of a guy, you know, stares at his home run and weights or flips about whatever the the, some of the antics after a touchdown. I actually laugh at, I think it's so silly level. Yeah. Yeah, I do too that I don't. I don't mind at all. And I was doing a an Ivy league football game two years ago, and I can't think of the guy was, but the running back for more. But I think then he went to the end zone and he did an Ozzie Smith backflip and all I thought is boy. I wish I could do that and they gave him fifteen yards because his college football the game, fifteen yards. You know, and is right. So I don't. I don't mind the touchdown celebration. Some of the we've had a few in New York. Some of the off color football celebrations are Lou. Digress. What are they thinking of or are they thinking? But those things don't bother me at all. Remember back in the day now we really sound like two all guys talking. Remember back in the day where I remember reading the story because I love to read about old baseball stories when I want to say it had to be, was it Ken Boyer that played third base for the for the cardinals cardinals? Yes, yes. So Ken Boyer I believe was was writing and talking about that he used to. He used to hit behind stem usual. And when. There was a certain picture and every time Musial would knock one of his famous doubles off the wall that Bush Bush stadium or whatever they call the back in those days. He knew he was getting thrown at. He knew that picks coming right at his ribs, and he knew it. And he tells the story about one time. He was praying for a pitching change and he waited and waited and waiting. And luckily there was a pitching change. And so he's kind of happy and excited and he's now paying attention and I forget who was pitching. But the guy threw it at him as he was leaving the mound and almost hit a while. He was on the on deck circle that was an accepted part of baseball, right? Right. Right or wrong. Don't give me. Don't get me wrong. I'm not saying I agree. I play baseball. Today, you even brush your guy back and there's a a brawl on the field, your your thoughts on that. I don't. I don't know why baseball doesn't do it. Basketball is done not allow the players leave in this case, the dugout or the bullpen. I all I have to do is make a rule. No, because it could lead to a tremendous brawl which looks terrible for the sport and also could injure someone, and I'll give you a great example Gino. We were in Tampa a couple of weeks ago. And sabbatical, especially to a left hand hitter. He left the left, you the lefty, and he threw a pitch up and in. Chest. I, though in the battles left-hander named Jake Bowers shorter to go. He started a move, his hands, the swing and the ball hit his hand on the bat. Absolutely accidental Sobat. He was fishing shutout at the time and the next inning Austin role model leaves off the anx and their pitcher of a journeyman. They Andrew Ketteridge fired a fastball up in not grow mine down. Well, it was retaliation obviously and accept that Sobat is just a normal pitch. And so CC. Went out the next inning that Amy, the chew innings for a clause to kick in for half a million dollars and but he's such a, yeah, he's at the team guy, hit the first guy in the leg. Even it up and so then both benches. Got warned. You know we talked about it's a different world. Yeah, yeah. How come these guys all get injured, some believable, the injuries ended up feelings. They get their feelings are so much. What are your feelings are? They got hurt if they feel a base with a high score or or bunch of something. They would just play the game, stop worrying about their feelings and but anyway, and that way it's changed. I'll give you a great Yankee story. One of my favorites. I mean in baseball. Now there literally is an injury or more every single day. And in nineteen twenty seven when the Yankees had you know one of the best teams of all time for sure, for sure. Yeah, they they broke camp with twenty five players. And those are the ten twenty five players played all year. So you know they were on whether I, when your contracts and they had to keep weighing when they wanna take their job. And nowadays, I think the agents probably tell the players if you slightly hurt, don't play. We want a big contract. That's what I think. Well, the money certainly has changed the game. Yeah, of course. It's changed. You know the the the to me, the craziest thing. I again, I'm not judging on just commenting the crazy thing. Yeah, the craziest thing is you know, you give a pitcher one hundred and fifty million. The guy goes five innings max, you know, I mean, if you came out to take the ball from Gibson, he probably hit you for head with a with a. Absolutely, right. Absolutely, right. So we were talking about this on the air and we're in Minnesota and x. number weeks ago and Jack Morris was doing the game, Minnesota TV and and that's what Susan I said on the air boy came to take the ball from Jack Mars. You'd be. Yeah, so, but that's change. Oh, is that change? Yeah. So you give the guy a hundred and fifty million. He's going to give you five innings day. You know, maybe once in a while he's going to give you six and God forbid, he's, he's throwing a no hitter gives you eight and then you, you know, the bullpen, saves it form, but. Now, the guy pitches two years out of his five year contract, one hundred and fifty million, and then he can't go the rest of the other three years and they all mold that money. I mean, I get why they do it, but it's, it's really, it's changed the game. For well without, yeah. Go ahead without knocking how much money the the players make, which is obviously Norma's. But I'm saying if I was a team, the last thing I would do is what they did with David price in Boston or exact Ranki in Arizona. When you when you sign a guy thirty million a year for five years, they probably is no chance that he's going to be pitching well in five years. I mean, they these pitchers get so fragile. They get injured every day. So. Yeah. Well, it's the same with long term contracts with. Baseball for for everyday players. I'm not an agent. I'm not a general manager. I'm not any of that. And if I was a player, I would certainly line up and say, okay, I want my, I want my share of it, but you know if few Mike trout? Yeah, signed him for ten years and give them fifty million a year. He's worth every penny of. But don't give them don't give him fifty million or twenty million or thirty million between the ages of thirty five and forty five. Which is well, you know, and to me that you wonder is having a star, and this is a question that that I like your comment on is having a star on your team regardless of whether he's able to perform at a certain level, having a name. That important to a franchise that they're willing to overpay. I don't think so in baseball, because although every what we'll see this winter with Bryce Harper among others. Manny, Machado free agents. But in in baseball, you know, you're a great baseball fence. You know, this one guy cannot investment. One person could turn a team around, you know, magic or bird or whatever, but not in baseball. The proof of it is the best pitcher in the National League was the Mets. Jacob degrom. It was brilliant all the time and Ziara was in the ones and they had a losing record because right. The rest of the team wasn't good enough. So I think to you probably seeing a little something different in baseball anyway, because last year the owners did not trip over themselves and sign these free agents, big contracts and so interested to see this winter, what they do with Harper Machado. So are you in favor or you okay with the with the status quo of like, for instance right now, the Red Sox and Yankees have to play, and now. Okay. Houston is amazing. And the Red Sox were amazing, and the Yankees had an incredible year and Cleveland deserves to be there obviously because they want division, so should now the Yankees be playing Houston and the Red Sox play Cleveland based on their regular season records griot. Well, we think exactly the same way now I've said it on the air that baseball has to see the teams just like they do and and basketball, and hockey and football. And if you see the teams, they'd be just exactly what you said. Boston would be one, Houston movie, chew the, it'd be three. Cleveland would be four, and I think that's a much more equitable solution. That's too bad that you know the to TV Orleans Boston and the Yankees. One of them's gonna get knocked out. So. So I just think it makes sense. Anyway, I would like to see baseball do that and and not that they don't deserve it, but you could end up having the teams, the two teams with the best records in the American League, the Houston Astros in Boston, Red Sox playing for the right to go the World Series in in a week or so. Yeah, yeah. And. Well, good. I'm, I'm glad to hear you think that. And and then the next question is. What do you see. As you look at the playoffs and the American League, obviously, what do you see as the strengths of each team before I ask you the next obvious question, what do you think each team. Does. That's that. That's that separates them from from the average teams, all Boston has a very, very offensive team. They the best offensive team in baseball. They do hit home runs. They also steal bases, and they have a lot of guys who make contact. They don't strike out a lot. So you know, they're, that's their strength. And you know the question about Boston probably is answered in the first game when we find out how Chris sale bitches. Yeah. I mean, if he is Chris sale when he's at his best, he's impossible. He's crate. But if not, if it's not, then you know he can. He can be beaten. Cleveland has a lot of punch their top five hitters are excellent and balanced. You know, Switzers and lefty hitters and righty hitters and and they have terrific starting pitching. Their bullpen hasn't been great. And bullpens is so much part of baseball because you don't see guys going eight, nine innings and pitching on two days rest like they did in the old is Houston also as terrific starting pitching in a very good offensive team. I really think anyone of the four teams can win. But if if Chris sales that has best, then then Boston by virtue of their hydrogen, seven wins probably is the best team. When you when you look at the World Series being played in November. Maybe maybe we get a, maybe we get a Cleveland Milwaukee WI. Actually, we got Cleveland Chicago World Series a couple years ago when the players were, you know, wearing parkas it looks terrible. It looks terrible. And the next year we had a three game series in April in Chicago, and I said, on the air every game, not that it proved anything, but I said it's not cold. It's winter and whoever heard of playing baseball outside in the winter. If Milwaukee's in they have a dome Colorado is in it. You're going to be very cold Colorado and Cleveland ball. Would that be cool? But you know, that's why I wanna see the wildcard chew out of three. I'd like to see this series. We're to play against Boston. I'd like to see it four out of seven instead of three out of five. But the problem is if you do that, you are planning on November. Over and and then the baseball just doesn't look good that way. People playing with, you know, the. The the hoses and the masks. I mean, that's really, that's not baseball. Well, some are whether the most important games of the year played in the worst weather sometimes and you can't be Mr. October anymore. You know, you have to be called Mr. November Mr.. Right? Overslept. Why don't they start the season earlier. Who needs that long for, you know, start the season earlier, have most of the March games be played in the south and in the west and end the season earlier. I mean, would you they? Well, they are starting at a little earlier these days, but apro April in a lot of cities. Boy, quitting New York is really tough. That's when you see the ski masks and the and the hoods, and the looks really look silly so, but one thing they ought to do, we say it all the time. They ought to begin in in warm places and homes. That's right. They have enough of them right. And you know that would, but you know what it is to Gino people, coaches managers, Joe manages owners presidents. They don't want their team to get off to an eight. You know, they're, they're playing on the road in some warm place and that will kill ticket sales. You know, if you get off, especially if you're a bad team, you got off to a bad start and you're buried. So it all has, you know, wanna. When you get right down to it has to come down to a Konami and. You know, follow the money kind of thing. Do you ever think there'll be any day games again, in the World Series. No, that's sad. It just for ratings that's not just, but that's business. And the the networks spend this phenomenal amount of money on sports and they for their advertises which are sold on ratings. They want, you know, biased rating possible. I mean, it really it really is pretty simplistic. It is about money. It is about the economy and I might be simplifying things. I'm sure I am. But all I know is this the World Series was on and it was on TV and it was on during the day. I don't care where you're working. There's a TV on in your room somewhere. You know if your, whether you're casual baseball, free and not a baseball fan. I mean, if you're certainly if you're a die hard and especially today with the mobile devices and everywhere that people are watching their games. That's one way to give the players like, yeah, how about we play when it's sixty five degrees out in the afternoon at one o'clock instead of playing when it's thirty five at nine o'clock. That's just me. I'm certainly old enough to remember all the day World Series games and how you know. 'cause when you're a kid, my goodness this, they're, they're more than phenomenal. And by the way you, you talked about the new technology. Maybe the fact that they're changes will be upon us because of the new technology. Maybe I was wrong maybe one day that day games will return because they're on all these devices. It is a heck of an age living in where you know you, you could near the Anki broadcast all over the world that we we. We have listeners all over the world. You can listen on their MLB app or whatever the devices are. You. You know, I I didn't ask you when when does your season begin? Well, we actually start practice next Wednesday, October tenth, and our first game is sometime the first week in October or something like that. Yeah. Remember we look, it's believe me. I'm. I wanna actually you have to call timeouts and walk up and down the sideline this year we're, we're going to have to work at it a little bit more than we have. Let's say in the last couple of years, so it'll be exciting. It'll be a nice challenge for us. You know? I have. I have an ability last night. It's a great example. The game is just as much fun and exciting. Of course. Then last night was a playoff game, Yankee Stadium, MOS delirious, and every game is great. Do you feel the same way when you entering a game, you're gonna coach game. Do you feel the same way that you just love this game and you can't wait for the the competition? Yeah, you know, I'm sure after one hundred and sixty two games during those on your sixty two games, you're not going to feel that way every single night out. Obviously. I mean, that's just human. Obviously, but but when you go out and you know, like let's say, we play at the excel centre in downtown Hartford, and we're playing and there's fifteen thousand people there, and it's national television and the fans are crazy. And we're playing, let's say, Notre Dame or somebody. Yeah, you walk out there and you go, man. This is going to be amazing and you feel it, you feel it all through your body and you you become like. You become one with the with the players in the you want. When I, you know, when the opening tip goes up and. Your team gets the ball and you're coming down on offense. It's almost like you're playing in a in a library 'cause you don't even hear the crowd. You are so completely invalid in the game, and it's not until all of a sudden, some big thing happens late in the game. There's a Ron and and there's a time out and the players are coming to the bench and you realize, damn, there's places loud and it it just it does it. It kind of overwhelmed you. It really does. It's incredible. So I can imagine what it's like the walkout the Yankee Stadium for a playoff game and sixty thousand people are out of their minds and especially if you hit a, especially, you know, there's a. When the judge had his own run first inning. Yeah, you just sat down and your seats and right away. Now you've lost your mind. Like, you know, we're. We're gonna come on what could be better than this? So. We're very lucky that we can make a living at a job that you really love. They really, you really want. I don't like the packing and unpacking and the traveling and Yankee time we don't. We don't get getaway day game. So Yankee time as we get every city at four in the morning, I don't love that. But as far as the game, that's it's easy to like, and you're in a car right now driving the Fenway park. Right, right. So I'm I'm driving to the hotel, but yes to the hotel. Okay. So tomorrow night. I pitch. The judge and it's over the green monster. Let me hear it. Come on, it's judgy and blast. Hey, his one over the green monster, all rise here comes the judge. I love it. I love it. I love. I love it, John. Thank you so much, really. Really appreciate this was a lot of fun. My pleasure. And I hope I run into you on the sideline some night, but I would love nothing more than that. Enjoyed the sink you. Thank you. Take care now. All right. Bye-bye. Well, there you have it. We just got a home run by Aaron, judge. You heard it right here from the golden voice of the New York Yankees, John sterling amazing. Talk baseball with John sterling for ever. I could talk baseball when most people forever, because I'm fascinated by baseball have been since I was a kid still love it to this day. I found that to be incredibly informative, rewarding enjoyable, just that really, really nice man to talk to. I hope you enjoyed it as well. So until our next podcast be on the lookout for it. All I can say is I'm gone. See you soon. See you soon.

