19 Episode results for "General Vivek Murthy"

Introducing: The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

1947: The Meet the Press Podcast

02:29 min | 4 months ago

Introducing: The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"We choose to. Do the other thing not because they are easy, but because they are odd, hi, this is Chuck Rosenberg host of the oath podcast. I speak with people who sacrificed for the common good who believe in collective responsibility who do things that are hard. Our conversations on the youth are thoughtful, civil, respectful essential. We bring these leaders and their struggles and successes to life in the third season of the oath. You'll meet more inspirational leaders. People who took that oath made that promise and serve this. This amazing country in various ways leaders like former secretary of defense and CIA director Leon Panetta. The toughest job I had as secretary of Defense was sign deployment orders that placed young men and women in uniform in harm's way. Former NASA astronaut. Kathy Sullivan in your role as an astronaut. One of the key things you're doing is helping. Make sure the pieces are coming together. The unknowns are being probed carefully. The risks are being evaluated carefully, and it's very hard on families to stand there. There and know that their loved one is writing bombs for living the highest ranking woman in the FBI Amy Hess, I remember he was kneeling down on the ground, and he was holding a baby's shoe. I knew he had young children. And I watched as he just dissolved in tears, and all of a sudden the evil that happened there in Oklahoma City on April nineteenth nineteen ninety-five struck me former judge and United States Attorney Carol Lam walked through that door. They would all look at. At me and I would think to myself I. Know what you're thinking about me right now, and by the time we leave this room, you're going to be thinking something else and former Surgeon General Vivek Murthy, there are fundamental core values around decency round kindness around compassion. It's part of our shared humanity. We are truly interdependent. We are stronger when we are together. We live in an uncertain world public faith in our most crucial institutions waivers when we most need those institutions to thrive. But remarkable people still take the oath. They still raise their hand serve, and they still sacrifice for the common good, despite the turmoil reminded us of the need for good and honest, public servants join me for season three of an MSNBC podcast search for the oath wherever you're listening right now and subscribe new episodes everyone's.

Carol Lam secretary General Vivek Murthy Chuck Rosenberg Kathy Sullivan Leon Panetta NASA MSNBC FBI Oklahoma City CIA Amy Hess director United States Attorney
MSNBC presents The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

Legal Wars

03:20 min | 4 months ago

MSNBC presents The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"You're about to hear a preview of the oath and MSNBC podcast hosted by former US attorney, senior FBI official and acting head of the Da Chuck Rosenberg the oath is a series of revealing one on one conversations with fascinating men and women who took an oath to serve America interviews include former Secretary of Defense and CIA director, Leon Panetta Kathy Sullivan, the first American woman. Woman to walk in space former US. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy and more these captivating stories reveal what shape these leaders and exemplify what is best about our country integrity, civility, service, humility and collective responsibility. Their stories feel more relevant than ever in these extraordinary times. If you enjoyed this preview search for the oath wherever you're listening right now to subscribe new episodes, air every Wednesday. We need to. Do the other thing not because they are easy, but because they are. Hi, this is Chuck Rosenberg hosts of the oath podcast I speak with people who sacrifice for the common good who believe in collective responsibility who do things that are hard. Our conversations on the youth are thoughtful, civil, respectful essential. We bring these leaders and their struggles and successes to life in the third season of the oath. You'll meet more inspirational leaders. People who took that made that promise and serve this amazing country in various ways, leaders like former secretary of Defense and CIA director. Leon Panetta the toughest job. I had as secretary of Defense, was to sign deployment orders that placed the young men and women in uniform in harm's way former NASA. Kathy Sullivan in your role as an astronaut. One of the key things you're doing is helping nature. The pieces are coming together that unknowns are being probed carefully. The risks are being evaluated carefully, and it's very hard on families to stand there and know that their loved ones riding bombs, living the highest ranking woman in the FBI Amy Hess I remember. He was kneeling down on the ground, and he was holding a baby's show. I knew he had young children, and I watched as he just dissolved in tears, and all of a sudden the evil that happened there in Oklahoma City on April. Nineteenth nineteen ninety-five. ninety-five struck me former judge and United States attorney. Carol Lam when I walked through that door. They would all look at me and then I would think to myself I know what you're thinking about me right now, and by the time we leave this room. You're going to be thinking something else and former surgeon. General Vivek Murthy there are fundamental core values around decency round kindness around compassion. It's part of our shared humanity. We are truly interdependent. We are stronger when we are together. We live in an uncertain world public faith in our most crucial institutions waivers when we most need those institutions to thrive. But remarkable people still take the oath. They still raise their hand to serve, and they still sacrifice for the common good. Despite the turmoil they remind us of the need for good and honest. Public servants join me for season three the of an MSNBC podcast search for the oath wherever you're listening right now and subscribe new episodes every everyone's.

director Secretary Vivek Murthy Chuck Rosenberg General Vivek Murthy MSNBC Leon Panetta Kathy Sullivan FBI Carol Lam CIA Kathy Sullivan US Leon Panetta US attorney Oklahoma City America NASA acting head United States attorney Amy Hess
MSNBC presents The Oath With Chuck Rosenberg