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Episode 18: Jeremy Schaap

Holding Court with Geno Auriemma

50:32 min | 1 year ago

Episode 18: Jeremy Schaap

"MGM Springfield is going to be your go to destination for all your post game celebrations as a proud partner of the university of Connecticut. We invite fans to keep the fun going by checking out all the entertainment g. m. resorts has too often by visiting MGM Springfield dot com. In sports. There are smart moves and not so smart moose, like making sure you get the practice on time. That's smart parking in the coaches spot, not so smart and the same is true when you're hiring, there are smart ways and not so smart ways to get things done like job sites that overwhelm you with tons of the wrong resumes. That's not smart, but posting jobs on ZipRecruiter, letting them find the right candidates for you. Now that's smart, ZipRecruiter's powerful matching technology scans, thousands of resumes identifies people with the right skills, education and experience for your job and actively invites them to apply. So you get qualified candidates fast, which is why it's rated number one by employers in US based on trust pilot rating of hiring sites would at least one thousand reviews. And right now my listeners can try ZipRecruiter for free at ZipRecruiter dot com. Slash. Gino. That's right. Free. Just go to ZipRecruiter dot com slash GE and, oh, so if you're looking for a smart way to find the right talent for your team, go to ZipRecruiter dot com. Slash Gino today, ZipRecruiter the smartest way to hire and the official job site of college sports fans everywhere. This is Gino Auriemma and this is holding court your to your more famous in China than liangelo ball. I mean, and he just became famous your way we're famous than we were on runs. Undefeated runs, who was I call it? If you don't wanna, wait too. To know how do I keep this. Your mom. Hello, I gotta tell you, you know, she still watches you on TV, but she said she said, Charles, I like you. I like you lot and you. But then she said, but I love the shack. Okay. For that. Welcome everyone to the next installment of holding court with Gene-o REM. This is Gino Auriemma hopefully you've gotten the sense now of our previous podcasts. We touch on a lot of things, mostly sports, but not always some, you know, popular some maybe not so well known, but always interesting. I hope and today's guest has a famous last thing and has become famous in his own right, Jeremy Schaap, son of the legendary dick chap who people my age grew up with very influential sports reporter writer, author and Jeremy now, very prominent writer, journalist sportscaster at ESPN among other various projects that he does, and we're going to touch on a lot of different topics. Hopefully ones. That you'll find interesting and ones that you'll find thought provoking here we go. I didn't grow up with a with a famous dad, my son, my son did my son grew up with a famous, and I remember an and he actually played basketball, and it was actually really, really good. And I know some of the things that you know growing up through high school and and all that. Tell me about growing up with your dad and watching him on TV and reading his stuff and listening to people talk about him. At what point did you think? You know, I wanna be like that, or I want to do something like that. Not necessarily be like that. You know, I, I wouldn't say it was from the very beginning. I mean, growing up with my dad. You know, it was a lot of fun in the nineteen seventies in New York. He wasn't just the guy who covered war wasn't going to be talking about four t was just kind of part of the team. No know he knew these guys get relationships these guys. So you know they were. They were friends of it. They were business partners. Well, he wrote books with, you know, gave Bush shirt. Tom's e kill name, rank year godfather, Jerry Kramer. Any room and he was very close with, you know, I'll leave all of those Knicks tonight era. Reggie Jackson came over the house. So there was somebody who mattered in the world of sports. Pretty much my dad knew them, so it's still natural to be around that and it was fun. I mean, most of my weekends, you know these days Inc, things have changed. No parents take their kids to, you know, their little league games and all that kind of stuff. I just tagged along with my dad to work. I mean, my weekends were pretty much up in NBC who's working. I was a little kid hanging out and just watch him, do his show pieces us the live stuff. And it seemed like a lot of fun. I mean, I got to the all these great games and I was president some of the most historic moments in sports. You know, he took me to spring training that was like being in the candy sports being he. Loved baseball. So it was great. Why wouldn't you wanna do that? You're part of that because I really never felt. I think him like. And that's everybody's dream, you know to to actually have a job where it's not work. I mean, you know, I had a job where a bunch of jobs we're actually had to go to work and actually do work. So when people say, you know, is it hard work coaching, basketball? I said, well, I don't have any calluses on my hands so I don't. I don't think it is. I've calluses in my brain, I guess that's where we get them, but growing up. What was your favorite sport? I was the baseball guy. I really would. I mean, I had an appreciation for all of them. I think you know, I was grown up in the in the all leave razor, four mini era. And so- boxing was also it was just a big part of everything we talked about in sports at that point when I was a little kid. So I was who's he asked about the history of it. But for me, I, I've always been attracted to as much as what's going on now and sometimes more so the history. So my dad took me to game six, the seventy seven World Series, and I saw Reggie check. It's the home runs that night. Oh, while in the World Series. How so? So hot with three pitchers and up until that when I was eight, I was kind of probably Abe even below average sports fan. You know, I was eight. I was into dinosaurs like a lot of kids and our trek and stuff, but then something clicked that night. I don't know. There was something about seeing Reggie and that excitement, you know, in the craziness in the Bronx, the South Bronx nineteen, seventy seven. Oh, out yesterday with the anniversary, I guess. It just it, it it. It was like a light bulb going on. I think I stayed up all night reading -aseball books in from that point on I became in my father's words, insufferable. I wanted to do was talk about baseball. I mean, you know, he, he wrote a story about it. Actually the New York Times my session with baseball. And I mean, you know, we sit down for dinner at night. I'd say that. Who do you think was a greater manager, Connie Mack or John McGraw you know, and he'd say, shut up. You know. I was obsessed with this. It's funny during during the mid sixties. When I came over from Italy in sixty one when I turned ten which nine hundred sixty four. Same thing. You know, I was just fascinated by the game of baseball because you know when you grow up in, you know, in your in Italy, five, six, seven, eight years. You don't other than soccer and stuff. You know. So that the game and I can relate to what you're saying, you wanted to know everything about the game. You wanted to know about trips, speaker entirely job, and you know, Christy Mathewson and you wanted to watch the old, the Babe, Ruth story, you know, and you know it was William Bendix playing playing vantage. Not a great favourite and. He must have given people. The impression that'd be Ruth was not a good athlete, and he was an amazing athlete, right? So when you're a kid and you have the ability to to discuss this at home. What was it like with your friends? Like as you started to become, you know, ten, eleven, twelve thirteen. You get to middle school era. And did you find friends that shared the same passion for for baseball or other sports? Yeah. Yeah, totally. I mean, you know, just very typical boy obsessed with sports in particular baseball wanted to be playing all the time wanted to talk about baseball. The time wanted go to every game and I found, you know, and you know, on an emotional level to my parents went through. Public nasty, divorce, late seventies early eighties, and I think without even obviously realizing at the time, baseball was kind of this emotional crutch for me and I could what whatever it was going on in my life and dealing with all that stuff. I always had baseball and come back to and in the game, you know, it just it just meant so much. I became kind of a history buff in general, I, I was probably the only. You know, the only in year old kid in New York who was Villier with like the, you know, order of battle or the allied armies, you know, World War Two. I just in part of it was I spent a lot of time with older people and a lot of time with my dad. I spent a lot of time particularly after my parents got divorced with my grandfather. My mother's father was history buffet of big baseball guy in Brooklyn guy. So you know, I felt like even though it was the nineteen seventies and eighties, I felt like as Evan's when pitched his nineteen thirty. One was part of my life that we had hit nineteen twenty four was a part of my life, and although he was the dodgers guy, the wheat and Vance were like kind of one into, you know, he, he loved Chris, Matt. So it was kind this motion detection other kids every once in a while. I'd have a friend who who had a similar enthusiasms. I hadn't met Keith Olbermann yet. So. He, he certainly does being all this stuff, but it was there was something about the game in the history and the wake next generations. None of this obviously, you know, by our late or even a process. But now I kind of understand it to be a way of connecting with my father and grandfather. When you when you got the high school when you as you as you grown up and you get the high school. And then you know. Heading off to college at what point did did it becomes serious that, yeah, I'm going to have a career in journalism. Well, for me, I'd say it was you don't pretty early in high school. I started working for the school paper and my after school job was with a publishing company at one point. And you know, he, I, I can't say that I knew at that point that I wanted to be sports writer. I wanna be what's broadcast right? Wanted news or wanted, you know, whatever it was, but I knew that that was. The business interested me so, but it's time I get to college. I went off to college nineteen eighty seven. As a freshman. You know, the first thing I did was go to the office. The school paper sign up are working for the school paper. The first sport I covered actually was women's basketball. It was assigned to cover the Cornell women's basketball team nineteen eighty seven nineteen eighty eight. And actually Yukon program has an action to the Cornell women program is I'm sure you know that Chris Nellie. That's right. And she had already left, but she had a worked with the woman who at the time was the coach, the women's basketball program at Cornell, and you know, and then you cover all the different sports. But that was my goal. I went off to college not to be any kind of rate. Scholar were to really take advantage of the incredible educational opportunities at one of the world's great research universities, but to work for the daily newspaper. That was that was where that was the best education you could get. There was no journalism program. Nothing like that. My my school Cornell, it was all it was all working on the job. You know, with a bunch of kids, student journalists, and you know you, you learn a lot of lessons that way. I, you know you've been you've been working with dealing with student journalists for a long time, and I'm sure a lot of them really good and a lot of them are in well, certainly in the latter category. The when when when the old big east was was in its heyday, the worst place to go and the best place to go for us to play. It was the worst and the best was Syracuse university because you get there and you know what I'm gonna say, you get there and you got forty five wanna be Bob Costas Berman's whoever the hell they wanna be and they all got. They all think they're they're working for outside the lines or going six minutes, and they all have these incredible questions about this. And I'm thinking, oh my God, these guys are going to grow up to be those guys and there's forty of them and they all they all want interview. They all want to do their own and and it was. It was really cool this, you know, these kids, they, they act the part, they act like, hey, I'm going to be famous Sunday, and I'm going to do this. Many of those Syracuse kids not only you know, some of them are famous and other ones are just the boss here. So I gotta be careful what I. But there's another connection that I have with Cornell athletics, and one of my best friends. Played lacrosse and then coached at Cornell, Bruce Arena. Oh, what are your best friend? Yeah. I mean Reuss AVI Brucie's we're now legend in Cornell and he's Alexa does. Oh, my gosh. Yeah, Abe of course was, you know, is the number two guy in the US Daschle team and he used to be the Cornell head coach? Yup. I all those guys. I barely know Bruce somehow, all the years of Cornell, we never really crossed paths very much the first time I met him actually. Other than attending games in which he played when I was a kid, I think the first locked room I was ever in was Cornell cross locker room in seventy six. What vers Ritchie more at my dad played lacrosse for now and rate Richie Moran at a national title that year. And I remember we went there and I like that. So we'll Bruce would elect might have been coaching anyway. The point is a great guy walking the grounds at the master's a couple years ago, right? When he was coming back US incognito of what you know, he's a, he's a New York guy. He's from, you know, born and raised in New York. So when he was at the university of Virginia, we had a softball team. We had a great softball team was it was he was on the team riccar Lau was on the team route. Lampson was on the team. Bob Bradley was on the team. Yeah, it was all it was really incredible. There's a lot of fun and arena would hit the ball, and you know he's run around two basis. You know, he tried to act like Reggie Jackson, he, you know he was just he was an obnoxious, New York guy living in quaint stayed old Charlottesville, you know? And so as you can imagine, he stood as opposed to the of not just, you know, Pennsylvania guy, exactly. None of those guys. None of those guys. Yeah, we became close friends. So. So ad out of college. I'm fascinated by the path that people take. Sometimes people think they choose a pet, but actually a lot of times paths, choose them. You know. So. Most college kids when they're getting ready to graduate, there's a little bit of fear late with them. I going to do with by the Greek, where am I going to end up. What what was it like going out after school when you got to be on your own, you know, and it's no more going with your dad or no more getting anywhere. Like I was very lucky. I agree my senior year and I had all these clips than I was sports editor of the paper. And you know, I, I had rates summer jobs, you know, I was. Internet your times for two summers, but another summer transcribing tapes. My my dad is boot Jackson book. I, I was like, you know, in those days, you know, there was no internet, so I kind of want my father would just essentially key chain to a desk working for them all summer. You know anything. He needed done research and I was there because there was no Google. But when I when I was a senior in college, I got a great job. It was a one year job working technically working at Sports Illustrated, but it was really a separate unit entirely. There was producing content. The news. Fats the ninety, two Olympic ninety. Two Winter Olympics in the ninety two Summerlin in as an Olympics enthusiasts. It was a great job for me. I mean, I was when he one years old and I had an office in the time life building on the forty fifth or forty six floor, and I was making thirty thousand dollars a year which seemed like a million dollars even in New York City in nineteen Ninety-one. And I, I was very fortunate because nineteen ninety one that that college last coming out that year was kind of still encountering kind of a there was kind of still a recession. Newspaper jobs are very hard to come by. I lied for a lot of newspaper jobs in get any of them up before Chit -ly. One of my dad's old friends, very talented editor names, eve Gilman, who worked at time life for longtime with churches, win big project, and you know more on the strength, I think of my. Gene than on my flips hired me to work on this project for year and it was great. It was great, and so I got to write or he's special advertising sections that were in the international digital time. You know, bylines I wrote for the officials of funny story. So the main part of the job Gino was putting together the official souvenir program with the Barcelona Olympic, you know, the big boss, these souvenir program, and he came out it was a big project, four languages, English and French, which you know or the Olympic fish languages plus Spanish and Catalan. And I was given the assignment of among other things, picking re athlete to profile in this thing that would be sold all of our Sloan all over the world on TV. There was no internet again, it's so I had to pick riche or thing because this thing went to press in like may where's the games were August though. They had be three short thing. So I picked galman Chinese diver would end up winning another gold medal Barcelona. Great. Diver I take it looks own Cuban heavyweight would win another gold medal in Barcelona. And then the other chore thing pick the lock of the century. I picked Dan O'Brien who, of course ended up. No hiding in the poll. The Olympic trials in New Orleans. And so there were hundreds of thousands of these things on the seats are slowed and around the world, each ring, you know, their ten thousand athletes at the Olympics, read them profiled in the official program in one of them did not qualify for the Olympic. That's on. That's crazy. That's crazy. Well, you know. When you get a chance to do something like that and you you, you know, you make mistakes, you get you get the high of getting something right. You get the feel the low get to experience all the emotions that go into. You know when you have to put yourself out there. When you when you decide to write a book. Because two things that that have always intrigued me. People that can write music and people that play music play music, m people that can sit down and write a book and know how it's going to begin how it's going to end how I want this to read and to be able to have the ability to do that. And when you decided to write Cinderella man. How did how did you come up with that? Well, I remember it vividly. I was sitting at like a coffee shop or bar sixth avenue and thirteenth street in New York with a college friend of mine got Waxman, who's the very successful literary agents, even then like team fifteen years ago. And for years I've been saying look, no, I'm right. I was right. I get a freelance writer. I'd written some magazine profiles here and there, and I always, you know, had this plan in my mind. I wanted to write a book. Dad wrote thirty three books. I'm gonna write a book and and I felt I had something to say, but I never had really the idea who'd ideas. So Scott said, hey, you know, they're making a movie about Jim Braddock. Nobody's ever written a book really bad Jim Braddock or not in a long time. Anyway, not since the nineteen thirties. What do you think about writing a book that might coincide with this film that's being made? I said. I, I love the Jim Braddock story. I love the max Baer story. You know what? I'm gonna do it. Finally gonna get off my butt and actually write the book. I guess I was three fourth time, something like that. Thirty three thirty four nights at you. I'm gonna do it, and I fell in love with the story and got sold the book very quickly who great editor at Houghton Mifflin, who some candidates and shepherded the project. And you know, I immersed myself in it, you know? And I look back now I wrote that book which did well, then at eighteen months later, I published a book that Jesse Owens triumph, which did nicely, and I figured I'm gonna do this every year. I'm gonna do this every year and a half like my dad did. And then. Life change? No, I got married. I re kids. I used to write those books between midnight and three AM pretty much now you know, I'm I'm asleep most nights by like ten pm, so feel kinda bad. I haven't. I haven't followed up on those two and they there were books that eve me, you know, it was a great experience and I'd like to do more in fact, right after triumph came out and she's seven, I was having compensated sounds like namedrop it, but he was friend even Halberstam calls me for about that. He says, disturbing. Sure. Mike, what should it be Davies after write a book about New York? Mets. Thank you. Rate story. I can't writable but he ate FLC's giants. Coal. It said, okay, you're David alverson, I'll do it. That's a great idea. And, and he said, I'm gonna, you know, teach you how to do because I never really dealt with living people before my two books were about guys were long gone, and he said, I'll teach attitude. I'll show you the ropes and you know, you know, one of the a horrible tragedy took place within a week of that conversation. David of inside aren't crash. Irk rats, mortgage. And and I never got obviously, you know, horrible tragedy rate band, Rachel couple of great books that that that he came out with really long story short, I've, I've, I, I have not got around to writing the book that meant I'm not sure. I'm not sure where to go from here, but I've got some ideas, but you know, I, it's nice. I still take pride in those things that on my shelf in basketball accuracy can be the difference between winning and losing. And this is also true when it comes to your health. The genius three d. mammography exam is a more accurate and comfortable mammogram for all women. So why not find the facility that offers the genius exam near you? Visit genius, three d. near me dot com to learn more and make sure your next mammogram is a genus exam. Is your retirement game plan a well executed play or a wild shot at the buzzer. Johnson Brunetti has helped over twenty five hundred Connecticut families prepare for financially secure retirement, and they are proud to be the wealth management partner of the Yukon huskies, visit them Johnson Brunetti dot com, and see how they can help you with your retirement. Johnson Brunetti, retirement and investments specialists go to Johnson, Brunetti dot com. For free books and financial planning tools. I just discovered something that's pretty extraordinary. I'd heard about it from some coaches and pro athletes, and now I've experienced it for myself mizzen and main. Dallas based company. Is the maker of performance fabric dress shirts. Now you say, what's performance fabric? Well, you know this stuff you work out, so you get all the benefits of workout gear, but you wear it with a suit. You can dress it up. Dress it down. Put a tie on, don't put a tie on. So if you see me on the court lately, that's what I'm wear. You don't know that it's drescher if feels like a casual shirt, but it looks like a dress shirt. Yet it moves around you like workout gear. It's revolutionary. You can check out WWW dot mizzen and main. That's z. e. n. n. Maine m. a. I n. dot com slash Gino see you. Some of my favorite shirts. Take a look. You'll be impressed, give it a shot, husky fans. I know there's no one more loyal than you, and I appreciate that. You know what else appreciates loyalty, AAA, so much so that they'll reward you for like how you get savings on AAA auto insurance just for being a AAA member and the longer you remember the more you could save have both AAA auto and AAA home insurance. You could save even more. Have you been loyal to your existing insurance company for a while? We'll though we ward that too with a discount when you switch the AAA loyalty gets you more than saving. It gets you comprehensive help from an expert agent who gets to know you because when you're triple a. expert agent knows you better. They can help you better for insurance. That's not just insurance turned the triple eight. So what's what's max Baer, son, it is his son right. Junior Jan throw on the Beverly hillbillies. It's right. A lot of people maybe don't know that character character mexic- what's he is he still alive. Baxter junior is still alive. I have not spoken to him in many years, but he was he was really a lot of fun of and he had great stories. And he told me some of the great stories about his dad who was just a, you know, he was a markedly talented fighter, but also a big character to and they had, you know, I- stuff that we can't really get into here on GTO. Max's got interesting stories about Hollywood scene of the nineteen fifties nineteen sixty pre, but he knew everyone. He dated everyone. Yeah, great, great character. That's the guy who should write a memoir eighty. At there you go. There you go. What what stands out for you as. As kind of a defining moment. Of your career at ESPN? Well. It was a few things I would say. I think the extent that anybody knows who I am. The first thing they think of is interviewing with Bob night after it was fire. And that was just, you know, that was a that was an interesting experience. I think. I think that interview which in confrontational kind of put me on the map for a lot of people. You know, you don't get a lot of opportunities. Those moments do those kinds of interviews with the guy that everybody wants cheer. He's challenging interview in the best of circumstances was fiery that night in a live situation which is different from most. You know, interviews, you see, that was a big one. I did a piece a few years after that about Bobby Fisher, which I I come back to because it was it was kind of. Again, this bizarre situation, but it ended up being kind of deeply personal. Fisher story. No windy him in Flint. Lease visit Japan. That's a that's a story. It's another situation where you don't get too many. Stories like that over the course of life. Well, you know, it's funny that Bobby Knight interview. And anybody who knows night knows you know, for all his great qualities which he's got a lot obviously. Not the easiest guy in the world to talk to in general, much less, you know, down enough to tell you, but I remember our, I. R. s. ID saying to me, hey, ESPN wants to do this feature on you. I said, oh, really? He goes, yeah, they're going to send somebody out. Here I go. I said, who's it going to be? And you said you're going to be with Jeremy shop. And I'm like. Damn, what can I talk to his dad instead? I don't. I don't wanna talk. They say he's a pain in the ass. You see what that other now's laugh. For the whole time. But yeah, people people get to see you. And then did you ever after that when you had the interview, somebody that they ever almost look at you like sixty minutes the same thing with me, they go, hey, we want to come out and do a piece, and I go, well, who's it going to be Mike Wallace? 'cause they say, no, it's going to be Morley safer. I said, I'm in. Did you ever get? Did you ever get the feeling from somebody you were going to interview that going? This guy he's, he doesn't trust me, doesn't you know he's going to make me look bad. Oh, sure. Sure. I think that's that's the fine line. You know, if you're. You know, I feel like I feel like if you go back and look away then over the years, it's always been fair. I don't think I've ever. You're free out, you know, make somebody look bad. I think I I've asked questions that I've tried to do it. Try to do it fairly tried to give people the opportunity to state their cases, but you know, a lot of people are not interested in that. I remember once this is kind of a something, a colleague of mine really wind by my talk about a lot. Willie was. What are yours go? But trying to get an interview with Albert bell when he was a free agent, God layer. Okay, he's Albert bell went off to and he's his brother Terry who is representing him and carries no longer with us. Finally, after a long period of time, you know, eight, you know, really telling him, you hate this is going to be a fair story. We're not interested in, you know, eating unfair. You know, this interior finally says, you don't get it. I'm not interested. If air story, I'm interested in a mood story. That's the way it is sometimes insure. You know, if you're going to. Have a reputation for asking people, tough questions. You're not always going to get people to sit in the chair. That's what happened. I couldn't agree with you more on that. Your one of your one of your cohorts? Bob Lee, his daughter, my daughter went to went to high school together, always been always been a big fan. What makes sense? What makes them so good orders. Bob makes probably so good, you know. So I've been working with Bob weir twenty five. And. Pains me to say this in public as I try not to ego, but he. Bob is. He's so committed being fair, being journalists, these down. I've been working with them as they said for quarter century guy. Never mails it. He's always prepared. He works himself yet. He cared hears about story. Here's about people. Here's about his colleague. You know he, he's been the conscience of this place for a long long time. You know what I like is that in the last couple of years in particular, he's, he's also showed us his funny cide his personality. He's he took a long time for him to decide that it was okay not to be just kind of a dispassionate Justice sitting on the bench. He neutral orbiter into show us. Who he really is and to express opinions. And now we've got a think, you know, Bob, Bob's better than ever is more effective than ever. And he's he's a meant she got and much as journalists. He's always prepared e. He he, he wants to dig deep and look. He could have decided longtime for, you know what? I wanna do you know play by play on this? Or I wanna do this, which are all worthy pursuit, but he's remained committed journalism would it wasn't always the fashionable thing when certainly is the thing that draws most eyeballs. I will say this. I mean, this is the highest compliment that in in our business, he's more interested in being good. That'd be bad. He spoke, but I'll tell you what he let me. Let me ask you another thing about that part of your job. What what is the most memorable e- sixty or outside the lines or any of those features right that you've worked on for me. They're kind of related. But one in particular, which I'm proud of his story that we did about cut tar and Decians in which migrant labourers there live and work. And that was very, we did is that the one I'd get ready for the World Cup right about now building the world competent was a story that you know. Was largely unknown story that we were working on for years story that I think opened up a lot of is systems in place carts are, which is one of the richest countries in the world which is going to be the host of the world's hot dealers sports event in which you know continues, I think, make a difference because there's still pressure being applied to improve the conditions. Workers in cuts are, and that's really the thing that's been most wording, eleven years plus that we were working on east sixty that we've kind of carved out this niche doing stories on human rights issues around the World, Social Justice issues here in the US and around the world that sometimes are only tangentially about sports only marginally about sports, but that's. You know, that's been our mandate. He'll be story and they, there's res about sports and society and. That one, that one's the one that stands out and then connected with the story that we did about e foot up ladder your later. Let us that wretched we did an hour on the mess that was in particular during the bladder. And I think that opened up a lot is to the timing was good. Ended up coming out just before best. Igations were announced to the work. Fief broke some news and within a couple of weeks, there's a causal relationship timely within a couple of weeks. That piece guy who seemed like in that job river with out of that, or you know, it's, you know, it's interesting people on the outside wouldn't know this, but ESPN may do fifteen hours on a particular sport, let's pick soccer and and promote it, show it talk about it, make it seem like, you know, ESPN. And soccer or one. And then it joins us tonight at ten when Jeremy Schaap takes all fee for apart. Understand that the these are two separate two separate things. I found that out, you know what ESPN sports does and what you guys do on your end sometimes are two different things that you have that kind of autonomy and that kind of freedom. That's right to follow your own projects. And you know, we always have, you know, we've been. Luke, we've been fortunate it is, you know. You know, there are relationships Lee and our relationship with the global governing bodies all that stuff. But you know, they've never prevented us from doing our boarding United States, things that we're a, you know, most proud of over the years or challenging the powers that be calendering national government now challenging redo allies. The US, whatever it may be. You know, we've gone out. We've done those stories than human rights stuff. We kind it in. Fard RA. And those these are all these are all serious serious topics that end up being, you know, obviously. Sort of cultural cultural changing the culture of of a lot of sports, and then you do something, which I think isn't necessarily culturally. Seismic. The guy shoots himself in a nightclub in New York. Is that more funny or is that more. You know that one, you know, like SCO, Burress right around think giving, you know, thousand eight. You know, it's not funny though because circumstances there is certainly something comedic about the circumstances. If somebody shooting themselves in the leg raising themselves, essentially a skin wound in Ben ending up in prison for twenty months using thirty five million dollars bringing down the giants season. All of those things perplex go, very sad. I mean, and look, I believe, you know, eat. He deserves to be punished, broke the law. He is charged Ludi done in a crowded nightclub in New York. You know, then we, we sat down with him that that first interview with with him about a, that's an example. You know, it's like. Yes, Kim the questions. How did this happen? How do you let this happen? How do you possibly do you live with yourself? You know what I mean? But I mean, he's so lucky. He didn't kill somebody roar himself exactly you. He didn't kill himself somebody else. And at the same time you can appreciate. I mean, he paid, he paid a heavy price of them state. And you're right. New York for those people who live there. Obviously, there's one of the most stringent severe gun laws in America. I mean, I think I mean, I don't know the it's been a while now, but I think you know if he pretty much done that anywhere other than in the city limit the he'd come into the city that night typically with a gun, if he'd stayed in jersey that night had done the same thing. Different outcome thoroughly in many parts of the country, different outcome where there are, you know he'll and open carry, look. I mean. Like so pick the wrong city which to east charge got in that point the gun. I don't think it was legally registered, I don't. I don't want to say. I think it had been at one point, but it fired. I don't want to long, but yeah, you know, the thing is though people don't know. You just been to New Jersey if you know where he was like what he would have been with Lincoln tunnel in and mid it back jersey and gone to a hospital and Hobo in a hospital seventy th I your costal, but he thought he was dying. He saw blood and buddies he's dying. He's like me to hospital turned out. He told me that, you know was basically a band-aid. Oh, I, it's no, nobody. Nobody would have known right Bill be heard the gunshot. It was still allowed in the club. He's the only one who went off. How so when you think about life, you know, like his turned upside down by his. Well, you know, that's that's a topic for another night that I would love to explore with you. Having to do with athletes and incidents off the field of behavior firearms or or whatever, whatever it is that that takes athletes who you. The person watching on Sunday afternoon or Saturday, or whatever, and sees these guys play and things these guys have world. You know, in the palm of their hand, they've got it made and some of the things that either within their control without their control that they get involved in that just makes you shake your head and outside of this. So many stories we've done, here's what's your next project? I know you gotta go. I know you don't have much time what, what's your next project? I'm really excited about this one. So on December eleven. I been working on with my colleague Ben house or read it or Mike show. Keep documentary thirty for thirty on Buster Douglas upset against my type Debussy Levin, really. And nobody's ever told the story before from busters perspective, nobody knows anything about BUSTER. I think one of the things that's so interesting about the story is that Buster Douglas is the name that you know, I think certainly people over the age of thirty, they know the name and they can tell you the first sentence. You know, his biography guy who knocked out Mike Tyson, but they know nothing. Nothing else about him. No. Second Senate, those tech and clause, you know, I, and and he's got an amazing story and it's always fascinating means, you know, you know. How someone at a particular moment you see this vast place this in all sports, find the best version of themselves at a moment when it batters boat and they might never get there. Again, they might never have gotten there before. Certainly Buster Douglas his case, you it what you want about career afterwards, beforehand, guy with talent. He didn't always Marshall wasn't always motivated, certainly. But for one morning in Tokyo really afternoon, nighttime back here, the the US he was a champion. And he didn't get lucky. He didn't win with a lucky punch. It was a ten round fight and eat kick the stuffing out of my most, those ten round. And I've always been fascinated by the busters stories. So I'm really excited that we're doing it thirty. Well, you know, and I gotta let you go. I coaches ask me all the time. You know about success, you know. And I have a kind of a standard reply that that I find to be really, really true and you just touched on it. You know, if you're lucky if you're lucky in life and you're fortunate in life at some point, if you're very fortunate, fate will tap you on the shoulder and say, this is your time right now. And if you're prepared, then you have prepared yourself and you take advantage avantage of. Something magical happens and it may never happen again and it may never happen once in your life. But the worst thing in the world is for fate, tap you and say, this is your time and you're not prepared, and it passes you by right? And that happens to to a lot of really, really talented coaches, writers athletes, doesn't matter they, they get their moment here comes and they're not prepared or and it just doesn't happen for them. And I think your case. You know, growing up in the way you did and aspiring to be what you aspired to be and and like you said, fate taps you on the shoulder because whatever circumstances, and then you did the rest and. Carved out an amazing career for yourself and your family and. It's it's a pleasure listening to you. It's a pleasure. Watching some of the things that that that you've put together and. I'm very, probably the best thing that anyone could ever say about sports writer. Journalist, in your case is that they are fair. You might not like what they say. You went and like the questions, but they're fair, and you're fair to the people that and I'm a notice from personal history, your fair. And I think every every coach every athlete, you name it appreciates that, and I certainly appreciate you taking the time to spend with us Jeremy. It's been an honored. Thank you so much. Let's talk again. Right? I would love. Okay. Take care of my friend. Thank you. All right. Bye-bye. Well, there you have it. Everyone really, really interesting guy. Don't you think Jeremy shop? We could've gone for two hours. Fortunately, Jeremy had the run to a to another event that he's got going in a short time managed to touch on a lot of topics of you're interested in some of the things that he talked about. If you saw the movie. Cinderella man on James Braddock. I would encourage you to get that book his book on Jesse Owens and the Olympics during the time in Germany that Adolf Hitler was taking that country down a dark road. Walt Disney is in the process of turning that into a feature film. As I said, we could've talked about a lot of things over a long period of time, but I found it really fascinating. So thank you for joining us. But for our next podcast, holding court with Gino Auriemma Gino Auriemma saying talk decent.