American History Tellers

03:20 min | 4 months ago

MSNBC presents The Oath With Chuck Rosenberg

"You're about to hear a preview of the oath and MSNBC podcast hosted by former US attorney, senior FBI official and acting head of the Da Chuck Rosenberg, the oath is a series of revealing one on one conversations with fascinating men and women who took an oath to serve America interviews include former Secretary of Defense and CIA director. Leon Panetta Kathy Sullivan, the first American woman. Woman to walk in space former US. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy and more these captivating stories reveal what shape these leaders and exemplify what is best about our country integrity, civility, service, humility and collective responsibility. Their stories feel more relevant than ever in these extraordinary times. If you enjoyed this preview search for the oath wherever you're listening right now to subscribe new episodes air every Wednesday. We need to. Do the other thing, not because they are easy, but because they are. Hi, this is Chuck Rosenberg. PODCAST I speak with people who sacrifice for the common good who believe in collective responsibility who do things that are hard. Our conversations on the youth are thoughtful, civil, respectful essential. We bring these leaders and their struggles and successes to life in the third season of the oath. You'll meet more inspirational leaders. People who took that made that promise and serve this amazing country in various ways leaders like former secretary of Defense and CIA director. Leon Panetta the toughest job. I had as secretary of Defense, was to sign deployment orders that placed the young men and women in uniform in harm's way, former NASA. Kathy Sullivan in your role as an astronaut. One of the key things you're doing is helping nature. The pieces are coming together that unknowns are being probed carefully. The risks are being evaluated carefully, and it's very hard on families to stand there and know that their loved ones riding bombs, living the highest ranking woman in the FBI amy. Hess I remember he was kneeling down on the ground, and he was holding a baby's show i. knew he had young children and I watched as he just dissolved in tears, and all of a sudden, the evil that happened there in Oklahoma City on April nineteenth nineteen ninety-five. ninety-five struck me former judge and united. States Attorney Carol Lam when I walked through that door. They would all look at me and then I would think to myself I. Know what you're thinking about me right now. And by the time we leave this room, you're going to be thinking something else and former surgeon. General Vivek Murthy, there are fundamental core values around decency round kindness around compassion. It's part of our shared humanity. We are truly interdependent. We are stronger when we are together. We live in an uncertain world public faith in our most crucial institutions waivers when we most need those institutions to thrive. But remarkable people still take the oath. They still raise their hand to serve, and they still sacrifice for the common good. Despite the turmoil they remind us of the need for good and honest. Public servants join me for season three, the of an MSNBC podcast search for the oath wherever you're listening right now and subscribe new episodes everyone's.

director Secretary Vivek Murthy Leon Panetta Kathy Sullivan Chuck Rosenberg General Vivek Murthy MSNBC FBI CIA Carol Lam US Leon Panetta Kathy Sullivan US attorney Hess official America NASA acting head Oklahoma City
MSNBC presents The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

Business Wars

03:22 min | 4 months ago

MSNBC presents The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"You're about to hear a preview of the oath. And MSNBC PODCAST hosted by former US attorneys, senior FBI official and acting head of the DA Chuck Rosenberg. The oath is a series of revealing one on one conversations with fascinating men and women who took an oath to serve America. Interviews include former secretary of Defense and CIA. Director Leon Panetta Kathy, Sullivan, the first American woman to walk in space former US, Surgeon General Vivek Murthy and more these captivating stories about what shaped these leaders exemplify what's best about our country integrity, civility, service, humility and collective responsibility. Their stories feel more relevant than ever in these extraordinary times. If you enjoy the preview search for the oath wherever you're listening right now to subscribe new episodes, drop every Wednesday. We choose to go to the mall and do the other thing, not because they are easy, but because they are hard. Hi, this is Chuck Rosenberg. Hosts of the youth podcast I speak with people who sacrifice for the common good who believe in collective responsibility who do things that are hard. Our conversations on the oath are thoughtful, civil, respectful essential. We bring these leaders and their struggles and successes to life in the third season of the oath. You'll meet more inspirational leaders. People. Who took that oath? Oath made that promise and serve this amazing country in various ways, leaders like former secretary of defense and CIA director Leon Panetta the toughest job I had as secretary of defense was to sign deployment orders that placed young men and women in uniform in harm's way former NASA astronaut Kathy Sullivan in your role as an astronaut. One of the key things you're doing is helping. Make sure the pieces are coming together. The unknowns are being probed carefully. The risks are being evaluated carefully, and it's very. Very hard on families to stand. There know that their loved one is writing bombs for living the highest ranking woman in the FBI Amy Hess I remember he was kneeling down on the ground, and he was holding babies shoe, I knew he had young children, and I watched, as he just dissolved in tears, all of a sudden, the evil that happened there in Oklahoma City on April nineteenth nineteen, ninety-five struck me former judge and United States Attorney Carol Lam. When I walked through that door, they would. Would all look at me. I would think to myself. I know what you're thinking about me right now, and by the time we leave this room, you're going to be thinking something else and former Surgeon General Vivek Murthy, there are fundamental core values around decency round kindness around compassion. It's part of our shared humanity. We are truly interdependent. We are stronger when we are together. We live in an uncertain world public faith in our most crucial institutions waivers when we most need those institutions to thrive. But remarkable people still take the oath they still raise their hand to serve, and they still sacrifice for the common good. Despite the turmoil they remind us of the need for good and honest. Public servants join me for season three, the oath and MSNBC podcast search for the oath wherever you're listening right now and subscribe new episodes everyone's.

General Vivek Murthy secretary Chuck Rosenberg Kathy Sullivan FBI CIA US MSNBC Leon Panetta Kathy Leon Panetta MSNBC Amy Hess America Director Carol Lam acting head Oklahoma City NASA official director
Former Surgeon General Vivek Murthy

Kickass News

40:01 min | 4 months ago

Former Surgeon General Vivek Murthy

"This is kick ASS news. I'm Ben Mathis. Many Americans have never felt more isolated than they do right now. Travel restrictions have made it difficult to visit our loved ones besides who wants to brave crowded airport, a confined airplane cabin just to see friends and family in many counties, strict social distancing rules still remain in place, confining us to our homes, and discouraging in person interactions, and all of the usual public events that bring together communities in the summer from. County Fairs Music Festivals have. have been banned as a result, the United States is facing loneliness crisis, but my guest today says that loneliness was already becoming a mental health epidemic long before the quarantine. He's former US surgeon general. Vivek Murthy and he writes about it in a new book titled. Together the healing power of human connection in sometimes lonely world and today Dr Murphy joins me on the podcast where he discusses the mini mental and physical impacts of feeling, lonely and And reveals that chronic loneliness is just as bad for you as smoking or obesity, he opens up about his own bouts of loneliness at times during his life how he came to realize that it's a much larger problem than he ever realized, and even says he spoken to a number of members of Congress. Who struggle with it as well. He shares the difference between someone who is genuinely lonely versus someone who enjoys being alone. How loneliness can. Can often disguises itself as other health problems, and how loneliness once served as an evolutionary function, but might be holding us back in modern society. Vivek also weighs in on the president's handling of the coronavirus pandemic shares insights from when he dealt with the Abullah and Zeke outbreaks as surgeon general and offers advice for how to improve the quality of our online and socially distanced interactions during quarantine, coming up with Dr. Vivek, Murthy in just a moment. Under the. Dr Vivek Murthy served as the nineteenth surgeon general of the United States appointed by President Barack Obama during his tenure Dr Murphy, launched the turn the tide campaign, catalyzing a movement among health professionals to address the nation's opioid crisis, and he issued the first surgeon general's report on Alcohol Drugs and health, calling for expanded access to prevention and treatment, and for recognizing addiction as a chronic illness rather than a character flaw, he's also been a leader in addressing what he calls America's loneliness epidemic, and he writes about it in a new book together the healing power of human connection in a sometimes lonely World Dr Vivek. Murthy welcome to the PODCAST. Thanks so much van. It's good to be with you. Will have to say I. Really Found Your Book Very Enlightening. I feel like we're only beginning to recognize just how many people in this country suffer from chronic loneliness, but it is something that's coming up a lot in my conversations with people about health more and more these days. When did you first become aware that the US is in the middle of Loneliness Crisis Open I I realized there is something deeper going on those affecting people around the country when I was surgeon general and it was during that time the very beginning of my tenure. That I embarked on this listening tour where I would go to small towns in big cities across America asking people simple questions like how can I help and what's on your mind when it comes to your health? And I would sit back and listen and I am. Some extraordinary things some things that. Didn't surprise me although they were really important for me to hear like about. How devastating, the OPIOID epidemic had been to families I, heard stories about violence in communities I heard from parents who are worried about their children using aping devices and weren't sure how to address that. I heard from so many people who wondered if technology was ultimately. Helping, their social lives are leaving. Them were disconnected. But. What I realize is behind, so many of these stories were these unspoken threads of loneliness. And people wouldn't come up to me and say hi. I'm Ben I'm lonely and Vivier come lonely, but they would say things like I feel I have to carry this entire burden on my own. Where feel if I disappear tomorrow? No one would even notice. Or feel invisible. And I was hearing this from college students. From. Elderly folks healing hearing this from parents. From people in remote fishing villages in Alaska. And for members of Congress who would confide this hushed tones behind closed doors, really members of Congress I guess I could see that I. Mean Congressman aren't exactly treated like everyone else. In every interaction they have with a person is probably a complaint or an ask rarely anyone ever happy with you. You can't really vent about your problems. What kind of things did you hear from them? Yes, in fact I remember one member of Congress in particular that I. Was Meeting with in his office and just me and him at the time. There's no staff around. And he confided that he had heard me talk about loneliness and was happy that I was addressing it but acid. Some point could do something about the struggles with loneliness and emotional wellbeing among members of Congress. He said that many of them would would have to move to DC away from their families. They would be constantly under the microscope. They would get criticized if they even tried to have lunch or dinner with a member of the opposite party, and it became an extremely lonely experience for them where they felt that they were very few places where they could be themselves He wasn't looking for a sympathy per se, he certainly recognize that members of Congress are certainly privileged compared to most people in the country, but. The point I took away from him, and from the stories of so many others that I heard around the country was that loneliness is far more common than I had thought ride, and even before you realize that this was the national crisis. You admit that you yourself have battled with loneliness at various points in your life. Tell us about that. My own experiences of loneliness as a child, which were in deep and painful during. During my time in elementary school, in which continued at various points during adulthood, but it reminded me of my experiences as a doctor, taking care of so many patients who came into the hospital alone, and even at critical moments when we had to give them a difficult diagnosis or make a really tough decision on treatment. There was nobody there to be with them to help them. Make those tough choices they were all by. And, of course, not a lot of people want to admit that they're lonely because we have a bit of a stigma against it, have you found that others who suffer from this are maybe finding it comforting and encouraging to hear a successful former surgeon, general of the United States open up about his own bouts with this issue, and I do hope that it's helpful and I hope that we can all start sharing more of our stories when it comes to loneliness because