US New York City ESPN Jeremy Schaap Gino Auriemma Gino Auriemma baseball basketball writer Reggie Jackson Olympics official Bob Cornell ZipRecruiter Cornell max Baer soccer Jesse Owens editor Knicks
The Sporting Life - 11/2/18

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

39:47 min | 1 year ago

The Sporting Life - 11/2/18

"Squirrels are known for saving. But with the help of AARP, they won't be the only ones from planning to budgeting AARP is here to help you stretch your dollar further. So take on today and every day with AARP learn how at take on today dot AARP, welcome to the sporting life with Jeremy shop. Over the next hour. The Red Sox are World Series champions once again and the Boston Globe. Dan, Shaughnessy looks at this team's place in history since February two thousand two starting with the Super Bowl in New Orleans. It's eleven championships eleven parades. And that's an a sixteen year period. Them belonging to the Red Sox. Who are now the team of the century. And Michael Sokolov says it's only a matter of time before Rick Pitino returns to the sidelines. Nobody questions is ability of the basketball coaching meeting thing about Patino you've won at Louisville without the best players without lottery picks sometimes without first round picks. So he's a genius of a basketball coach somebody will want him to coach plus the Greek Gino Auriemma reflects on his unprecedented success in women's college basketball. I feel really really proud of that that you know, when they write the story of women's basketball hundred years from now, they're going to say university of Connecticut, and I will always always be incredibly proud of that. This is the sporting life on ESPN radio and the ESPN app. Here's Jeremy shop. Welcome to another dish of the sporting line. The first game the college basketball season are just a few days way today will be speaking with one of the sport's. Biggest names the legendary coach Gino Auriemma will also be talking about another legendary coach Rick Pitino but first this week. The Boston Red Sox won the World Series again capping historic season after one hundred eight regular season wins. And we welcome back to the show to discuss it one of our favorite guests. Dan, Shaughnessy of the Boston Globe. Dan. Thank you for joining us. Great to be here. Jeremy, Dan, I I don't know how to put this. But is it just getting kind of whole-home blase winning World Series up in Boston? Whole thing's ridiculous is high renaissance of Boston sports. I mean, we have the Celtics in our youth and in my youth. And there was that. But then it was sort of drought after the eighty six Celtics one. There was no championship in the series in the city until. Two thousand two and since February two thousand two starting with the Super Bowl in New Orleans. It's eleven championships eleven parades. And that's an you know sixteen year period. Four of them belonging to the Red Sox. Who are now the team of the century. It's interesting, Jeremy they won historically. They won five of the first fifteen ever played in the last century. And now they've got the first team to have four in this century. So it's quite a turnaround after that eighty six year drought. Does this make up for the eighty six years? I mean, does it all you know, is an offer gotten at this point. It's good question. I was saying the I think it guys my age. It's sorta tainted us because we expect bad things like after they lost that, you know, eighteen inning, you know, seven hour twenty minute deal Kansas error. I'm thinking, oh here, we go again, you know, that's going to be taken away. But no these guys when those things happen they reverted and their behinds four nothing the next night. And then scored nine unanswered runs in the last three innings. So they this is a whole is not your father's Red Sox. And they they come through when some of us. All times doubt them which the Dan Shaughnessy the Boston Globe. After the Red Sox victory the World Series their fourth in the last fifteen seasons. What is it about this organization that has made it possible for this success now in twenty eighteen hundred years after? They won that last World Series of theirs in the twentieth century. Well, they've had good stable ownership for like sixteen eighteen years now with deep pockets this is the highest payroll in baseball they were built to win now. And you know, some of this has to go back to Epstein the two thousand eleven draft. I think it's I know it's bets spradley a lot of half of this team is is oh to him, including it's just guys who were brought in now Dave Dombrowski came in, and I got kimberlin sale and price, and and that and certainly big contributors but much like to have had half the team when THEO one in four THEO still got a lot of these guys who just one this one so good drafting the core players have come into their own and the pitchers developed. Elsewhere have been brought in through trades and free agency hord after growing up professionally in the Boston sports media. Whereas your he suggested failure was what? Was expected to turn on a dime and half the right in his celebrate Tori manner, so often. Well, it's got me off my game a little bit I have to. But in now now that we're this far into the century you start to you know, those those years like eighty six with them Shea Stadium in the Mets and the Buckner game. You know, you flip it around fast. And I know when when the pay the undefeated patriots lost the Super Bowl, you know, that was the sure win we had to flip it around fast. So through the as you develop a ability to do that. But now they've gone the other way because I know when when it was when they were down for nothing in the seventh inning on Sunday night. We're thinking or Saturday nights excuse me with thinking. Oh, boy here it goes. Now, it's going to be too to tied series. And it's all going to go back to that that that game three when they they spit it up in thirteenth, but no they score nine on answered runs. So yeah, it's getting pretty pretty equipped to write these championship stories. I'm I'm in my office at home. I'm looking at. Ten frame covers from ten championships and got a space for the next one. I mean, I know this is kind of silly. But when when he changes so much the culture changes from one of expecting a horrible things to happen to expecting championships. How do you how do you adjust? Totally. I mean, do you have to acknowledge that all the time? Or is it just kind of baked into the product down everybody who's reading it knows. How things have changed or do you have to nod to the past these days? Well, you have to kind of listen to the millennials listen to the young people because their experiences that the Boston team will win. And why would they have anything else? I mean, so people, you know, who are in in college, or, you know, thirty years old now, this is all they know they don't know what we're talking about with these things that used to happen. So it's it's really it's a change dynamic. And you know, I know you've got a lot of Boston sports fans who are friends, and and that becomes they're they're a little bit full. Elves when they travel now. I mean, they take over your ballpark, which they did a Dodger Stadium in a big way it sounded like a home game even early when Pierce at the two and home in the first you can tell a lot of dodger fans had just dumped out after going down. Three one said. Yeah. Take the tickets. We'll sound to you whatever. And and they really took over that ballpark and thousands of them all three levels of the stadium hung around afterwards. And they're, you know, they're chanting Yankees suck and they're swinging seat swinging singing sweet Caroline, and and just really getting into it. And it it's I don't know. I don't know how many of them are you come across. But they they travel. Well, and I can tell you like a week from Sunday. They'll they'll be taken over Nashville. They do that. We're speaking with Dan Shaughnessy, the Boston Globe. And when we had you on the show over the summer and the Red Sox were in the midst of this historic season. We were talking about how there wasn't that much excitement about people were already talking in July about patriots training camp or June about patriots training camp. And there were. We're talking about what the Celtics were going to do in the off season. When did it turn? Well, I mean, and that that's some of the doubt this team had finished in first place. Two years in a row. Ninety three wins back to back and got eliminated immediately in three games by Cleveland sixteen and four games by Houston, seventeen first round one out. So for me, I was in a, you know, show me mode right into October one hundred and eight wins. I was like, well, that's swell. But until you do in the postseason, they only had one player on the roster with the postseason ring, and that's Bogart's and a little Cup of coffee and thirteen none of the starting pitchers had ever wanna postseason game. And that includes sale price per Selo a lot of starts. So I'm thinking until these guys do it. It's on them. And then they win the first game against the Yanks. You know, it's a hundred win Yankee team, but they were up five nothing and they won five four, and you know, Kimbrell is just so nervous and giving up a Homer in the ninth. And it just feels like it felt like a loss. And then they do lose the second game. Six two to three monsters homers by Sanchez. And judge, and then judge trolls, the clubhouse stolen by with this bluetooth amplified, you know, New York New York Frank Sinatra, and I'm thinking, oh boy best to five it's one when they're going to New York. They're not coming back. I was still I was all over it. But then they come out and they went sixteen to one in game three. You know, what that's that? That's brought me around. I'm like, okay. And from that point, Jeremy they were they were ten and two they won seven straight road games. I mean, they just they were wagon, and, you know, lean into that thing over the weekend and the World Series where look like it's going to be a square series. And then they score nine unanswered runs in the last three innings of game four so I came around during the New York series last year this time we were talking about the Astros kind of team to be built to win championship after championship. Of course baseball. That's always a difficult proposition. Never know what's going to happen. And now it's coming down to relief pitching not just pitching how well suited is this team in your opinion for long-term repeat kind of success. Well, you know, they'll prob. Be favored going in with. But the big difference between being favourite and likelihood of winning because it's like it's still one in four chance. Even if your favorite that kind of thing. So you know, all the stuff that can happen October. I think you know, they'll be probably be favorites. Going in Houston's really good. They want a hundred and five. It's a great core. You know, they that's why the socks thing was so impressive. They shocked them in five and they beat them three straight in Houston. So, but I think you know, the answer a factor. The American League just has the better teams the better league right now. And Boston's probably gonna lose of all the and kimbrel. The rest of it. They should be able to hold onto most of the guys, and and depending on who's healthy and who plays well, but sure they're they're tested. And and I think they got a good shot to to do it again. But doesn't have very often baseball's, you know, how how does it work? Do the patriots always win after the the Red Sox win the World Series? I can't remember how that goes. Well, looking up at the wall here. So, you know, the patriots they won before the SOX won the first two in in New Orleans and then Houston the. Jacksonville thing was right on the heels of the socks that was back to back in in that one there. And then you know, you could sort of make a case after the SOX one in against the cardinals and thirteen the pats are back on the wall and fifteen so yeah, pretty close. But I think that you know, New England doesn't necessarily have the best football team Ashir. But there in that division, I expect they'll get to the AFC championship. And whether that games home or not will probably have a lot to say about it parade town America Boston, Dan Shaughnessy, the Boston Globe. Always a pleasure, sir. Go celebrate some more. That's all you guys do up there. I will. Thank you. Jeremy? These these the sporting life on ESPN radio and the ESPN app. Verne Lundquist is one of the most beloved and respected figures in the annals of sports broadcasting. He's the recipient of the national kademi of television arts and sciences lifetime achievement award a couple of years ago, but awards don't begin to tell the full story of what he's meant to the industry into the millions who've listened to his voice over the last five decades. His new book is play by play calling the wildest games in sports from SEC football to college basketball, the masters and more, and it is not her to welcome for Lundquist, this sporting life Burt thank you for being with us. Jeremy as I told you before we came on, it's my privilege. I've been mired your work for men many many years. Well, not that many. It's very kind of you to say now, there's so many incredible moments that you didn't just witness, but they you were able to describe to millions of people on television. How did you view your responsibilities as the person communicating to detail audience? What was going on in these stadiums and arenas? Why I think this is true of almost all of us who are lucky enough to pursue this craft and to make a living at it. I think especially I I would guess is a play by play guy as opposed to a studio host I go into each encounter. Whether it's football basketball golf or pick your skating for crying out loud. The my hope is that something memorable will occur and. And then the challenge is to be verbally appropriate to the moment in order to enhance the appreciation for whatever it is just a place for the viewer or listener. And I've been really blessed over the years to not not just one but more than more than three or four and a lot of guys whom we both know go through their careers anticipating and hoping for something memorable and it doesn't happen. So I don't think any of this for granted. And I do believe that, you know, for the most part what I what I've had to say work enhance what we what we just saw. Now. Of course, we're speaking with Verne Lundquist. His new book is play by play calling the. Wildest gapes in sports from SEC football to college basketball at the master's and more. When you think about the wildest things ever in sports. It's hard not to come back to Lilla Hamburg, Norway in February nineteen ninety four and the events leading up to the ladies figure skating competition at those Winter Olympics. What was it like being a part of that? Well, I use this site side comment in speeches. I'm probably the only one in the room who knows Tonya Harding and Terry Bradshaw. Oh. Hey. Well, it all began on the waxen. The that was hurt round the world that was in January sick on January six of ninety four Nancy. Kerrigan was practicing and then just patient of competing in the US nationals in Detroit as she was leaving the practice. Right. A thug named Joe. Shame stand. Whacked her on her left knee in hopes of not in a her being injured to fix that that she couldn't compete in the Olympics. And it turns out that the wellspring of that whole. With knowledge forehand of hit which on your hardy and her ex husband who occasioned the whole thing that began the cartoon show that lasted for six weeks. And I it was extrordinary. I mean, these these two young women, Nancy Kerrigan and Tonya Harding were portrayed as contracting people, and and actually their backgrounds were not that dissimilar. I think their personalities were Tanya was the roughing up and comer from Oregon who who had had a very bad social life homelife, but Nancy's dad was a workman. He was a plumber and she grew up east of Boston. Mckay. And Daniela Brinda. Kerrigan just you know, they a middle class family. But I think CBS in particular, and I think all of us bore some responsibility. I would I would attribute that responsibility much more to the news department, then to the sports because comedy Charlie in particular was coined grandma. I don't mean to this very true at all I love her and know her well, but she grabbed this thing and ran with it, and she was helped by decisions made by by by the news up to and including the fact that she co anchored the evening news with Dan rather from the ice rink and little but the the day of the competing skaters was a Wednesday in late February and. And there was a bout what Scott Hamilton had predicted. It would be a time. You've finished eighth after the first the compulsory and Nancy. Kerrigan was in first followed by this little sprite named ex-army by you who ultimately won it. And here's my opportunity to to give an example that hype works the ratings for that night. We had a forty eight point five share, which means almost unbelievable. That was unbelievable in American. Yeah. And and the estimated the crowd the Ewing audience has been downsized, but it was then listed twenty years ago. Twenty twenty five years ago told me. Yeah. It I I was not a math major. It was listed. There may be as a hundred and twenty six million viewers now. Now, the only things I recall at that time, the only thing that had been seen by more people bigger television audience in the history of American television was the final episode of mash in since then I believe it's been surpassed only by one Super Bowl one of the patriot Super Bowls. I think you're absolutely on the Mark, and they still the non highest the highest rate of non Super Bowl ever seen by an American audience. Yeah. And the ad Tanya. Well, the the the championship I it was bizarre as well. She apparently broke her shoelace. And I think a lot of people remember that she was late getting on the ice. And she was almost a a very competition. Bootlace broke. And but all the attention became focused again on her our intent at CBS, I bring her on leather skates. Her foremen the moments get her marks and wish her well. And then concentrate, especially on the last group of six the six skaters. Well, it didn't work out that way because when Tanya asks for was granted, the re-skate because of quick malfunction, and that was just improper on the rules that threw everything out of whack all of a sudden a young lady's name Jos asianart Canada who is expecting to compete. Maybe eight minutes later, she was said get on the ice, you're up and then subsequently all the followers were affected by. So obviously, it's a it's a big part of my career. And through it. All I forged a friendship with Scott Hamilton that lasts until this day. He he's really an honor to have you on the show one of the greats of all time of the most charming and well loved people in our business Verne Lundquist new book is play by play calling the wildest games in sports from SEC football to college basketball, the masters in more Vern, thank you for being with us. Germany my honor. I enjoyed it immensely. Thank you so much. He's the sporting life on ESPN radio and the ESPN app. Our next guest is contributing writer at the New York Times magazine in the author of several previous books. His newest is the last temptation of Rick Pitino and we welcome Michael soak love to the show, Michael thanks for being back with us. Great to be with you. So last week we had the trial in federal court coming to a conclusion convictions for the three defendants. How does that fit into the narrative of your story? We know my book was really about the landscape of so-called grassroots basketball. And some of these big figures who are involved in in the scandal. Rick Pitino is certainly one of them. But not the only one, and then there was this court case and the court case involved this FBI investigation, and it was really a close call. I thought on whether these defendants were going to be found guilty because in what seemed to be some fairly convoluted. Logic. The government's case cast the universities as the quote victims. A federal crime has to have a victim. And the universities were the victims. The jury went for it. And I think that that what what that means what these guilty verdicts mean, you know, beyond possible jail time for the defendants is that the NC double A is going to have a little bit harder time turning its back and saying, well, this is just a blip as much chef you said at one point or this isn't serious. I think it was serious anyway, whether he was guilty verdicts or not, but but it gives it a little more sort of open import. I would say we're speaking with Michael Sokolov about his new book. The last temptation of Rick Pitino was story of corruption scandal and the big business of college basketball. It we've been talking about this story, obviously for a for a number of months on the air. Yes. PIN as well. And one of the challenges is details can be stunning. But the big. Picture corruption in college sports in college basketball in this case in particular is far from shocking. What are the challenges telling that story, then I think you've got break it down to what it is. And that's what I tried to do the big picture to me is the buying and selling of young athletic flesh. And that's what was going on and is going on on the college recruiting circuit. There are people who take advantage of a grey market. And the gray market is created by players being worth a lot of money in the marketplace playing in multibillion dollar college sports landscape who are not paid anything beyond the value of their scholarships. And then you've got shoe companies which operate almost as crime families on the recruiting circuit. And then all these characters on the periphery who are throwing money around because these kids are in fact worth something. And then on top of that. And this is really the new development in a mill you that is mostly African American and in a society of African American parents who are already concerned about their boys sort of being harassed or over policed by law enforcement. You've now got the FBI on the grassroots basketball circuit why because there are these tremendous inequities and kids are out there. Breaking NCWA rules, which have now been sort of cast as the rule of the rule of the land the law of the land. So it's it's a mess, frankly. And it's something that that needs to be addressed by the NC, double A C who Michael Sokolova. So you talked about NCAA rules now of the in some ways trans transformed into federal laws, but these were fraud charges were day. That's what we're talking about. So why the sudden interest? From the federal government when we know this has been going on for decades and decades, although the mechanics might have changed the specifics might have changed the involvement of shoe companies versus booster so on so forth. Why this why pick this low hanging fruit now? Well, I think that you need to see it in terms of the way law enforcement, and the FBI works and the way a lot of criminal cases, come into being almost by happenstance, the FBI or some law enforcement agency has somebody in their sights, and and in a criminal case. And that person says, whoa, wait a second. I know you wanna charge me with a crime and possibly put me in jail. But I can give you something better. And that's just simply what happened here. There was a financial manager in Pittsburgh by the name of mardi blazer who was charged with some security offenses some security crimes. And he said, you know, what stop second. I am sort of in the sports businesses. Well. And I can get you some college coaches and others in the recruiting industry. If you just let me sort of walk back into that world and put a wire on me. And that's what happened without that. They would not be this case, we FBI, of course, said yeah. Cool. We'd like to sort of get into that world, and they did. So it's time interesting that that's where this starts in a similar way to what happened with the federal involvement with the fi fa case except instead of mardi blazer was Chuck blazer except all this other stuff or in the case. And we're speaking with Michael Sokolov about his new book the last temptation of rip Patino, and when you specifically Puc Rick Pitino's name, obviously into the title, and he lost his job after this story broke after the trial last week where does he stand? And now we hear that he wants to get back into coaching in the NBA. That's a good question. And accomplish. Gated question, and Rick Pitino is a brilliant, brilliant, basketball, coach and flawed man and a and a flawed leader. So look there's probably going to be a market for Rick Pitino if he wants to coach somewhere, although whether that market would be an end as sort of second tier NC double a program, that's one possibility. Although, you know, this is the third strike against Bettino one of them was a personal sexual scandal. One of them was what in in Louisville is not a stripper gate, which is where his team or his his his basically his team at four years of of sex parties sponsored by a local escort. And in that case Patino said well that was just somebody I hired who who made that happen, and he is bad judgment with this is the same thing, you know, in this recruiting scandal. There are two assistant coaches right under Patino who seemed to be elbows deep in some of this two of them. Testimony of trial was that they open their wallets and paid cash to the father of recruit. So whether Patino has a route back into NC, double a basketball or something the NC double A would have determined. Whether he's got marketability as a pro coach where he was less successful than in the NCAA. I think that's a possibility as well. He's he's a youngest sixty five sixty six. Nobody questions is ability as a basketball coach the amazing thing about Patino is he wanted Louisville without the best players without lottery picks sometimes without first round picks. So he's a genius of a basketball coach somebody will want him to coach Micheal Sokolov is contributing writer at the New York Times magazine, his newest book is the last temptation for Patino astray of corruption scandal and the big business of college basketball. Michael thank you for joining us here in the sporting life. Thank you. Jeremy was pleasure. These these the sporting life on ESPN radio and the ESPN app. With the college basketball season upon us. We welcome to the show. One of the great coaches in the annals of the game a member for the last twelve years of the Basketball Hall of fame the only coach to win as many as eleven division one national championships. The only coach with as many as six undefeated seasons to his credit when it only GIO Auriemma. Thank you for joining us. Thank you for that introduction. Jeremy, I'm I'm even more impressed with myself now than I was before. That saying something I mean. Let's be honest GTO. You've been you've been doing this so long with so much success. What continues to drive you? You know? I asked myself that question quite frequently these days because it's harder than it's ever been it progressively harder each and every year, and I noticed this year that we don't have quite the same level of talent that we've had you know, the last five or six years, especially we don't have the experience, we don't have the debt. So each year the challenge is different. And what I see driving me now is how how to try to put this thing together to get the same results with their completely different castes than we had three years ago when we last one or national championship and. That drive is still there that that's that drivers air every day. Some of the other stuff bothers me a lot more than it used to about coaching in college. But that drive when I go to practice it. It's still there everyday. What what other stuff you talking about? You know, the to me each and every year, the NCAA stuff becomes even more ridiculous. Some of the things that you have to deal with the recruiting becomes even more outlandish. In terms of what these kids are being exposed to at a young age. A lot of the people around the kids have become unbearable in in what they think of that that the potential for those kids are and what's real so trying to cut through all that. And you know, all these kids have I quit like the players have a union now. And I was in the steelworkers union when I worked in the steel mill this union. That the players have you know, I know they don't get paid. And I know that's a problem for a lot of people including me, but I'll tell you what their work schedule what you can demand of them. They're they're union is the best union in the country. I tell you that right now, we're speaking with Gino Auriemma, uconn, women's basketball coach who's won eleven national titles that you who created the program from scratch more than thirty years ago, you know, as the preeminent coach in women's game. There's this trial going on in federal court, which has a lot to do with the things you're talking about the money in college. It's all in the men's game. What's going on in the federal trial? The Dida stuff the sneakers, the coaches accusations. Now, you know, the Pitino's in the Bill selves accusations. What do you make of what's going on in that trial? Well, I obviously, I'm I'm really good friends with a lot of men's coaches, some more friendly than others. And they'll tell you to to a man don't tell you in in the men's game that they are not surprised by anything that they hear. There isn't anything. That's come out of that trial. That would make a college coach. I think go I can't believe that, you know, forget whatever names are being involved. They may be surprised at some of the names that are being thrown around. Maybe, but they're not surprised, and I'm not either that when there's this much money involved when you when you think about the money that the NCAA makes the money that the colleges make the money that the coaches make the money that the TV networks and make their there's so much out there to potential for how much money the players are going to make when they when leave college that anytime that that's the case, you're gonna find there's people abusing the system, and you know, in ninety percent, I'm sure. Over ninety percent. Probably of all the coach's coaching men's college basketball. We're trying to do it the right way. But they're not going to be in the newspaper. It's in the media. It's the other guys stuff that we're hearing about Gino. Does it go on in the women's game? No, it can't they can't again the money. You know, that's the root of everybody. You know, when they say follow the money. There is no money women's basketball there. There is no pay day for someone to invest in a kid. Like what difference does it make? If a kid goes to Connecticut or Notre Dame or or anyplace else in women's basketball that is not going to graduate and make any more money. You know, no matter where they go to school. You know, the the return is is such that it's not worth the investment St. with Gino Auriemma, the head coach of the Yukon women's basketball team, which has had so much incredible success over the course of the last three decades, and Gino when I think about the the biggest change in sports of last quarter century. And you could go back farther than that. Really? To the advent of title nine in the early nineteen seventies the growth of women's sports, the growth of girl sports, the empowerment of the female athlete you've been central to that story when you look back at how things have grown in. How things have changed what kind of sense of pride you take in the development of women's sports in this country in particular. Well, you know, when I when I first started coaching, it was by accident on it's not something that I said out to do, you know, I didn't graduate from college. And I wanna be a a basketball coach and an certainly didn't say I wanna be a girls basketball coach in high school. But I ended up doing a favor for a friend of mine and next thing, you know, you're I am I'm coaching girls basketball, and I'm getting paid four hundred dollars for the season. You know, and it's it's almost treated as an afterthought, you know, but little by little as title nine started to take take hold around the country, you know, more and more young girls in high school were given an opportunity to play college is all of a sudden started to invest in in women's sports. And I was given an opportunity to coach fulltime at university of Virginia which didn't exist before title nine really took hold. So I'm a direct product of that of that movement. And then, you know, all the all the women that have worked on my staff that have gone on to be you know, coaches in their own, right? Teachers and everything else, you can imagine. And the fact that now we have a professional league all this has happened during my time as a woman. Basketball coach, and I feel like the university of Connecticut has been at the forefront of that. And we have been kind of the poster child for a lot of that as the media has taken on a much bigger role in promoting women's sports. And and I feel really really proud of that that we had you know, when they write the story of women's basketball, you know, one hundred years from now, they're going to say, the university of Connecticut, and I will always always be incredibly proud of that. You know, you've had so much excess. Of course. So when you don't win the championship. Can you take satisfaction out of other things that you've achieved during the course of the season that doesn't end with cutting down the nets? Well, the politically correct answer is, of course, our kids grew the right thing, we gave him a great experience. We competed really hard. There were a lot of successes along the way, and then your private time you go. Thank you for the interview. And then you go it sucks to lose in the final four. And everybody hates it players coaches fans everybody, but to be realistic. You can't win the national championship every year. Even though there's a lot of our fans, I think we should there's a lot of players on my team. I think we showed. There's our coaches think we should the real the real answer is. Yeah, you have to find other things and some years it's hard to do that. So the last two years we've lost in overtime. And and on the last shot, we lost three games. And in the last five years, all of them and overtime. My regular. My seniors have never lost a regular season game that is beyond fiction that is fairy tale and unless you take some satisfaction out of a big comeback win against Notre Dame during the regular season like huge win at South Carolina or an incredible win, you know, against a really really good Louisville team. Yeah. Unless you start to really appreciate that you're going to constantly be disappointed. I've learned listen be realistic. Put yourself in a position to win a national championship every year. But to actually think you're going to win it every year. That's ludicrous. You know, Auriemma is the head coach uconn women's basketball team in search of its twelve national title under his leadership. It's been three years. That's just unacceptable, Gino, I'm on a losing streak jerem. We're gonna have to fix that. You know? I it's always a pleasure. Thanks so much for coming on. I appreciate Jeremy I always enjoy talking to you. Thanks for having joined us, I'm Jeremy shop, and this has been the sporting life on ESPN radio. Join us next week for our second annual Veterans Day special.