the truth is that when I was a child, I, never spoke about these things. Even though I was struggling with loneliness, and I didn't talk to my parents about it or anyone else because I was ashamed. I thought that somehow being lonely meant that I was broken. That I wasn't likeable and I certainly didn't want to feel that way, but what we know now and what I know now that I wished I had known before, is it? Loneliness is not a disease or evidence a you are broken loneliness, in fact, a natural signal like hunger or thirst that our body sends to us when we are lacking. That we need for our survival, and in this case, so social connection. And when we respond to that need by calling a friend or visiting a one, and the loneliness may subsided just as hunger thirst, sub- subside when we get food or water, but if it persists for a long time. That's been loneliness kits to have serious effects on us. Impacting our mental health as well as our fiscal health. Yeah actually you made this rather astonishing and perhaps controversial statement when you said that loneliness is worse for us than smoking or Obesity A. What are the statistics to back that up EVAC? Term Meta analysis that was done at Brigham Young University by Julian Lanston. Research was done after a growing body of evidence was showing that loneliness to be associated with poor health outcomes. And would Julianne found in her work was at loneliness, was associated with a reduction in lifespan. and was in fact, also associated with an increased risk of premature death, and when you look at the degree to which the lifespan was shortened in people who struggled with loneliness, it was similar to the mortality impact of smoking fifteen cigarettes a day. It was greater than the mortality impact of city and sedentary living. It also seems particularly difficult to diagnose and treat because loneliness sometimes disguises itself and so many other ways as depression or anxiety over eating addiction while the root cause is far more elusive. How do we go about treating a health crisis? That doesn't always show itself in the most obvious ways. I tend to avoid thinking about it. As a as an illness, the way we might think about diabetes or high blood pressure because I think that loneliness is more complicated than that I think it. It is a normal state of being that can have adverse effects when it stays around for a long time, experience it for prolonged periods of time into the same way that I wouldn't consider hunger, disease or thirstier disease. I wouldn't consider loneliness into disease, but I do think what's important is that we understand one how to respond to it effectively into what to do. When it persists for a long period of time. And I say this because I you know i. one of the things that has struck me and I and I say this despite my medical training is that I do think sometimes we can have A. Tendency to over medical is things in in our culture, and there's some cases where that's the right thing to do. there other cases where that can. Actually take the issue that we're talking about. An almost remove our agency from it right and not everyone who just kind of enjoys doing their own thing is lonely. What is the difference between someone who is maybe a bit of a loner or enjoy solitude? Someone who genuinely suffers from loneliness, that's a great question, and it brings up the question of definitions, so loneliness is a subjective state, and it's in contrast to an objective term like isolation, which is more a description of the number of people we have around us, but loneliness is really about how we feel about those connections, so if we are a freshman in college surrounded by hundreds, if not thousands of new students. We. Don't know any of them and don't feel comfortable. Showing up is who we are. The net can become a very lonely experience very quickly. With also relevant here is that being a college student on campus or A new person joining a company, you might find that you're thrown into an environment that has very extroverted. Expectations so if you're in orientation week in college, there likely mixers and parties and other events that you can go to, but what if you're an introvert? And you actually don't enjoy socializing as much in large group settings of drains you and you prefer in fact, one on one conversations or small groups or to stay home, because you need time for solitude to replenish your energy I'm an introvert, and what that means for me is that I need more solitude perhaps than my extroverted friends and I if I don't do a good job of creating time for solitude which? which is again solitude not being the same thing as loneliness. Solitude is time we seek out. It's time that can be joyful. That can be peaceful. That can be replenishing, and it's time when I spent time. In solitude I feel more centered and grounded. Is One of my friends told me the here's how to understand the difference between introverts and extroverts. She said an extrovert starts out the day with an empty basket. And every person they meet along the way gives them an apple. And they put that in the basket, and by the end of the day after all interactions, their basket is full and they feel great. An introvert starts the day with the basket full of apples and every person. They mean they give apple to. By the end of the day after all those interactions, your basket is empty and they are energetically deplete, and they need to replenish. Interesting so solitude and having time for say, Meditation Actually Makes Our interactions with people in person better. He does because what matters so much in our interactions with others is. Where we're coming from, are we grounded in that moment or are we frazzled? Are we feeling calm and confident, or or we anxious and worried? Even extroverts need moments of solitude. Having solitude in your life doesn't mean Ben. Do the all of us need to go seven day. Silent retreat once a month, although that may serve you well, and I certainly would love to do that at some point. But solitude can just be. Five minutes the we spend sitting on our front porch. Feeling breeze against our face, it can be a few minutes that we spend remembering a few things to be grateful for or few minutes, meditating or praying or simply taking a walk through nature or curling up with a good book. There are many ways to experience solitude. But we all need some of it. And what worries me. Ben In the modern world is that. Our time for solitude. As evaporated as we become busier and busier and his our. smartphones hip field in all the spare moments in our life. But I also worry that we've become uncomfortable with solitude. And that when we're alone with our thoughts. that it doesn't, it makes us feel. uncomfortable. We don't know what you do with that and we can very quickly pick up our phone. Look at the news or or read something on social media and feel the comfort and certain t at comes from those things, and not having to confront our own thoughts, but comfort with being alone developing and protecting time for solitude, these are essential in everyone's life ride, and in the same sense how? How much of this problem can be attributed to the fact that we are constantly distracted by texts. Our instagram feeds work emails. Wimmer, supposedly spending quality time with our kids are having dinner with a spouse or a friend is the lack of presence in our