basketball Rick Pitino Boston Red Sox Dan Shaughnessy Jeremy shop ESPN Gino Auriemma Boston Boston Globe patriots baseball Louisville Michael Sokolov NCAA SEC Celtics Verne Lundquist FBI
Pay For Play?

Outside the Lines

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

Pay For Play?

"We've had our struggles. We had our ups and downs. We got smacked pretty good. A couple of times you have to be kinder nicer in gentler. With today's layer when I'm really going after that passion through its that pass. I'm attack not used we play Friday night. It's been all over the news. The Bill the athlete would have to ride consent to school for through the profit off of the name, image likeness. What this is all about is for college athletes at the same economic rights. As literally everyone else you make scene where everybody has to pay. Attention EJ says you kick the I think things could have been handled differently. Everybody has social media. Everybody hasn't broadcast. So everybody knows what happen. What you see your perception of abbey sporting event. Get this. Welcome outside the lines. I'm Ryan Smith eleven time national champion coach Gino Auriemma going his twelfth joining us from the final four just moments away. But today our big story. Bad. Blood Bruin baseball thinks chippy from the outside looking in at Wednesday's Astros. Ranger's game home plate umpire round culpa. Calling. This pitch by Mike. Minor of the Rangers a strike. That's a pretty low strike rate there. Check out those pits graphics stroz dugout up in arms as culpa jaws. Right back at them. Now. Look this is baseball tensions run high. But this high check this out moments later manager, AJ Hinch and COPA at each other's throats. Now, what copay tell him. Would seem like she when you ran out Ron told you I can do whatever I want. I can do whatever I won't what were you displeased that he was doing. That's what he said. Yeah. That's what he said sets parenting. What you meant. So he's in charge. You know, obviously, it gets you you make it seen. I guess so everybody has to pay attention. But what leaks sorted out? It seemed like you were upset because he was looking into the dugout. I think things could have been handled differently. Everybody has social media. Everybody has a broadcast. So everybody knows what happened after Hinch was tossed out COPA continued his fiery behavior repeatedly jawing with Houston. Started Garrett Cole. The Astros lost the game four zip. Let's talk about this ESPN MLB insider, Jeff passan, add a little bit more context to this dust up. So Jeff, what are you hearing about this? Well, right. It's interesting when Ron culpa says, I can do whatever I want. It's in response to AJ Hinch the Astros manager saying to him. You can't look into the dugout like that and expect everybody to be quiet, and it's indicative of this. I'm not going to call it disrespect. But but it's this percolating feeling. That's been going on for years now between players and managers and unpire 's that has been exacerbated by technology. You look at the way that I'm Pires work right now every little thing that they have to do is checked in real time. And so players can go back watch video see it and say, hey, you were wrong and the Pires feel almost attacked and while I'm Pires supposed to be behind the game and invisible almost now it's almost like they're they're bringing themselves to the forefront by fighting back. So how's the manager? Like Hinch supposed to handle it. If he's got a genuine concern about the way, balls and strikes are being called. It's a difficult thing. Because the second you come out of that dugout argue, balls and strikes. Ryan you get tossed from the game. And look AJ Hinch is not somebody who's going to avoid a confrontation. That's not his style. That's not who he is. As a manager. He's been thrown out of games, plenty of times. But I think on Ron cope in this situation. It's incumbent to be able to to compose yourself and to understand that as the unpire the onus is on you to be the bigger person in this situation. That's what neutrality is about. It's not about fighting. It's not about going after guy. It's not about staring someone down not about being the biggest person in charge. It's about controlling the game the right way. And I think I think most managers recognized that everybody's gonna screw up a call every now and again, that's just part of part of the game. It's human error. But when you do it, you can't have an. Attitude about it, particularly when you're protected by the league. So could this have wider implications for baseball and the parks. Well, it's really interesting, right. Major league baseball and the empire's union or in the midst of negotiations right now on a new working agreement between the parties, and I almost wonder if some of the incidents of the last couple of years with umpires lashing out is going to lead to MLB asking for public discipline for on Pires when a manager gets kicked out of the game gets fine get suspended that is out there. If I'm Pires are going to be snapping back at the managers, if they are going to be taking their own impartiality out of things than certainly it would make sense logically for them to have the same repercussions in terms of public discipline now Ron COPA mega disciplined for this behind the scenes, but very rarely does major league baseball come out and say that publicly. I think it's a fair question to ask should that change? Wow. Could you imagine? If it did. All right, Jeff. Thank you. When's I on Williamson shoe exploded, two seconds into dukes matchup with UNC? And February that collective gasp per round the basketball world was noticed all the way in congress. Namely by Senator Chris Murphy, he's been studying the NCAA's rules against paying players since before shoe gate and now he's produced a report called madness Inc. How everyone is getting rich off college sports except the players the first in a series. Among the information, he notes the report college sports programs collected fourteen billion dollars in total revenue last year. And institutions in the power five conferences, collectively spent more on coaches salaries than they did on student aid. Let's bring in Senator Chris Murphy of Connecticut, he joins us now from the nation's capital Senator thank you so much for being with us. What is the most important thing you found from your study of college athletics? Well, I think what we found is what people have seen in front of their eyes. College sports has gotten to be gargantuan business in a short period of time in fifteen years. College sports is tripled in size. That's just the money. That comes to the Atlantic departments is now a fourteen billion dollar enterprise, not counting the money that all of the industries, the TV networks, the shoe companies make off of college sports, and it's just increasingly impossible to justify everybody getting rich off of this system. Well, the students stay poor. And so the sheer size is probably the thing that catches people's eyes. I fourteen billion dollars coming to the universities, but the second statistic and the report that gets everybody's attention is that only nineteen percent of that fourteen billion dollars is ending up in scholarships. And that's simply not enough today. It's not okay for all these other adults to get rich. Well, these kids are remaining poor and zions shoe exploding and Nike. Market value declining by a billion dollars. The next day tells you how broken the system is when a so-called amateur athlete can have that big an impact on a four profit company and had that injury. Then more serious. He would have come out with almost nothing. Have you spoken to the NCAA about this? I have I've had extensive conversations with the NCAA. They are not willing right now to budge on their vision of what a amateur college athlete is. But I think they're going to be forced to change their position. There's a growing sense of public outrage about how rich people are getting off of these kids, and there's also cases going through the court system right now that I think very rightly claim that the NCAA is a monopoly, and they're using their monopoly power to make lots of coaches, rich, lots of athletic directors, rich at the expense of the kids and federal law doesn't allow you to do that. So it may be that the courts step in here to what about congress you mentioned being forced to change with congress. Have a role somewhere in there? I mean, listen, I would much rather the NCAA do this themselves. I'm a huge sports fan of big college sports fan, but I'm not the right person to be writing a piece of legislation telling schools how much they should be compensating student athletes. My report which has gotten a lot of interest. I think is hopefully something that will propel the NCAA to move forward. There is legislation in congress right now. That's interesting. There's one piece of legislation in the house, bipartisan, Republicans and Democrats supporting it that would least let college athletes make money off their likenesses. So your jersey is being sold. Maybe you and not the jersey companies should be able to make some money off of that. That might be a good start. But I'd much rather see the NCAA make the changes themselves, but the NCAA so far has been reluctant you mentioned even in your conversations with them, they were reluctant at what point does congress step in and say, look, if they're not willing to do anything, then we have to do something on behalf of these student athletes. If you feel that way. I think that moment is coming again. And maybe the courts that pushed the NCAA to do something before congress does. But when I released this report a few days ago, I got phone calls from a conservative Republican senators who felt the same way they frankly thought that the way that the currently sets up these rules is a restraint on the free market Republicans who are big believers in the free market. You know, it doesn't make sense to them that these kids are generating all of this revenue, and they're being told that they can't share in any of it. So there may be some real opportunity for Republicans and Democrats to work together. I love to give the NCAA the rest of the year to try to start a process to come up with solutions. But if they don't then I think there are members of both parties ready to do something. Okay. So let's just talk about that point you made their giving the rest of the year. So come January, what kinds of things could be offered to get the NCAA to move. If they still say, no, we are not paying players. Well, as I said, the easiest thing to pass is a piece of legislation that allows players legs Zayn Williamson to make money off of their likeness or their image being sold that to me is an important step forward. But it's probably insufficient because the Auburn offense lineman probably isn't going to have a lot of his jersey sold, but he makes lots of money for Auburn in for the SEC and all the. Shoe and apparel companies that sell Auburn gear. So I'd love to see him get compensated as well. Okay. Senator murphy. Thank you very much. We'll be looking out for your future reports on this as well. Predate the time, okay per share it coming up. He's going for his twelve national title. You Gino Auriemma from the final four next. When it comes to hiring. You don't have time to waste you need help getting to your shortlist of qualified candidates fast. That's why you need indeed dot com post job in minutes. Set up screener questions then zero in on qualified candidates using an intuitive online dashboard. And when you need to hire fast, exceleron your results with sponsor jobs. New users can try for free at indeed dot com slash outside. That's indeed dot com slash outside. Terms, conditions, and quality standards apply outside. The lines is brought to you by corona extra. Find your beach. It's everything. Coach REM does. There's a setup it just know that if he's ever liked doing this. Oh, no. He's setting up. Setting me up to say something really mean. I know it. When I was a freshman. I threw like Bill pass and practice. I was coming down. There's someone over there. And I went. And we had a concourse that that the students would walk through just because it's cold out. They were able to cut and he was like. Well, who is on these? No, Corey looking at who are you looking at and then he looks up and he sees this candies. Like, hey, you are you looking at him. You think he's killed? Nobody get's number. Hey, you anymore likes you? You're distracting. I'm a freshman. I was like, oh, my gonna die. This is it. This is the end this is like it can't get worse than this. So anyways, he does that. Can't get worse than this here. He is right now with us eleven time national champion and matchmaker to Gino Auriemma. So so is that your play you remember that? Yeah. She say that she threw the pass away then complete the past. Yeah. If she had completed the past I want to set a word. I remember like it was yesterday. Absolutely. Is that your is this your said, go ahead? And she said it can't get any worse. It. She said it can't get any worse. And I said look back now. Yeah. Did. So is that the Tel the hands through the hair? That's when your brain starts working. That's when I feel like it's going to explode. You know? Sometimes you just gotta, you know, sometimes you just gotta find something funny. You gotta find some humor in in in finding a way to to lighten the situation. I mean, I I try to make fun of as many things as I can practice every single day because you know, what I think humor humor is degrade equalizer between tension and having fun. And you know, you just gotta find it. So now here you are final four once again seeking that twelve national championship. What's different for you this year as compared to pastures? Well, you know, every coach that comes here thinks they have the best team and can win a national championship. So each year is the same. You know, you come here you want to win a national champion. What's different this year? As I think we have a lot more question marks surrounding our team both by the players and rightly so, you know, there's a lot of things that came up during the season that we may not be equipped to handle. And that hasn't been the case a lot of years that we've come here and the road here has been much more difficult way more difficult. So I think this one we had the earn this one a low more than some previous ones. Let me ask you about college basketball the landscape in general not long ago. You were asked about the accusations. Some players are making about coach abuse that entire subject you mentioned that you think that the majority of coaches in America are afraid of their players. Why? Well, you know, hard to answer these questions because the only thing that's going to pop up as a soundbite, and you have to read the whole thing and listen to the whole thing. But. I'm in the business. So I know I see it every day. I deal with it every day. And I know what teachers are going through. I know what's going on. I'm not making stuff up, you know. And I see high school coaches and how they have to treat their players because magin at your job if every day people came and stood behind you an interpreted every single word you said how you say it the tone. What's meant by an one word comes out that they don't like your subject to lose your job. Now is it that bad not necessarily ninety nine percent of the coaches in America are passionate they love their job. They loved their kids. They do it the right way. And then you've got one percent. They don't know what they're doing. They're out of control, they mistreat kids. So because of that I think the pendulum like it always does in America goes completely the other way me I don't live in the extremes. I don't live over here. And I don't live over there. I live in the middle. And I don't think today society is in the middle. We have to be extremists. It's either all or nothing why I like to live in the middle. Well, let me ask you first. How do you as a coach coach our coaches having to have trouble finding that line between really pushing players and maybe having behavior that some people would call threatening. Yeah. You know? I remember great line. Rebecca Lobo used one time. She just got an award and say, how do you feel Rebecca you must feel like a million dollars? And she said, yeah, I do. But then tomorrow when I go to practice, I go back to being the worst post player in the market, you know, and we all laughed and everybody had a great time. Because every day, I would say Rebecca, you know, you're the worst great player I've ever coached. She knew what I meant. But at because she would do something that was really dumb that was beneath great players and beneath her. So I think sometimes coaches crossed the line between criticizing a thing that you did versus criticizing the person who's doing it. And for me, it's always been I'm attacking that pass. You just through. I'm attacking the fact that you didn't block out. I'm not I'm never attacking you. And I think sometimes coaches. Who don't know the difference cross that line, and they need to be held accountable. No question about it. And you know, how they're held accountable. A lot of times right now, they get fired or they lose they lose their. They lose their pliers. And they don't win. They don't win plain and simple, and the coaches at understand where that line is they win and they win consistently year after year after year and kids keep coming back. So what do you think they keep coming back after they graduate? What do you think needs to change to the situation, right? I don't know. I mean, you're asking a question that's really difficult to answer in this little short period of time. But. There's just too many things involved right now, you know, every coach that I talked to you know, as soon as the game is over kids goes in the locker room gets on their cell phone and caused her a coach or caused their their parents and says, I hate it here. Why? Well, the kid didn't play that night or the kid got yelled at for something that night. Well back in the day. You know, the kid had to go to their dorm weight live for an hour to use the phone. And by the time, they got on the phone. I wasn't that bad. You know? So today there's so much going on so many things going into this these kids ears. How do you change that? I don't know you don't change it. I just think you have to have a relationship with your players that starts during the recruiting process. And you have to be able to spend time with your players at practice, which is a whole nother story of how the NCAA limits. How much time we can spend what our players yet. They want us to have a great relationship with our players those things don't go to now coach we are watching you. We are wishing you luck in the final four. We know. No that your team is always on the on the forefront of everything. So so I mean your chances of winning. It's gotta be good as anyone else's and we'll be rooting for you coach. Thanks. Why appreciate it? Thanks for having me. Oh, by the way, the reason I did this. I thought I was getting a summertime supply of corona. I didn't know it was just to talk to you guys about that kind of stuff. Next time coach next. Take care. All right. You got. All right. Saturday's the one year anniversary of a bus crash that shook the world a truck driver colliding with the bus of the sketchy Juan junior Hockey League team, the Humboldt Broncos killing sixteen people and injuring thirteen others. Among those killed coach Darcy HOGAN who left an indelible impression on the team end his community. He sixty talk with those who knew him best. Two types of coaches in the world. There's types of coaches when you meet your players twenty years later that the kids are gonna run across the street because they don't wanna see you or that they're gonna run across the street 'cause they wanna see. P coach would still be a good guy. And that seems to be the kind of guy Darcy. It was referred to us as gentleman's favorite where if you is call this gentleman. He did such a great job of bringing in guys with character. Everybody else. Same thing is with their workout. That's all I think really. Really care layers. Do you want the guys that finally cared about winning hockey games cared about their brothers cared about their teammates? How's the Darcy's? Having those good guys. Call them blue guys together that he'd bring in glue guys brought the team together. Team was our whole. Our kids are familiar with the rink as they are a house. Hockey is Darcy's passion. So we kind of just embraced it as a family. He was just a good person. That's what he wanted to get his players to see understand and be a part of just to be be a good, man. And he will come along with. This Sunday on east sixty at nine AM eastern on ESPN an entire hour dedicated to the story of the Humboldt Broncos. We'll be right back. I can't believe it that Philip brought his little brother on our mission into orbit. How long until it? Got there alone. Get there. I'll get there. No. I can't believe how easy it was to save hundreds of dollars on my car insurance with Geico. What's this button? Do what's this button? Do what's this button? Do what's this? Believe at Geico could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. Sportscenter at six after PTI with sage and Kevin they're going to preview the buck. Sixers statement game for Jaanus. Plus is a panic or patient time for the Yankees and the socks and Louis Riddick rundowns. How the top picks may play out. Sportscenter at six on ESPN and the app and then tonight on ESPN an IT championship game lips come in Texas at seven pm eastern from Madison Square Garden, then it's the thirty first annual college, slam dunk three-point championship from the target center. In Minneapolis both on each streaming live on on the app so enjoyable.