interactions factor in why so many people feel unheard, unnoticed unimportant alone will Ben. You're hitting on me. It's really important which is I, do think. That the way in which we're using technology these days having a dilute effect on our relationships. So if I'm talking to a good friend and the phone. But I'm also refreshing my social media feed checking my inbox and Google question that popped into my head while I'm checking the score in the game that's on the TV in the background and occasionally looking at the news. This is a very distracted conversation. I'm having. But it's actually not unusual for people to be doing that and I have done this to not proud to say it, but I have done this, too. Because we convince ourselves, we can multitask. Science is very clear that we cannot what we do when we think we're multitasking. We actually rapidly task switch, which means when we're paying attention to our inbox or not actually fully listening to the person. person that we're talking to so tech and have that effect and diluting the quality are by interactions. It can also edge out our in person interactions is we spend more and more time in front of screens and on social media, but we've got to be mindful of how technology is impacting our relationships, and we have to draw boundaries around it, so we have sacred spaces in our lives. We are just focused on another human being where we are giving them the gift of our full attention. And when we do that, we'll find that five minutes. Of Deep. Open fully. Present. Conversation can be more powerful than a half power of distracted conversation. Yes, technology is great in many ways, but we've always had this problem of keeping up with the Joneses, but now it's keeping up with the Joneses on Steroids I. It's not just keeping up with the Joneses keeping up with everyone on our facebook feed, and in some cases people. We've never even physically met people we don't even know. That's exactly right, and you don't in the face of it, it seems. Almost unbelievable that we would. Let's say care so much about what somebody was doing. Thousands of thousand miles away who we don't even know probably will never meet, but the to have nicer car than us, or they seem to have a fancier house than us or. Or. They seem to be more popular than us, but. You're looking at people's idealize versions of their life. You're looking at their best moments. And inevitably you compare them to your average moments. And you always come up short. And I worry particularly for young people who are receiving these messages. Through social media through larger channels that they're not good looking enough. They're not smart enough. They're not thin enough. They're not popular enough. And as erodes their sense himself in his self confidence, it makes it harder for them to have meaningful interactions with others, but it doesn't have to be this way. See Technology. The end of the day is not evil technologies a tool and it is how we use it. That determines whether or not it strengthens or weakens our connections and another interesting thing that comes up in your book is how we're really genetically hardwired to experience loneliness. We evolved into a tribal species. Because of course there's strength in numbers, but has that survival mechanism in us, perhaps turned into something that now does more harm than good social connection truly is foundational, but interesting about it is. It's not new. In the thousands of years ago when we were Hunter Gatherers, wondering the Tundra, it was our trusted relationships that increased our chances of survival when we had groups that we were part of we could share our food and reduce the likelihood that we'd starve from an insufficient food supply. We can also take time watching around the fire at night. To make sure the group was protected from predators. We could help each other out with childcare and other home responsibilities to make life a bit more easier and sustainable. And when we were separated from the group that automatically meant that our chances of survival dropped. And our body knew that and induced stress state in our body, because we were under threat, more likely to be pursued by predators. For example, we had to be prepared to fight or to flee. That stress state is beneficial in the short term in the same way that loneliness today. Might motivate us to call a good friend or visit a family member. But the problem is when loneliness persists for a long period of time, and even though we're no longer hunter-gatherers been. Are Nervous Sims are very similar to how they were thousands of years ago, and we experienced the same stress today when we're separated from family and friends, and when we feel lonely, and over time that chronic stress can lead to greater inflammation in our body, and increase our risk of heart, disease and other chronic illnesses. GonNa take a quick break and then will return with more when we come back in just a moment. Are you ready to set a new standard of success for yourself as your career grows, you wanNA. Do more strive more. Your drive and determination have helped you get to where you are today, and at Capella University. They want to help you do even more. They've created flexible doctoral programs that work with your schedule and can help you. Put Your Passion into action wondering where to start what it's like to be a doctoral student or what it takes to find success with online learning. Learning Capella has designed online degree programs to help you raise your own bar and gain the skills. You need to get where you want in your career. Their courses curriculum and learning formats are all created with flexibility in mind to fit your life and your schedule learn more about the experience and skills that Cappella can help you build while earning your doctoral degree when you're ready to explore next steps visit. Cappella. Dot Edu slash doctoral journey. That's Cappella Dot. Edu Slash doctoral journey. A while back I, talked with senator. Ben Sasse about political polarization, and I was shocked at how often loneliness crept into that conversation. Do you think that our politics and polarization or contributing to our sense of isolation or might even be a vicious cycle where the two are just feeding off of each other, and that's a good question. I do think this is deeply tied an together. They issues of loneliness and political polarization. We've evolved to seek out our tribe and the question that we have to ask ourselves in the modern age is who constitutes our tribe. In thousands of years ago, it was people who look like us and came from similar background. But the world in which we live in now. A world that is more pluralistic. That is more inclusive. Requires us to expand our definition of what could constitute a tribe. The United States in many ways was built upon that premise and premise that our tribe is not defined by the countries that we came from the language that we speak. It was defined by our desire to seek out freedom to work for it and to protect it. That was a radical idea for so many reasons because it ran counter to thousands of years of evolution where people were primarily getting together with people who shared very similar backgrounds and experiences, and that was her tribe. Okay, so then how do we get back to that sense of shared values and purpose in this country what we are called to do? The modern age now on the United States and I think increasingly countries around the world. A C- be more explicit and clear about who constitutes tribe. To define that not by our skin, color or language or cultural heritage, but by our values by our shared experience, shared outlook for the future, we all care about the welfare of our children and we WANNA. See for world for them. We want our children to have opportunity. We don't want our children to struggle in poverty there alone constitute just a few of the core values that can serve as a point of connection. That's where we have to focus. That's how we. We have to build a relationship and if we build relationship that becomes our foundation of dialogue, that's how we begin to address political polarization in the US and around the World Vivek a half to ask you about covid nineteen, and inevitably some of this will dovetail with our conversation about loneliness first off. Do you think that the trump administration has done enough and done enough early enough to combat the coronavirus? Well, let me say from outset, bandit having been a part of. Two major responses when I was in government the Bulla response. And Ezekiel response. I know that it is. Very difficult to be learning about something you while you're trying to take action to address it. And inevitably in a Republican and Democratic administrations are stumbles. But what matters is how you react to those stumbles? Do you learn from the mistakes that you made to communicate openly and honestly with the public about those so that you can build trust? And what I worry about is that we were both late to the response here with covid nineteen in the US. But. We also continue to struggle. When it comes to. Pulling out the stops to make sure that we are expanding the core capacities that we need in which include testing the ability to do contact tracing the ability to ensure that our hospital systems have the protective equipment and capacity to search. We have a second wave. The People in America have made extraordinary sacrifices. To, stay home to turn their lives upside down. In many cases. They've lost their jobs and they've done this because we told them we needed to buy time for a hospital systems not to be overrun for US build testing and tracing capacity to be prepared and the question is. Are we doing right by people who have made those sacrifices? Are we making use of that time to prepare I? Don't think we're doing enough now. And that is what worries me will. Will Vivek I wanna go back to something that you touched on a moment ago. Which is the importance of truth in the public trust in dealing with the crisis like covid nineteen, when you were in the Obama administration dealing with the Zeka Abol epidemics, how important things like truth in the public trust to the overall success of the effort you know in moments this what we've seen in past administrations is people pull together in times of emergency. We have to communicate. Consistently and with one voice. That doesn't mean that we never change your mind, but if we get new data and he tells us we need to change course. We explained that a public. We help bring them along our process of decision making. I worry that we're not doing a good job here as country when it comes to. Delivering on these core benchmarks that we have to meet to open safely and to address a second wave, and where sowing confusion in the country as we have allowed this response to become politicized a simple example. The CDC issued guidance saying that we should be wearing masks in public yet. Somehow that public health guidance has become politicized and now wearing a mask seems to be. Be a political statement, which side of the aisle you're on right that is truly unfortunate, because when public health becomes politicised, people suffer, and we lose more lives. We've already seen that happen. I were worry many of the debts that we're seeing now in the country I do think could have been avoided if we had an earlier and more effective and more unified response. And in some sense, this is just an extension of an alarming trend that we've seen over the past few years, which is the politicization of science? Even now I'm seeing a significant number of people on my social media, people I know making this whole. The Cure is worse than the disease argument against the quarantine, and they point to the mental health impact of physical isolation in particular. Do you think that there is a significant population for whom the resulting loneliness and depression might actually be more dangerous to their health than the potential of catching the virus will everyone in the population exists on a spectrum of risk. There's some people. For. Whom even if they catch this virus? If they have been nineteen, the effects will be minimal to none. By! Yes, they may suffer. Serious consequences from losing their job or from the depression, anxiety and loneliness, comprom- Kobe nineteen, but they are plenty of people. For whom the opposite is true where they are at high risk of having complications or dying if they get cope in nineteen. And that would be worse outcome than the economic challenges and the mental health challenges they may face having to stay at home they do truth is though is saying that you have to choose between one or another is a false choice that we've been forced into here. The reality is that. If, we do our job as a country, our government steps up. To ensure, we have the pieces in place to open up safely which it has the power to do. By expanding testing dramatically by getting the contact juries in capability in place, and we need an all fifty states. If they do that, we can open up earlier. We are in fact, delaying are opening up because we're failing to get ready. As a country were making up safe in by what were forcing. People do have to make this choice. There is a third option which we can choose both to protect the economy in our health, but it requires is moving fast, and they were times Ben when we function as fifty states and we all do our own thing. But there are times when we have to be one nation. This is when you need the federal government to step up. And in this case they need to take over the production and distribution of tests to make sure we have not only enough, but it's distributed well and that. Anyone who needs it can get tested. which is not the case now they need to take over when it comes to ensuring that we have a trained core of contact tracers, and so they need to support states in that effort. We have a small fraction right now. Of the people that we need in order to trace contacts, and what that means is that if we detect a new infection, we don't have enough resources to make sure we can in a sense, throw a net over that infection container, which means it will continue to spread in the community, but these are avoidable problems. This is where leadership from government is so critical and bringing it back to loneliness. It's been kind of interesting and fun to see how people are getting creative about finding work arounds to this quarantine such as a happy hours. Hours on zoom face timing, but still none of this really takes place of normal social experiences where you can hug shake hands, share the same space having a herky-jerky conversational zoom or skype where you're talking over each other, or there's a delay because of