NCAA Gino Auriemma AJ Hinch Pires congress baseball Senator Chris Murphy Astros Jeff passan Darcy HOGAN Ryan Smith unpire corona America Rangers Humboldt Broncos Ron
Geno Auriemma, UConn WCBB Head Coach

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

11:14 min | 1 year ago

Geno Auriemma, UConn WCBB Head Coach

"Squirrels are known for saving. But with the help of AARP, they won't be the only ones from planning to budgeting AARP is here to help you stretch your dollar further. So take on today and every day with AARP learn how at take on today dot AARP. These the sporting life on ESPN radio and the ESPN app. Here's Jeremy shop. Basketball season upon us. We welcome to the show. One of the great coaches in the annals of the game member last twelve years of the Basketball Hall of fame the only coach to win as many as eleven division one national championships. The only coach with as many as six undefeated seasons to his credit the one and only GIO Auriemma, Gino. Thank you for joining us. Thank you for that introduction. Jeremy, I'm I'm even more impressed with myself now than I was before. That's saying something I mean. Let's be honest, Gino, you've been you've been doing this so long with so much success. What continues to drive you? You know? I asked myself that question quite frequently these days 'cause it's harder than it's ever been it progressively harder each and every year, and I noticed this year that we don't have quite the same level of talent that we've had you know, the last five or six years, especially we don't have the experience, we don't have the debt. So each year the challenge is different. And what I see driving me now is how how to try to put this thing together to get the same results with their completely different cast than we had three years ago when we last one or national championship and. That drive is still there that that's that drivers air every day. Some of the other stuff bothers me a lot more than it used to about coaching in college. But that drive when I go to practice it. It's still there everyday. Well, what other stuff you talking about? You know, the to me each and every year, the NCAA stuff becomes even more ridiculous. Some of the things that you have to deal with the recruiting becomes even more outlandish. In terms of what these kids are being exposed to a young age. A lot of the people around the kids have become unbearable in in what they think of that the potential for those kids are and what's real so trying to cut through all that. And you know, all these kids have I quit like the players have a union now. And I was in the steelworkers union when I worked in the steel mill this union. That the players have you know, I know they don't get paid. And I know that's a problem for a lot of people including me, but I'll tell you what their work schedule what you can demand of them. They're their unions the union in the country. I tell you that right now, we're speaking with Gino Auriemma, uconn, women's basketball coach who's won eleven national titles that you kind who created the program from scratch more than thirty years ago, you know, as the preeminent coach in women's game. There's this trial going on in federal court, which has a lot to do with the things you're talking about the money in college. It's all in the men's game. What's going on in the federal trial? The Dida stuff the sneakers, the coaches accusations. Now, you know, Patino and the Bill selves accusations. What do you make of what's going on in that trial? Well, I obviously, I'm I'm really good friends with a lot of men's coaches, some more friendly than others. And they'll tell you to to a man go tell you in in the men's game that they are not surprised by anything that they hear. There isn't anything. That's come out of that trial. That would make a college coach. I think go I can't believe that, you know, forget whatever names are being involved. They may be surprised at some of the names that are being thrown around. Maybe, but they're not surprised, and I'm not either that when there's this much money involved when you when you think about the money that the NCAA makes the money that the colleges make the money that the coaches make the money that the TV networks and make there's so much out there to potential for how much money the players are gonna make when they. When they leave college that anytime, that's the case you're gonna find that there's people abusing the system, and you know, ninety percent, I'm sure over ninety percent, probably of all the coach's coaching men's college basketball or trying to do it the right way, but they're not going to be in the newspaper. It's in the media. It's the other guys the stuff that we're hearing about Gino does go on in the women's game. No, it can't they can't again the money. You know, that's the root of everybody. You know, when they say follow the money. There is no money wins basketball there. There is no pay day for someone to invest in a kid. Like what difference? Does it? Make a kid goes to Connecticut or Notre Dame or or anyplace else in women's basketball that kids not going to graduate and make any more money. You know, no matter where they go to school. You know, the the return is is such that it's not worth the investment. We're speaking with Gino Auriemma, the head coach of the Yukon women's basketball team, which has had so much incredible success over the course of the last three decades, and Gino when I think about the the biggest change in sports of last quarter century, and you could go back farther than that. Really? The advent of title nine in the early nineteen seventies the growth of women's sports, the growth of girl sports, the empowerment of. Of the female athlete you've been central to that story when you look back at how things have grown in. How things have changed what kind of sense of pride you take in the development of women's sports in this country in particular. Well, you know, when I when I first started coaching it was by accident. You know, and it's not something that I said out to do, you know, I didn't graduate from college and go, you know, I wanna be a a basketball coach and an certainly been say, I wanna be a girls basketball coach in high school, but I ended up doing a favor for a friend of mine and next thing, you know, you're I am I'm coaching girls basketball, and I'm getting paid four hundred dollars for the season. You know, and it's it's almost treated as an afterthought, you know, but little by little as title nine started to take take hold around the country, you know, more and more young girls in high school were given an opportunity to play colleges all of a sudden started to invest in in women's sports. And I was given an opportunity to coach full-time at university of Virginia which didn't exist before title nine really took hold. So I'm a direct product of that of that movement. And then, you know, all the all the women that have worked on my staff that have gone on to be you know, coaches in their own, right? Teachers and everything else, you can imagine. And the fact that now we have a professional league all this has happened during my time as a woman. Basketball coach, and I feel like the university of Connecticut has been at the forefront of that. And we have been kind of the poster child for a lot of that as the media has taken on a much bigger role in promoting women's sports. And and I feel really really proud of that that we had you know, when they write the story of women's basketball, you know, one hundred years from now, they're going to say, the university of Connecticut, and I will always always be incredibly proud of that. Do you know you've had so much excess? Of course. So when you don't win the championship. Can you take satisfaction out of other things that you've achieved during the course of the season that doesn't end with cutting down the nets? Well, the politically correct answer is, of course, our kids grew. The right things. We gave them a great experience. We competed really hard. There were a lot of successes along the way, and then your private time you go. Thank you for the interview. And then you go it sucks losing the final four and everybody hates it players coaches fans everybody, but to be realistic. You can't win the national championship every year. Even though there's a lot of our fans, I think we should there's a lot of players on my team. I think we showed. There's our coaches think we should the real the real answer is. Yeah, you have to find other things and some years it's hard to do that. So the last two years we've lost in overtime. And on the last shot, we lost three games. And in the last five years, all of them and overtime. My regular. My seniors have never lost a regular season game that is beyond fiction that is fairy tale and. Unless you take some satisfaction out of a big comeback win against Notre Dame during the regular season, a huge win at South Carolina or an incredible win against a really really good Louisville team. Unless you start to really appreciate that you're going to constantly disappointed. So I've learned listen being realistic. Yeah. Put yourself in a position to win winning Astra champships every year. But actually think you're going to win it every year. That's ludicrous. He no Auriemma is the head coach uconn women's basketball team in search of its twelve national title under his leadership. It's been three years. That's just unacceptable, Gino, I wanna losing streak. Jeremy we're gonna have to fix that. No. It's always a pleasure. Thanks so much for coming on. I appreciate Jeremy I always enjoyed talking to you. I'm Jeremy shop, and you can listen to new additions of the sporting life every Saturday and Sunday morning on ESPN radio and ESPN app beginning at six AM eastern time.

Gino Auriemma basketball AARP Jeremy shop Basketball Hall of fame ESPN NCAA GIO Auriemma university of Connecticut steelworkers union university of Virginia Connecticut Louisville South Carolina Patino nets Bill ninety percent
Chiney Ogwumike