Wi fi. Being really slow doesn't quite cut it I wonder. Are there things that we can do to improve the quality of these virtual and socially distanced interactions through this? Yeah, that's a great question. The truth has been there. There is really no full substitute for being in person that is. That's true because that's how we've interacted for thousands of years. That's what our bodies nervous systems are used to responding to, but with that said I do think that we can use technology in particular ways they can help keep our connections alive, and in fact can actually deepen our connections from where they were before the pandemic, so for example if we make a point. To put some time assigned each day could just be fifteen minutes to spend with people. We love whether that's. Video conferencing with them or speaking to them on the phone. That can serve as a lifeline for us, and even though that's only a few minutes, a day can leave us. Feeling more deeply connected. The second thing we can do is to focus on the quality of time we have with the people were speaking with. And that means putting away distraction when we're speaking with them, you know if you had this experience of being deeply listened to of having somebody who's fully present. When you're talking to them, you know that five minutes of conversation like that is so powerful. And weaken achieve that right now without spending a single minute with somebody simply by giving them our full attention. I considered to last things. which is one the power of solitude. I had a professor in medical school. Was it extraordinarily busy busy professor. She was a mom, two wonderful boys. She taught medical students. She took care patients. She helped run the medical school. She was incredibly busy, but what she did is recognizing the need for solitude, but not having the time to spend an hour meditating each day. She would use the twenty seconds that she had while. She was washing her hands before she saw a patient. She would just think about the things. She had to be grateful for that day. And then she would walk into that room after those twenty seconds. Healing, nor at peace and more able to be herself. And she had been before. That's a power of what solitude can do for us. And keep this in mind as well. Perhaps one of the most powerful antidotes to loneliness. When of the greatest? Sources of connection that we can find service and what service does is it shifts the focus from us to someone else in the context of a positive interaction. It also reminds us. That, we have value to bring to the world. There are many people around us who are struggling. And there many opportunities to serve them. These are simple ways. That we can strengthen and deepen our connection in this time of the pandemic and if we do this. We use this moment. To refocus on our relationships to recommit to making people a priority in our lives. Then I think as painful as his time is. We can come out of this pandemic. More deeply connected and more resilient than before the pandemic began the. I certainly hope so I wanna ask you. What about our kids? So many parents are now there's children's sole source of companionship, and there's certainly nothing normal about not going to school, not having extracurricular activities like little league and summer camp plates with friends and I. Seriously wonder how this quarantine is affecting young people's emotional development. What kind of advice would you give to parents about how to deal with that? And maybe what kind of signs to look for that? Their kids might be suffering from loneliness, explaining to our kids. What's happening during? This pandemic can be tricky depending on how old they are, and it's tricky, also because we don't know all the answers in terms of when this is all going to end either. And so this, this is uneasy, but A couple of things that are worth keeping in mind here one is that is to recognize that this is a stressful time for all of us. Adults in kids and stress manifests in different ways in people's lives, and in their bodies for some people stress me, look like increased irritability and anger in other people may look like depression. Or like withdrawal. May Show up as soon disturbances or difficulty focusing I during teaching. I would keep an eye out for patterns like that. For disruptions in how. A child normally behaves. Now they learn. In how they socialize. And what I would also emphasize is that. Is it. This is a time where we also may have an unexpected opportunity. To spend quality time with our children in a way that we weren't perhaps able to before and so I'm finding in this time while I'm like many parents trying to figure out how to do work calls and potty train our two year old, and make sure three-year-old is eating, and do all of that that I do feel stress and strain two times, but I'm realizing that just taking five minutes. To Horse Round with the kids to give them piggyback rides around the House, but it makes a real difference in how I feel as well as in how they feel in less than. It's just keep this in mind our kids. Learn so much from watching how we react to circumstances. So, there are many ways I think we can strengthen our bonds with family and role model for our children how to deal with the stress of this Mon, recognizing that this is a stressful moment for all of us. This is a type of trauma that we're going through. We'll before we go. Do you think that perhaps if there's a silver lining to this horrible pandemic that we're starting to realize again the importance? Importance of the people in our lives and having meaningful social experiences with those people, maybe once it's all said and done. Might we finally put down our phones, and maybe even enjoy a renaissance of social connection when I finished writing this book? What became clear to me is that the opposite of loneliness is actually love, and that's what the book is ultimately about, and if we focus on building a people centered life. Then, we will make it possible to build a people centered world. So that is my hope. Coming out of all of this is that we can move forward with a simple credo. Put people first. That's how I approach my life. It's what I'd love to see us us as a force for guiding how we designed society, and how we emerge from this pandemic. Let's beautiful thought for us to end on again. The book is called together the healing power of human connection in a sometimes lonely World Dr Vivek Murthy. Thanks for talking with me. Thank you so much. Ben a really enjoyed this time together. Thanks again to Dr Vivek Murthy for coming on the show order his new book together the healing power of human connection in sometimes lonely world on Amazon audible, or wherever books are sold, and follow him at Vivek Murthy Dot Com. We're on twitter at Hat Vivek Underscore Murphy. If you enjoyed today's podcast. Be Sure to subscribe to us on Apple podcasts and rate and review us while you're there. Five star ratings in detailed reviews or one of the best ways for new listeners to discover the show you can also follow us on facebook or on twitter at at kick ass, news pod and recommend us to your friends on your social media for more fun stuff visit kick. ASS News Dot Com and I welcome your comments, questions and suggestions at comments at kick, ASS News, dot, com, or now I'm Ben Mathis and thanks for listening to kick ASS news.