The Woj Pod

49:48 min | 1 year ago

Chiney Ogwumike

"Hey, everyone. Welcome in to another edition of the wochit pod. My guest today. Chennai Gumi K WNBA star with the Connecticut. Sun all American at Stanford and an analyst an NBA analyst for ESPN. We talk a lot of NBA a lot of warriors. And we talk about the pending collective bargaining agreement. Facing the WNBA great. Visit great talk about hoops with one of my favorites. Here's my visit which k. Here with Chanel Gumi K WNBA star with the Connecticut. Sun ESPN NBA analysts you have four or five other jobs to write what am I missing W N B vice president job, that's true. That's a job as a big job right now. Thanks for having me. We'll tonight. It's great to finally have you here on the pod we're going to get to the WNBA CBA. But I want to start with the warriors and what's gone on here in this last week. And it's been what everybody's been waiting for with Golden State, which is and I think it's funny. Bob myers. He has said it, certainly privately, and he said it publicly the other day, he said, this is not a perfect place. And I know some people thought it was or think it is it isn't. And it reminds me of and Steve Kerr looted to this today in San Antonio all those years where people thought it was this. Utopia and that they didn't have controversies they didn't have issues in the locker room. And no they did. But what they had was Tim Duncan to police it all and it's not the coach. It's almost never the coach. It's not great Popovich. And it's not Steve Kerr when they had issues in San Antonio. They would always tell you Tim Duncan took care of them in the locker room. They never got out. They most never got in the media. This one would drain on green and Kevin Durant. It got out because it happened in front of twenty thousand people national TV audience. But I I just think it's a reminder that it is fragile. It is hard to keep a team going. It is hard to keep even when everybody has the best intentions and has the talent they have it's still really hard to do. This people forget that athletes are together twenty four seven and during the course of a long season like the NBA you're together for most of. The year year rehabbing practicing, you're playing games, you're traveling. It's a lot. It's a lie. I know this from my experience playing the WNBA also playing overseas doing that twenty four seven, but I think you hit on a really interesting point. Tim Duncan was the diffuser. He was the president. He was the politician. He was the handler of all he was like EON, LA fix my life. Right. People would come to him, and he would fix their lives and keep them positive and protecting the issue here is that for so long. I feel like everyone believes Draymond green was the heart and soul of the warriors. And he was the vocal leader. He was on the floor on the court leader making all the small plays that happened. But when he's in the center of an altercation a controversy who do you turn to staff wasn't on the court, and he's sort of like the ultimate peacemaker, but he's also Stephan Claire kind of feel like in this situation out of it. And when you have these type of altercations between Katie injury mon- who's checking both of them. And I feel like it has to be stuff because at the end of the day from day one this is Steph team, right? And I think that's why they brought him on the road. Even though he's out for ten days or so his value in being. There and being the guy kind of guy that we all know him to be the uplift or is going to help. But yeah, the big issue for me is Draymond was a heart and soul, quote, unquote, the vocal leader of the team. And when that person is caught up in something who's going to emerge in settle things. And there's no Tim Duncan here. Right. Yeah. And I think to the one thing about Steph curry and Klay Thompson and somebody in Golden State made this point to me. And I thought it was really good. They grew up in the NBA. They grew up around the NBA they've been in NBA locker rooms or whole life, and they become I think a little more. So than some other guys there little desensitized to you know, the stuff that goes on around it. The the noise pettiness that might be going on or the gossiping and a locker room or the, you know, some dust up that might last or two or three weeks between two guys over and on top of that that's not their personality as human. That's that's exactly right. And so, but the one thing with those two and people say have seen this come out in the last several days, they're not going to pay attention to any of it. They don't get involved in any of their sometimes very oblivious to it even going on around them. But if somebody gets in the way of winning if something gets in the way of winning that's where you're going to hear from Steph curry, and that's where you're gonna hear from Klay Thompson, Andre with dollar is a player with the been described to me the two other players who have the. Stature even have an opinion about this in a locker more to have a voice Andrea dollars, Shaun Livingston. Yeah. Restricted voice and Andres, obviously been a great player for them. Shawn's respected veteran player. And so the fact that those two it was gonna make it harder for this derail this team. Because of certainly it's got the tension of Steph, and clay, but this is something that like because they just care about winning. And they've shown that in the end that's really would drain on cares about like Draymond will cross the line. He'll dance over it. Then like he's going to come back which we saw because that's who he is. That's what he said yesterday pre-game because that pre-game that was a lot of restraint for Draymond green. Because I know what I sure know him. Well, there was a lot. He wanted to say, and he was dying to and he may yet say again, but he knew that wasn't a day to do it. So I I met Draymond green. When I was playing on the World University Games. And this was a crash. Course in getting to know everyone because when you play in represent the country for USA and World University Games you train for a month in Colorado Springs, and you go and compete for a month, and we were in China. And so we were there my sister. And I my sister also plays in the WNBA and a whole bunch of top players on both ends. We were there. We got to know a lot of these guys and Draymond was one hundred percent consistent. He's a same dream on. You saw there when we were went twenty twenty one to the same dream on you see right now, and he will cross that line, and he will challenge you. But it all comes to me from a place of loyalty. And in this instance, I feel like if Draymond sent some sort of weakness, he will attack that that's right. And that's what he does. And he does it to a fault. And I think for him and he's going to go to your most. We all have a friend. He's a professional at right? I mean, he's going to go from zero to one hundred say, hey, your shoes on Thai. Hey, I've always hated you. Where the soul her. That's right. And his, and that's what he did in that moment. He did. And I think he's able to walk it back for me. Knowing him for him to actually come out and say, hey, we're moving forward. That is a big gesture that's a big gesture for Katie to after that sort of. I'm not talking about it after. Feel like it regressed the whole momentum of the locker room us getting better. And I was watching the game against the rockets and the huge blowout. And everyone's talking about how great it is for the rockets, and how bad it is for the warriors. But there was a key moment in the third quarter. And I always bring this up where Draymond was pushing in transition. He lost the ball turn it over. I think it was a Kerry Katie was the recipient supposedly like he was supposed to be very similar incident to what caused this whole drama, right? But right after they dapper each other, and they kept moving forward and even running back in transition, Katie said, that's my dream on said, that's my fault. Oh, wow. And I keep saying that's the real love language of athletes right there. But no one I don't know it's reading into one play one situation. But I do think that there's there's going to be hope. But again, this is something that is not a short term issue as you mentioned when it comes to winning because everyone cares about winning. They need to find a way back on the winning path especially without Steph. But long-term these are the things that are like elephants in the room the stuff that stays in the back of your heads that when you do make it in long term as a player like am. I good enough. Am I happy? And I don't like that. They've created the scenario that is just ballooned out of control that we can point back to and say, this is why you remember this. Yeah. And I think for Draymond his path to becoming an all star in the league in his mind. He's always going to be the second round pick. He's going to be the guy that everybody passed on. He's going to be the guy who stayed in college for years, which is treated like your failure. In college basketball back for your senior year. It means you're not a prospect. That's how it's viewed not always certainly true. And he proved that and so I think he's extra sensitive to hey, I've earned my way into this echelon. And I know I'm not Kevin Durant. And I know I'm not Steph curry because in the end people mostly value scoring for everything. Draymond. Does this game sport mostly values true? And so that's a different echelon. But he does something that's so unique. And he is shown what it's value is in winning in. It's had a huge impact and building the identity that the identity is a really good offensive team. They've been through this era his largely been built through him and his identity, and so all those things. And so in that moment where he felt like Kevin Durant was treating them like a scrub was treating them like a rookie. That's the extra layer of him going at Kevin. And you see that's probably why he's appealing the suspension because it's sort of like Golden State made a decision. Hey, we're gonna penalize our day. One for our new guy who we don't even know what his decision is in the term and to drain on that probably seems offensive, but it's also a pretty chunk of change because I feel like it was it was over a hundred grand. So I would appeal thousand but here's also the thing too. Like they. Don't have to take that fine. They can do this suspension. And no one will ever know if they find him like it can be between the team and drain. Exactly. So yes, they suspended them. And yes, the hundred twenty thousand comes with it. But it's not a league suspension where the money just gets taken out the team, it's different. And so the come Colletti can treat it differently now. They may I think two and people are looking and there's no question, I think Golden State new at the optics would be we picked Kevin Durant over Draymond. Yes. But that's a Suming that if this had happened between Draymond and Dala that the organization might not have done the same thing. Draymond and Shaun Livingston. I think it was because it was on the court, and it was in public, and it was for everybody to see it would have been treated differently. If it was somewhere else. But I think they made it termination he said things you just can't say we don't want anybody saying to anybody here. And the one thing to people talk about is it will dream on. Does this all the time? He's always going off on. And I think the people are under say, no, he's not not the only other comparison than anybody. That would make to was the Steve Kerr in the locker room and Oklahoma City which looking back, maybe they should have suspended. Maybe they should have doing that. With your coach in front of everybody. The difference was in that moment. The coach is going to be like I wanna move us with my player. I don't want him to think I'm responsible from getting suspended. What we probably don't know. Fully yet is if Kevin had gone, if Kevin Durant had gone back to them in the aftermath of this and said guys if you suspend drain on I'm gonna take more crap for this. It's gonna look like I wanted this. I don't want that on me don't suspend them because it's going to create what's been created. I don't know if Kevin went to them, and I don't know Kevin gave them even an opinion about that. But I do wonder if Kevin said absolutely positively do not suspend them and Monday night in the press conference when they asked about suspension Kevin could have said, hey, I wasn't for this. Or I wish they didn't do it. He didn't say any of that. And. Everyone tends to sometimes blame the media. Like, why are we asking these questions provoking, these athletes as an athlete and a member of the media? I understand now the struggle right because you have a responsibility to continue reporting on something and getting information and players can obviously be that up. Right. But I feel like at the end of the day, the onus is on the athlete. So if you want the storyline to contune, you don't say anything at all like you have the ability to straight up shut it down and really move your locker room forward. But we didn't really get that from Kevin. But I hope that we get that soon. Yeah. It's it's the rest of the fascinated by this. And of course, the question like you get from everybody like is this real? And I think people now have seen. I think in the first day when we reported the store that morning. A lot of what I got was was this real isn't something that just happens all the time in like, you know, Marc spears, and I knew that day. When report like I hear things in locker rooms, we all do very often. And you have to be able to differentiate what's just normal. Yes. Like couple people going at it in practice that doesn't have any. There's no consequences or infiltrations of it. That happens all the time. We could write about it almost every day. I've seen you having to make these decisions vote. I remember when Spurs the issues were happening with coli, and you were back and forth. Trying to make sure you follow the fine line. But I agree. I completely agree. Because this could be a legitimate crack in the foundation, this could be incident that you can point to and say in the future. This is why this happened. There was a genuine beef between players that was not solved throughout the course of the fact that the team had to they were meeting about it. They were talking with the players they were going through it. There was a possibility for punishment said. Well, it's a story now Sewri. Yeah. Because they're treating it that seriously, they they're not just dismissing this, and and obviously they suspended, and this this does happen at this level. Now, there's a huge magnitude when you're the Golden State Warriors. And there was little magnitude when my team the Connecticut sun had an. Altercation. We had a real like I'm talking about real real altercation on our team this year, and they talk to each player, they evaluated. We went one in three on the road. We won by game winner. So this was acting our locker room and at the end we decided to trade away player because it couldn't get solved. We still want were still professionals. But at the end of the day, you know, these things do happen, and they have serious consequences. We lost the player to altercation that happened. So for me when I'm watching this happen. I was like, you know, what these things can build and boil over and create some kind of resentment, but at the end of the day after like, the warriors, there's there's still the warriors you're still going to figure things out there still going to turn it on when it comes to margin of error that nobody else has they don't have to be at their best to win. And if anyone's going to beat them they're going to have to be at their very best than they can quarters. They can be less than their best to get through series. True when they beat Houston last year and seven games like you felt like they were not at their best. They weren't nearly at their best and still even with Chris paulie still were messing around and game sub. So true. It was really. A dangerous. I mean think how different all could if they don't get out of that game seven does Durant. Even stay gets. There's always these even the series with the Spurs when Kawai went down like they weren't playing their best. I think this first game win or something. And they were up to us to be nice. Today's episode of the pod is brought to you by policy genius life insurance isn't the most enjoyable thing to think about of course, most people don't like thinking about dying. But actually having life insurance is a really good feeling. It's nice to know that if anything were to happen to you, your family won't have to start a gofundme. Meet the stay afloat. 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So you never miss a second of the action create the ultimate entertainment system when you pair beam with a sub and to Sonos ones for truly immersive surround sound for me the ability to watch multiple games. Listen do it in every room. It's perfect Sonos. Speakers are easy to sit up. But if you don't wanna bother will send someone to do it for you. If. If you live in any major metropolitan area up and running we'll have a Sonos expert deliver and set up your system, and we'll do it absolutely free. Just order from Sonos dot com and select up and running at checkout. If you qualify. Let me ask you this Chenevey about teams and talking, and I hear this a lot from coaches, and I imagine it's probably true in the women's game too. It used to be when players were on the bus and in the locker room and on planes and in airports, like everyone was talking you talked. You talked people got to know each other you talk through issues, and now we're in a world where everyone just you know, they have their iphone. They have their music. They have their ear buds in. They have and coaches will notice like on the bus who've been in different eras of how like they don't hear as much anymore guy's talking basketball talking through things it's just everybody is often their own separate world. And that communications not what it once was do you see that one hundred percent. I think on teams people always say people have their people. So you have one or two people that are your people that help you through situations, you go to you turn to, but it's not necessarily those good old days when we were all starting to play a you. And I always and I'm like this bigger conspiracy theorist, but I think it's actually more factual. In the sense that technology has changed the game on crazy level young players when I started playing basketball, and I'm not like too old. But what I learned from my coach. So I go to practice three days a week. My coach would teach me the moves. We weren't watching YouTube now young kids are watching YouTube. So they don't need those intermediate intermediaries the coaches to teach them the game. They can watch stuff. You know, they come watch clay. They can watch LeBron. They can go to to'real they have so many programs where technology's there that's where you learn the game. Right. You're moving a lot of strings that are have been so involved with communication respect for the game with coaches with individuals and stuff. Why does my teammate needed show me how they learned how to dribble I can learn it by myself, that's technology on the most basic level that has affected, you know, the new nature of the game. So when it comes to these situations, it's true when you have a team, and there's a player they can be isolated. They could go to practice do their thing be gone. And if there's an issue. Maybe you don't even deal with it. Because that's just not what we do anymore. We're not interacting much even though we're together lie. You don't into basketball really should be is the ultimate it's a team game. And you need there's nowhere you play offense and defense. You can't there's no designated hitter. There's nowhere to hide if you can't defend your position. Can't you can't run and put you in a position baseball, whatever. Yup. Everything's built around individual workouts, and everyone's got an individual workout coach and everything. Yes. Isolated in the silo like, and I would say it with my son would travel bask like they would all do their individual workout. They'd get on the gun, and they would do all that stuff. But like is anybody gonna go play five on five, right? Like because that's where you can. But but you learn you learn whether it's five on five and we've kind of been through a lot. But, but it's I think it's harder than ever to sell in buying do in pitch the team. Yeah. I completely agree. And it's funny. And there's. Okay. The con is your communication is lacking. Because of our own world our own technology our own brands that were considered about right? We're considering constantly. But the pros is we're seeing athletes do things we never seen before with scoring with the evolution best benefactors bene- benefits percent. That's the main benefit. But the the con is that on teams it's not necessarily all about the team like year focused on your own individual work, and growth and development more. So, but that's what's the beauty of the warriors for so long. They've been perfect. They've had high level skill in high level team come rotary. But now that dynamic has sort of changed for a moment. What's the best team dynamic that you've ever been a part of in basketball? What was the best team dynamic the best team dynamic half to be? I guess when I was at Stanford went to three final fours played with my big SIS. And my first coach was my big SIS. We have a hall of fame. Coach end of your amazing to this day. She'll say that Neka was my first coach because when I came in as a freshman, my older sister was two years older than me neck and neck a dog me. She wanted me to play so bad. She wanted us. Have these memories of playing together? She was all me. And I really am grateful for that. Because we had to amazing years in which you know, we sort of redefined, I guess you can say what it was to be a Stanford soon athle- like being a nerd, but also being cool and swag. And again, this was a time at Stanford when our athlete athletics was popping Andrew luck. Number one in the NFL. We had storm. We who has I think it was a fifth year senior senior Doug Baldwin. So football was going Mark appel what number one to the Moby my sister. When number one the WNBA we had a girl named Ashley Hansen that went number one in softball. So this was his prime piece period. Stanford. We're like every single person whatever they're doing the best that like the best piano the best. They're the best science student is they're the best future physicist. Is there is everybody? Yeah. As athletes we feel like we're doing nothing. So I could mention Richard Sherman. My sister, Mark appel, the best of the best athletes, and we feel like we are not doing anything major. I remember when I went to my freshman dorm the first night it was there. I heard a door slamming. You know, me I'm sure because it's I make sure everything's good pop. My head out, and I see one of my dorm mates in a suit. And this was probably two am heading to go to a conference call with China with China because he has a company and he had to make sure he'd misses meeting. I was like this is a freshman. I was like, oh, I got my game about here. Don't so funny. I always say like only did was put up on a basket while everyone at Stanford was out here changing the world, but I think as athletes energies contagious. So we use our platforms and unique ways and we use our voices. But yeah, we're part of this like commodity, and I think it's a special thing. Because when you that's where learn honestly that what you do on the court is great. But what you do off the court is what really matters and as a team off the court at Stanford a women's basketball team, we were very tight, and we were bound to the community doing a lot of community work. And we went through some things back in the day where they didn't check. How many? So that was a special year for me, my freshman and sophomore year, we got to play with my sister. We went to two final fours lost to uconn up and somebody Texas AM. I don't know if you guys remember that we lost on a buzzer. That's when a when their championship. So those were special years for me because I always talk about basketball with my sister. Because basketball has always been a family thing for us. We started together we went through it together. We will horrible together when championship in Houston state title there, and then went to Stanford together. So basketball's all about family. So Stanford really was the first real family setting. I had on the court where I treated everyone like my sister. And we went through it. And it it set us up pretty, well, you know, to be prepared for the next level, you visited Yukon when you were in high school, and I imagine you probably never thought. Well, I'm never going to be in Connecticut. My God how you drafted you play for the sun. So you're here you're and of course, he SPN you're here is a fulltime analyst now even during the season. I saw you. All star weekend, which is in the middle. No. It was Vegas summer league. Yes. It was in the middle of your season. Yeah. I see you in the gym. And all hey, what's up, and I'm going what are you doing here? Like, aren't you a west coast trip ere like do something funny? That was the middle of our trip. We had our team altercation. So it was like really crazy because that's when we went one in three. But yeah, we played the Phoenix mercury of the day. Previous. I took an early five AM flight to make it to summer league to do. The jump was so much fun. Then I went to video and then practice, and then we played Vegas the day after all playing in Vegas. So it makes sense. But it was this little on a nation. I know, but you can't. So now, you're here all the time because you're in Bristol, your your team think about that like how V here? But like, no one says noted, you know, REM. I mean, I really wonder what the percentage of right of young women who visit Yukon if you go on that visit I'm one can't imagine. There's very many who said, no, I'm going some. Somewhere else? So the funny thing is that was my one visit that my parents didn't make because they're working. And so I go to uconn by myself, Stephanie Dawson's, there be a Hartley's their believe clean. Mosquito. Lewis is there and these are all top women's basketball recruits. And so I'm on this amazing trip. Tina Charles is my host having a great time. And so the final thing that coached, you know, does is before you leave before everyone's flights out like he blocks out a little our, and so we all up so it's staff brea Kalina me sitting against the wall. One by one Steph walks in a couple of minutes later, she walks out smiling parent tucking she's coming. Clean. It goes in there walks in oh, walks out. Yeah. You know smile hugging. Okay. She's going in. I'm starting to sweat because I can't make any decision by myself without my parents. I've got at least at this point your sister's at Stanford. Yes, stanford. So I went to Stanford. I went to Notre Dame and uconn was my final visit. And then finally might turn comes up, and I go in there and he sitting his office in his desk like it's almost presidential huge desk. Huge the, you know, not so big of a man, but he's got a big legacy. And then all the trophies behind him just domineering and I sit down and like oh snap door closes. So are you coming? Oh my God. I don't see. How do I say? No. How do I say? No, why still did. I can't my parents. I can't make a decision. It was the hardest thing that really sore you coming. Yeah. That's it those straight. So are you coming? And I was like that's it just one line. And I feel like you understand the power, you know, you have this opportunity, and he what he's you're staring at the trophies and the championships, and you can be a part of that. And so how do you not say? Yes. Well, I just blame. My parents. I'm like man, I can't do this. I can't take a phone. Call eight mom. I'd made this decision by myself. Myself, but he's still Greg. I gravitated toward his personality. We sort of like, you know, confident edgy type of people into the sad. Not too long ago on campus. He's real supportive. He comes to our Connecticut sun gays, but I know in the back of my mind, I'm like, yeah. That was revived. I went through the horn, isn't is your personality is a lot more like gino's than it is Tara VanDerveer for sure. But when you pick if you were just picking just an absolute pure, just I'm just going for the basketball experience, you probably it's not an is one of the great ever, and others might view it differently. If it was just the pure basketball experience, you'd probably go you've to you. But when you pick Stanford, you're picking something a your time investment and to this day like I don't regret it. I wish we wanted to champion. Advisor was essentially, Dr Condoleeza Rice, like those are the things that happen. I know you let me to it. So it's funny on my official. Visit I went, and it was like the most lit nerdy weekend ever. So we had chief Justice John Roberts, Dan, Dr Condoleeza Rice there like there's a huge football game. So if you're a nerd your heaven something how they finesse for me to go meet with chief Justice, Dr rise that was great. So I- commit go to Stanford and my freshman year, I don't expect Dr rice remember my name, or who I am because she's a huge ambassador. She we beat uconn huge game. My my job was to guard my more that whole game. I remember that was my one assignment as a freshman. And I was like everyone's like, you know, what to pay. She uses more. Don't you stuck on her? And it was a huge one of the signature wins in the history of mass while so much fun. And after Dr rice, she comes to every sporting event, people know that she's also on the college football playoff committee. She's also helping spearhead, you know, all the issues with the corruption in the NCAA with basketball. She's one of those great minds. She's a huge fan. Fan. I great golfer, by the way, every time we woke up and did weights. She was in there doing waits for her gall swing like five AM in the morning. She's she's a whole 'nother level, but she comes the locker and congratulates us. And I'm like just sitting there like she's back. Like, it's amazing. And she stops on her way out today. I was like oh snaps. You remember my name? Didn't you say you're interested in politics? Remember when you're here on the visit you should come by and stop exit. We can talk about it. I was like say, no more. So the next day had called her office and within the that week. I had a meeting with her. And it's so amazing. What you go to the Hoover institute, which is the primary conservative institute at Stanford. Go one office, and there's another office in this office, which looks again like another presidential office met with her amazing meeting. She inspired me to international relations as major she gave me the confidence to finally speak up in class because despite playing on in front of millions of people going to Stanford, you know, again, we're athletes, and we sometimes think, oh what why are we here? Granted we all are here for. A great reason, and we are capable, but you know, I was a little shy at give answers and class. And she gave me the confidence to do that. She gave me the confidence to go study abroad in the middle of my prime time in college which was like a taboo, then to leave school for eight weeks when you're supposed to train twenty four seven. I'm yeah. So she's been a great influence. Today's episode of the woods pod is brought to you by quip one of the most important things we do for our health. Every day is brushing our teeth yet. Most of us don't do it. Properly. Quip is a better electric toothbrush. 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And there was a basketball game on the students were jumping so hard that the camera was shaking, and I thought man if I could be a part of that that would make me feel really good. What happens on the field tells one story what happens off? Gotham Chopra from religion of sports available. Now, why sports matter on apple podcast radio dot com or wherever you get your shows. I mean, just in this midterm election cycle. We have seen a breakthrough for women candidates at all levels. Yes. Is that in your future? Oh my gosh. That's like going from zero to one hundred I just live in the present. And I love ESPN, and I love sharing my new company Hines like so to be here today. I had no clue that I would end up working fulltime for ESPN being in the WB even going back to when we we never like my sisters. And I we never start out basketball things have just happened. I got injured twice. I don't know. If I've told you ever my specific injuries. I had right knee microfracture surgery and left achilles injury. So I get to the league have great rookie year. Go overseas Italy, and I have microphones sure I have to have microfracture surgery comeback rehab for a whole year and a half and then I play again comeback season. Great go to China, and injure my Killys and I injured my. Chilies in a foreign country by myself on the road. But because of my first injury in I got a super African mom like that like superhero, mom, she called all the doctors up and within. I would say fifty fifty six hours. I was back from China in the states on the operating table already dining hills. So I've had these crazy incidents in which I've realized that like basketball's not forever, and in the interim because Australia to connect it son ESPN's in the backyard opportunities came up, and I've just really I think my whole thing is there are a lot of people who have preconceived notions about the WNBA. And no matter what we say we can't we can't win those guys over and hopefully we will. But our game stance. You know for itself for people that doubt it or even I bet you if there's listeners that were like, oh WNBA player talking. That's the things we deal with twenty four seven like I love the game of basketball. I love the NBA, and I know the game because I played the game since I was ten played a high level draft number one. But people. Care about that type of stuff. The reason why I am here like working with ESPN insuring my voice. So that people can understand that we have value as women. Right. Just because I am not in the NBA doesn't mean I can't speak on it. And I feel like this is an issue that a lot of women have throughout industry. Right. And as you mentioned the midterms. I think women are starting to claim their voices. Right. And it doesn't come easy. Like every day. There'll be some kind of shade on my post. You know, you saw this firsthand the daily comet tweet that I put out and it was I saw the tweet. And I said, I don't think I wanna look at the comments. I know. But we're so used to it. But I actually surprised because it was like fifty fifty people like, hey, I'm here for this. Tune into w the daily, meanwhile, the other fifty were just being ignorant, but it's fine. You don't have to care about the WNBA, but please at least respect craft. We're the best women's basketball league in the entire world. If you come to a game, you get that. But people speak on our game without even knowing it. And I feel like me having this great opportunity ESPN to share my voice can hopefully open people's minds understand that. Hey, she does bring something to the table. That is valid and maybe these WNBA players, you know, I can understand in follow in support and watch their game because she's hopefully bringing light to that as well. So when you ask me, what am I doing the man, I don't know? I don't know. But I've just been following shooting. Does the idea of public office? I don't mean during your career, you can only I don't think you can if there's anyone who could run for political office work for US PIN kit. Playing the NBA and do the jump on their off day. It's you, but you've been around it you've been around people at the highest levels and public service year round it's year. And does the idea down the road someday? Could you imagine intriguing you? You know, I don't know what the future holds. And this is what I'd do. I follow myself and my passion. So I am Nigerian American I am a female. I'm an athlete and whatever's true to me, I just pursue. And funny thing is that now, you know, being Nigerian American female athlete manifest itself in two WNBA player that speed, you know, that's NBA like everything that I do speaks to who. I am. So I don't know if the opportunity presents itself later down, maybe. But at this point, I'm good love. Enjoy the WNBA the collective bargaining agreement is going to be reopened the WNBA players association. You're on the executive committee. Your sister is the president. Yes. You guys want to go back in with the league and look at the salary structure. And you know, it's been talked about for years. Yeah. The paternity in the Goshi to do it. What's been the? The thought in the league about listen, you know, at times, there's it's taken a while to figure out getting franchises in the right markets places that support women's ask. Well, I think initially there was a lot of WNBA. Well, we haven't NBA team. We're going to have a WNBA team, and it may not have fit, and then you realize well where I thought the league really kind of took off was when you went away from just having NBA markets and say, okay, you know, what there is great interest in women's basketball absolute. So we're going to put a team because this is a fan base that is used and appreciates and supports women's basket. You can say the same Vegas and the culture and the sports betting world. Now like having team there is valuable to prove that you can't have sports in Vegas. It will not be an easy fight for you guys. Not on this one because they're going to say, whether they opened the books books, they're going gonna go. Hey, you know, we've absorbed a lot of losses to keep the league going to grow at the thrive. I'm sure there's probably teams making I don't but. I think it's more of a I was we're on the jump and STAN Gundy set it, and we were talking about it. And I thought stands point was maybe more. This is much a moral issue. Absolutely. The league makes tremendous amount of money. They can afford to. I think you guys would like salaries that would allow you not to have to go overseas in the off season. Be able to stay here to help further build fan bases in communities instead of everybody having to everyone's gonna go to Europe or Russia or China to go play others can stay and also worked to grow the game in those marketplaces, right? Everyone else after escape when the season ends. Yeah. And you know, I'm just going to be candidates. We've talked around so much, and I'm just tired of talking around things when it comes to our CVA and the issues that WB players face a lot of people say that. Okay. When all you is care about is increasing your salary. We're like, no, we don't we want to enhance player experience. Now, there's certain issues that I find problematic like, for instance, we know where? Are the best women's basketball league in the world people that come to our games and watch like dang these women's these women ball, and it's great. But there's again a lot of people that speak on our league without even knowing it. Right. So it hurts our value to also have the league whenever it comes to these discussions and negotiations. Whatever it is the first thing that they say is we've incurred losses we've been investing. We're trying to do better. How you going to sell a product. When all you want to talk about is how much this product is losing. Let's talk about how much product is gaining the WNBA actually operates in profit. Right. We do generate profits at a league level. That's true. We do receive. I believe twenty five million from ESPN. That's great that helps with those losses that you wanna talk about so much, right? And also are streaming numbers up. Our merchandising is up sixty six percent our revenue is increasing as well. Right. So there's so many great positive indicate. Tres whether it's streaming revenue. However, it is that our game is advancing. But the players we sort of stay and remain the same. Our salaries remain the same no matter how this league is growing to us. That's a little problematic. And when you look at the NBA players, they know exactly what their value is. Okay. What's your revenue share around? What is it? Fifty fifty percent forty nine. Yes. When when WNBA players are playing twenty four seven overseas, and we have issues we're like what what's our value? We can't even tell you. Specifically, what our value is? That's a problem as well. So there's so many things that you know, we are so proud like the reason why Debbie players playing the WB is not because of the money, and we're fortunate to get paid to do what we love is because we're twenty three years in and we've never folded, we're the only women's league has never folded, and that's largely at the hands of the NBA, which we are extremely grateful for but for us. It's like we're looking okay, we have to push to make sure that the business is run the same way that the NBA's run if the NBA after twenty three years had incr-. Mental growth exponential growth. How are we going to force our exponential growth? We're going to hold the league accountable for making sure each and every franchises value is as high as it can be just like the NBA's at this point. And I think that's why people always talk about the numbers. We gave you the numbers. We didn't give you the numbers. Well, let's just be real. Okay. What are these numbers that? We can make sure every franchises maximizing itself. Right. Because you know, what's fixed? The players are costs are the same. Why aren't we growing? What's what's happening within each and every institution? And that's you know, we're we're only talking because we come from a place of wanting to better the overall business like we don't want to be looked to as a handout we wanna be looked to as partners in investment moving forward. Right. But, you know, everyone wants to ever wants to say, oh, they want. Brian Jay's money. That's not. That's not the case. We just wanna league where we know. The next few the next generation of Hooper's have a chance to be in something that's really thriving, and it's not treated as a movement or a cause like an actual business. The same energy that you're doing to help G league players. Same energy. You have in the NBA. Let's have that same energy to hold our business accountable. So that we keep growing. Now, the big issue, and you know, I'm on a previous book, our brand our brand we need to help find a way to, you know, make our brands something a little bit better because everyone's so comfortable to, you know, trash on the WNBA without even knowing it, and that's not cool people. Don't keep that same energy in person won't when they see like, oh, you're great. But then those same people will go and talk about our league in a disrespectful way. I always think like the greatest one of the great marketing vehicles for the WNBA has been for the most part how much respect NBA players show. It's amazing. They come to your games. They sit courtside they bring their families or they come or even if it's a player interacting like on Twitter social media share that like whatever men have issues or don't take the WNBA seriously. It doesn't include the men who are the best players in the world. Exactly. And we don't need their respect his our game stands on their own. But we truly appreciate it. Like when I was playing in Vegas today. After I saw you Damian Lillard was there are Celts. Was there? Damara rosen. Was there? I hadn't met damore yet. I've know Damon for awhile and Damara was like a I'll wash game you'll footwell crazy like and it's great Quinn. Cook was there, and they had the choice to go watch the G league team. And they came and watched us to us. That's that's amazing. And that's validation. But it seems like it doesn't resonate with a lot of people. Even I bet you on his podcast, someone might listen. And immediately say oh Buick conversation about in here. Pro be better than that. It's twenty eighteen different. You know, and it gets tiresome. But at the same time man, we built up some real thick skin is WB players because I think we're excited about the CVA. We're we're forgetting all the haters because we understand the people that know basketball like hilarious BoJ, you'll damore to rose in three sixty lay of so mazing. And then meanwhile, we're like, oh w I'm not watching three sixty layups. I'm like, hold a, wait. Where's that same energy? You have with the Marta. Rosen's three six versus angel doing in the Olympics. Like, that's the double. Anders women have to deal with twenty four seven. But you know, we carry forward. This was I'm glad we finally did this. I know we've been shifts in the night, so many times cross paths crossed the fast, but your desk is near mind. Now, it's true. I'm gonna very quiet corner. My cubicle, whatever it is isn't a pretty quiet corner of ESPN. So I walk. You know, I'm coming. No, I do usually here you before. But it's it's actually funny because like Chris Berman has an office back there very much here once in a while, and like you'll hear them, and he's there, and you know, you sort of feel like your PIN because like there's Christmas. How you sure, but that's sort of my when I see you. But yet, right. So, but anyway, but now, I've got you. And what is this thing you brought over here? Oh, okay. Lamp so I was out WalMart while while the world, and there was like a display, and I was out here buying things for my office because I just got my office to and I saw this lady was putting them up, and there's so many Himalayan salt lab salt. She's like, oh, you're in the office section. Do you need some everyone's plan? These I was just easy bait everyone's putting these in their offices. So it's like a natural that apparently absorbs radiation from computers and also absorbs negative vibes. So we will have we won't be positive have to do a lot of. I know a lot of absorption. How I know. It didn't help this week with all the stuff in the NBA his work. And I am I have to take a back. So that that was my question to you. So it absorbs negative. So is it like a WI fi? I can get my feet off of yours own first. Can steal off. Absolutely. A hundred percent. A hundred percent. Are you going to take the land? Thanks today time anytime. All right. Great stuff. Thanks for listening to the of the pod. A big. Thank you to my guest today. Chanel Gumi K. Remember, you can subscribe and listen to archived episodes of this podcast wherever you get your shows, you could find on apple podcasts or wherever else you listen. And of course, a big thank you today. Sponsors policy genius with and Sonos be sure to support them the way this is here at the world's pod will catch next time.

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How Baseball Chaos Will Impact 2020

ESPN Daily

21:55 min | 6 months ago

How Baseball Chaos Will Impact 2020

"What are you taking responsibility for? What happened on my watch and I'm not proud of that? I'll never be proud of it. I didn't like hit. The Commissioner's office very clear the GM and the manager were in position to make sure that nothing like this happened and we felt sure that was former astros manager. Aj hinch on MLB network giving his first public comments. He was fired for his role in the sign stealing scandal as pitchers and catchers report. This week Houston's shenanigans are still the talk of the League but so is the new playoff format a terrifying dodger's roster and a Boston fan base. The may have to root for a guy named jeeter today. A spring training begins. We break down the story lines that will define the upcoming coming MLB season. I mean times. It's Wednesday February twelfth this is espn daily presented by ADT. Jeff Hello let's break some codes mankind's Jeff Passan is an mlb the insider for ESPN. He's in West Palm Beach at the Astros Spring Training Facility. I keep thinking we're done talking about the Astros and then this story he keeps roaring right on back so the latest is we have. Aj hinch the former manager making his first public statement than jared diamond of the Wall Street Journal Final published a story with evidence that the Houston Front office laid the groundwork for some cheating with a system called code breaker. Can you bring us up to date date on us. Major League Baseball would love it. If this story went away in the Houston Astros would love it if this story went away and yet this onion with seemingly endless layers we'll start with the codebreakers story and the fact that we're talking about a baseball team and they have a system in place called code breaker in that one of their front office officials was referring ferring to it in emails as their dark arts. That helped win them a championship. Shows you just how deep the nefarious -ness of the the astros went the way it worked was they would have people in put signs and signed sequences this is into an excel spreadsheet and that excel spreadsheet would use an algorithm to spit out what the pitches were going to be. There's a lot to unpack here but I'll start here. I keep hearing that. These are the smartest guys in baseball. The Astros in particular right are geniuses it is and yet they called their scheme code breaker and put it in an email. I I don't even we know what to say other than you know in one of the early episodes of ESPN daily. We talked about the Astros. And and in that episode I remember pretty distinctly using a word Hubris when we look back on this astros team. Five of ten twenty years from now I think Hubris is ultimately going to be the defining characteristic of this team. The other thing that sort of moves the story forward so far as when the initial punishment came down Jeff often rob Manfred statement came out he seemed to put most of the blame. If not all of it really on the players now. We're here in the front office. They were up to their own. Misdeeds is that going to expand the punishment now and that's the curious part of this right the notion that at the front office which is still there is totally clean in this. It just doesn't hold a lot of water. Which is why the report that it came out in the Wall Street Journal was so damning because it name names it referred to a five page letter that Rob Manfred had sent to Jeff Luna that laid out his his case for Luna being involved in this now Luna still denies all of this? He said I would get these emails but I would just read the first page if you are essentially the CEO of baseball operations in an organization. Is it not your duty to read through emails. That people on your we're team or sending you particularly ones that might include references to these dark arts to these championship winning endeavors that you as the CEO either green lit or too incompetent to know we're going on. I would like to not be on the record for judging someone for not reading a very very long email right now you. You don't finish emails. I always read every long. Email my colleagues because you are the CEO Oh of ESPN daily and you know it would be wrong to do otherwise when you guys are figuring out the dark arts of casting hopefully code breaking going on over here at the same time as this Wall Street Journal story comes out. Aj hinch is being interviewed. And he was directly. Asked Jeff about whether whether players had buzzers under their jerseys to alert them to whether pitches becoming. Can you assure us there were no buzzers or anything like that. Being investigated the gated for three months. And the Commissioner's Office did as thorough investigation as anyone could imagine was possible you know. He mentioned the emails the text messages and I believe him. What did you make of his comments? All you have to do is just saying no. And the fact that he didn't come out and say no I think said a lot and is only fueling the fire here. I have been hearing for for upward of two years now about what one source called a pitch picking Algorithm. And that's exactly what code. Code Breaker was in so these little snippets. That I've been hearing whispers about but I try to track down and confirm every single single one of them. I mean every single one of them has become true. The only one at this point that has not been confirmed is being real is the buzzers. A major league. Baseball said looked into it. And it said it asked players during interviews news about the buzzers. Now we have like a prisoner dilemma situation here right. Let's say fifteen players were interviewed about this with with immunity if they tell the truth but punishment if they don't are all going to hold firm and hold strong knowing that even even one of them breaks the other. Fourteen are facing significant suspensions. Potentially that's the problem with the Buzzer story for me. It's is that you would need to perpetuate the most immense an enormous lie. You could possibly dream of for a baseball team and you better trust your teammates and in some cases ex team mates absolutely implicitly to keep that Li- going logic. Nick there tells me now there were no buzzers. They all wouldn't lie about it like that and yet I look back at the history of this in of all the things. I've I heard of all the things that have been proven true and it just makes me wonder what is the truth in this situation Houston brought in Dusty Baker to the manager team but also maybe repair their reputation a little bit. What message was the organization sending hiring him that we're going to bring in somebody buddy who stable that we're going to bring in somebody who can be a good spokesman for us that we're going to bring in somebody who's going to help take steps to repair this organization that has been broken by the scandal? You know this is a new beginning is beginning for us. A new beginning for me and I think the thing that we have going for us is the amount of love that the players half for the city and the city has the players in the players have for each other and yet I think it's a it's a little foolish to think that somebody who wasn't there throughout this is going to suddenly become the spokesman for what Happened during that time the Astros are trying to get past it but there are still questions that have not been answered it something as simple as is to the players actually feel bad about this acts Astros have said they do Dallas. Keiko came out apologize. Charlie Morton came out and apologize and yet here. We are with pitchers and catchers reporting in not a single current Houston Astro has apologized for a scandal Dole. That has been out there for three months. Going back to the original athletic story in which Mike Fires Blue this whole thing wide open in the midst of Elvis Drama Rama. The Astros are still very good at baseball. And they're among the favorites to go to the World Series in two thousand twenty. How do you think they stack up against the other teams in the American league like the Yankees? I think the Astros right now are the favorite in the American League West The Oakland as are going to be nipping at their heels the angels spent two hundred forty five million dollars on Anthony Down and get Shohei Ohtani back fulltime. I'm this year and so they're improving. The Texas Rangers gotten better too but the Astros of the team to beat in the West. The question for them is going to be pitching they lost Garrett Cole to the Yankees. He's in that is a huge huge swing of wins in the Yankees Direction and the Yankees. Now get to put coal out there in game one of the American League Championship. Happy gyp series against the Astros. If it comes down to that to face off with Justin verlander they're still potentially a hundred win team trash candidat you you didn't even mention the mariners when you went through the AOL west the disrespects in mentioned the other four teams in the division disrespect will not stand. They're coming up. It's not just the astros making news. As spring training gets underway. We're going to talk about some of the other stories dominating the major league headlines As pitchers and catchers chess report. ESPN daily is brought to you by ADT. What is real protection? Well when it comes to your home real protection means. ADT The nation's it's number one smart home security provider with Adt. You get all of the latest innovation in Smart Home Security combined with twenty four seven monitoring from the most trusted tested name in home security. You get everything from video doorbells indoor and outdoor cameras smart locks and lights controlled from ADT APP or the sound of Your Voice. So what are you waiting for. Help protect your home with. Adt Go to ADT DOT COM slash. podcast today So Jeff the other spicy baseball news is the reports. That Major League Baseball is considering changes to the postseason increasing the number of teams from ten to fourteen and letting leading some of those teams pick. Who they're playing? Can you explain to me what's going on. So here's the way it would work. You would have seven playoff teams. As in each league. There will be three division winners and four wild cards and it would be a tiered system similar to the NFL. Actually the number one overall seed would it'd be the team with the best record in each league it would get a buy into the division series. The six remaining teams would go into the wild card round the three game format. And here's how that would work. The number two seed would get to choose its opponent among the three lowest seeded seeded teams which would be the three wildcard teams with the worst record than the number three seed. The Third Division winner would get to choose its opponent as well and the the number four seed which would be. The Best Wildcard team would play whoever is remaining among those three. So why are they doing this. You know they're doing this for for a couple of reasons Money and money always talks and if you have potentially sixteen more playoff games you're going to have probably a pretty frenzy. Bidding among television networks but beyond that the idea is to make September more interesting now the blowback back here has been pretty swift. And I think part of that is that fans are reticent to change and they don't like gimmicky ideas and the the notion of a selection show where teams are going to choose their opponent on TV. Maybe feels right or wrong in some way but the the big question for me is what will this do for the number one seed in major league baseball. There's this prevalent idea that the longer you sit out during postseason postseason the rusty or you are and you are taking in this scenario the number one seed enforcing it to sit out for five days and so whatever advantage it may have have by getting to rest. It's pitchers or set up. Its rotation while others. Playing Games could ultimately be mitigated by the fact that it's been sitting out as long as it has jeff one team. That's GONNA have a challenging time getting that by the Boston. Red Sox who just hired a new interim manager Ron Reinecke now as everyone knows by now. Boston traded their former MVP. mookie Betts to the dodgers. The deal was briefly upheld giving fleeting and perhaps delusional hope to depress red sox fans everywhere but it was ultimately finalize. Let me ask you. Why did they do it? They wanted to get underneath the luxury tax in the easiest route to do that was by packaging. mookie Betts together with David Price and the Los Angeles. Louis dodgers are a financial behemoth who themselves had dipped under the tax threshold last year and accordingly. They have have money to spend right now and they WANNA win a world series. Let's remember the last time. The dodgers WANNA world series is when Kirk Gibson was limping around the bases in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight. So it's been a long time coming to go out and get bets is a move by the dodgers that says we want to win now. They're pushing their chips into the middle of the table. Right now and giving future value in Alex for do go in jeeter downs. Red Sox acquired a player named Jeeter that they did how. Oh great isn't going to be by the way when Geeta downs is starting at second base like heir apparent to Dustin Pedroia in. He goes to fenway in. There's just this constant cognitive dissonance of cheering guy at fenway. Park named Jeeter Sanath at the dodgers have Mukhi. How good are they? They're their floor. Is One hundred wins. Things can go wrong for the dodgers. This year you can have injuries you can have regression. I still think they a win. One Hundred Games ultimately this is about talent and the dodgers have more talent than anybody in the National League certainly and you can make an argument more talent than anyone in baseball. We're looking at a potentially historically good team. How many prayer candles is rob Manfred lighting every night it hoping that we get a dodgers Yankees world series and not totters Astros World series? I mean rob Manfred has a lot to deal with this year. The fallout of the Astros signed stealing scandal questions about the baseball collective bargaining agreement. I'm trying to cut twenty five percent of the Minor Leagues Issues About Baseball's demographics and its ability to make stars. I mean rob Manfred Job in two two thousand twenty is I would argue the most difficult of any commissioner in professional sports so if he could get a dodgers the Yankees world series. He would cart wheel from dodger stadium to Yankees stadium the entire way with the biggest smile on on his face because he would feel like his sport finally has won a Jeff. Let's and on a positive note because this is a positive time of year for baseball fans. Hope and optimism or if you're Seattle mariners fan like me eat delusion who is dark horse team that you are excited about this season the clear answer to this is the Chicago White Sox and it's interesting because the white sox four years have been talking about their rebuild and there was a pretty good one on the north side Zydus city that gave them their first world series in more than one hundred years and yet the white sox has been much more slow going you know. The prospects have been a little slower slower to develop and they haven't spent any money will finally this off season. They actually spent some money. Seventy two million dollars on he has Monte Grande dollars one of the best catches baseball. All fifty million plus on Dallas Heikal to help fill out a rotation that has a lot of young arms with great potential. You look at the white sox right now and and there's a five year window where you think they can compete. Considering they're in an American league central where Cleveland is either going to need trade Franscisco. Lynn door we're going lose him to free agency in twenty twenty one and a Minnesota twins team that while bill really well in the short term may not have the same long term prospects as the white sox knocks. The future. Looks really good for them right now. Thanks so much Jeff. Try to avoid the dark arts while you're out there I will do my best man. Thanks coming up. Yukon isn't Yukon anymore but they might get back to their old ways soon. Here's another story. I want you to know A few weeks ago we talked about the unparalleled success of the Yukon Women's basketball team and how their grip on the sport has finally loosened at the time we included a bunch of caveats about how you can still very good and basketball fans shouldn't freak out and overreact but since then the huskies have gone on to lose a couple times falling by eighteen points organ in early February and then on Monday getting beat down by South Carolina South Carolina. It finally seven fifty two so it might be time to freak out a little but hope might be around the corner because the number one prospect in the country high school senior from Minnesota named page. Bekker's Thor's is headed to uconn and according to a terrific profile by our Katie Barnes. She has program changing abilities. Here's how good Bekker's she's USA basketball's two thousand nineteen female athlete of the year and has one gold for the country's under nineteen and under seventeen feeble World Cup teams. She's a two time winner of Gatorade. Girls Basketball Player of the year award in Minnesota where she's averaging more than twenty one points and nine assists per game with her high school team. She's also McDonald's holds all American and perhaps most notably uconn coach Geno Auriemma told Barnes that Bekker's reminds him of Diana Tarazi saying she's she says good as anybody I've ever seen with the ball in her hands she has something that's rare. Now that's notable not only because. Oh my God can you imagine Gino Auriemma saying that about you but also because as barnes points out in their peace nine of yukons eleven trophies were won with Tracy. My more or Brianna Stewart as Gino said when we lost the last three someone said well. You know the only time those guys win the national championship is when they have the best player no bleep WELP. nope assuming Bekker's promise pans out soon enough they will have the undisputed best player and bring reinforcements. According to Barnes Bekker's Bekker's has been recruiting one of her biggest competitors the top ranked junior in the country as Fud who also happens to be one of her closest friends now fed. It could end up somewhere else. Perhaps igniting a new rivalry but if she ends up at Uconn the dynasty could be back. And so will the concern. Trolling along with that age. Sold question is Yukon to dominant. I mean it climbs and this has been ESPN daily. I'll talk to you tomorrow

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New Pressures

PTI

24:17 min | Last month

New Pressures

"Is your money not sure what to do with itself right now at ally, they'll help it save for the future with their smart savings tools, bucket your money for the things that matter most analyzer spending and save automatically all on top of a competitive rate for all things money. You deserve an ally. Visit A. L. Wide Dot com slash savings for more INFO ally. Do it right ally bank member FDIC. We're up in the attic. Beautiful up in this attic, regardless of what other people say and we're attempting to do episode ninety in the addict. We'll let us start close to home for us. With The Washington Redskins, a group of investors heavily invested people in companies like Nike and Fedex are urging those companies to cut financial ties with the Washington redskins unless they changed their name. Do you think that this financial pressure will be brought upon Daniel Snyder to the point where he says okay? Let's change the name yet Tony for the first time. For the first time I heard this news this morning here in Washington obviously and screamed out now. Oh! Oh and the response in my house. My Wife, saying what are what are you screaming in about? And I said this is the first time you and I had been reporting this story commenting on the story discussing this all of our professional lives. All of my most of yours I mean this is, this is forty years for us in Washington DC discussing the possibility and I think you and I been in the same camp, which has been okay. That's probably what should happen, but it ain't gonNA happen. Because there was no Tony, the financial pressure was not brought to bear, but now when you see the names of those companies and six and shareholders now. Them selves six hundred plus million dollars worth of capital. What people are saying? You know what we're done with this now and you're going to be done with it to. This is the first time I've ever thought Snyder's done. He doesn't want to do this. Only one thing, not societal pressure, not cultural pressure, no pressure other than. Pressure will make even consider, and now I think he's done. So? I'm going to say a couple. Things here that that have to be said one is that the name is indefensible. It is simply indefensible, but to is that the fans of this team, the black fans and the white fans of this team and I've learned this and so have you over forty years. They don't mean it in a derogatory way. They don't think of it as a slur. They love this particular. Particular team, but again indefensible, let's talk about the economics for a second. As long as the Washington, redskins are part of the NFL, and they share in the television package. That's enough to make you whole and profitable without anything else so the money we're talking about maybe money at the margins it may be signed. It may be stadium naming. It may be stuff inside the stadium I. Don't know that the economic. For Dan Snyder because as you know Mike. He likes to carry in his in his pocket, a piece of paper from the Washington Post in two thousand sixteen poll, in which ninety percent of the respondents who identified themselves as native Americans. said the names okay, and he's always talked about that I. Think and I will draw the line with Colin Kaepernick, and said this on on this program. If Roger Goodell wants con capital can leak. Happen Him. He's got to go to a team and say you sign him and if he wants Dan. Snyder changes him. He's got to publicly and privately do it. And I'm waiting for that one I. Don't believe that poll I believe they're Polish shoddy. The wonder Snyder carries around the results I believe is trumped up and completely phony to the point of being fraudulent. So that's the poll. Now what's The Washington Post Poll? He didn't do it himself. But he's he's also had his own. Polls taken and. Believe those and now that's only you know what the fact that certain people don't think that what they're saying about. Other people's derogatory. That doesn't fly because you know what you can have a whole. Bunch of people say well I didn't mean anything when I use the N word, I didn't mean anything bad. And like you said it's indefensible, so it's indefensible. Tony. So, many people who followed that team who believe that we need just people around the country older. Interesting think greater Washington, the DMV as I like to call it for marketing purposes now district Maryland Virginia Redskins fans, people know they use it, but Tony a Lotta people have just been calling Washington even PR neighbors, you know we have people, black, white, yellow and Brown. Who Just said I'm calling in Washington? I'm done with this. Tony this nominee pressure P particularly, if Nike and McDonald's and Adidas and the why an Nike I missed I don't know if this was one of, but if those major companies sign off on this not to shareholders companies Tony, Snyder is going to bend. He's GonNa. Be I know television money rules today, but it would talking. Of millions of dollars. Well let's talk about the economics of it first of all if he did change the name and he sold out all of his stuff with the original and branded name, and then could sell new stuff. Yes, he make money. There's another factor here. The mayor of the District of Columbia Muriel Bowser has let it be known that if they want that stadium at RFK, they have got to change that name now. She didn't say that last year. She avoided that issue last year. That's right now with everything going on in the country and in the capital. For America now there's political pressure as well as economic so to me that combination of what is essentially social social pressure. This is the right time to do it, I like you think that this name could be changed, but I like. You have seen this resistance for so many like I. Love the column over thirty ago. Has Done we wrote I was reading stuff we wrote in that. Eighties is so far back. Okay, batum line bottom line is the name GonNa Change within the next five years. Is the name going to be something else of the Washington Football Club? Again I think it will, but I think Roger Goodell has to publicly and privately say I. Speak For all the other owners and we can't have this anymore. This is our change, right? That's what I think that. You put a twist on either I wasn't ready to. It's interesting. Tony what you're saying. I don't mean I. Don't know if the deal is going to do that, but I think the name. This is the first time I've ever thought the names it'll be. Be something other in my lifetime, then a redskins. Great thing about facts, they're proven like the fact that crude oil contains impurities. Base oil made from natural gas is ninety nine point five percent free of impurities. And the fact that pennzoil is the first synthetic motor oil made from natural gas, not crude oil. It gives you unbeatable engine protection. The proof is in the pennzoil. Based on sequence for where test using SAS five W. Thirty. Ask for at Jiffy Lube. This is your apartment. I need some favors from you. Your cat keeps rubbing against the kitchen island and I can't return the favor. Can you give her extra pets for me after that? Could you bundle your renters and car insurance with GEICO? We could save money, and it's easy to do online and one last thing, could you the TV on during the day I need to catch up on my soaps. For bundy made easy, go to GEICO DOT COM today. In other NFL News Tony the. League will reportedly reduce the preseason to two games, but Mark Maskey of the Washington Post old employer, says the players. Union might seek further reductions to one or even know preseason games. One number makes the most sense to you. Well I mean you know what I think I think I know. Don't call preseason games their exhibition games. They're meaningless. They're stupid. All you can do is get hurt. There's no reason to play these things. Absolutely no reason if you tell me you needed. Something beyond practice to get your team ready. Maybe I'll listen to that for a little while, but what I really think. Is that you doing it for revenue? I don't think you really need to have these games at all I think the greater focus for the NFL should be on the sixteen game right season, which we don't even think it's going to be played all sixteen. So. Stop just stop with this. Yeah Yeah. I think we're GONNA agree again. Tony There's no hollander screaming at each other today so far because I agree with you completely and Tony The the one thing I think so when I first heard this I. Want right past a preseason, maske's always splendid reporting I went right past that and I thought okay, if they're canceling these. Is this a sign that the NFL for the first time is not being delusional. 'cause like the other sports acknowledged. We got a tough road here. We're going to try this. This we don't know we have here. We sweet here. Particularly Adam silver saint is all the time. What do we have and their college football coaches, and even a couple of pro football coach soups privately or not for attribution? Wow I. don't know if this can work so now you have the cancellation of these two games have to the preseason and I'm thinking. This is finally an acknowledgement that we don't we can do. We don't know if we can have a season I know the NFL. Doesn't WANNA present it. That way, but that's what I'm hearing that right? That's right. Okay I mean I'll just issue the micro part of the issue for a second. You would say that a team like Tampa Bay with Tom Brady could use. Yeah, he's exhibition game so that he could get integrated with his receivers, because that's why he's out there now in a parking lot or wherever he is trying to get to know the receivers but I would say to you. Do you think Tampa Bay's going to risk them? Forty three year old quarterback, getting hurt in dopey exhibition game. A forty three year old quarterback with forty seven thousand rings. Going did not going out there, not going out here, so this stuff is no. No, it's not needed. Let me stay with football. This is a cool story. They ask you as an exhibition game. Nowhere quarterback is, we could use seven or eight exhibition games as you call them, but you're not gonNA have. The athlete is reporting that the NFL may require fans who want to attend games in person, a ten games in person to sign a waiver, not holding the team responsible. If they get the corona virus will. What does the story tell you? Tells me what this goes back to delusion. This goes back to that. What are you? What are? What are we talking about? Fans in Stan. In waivers, really how many lawsuits would result anyway? Even if they're frivolous, even if cynical, how many lawsuits would result from people you know? Seventy five percent of one Sunday's audience testing positive for the Koran. This is so insane I. is it a deterrent? What what is it? Is some marketing thing to give fans thinking? They're going to be able to go to games sooner than we know will be the case. I don't even understand it so nonsensical I just it's just it's dismissed is so stupid and tone-deaf Tony that we're about fans at this point in early July. Maybe we'll get to the point. Columbus Day where we're talking about that, but now i. I'm sorry missing something that you caught onto. Well it. It tells me two things. It tells me that the NFL wants to have fans and. and. It tells me that they also want to protect your money. I, you and I may disagree on this. Defy on team. I understand this. I'm going to have a series of protocols. I'm going to tell fans where they can sit. If it's in the regular cedar close to their regular seat. I'm going to tell them how long the weights are when they're online and we'll tell them what the food situation is I'm going to tell them what the bathroom situation is, and if they're stupid enough to go to these ballparks and risk this sort of danger. I don't want to lose my money because of it, so I want to try to Kim the mark. Over possible I don't know what would happen in court. You're right. One hundred billion people would bring lawsuits. I don't know if you sign the waiver if Be Thrown out, but I think I understand. Why a team would want to do this, because it's so crazy to go to the game now it is Tony, but the there stands between. The owners of those football teams in the fans one important entity. Individual States. States. Yeah, how's it going to work? How does that's right so I think the football owners just get to say come on down. This is the price is right. No, no some the states you'll states, governors, and their staffs and their I mean they have to say wait a minute. What are you talking about here? This state may be only open for business to a degree in this particular time. I so we probably differ on this, too. Because I think I think what has gotten us into all the trouble with the corona virus is not having national policy that anybody believed yet allowing every state to do something, so if the NFL has. A policy that would be better to me than each individual owner. Deciding here's the policy on joint. Right I don't know so. The favorite three through independent Makira, I don't know. I've certainly said. Enough NBA Tony Austin. Rivers of the rockets telling Taylor roots of bleacher report quote, whoever wins the title should have an Asterisk, but only four being one of the toughest championships, everyone close quote. That cinema is being echoed by Janas Erik. Spoelstra might belong and even Adam Silver. Tone do you? This year is NBA title will be seen as something lesser or greater than usual. So I've thought about this and I. Actually think it depends on how the title is one. If it's a full photo, people might just say there was no competition. It wasn't hard at all. I. Mean to me. You don't know until it is played and played out. If it's a great final, it might be remembered as something greater of my inclination is to. To say it will be remembered. Is something lesser but more than it being something lesser or Greater Mike? I think it's going to be remembered as something weirder 'cause I don't think they're going to get through it easily I think there's going to be stops and starts and to me it's all hinges on the quality of the final. How about you Tony I? Buy into some of that, but like Austin rivers I believe that winning this championship presuming it's concluded, and the champion is crowned earned. I think is GonNa be harder mentally psychologically emotionally. I think it is going to take greater discipline and mental toughness than any championship ever because of what is required i. mean just the sacrifice that you have to. To be near the denial I mean just of indulgence your own visitation with your family. You can't go home and being your own, Ben you cannot conduct your life as usual, and you are sacrificing everything. Everything is all in to win this championship, and that is why you see the most serious competitors in the league whether you were the people think they have a chance, not obviously Lebron and Anthony Davis but Chris, Paul and Janas. Is Our professionals man these these Tuesday jiving around. They're willing to commit. Whatever is in them to pursue this championship for that? I applaud them Tony Standing. Ovation not a golf club, so I think an asterisk would be is Yanni said a star. You know it's. It's a gold star by the champion that wins district. Stay the course and I have great admiration will be different, and therefore required by some measures and asterisk. Maybe but man. I would be so impressed with the team that comes out of this. That's very persuasive I. Mean You yeah I'll? I'll go with that I. still think again. It depends on the quality of the finals. The lasting memory the quality of finals. Yeah, but it. It might be a little bit look. Here's what we know to be. Let's go back to the original story in the Washington Redskins in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, two, they won the Super Bowl and a strike shortened season. It was only nine regular season games. Do you think anybody in DC cares about? Got The ring no care about the ring, so the team that wins win yet so. Ninety nine in a fifty game shortened season. They don't remember world we remember. Is your money, not sure what to do with itself right now at ally, they'll help it save for the future with their smart savings tools. Bucket your money for the things that matter most analyze you're spending and save automatically all on top of a competitive rate for all things money. You deserve an ally. Visit A. L. L. Y. dot com slash savings for more INFO ally. Do it right ally bank member FDIC. Mapping No. NAPA AUTO PART STORES NAPA Auto Care Centers. Get a twenty five dollars prepaid. Visa Card when you get any neff automotive battery. It's the best deal for some of the best batteries from some of the best car people around, but we might be a little partial any take up any NAPA. Automotive Battery and Save Twenty Five Bucks. Do It yourself or have done for you. That's NAPA know how. That participating NAPA AUTO PARTS STORES AND NAPA auto. CARE centers while supplies. Last offer ends eight, thirty, one twenty. Let's just. One more time. Put on the glasses, golden, the fat and do the happens at the eighty third birthday. Richard Petty arguably the best and most revered driver in the history of masculine. They, don't call them the king for nothing he has the most wins the NASCAR Cup series. Two hundred is tied with Dale. EARNHARDT senior and Jimmy Johnson for the most Nascar Cup series championship seven, but it is pettis recent stance that makes him suddenly relevant. He's the owner of Bubba Wallis's part shares, the number, forty three petty make saints, and was Pettis, stood shoulder to shoulder with Bob and hub-bub, when that news was found in Bubbas garage, calling quote a despicable. Despicable Act Richard. Petty is no liberal. No progressive in two thousand seventeen petty, said anyone who kneels during the national anthem should leave the country, and that may still be the way he feels. SO NASCAR supports banning the confederate flag and petty supports the One black driver in the sport that is walking the walk that is creating change. Maybe we are all evolving day by day and Mike. I know you WanNa talk about petty, but you have another birthday mentioned as. I do cheers first of all which petty take everything you just said. Happy Belated by. Sixty third birthday to my dear friend Roy Green Tony Roy Green. In my way of thinking is the most underrated player in the modern history of the NFL, the last guy that we ought to play two ways why greed happy eighty third happy sixty Thursdays a pretty young guys still in history of the NFL, he played cornerback and made pro ball. He played wide receiver and made pro bowl. Eagles Carlos John Madden thought he was wearing a handful of greatest players. He'd ever seen Roy Green, my friend Roy Green Balazs Hall of fame. He does so. Happy Anniversary Warren. spahn and one Marsha on this day. Fifty seven years ago, the giants beat the braves won nothing in sixteen innings with both these hall of Famers, going the distance at forty two years old, sponsored two hundred one. Mashallah kid at twenty five to two hundred twenty seven pitches to get the win. No manager today would allow pitcher to get anywhere near that. The game ended on a solo homer by some guy named. Willie Mays author Jim Kaplan wrote a book about this pitching call. The greatest game ever pitched. These are the giants of maize, mccovey and Cepeda these were the braves of Aaron and Mathews to give you an idea how great these pitchers were spun into the. The game eleven in three hadn't walked anybody. Over eighteen innings now shell was twelve and had no hit Houston seventeen days earlier, Mattis Shelf finished his career one hundred one games above five hundred spun, finished his career one hundred eighteen games above five hundred. No COEN PITCHER is one hundred games open, spun retired in one, thousand, nine, sixty, five with three hundred sixty three wins more than any other lefty. No pitcher since has as many wins. They were pitchers wilpon. Tony doesn't it strike you? Neither one of us was because we'll sound like. Oh, man, say get off my lawn. Doesn't strike you that baseball is nearly this good anymore. You guys who can do that. That's three games worth the pitches. Two hundred twenty seven pitches, my father, who's talking about marriage shell, and Spun Barrichello, spun, and then when I got older, and particularly show was still pitching. I just remember thinking. You know what my old man was right. And now I'm thinking back those whatever V I was a little kid. Barely Memories Games Tony the Games now. They're not that good the pitchers now. They're not that good. Sorry, they're not. Get off my lawn. Get off his lawn off my house. He trails. Betrayals to the AFC for Connecticut the HUSKIES are now officially back in the big east where they belong. The University of Connecticut is a basketball school and the Big East is basketball conference. You can still play football, but will do so as an independent. They can play Villanova ten times a year for all anybody cares. Almost all of Yukon's glory came in the Big East under Jim Calhoun Geno. Auriemma when Boston College greedily. East for the ACC erosion began core schools. Syracuse and Pitt wants to the ACC UCONN went to the American Athletic Conference. I'm a big East Guy Bond the way you're a big ten guy I don't care about Repatriating Virginia Tech from Miami Louisville West. Virginia, football schools, I like Creighton and to Paul Marquette and Butler basketball schools with Yukon back what the won't feel so alone as the only secular school in the conference and now it's time to bring back Syracuse and BC. Can Be banished because they started all this. They were like patient. Zero that PC I don't even care. I covered the biggies. Even I'm a big ten guy. All the schools you mentioned in the Mid West data go back to having A. Sort of basketball conference in the Mid West Tony for right now. I'm sure there are happy places like Bristol. PTI. An auto policy from state farm gets you collision coverage and this radio state farm gets you coverage of this beloved nineties. For more. Coverage isn't state farm dot, com.

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