United States Ben Dr Vivek Murthy Congress Vivek Underscore Murphy America ASS News obesity apple Ben Mathis Barack Obama facebook Murthy depression Dr. Vivek Vivek Murthy Dot Com Vivier Alaska
Cow Cuddling, Goat Yoga, and Comfort Ducks

The BreakPoint Podcast

04:19 min | 1 year ago

Cow Cuddling, Goat Yoga, and Comfort Ducks

"There's a new craze in wellness involves cows and goats even ducks so why are so many people turning to critters instead of two other people were to God the Colson Center. I'm John Stonestreet. This is breakpoint. All of us have those times when we want to be pampered for some that means a few hours a day SPA or maybe a hike in the great outdoors but there's another option now available courtesy of a farm in upstate New York Cow Cuddling Mountain Horse Farm offers visitors a horse and cow experience audience the experience consists of spending quality time petting brushing and even cuddling the animals according to the website healthy food house cow cuddling is the hottest wellness trend of the moment and it's not cheap three hundred dollars for a ninety andy minute cuddle but the potential benefits are considerable were told cuddling with animals has shown to reduce stress and help us bond with nature. The horses cows at Mountain Horse Farms Ken and I quote feel your happiness sadness anxiety these. Is Animals will respond to you without any judgment and the results relaxation healing awareness comfort mindfulness and an improved assertiveness and confidence now Calcutta Ling is just one example of a larger in still growing trend friend. Increasingly people are looking for emotional support from animals instead of from each other another examples goat yoga which is exactly what it sounds like Yoga practiced in the presence of an in tandem with live goats now the the goal of go yoga isn't to sweat. It's to have a quote baby goat climb on your shoulders during your plank which is a position that resembles the top of a push up according to the L._A.. Times all of that bleeding cuteness promotes emotional and physical wellness and of course the sheer number of emotional support animals joining us these days and supermarket isles or crowded airplanes has led to that say challenges United Airlines recently announced. It's limiting emotional support animals to just dogs and cats. Hats that policy change came in response to complaints from passengers and crew members about all of the emotional support pigs turkeys ducks even a peacock or two that were biting people in soiling the cabin now having grown up on a farm with dogs and cats. That's a pet calf even pigs turtle. I love animals a few years ago. At our wilberforce weekend we featured incredible ministry that emotionally helps abused women and children using therapy that involves horses but the goal therapy was to help these people heal and to trust people again today the proliferation of emotional support animals and all of its forms and in all places just highlights a very real and growing problem across Western culture loneliness loneliness and our lack of connection with other people we are as former Surgeon General Vivek Murthy put it in the midst of a loneliness epidemic. It's causing reduction in life span similar to that which is caused by smoking fifteen cigarettes a day. Hey It's greater than the impact on Lifespan of obesity the cure for loneliness however isn't company. It's connection. We said this before on breakpoint. Many of our greatest ills such as addiction depression can be traced back to a lack of meaningful foe connection to other people societies like ours is one of my break point colleagues put it are loneliness producing machines because of our obsession with individualism and autonomy the average Americans gone from having three close friends on average average to just one because one commentator described for too many of us are alienated anxious despairing lost. We find ourselves putting down three hundred bucks to cuddle with a cower carried ducks around for emotional support and let's be clear there. I've not seen any church-sponsored goat yoga groups at least yet Christians aren't immune to our loneliness producing machine or the world view that fuels it still we have all people should understand the god-given created.

loneliness Calcutta Ling Mountain Horse Farms Ken John Stonestreet Colson Center Horse Farm New York United Airlines General Vivek Murthy wilberforce three hundred dollars
How To Break Through Loneliness

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

14:35 min | 2 weeks ago

How To Break Through Loneliness

"Coming up on this episode of the Doctors Pharmacy Again, there's a sense of shame that people have and even admitting to others that they need. Some more human contact with the they need some time with their friends. They don't WanNa seem desperate or needy or somehow. Again not. Likeable. Hey Rwanda's Dr Mark you know I'm all about the benefits of healthy fats and so many of my patients have found that toning down the process cards and their diet is the best way to support better cognition lose stubborn belly fat and even reverse signs of aging. But often hear them say that it can be really hard to stick to specially if they have busy lives, need food the big and grab on ago. So. When I found perfect Kito, I was really excited. One of my favorite items from perfect. Kito is there nut butters they're made with MC T. oil macadamia cashews and coconut. So there's plenty of healthy fast to keep you fuller longer. Plus their amazing flavors like chocolate hazelnut, almond butter and Jelly snicker doodle macadamia Vanilla, all formulated tastes great while keeping you in Kito Service. My favorite is chocolate hazelnut kind like new tell and I love it. A gums in an easy receivable squeezed package is really handy traveling there Keno cookies are also really tasty and a great way to enjoy an occasional healthy treat. They went through more than ten recipes combined with rigorous blood and ketone testing to make sure they're cookies don't spike blood sugar since the patients and friends on perfect Hito I've had multiple. People tell me they find it so much easier to stick with their diet. I'm about finding what Diet works best for your unique body, but whatever it is, it's important to be prepared with different options. So you don't get stuck in a food emergency if you're trying heat or just dialing back on carbs, be sure to check out perfect Kito snacks and keep some on hand to help you stay successful. Right now is a great time to stock up there offering doctors pharmacy listeners twenty, two percent off plus free shipping with the Code Dr Mark Dr. You'll also get a free nut butter on any order of eighty dollars or more through the end of November twenty twenty just go to perfect Kito dot com voice is Dr. Mark. And use the Code Dr Mark To get twenty percent plus free shipping and make sure you try their nut butters and Kito cookies. Now let's get back to this week's episode of the Doctors Pharmacy. Hi I'm pro at one of the producers of the Doctors Pharmacy for much of human history we relied on our connection to one another as a means of survival today most of us aren't reliant on our relationships for daily survival, but connection to others remains a vital component of optimal health. In fact, chronic loneliness can put us in a state of chronic stress which research shows can lead to inflammation and a host of other precursors to disease earlier this year just before covid nineteen was declared a pandemic Dr Hyman sat down with the former Surgeon General Vivek Murthy to discuss his work on loneliness and how we can overcome it in our own lives. The truth is whether you're feeling lonely right now. Or whether you're not, you undoubtedly know people who are lonely and all of us are at risk of loneliness at various points in our lives. Loneliness isn't something that you know you're born with an effect cheaper entire life we go through natural periods of connection and disconnection our life. And the question is, how do we prepare for that? How do we deal with it? How do we build a strong foundation of connection to to begin with? So there a couple of things in the in the book that I. I go through that are I believe helpful in building that connected life one of them unexpectedly is service. It turns out that when we serve others. We actually break some of these very negative patterns of loneliness that get in basically launched within us as part of our evolutionary history those patterns being the focus on self, and also the elevated threat level that we experience when we're lonely because when you help somebody else first of all, that takes you away from focus on yourself and you're focusing on on another person. But the second thing is it's also disarming when you're helping other people, you're also reminded of what value you have to offer to the world. And that's actually reassuring that lowers your your sense of. So service is a powerful way to connect with others and also to reconnect in a sense with ourselves our own sense of self worth value. The second thing though they can help us on an individual level. He said think about where we're spending our time when it comes to social relationships. So number one, are we making sure that we have at least five to ten minutes a day that we're spending with people? We love that could be spending in person it could be speaking to them a phone we know or through videoconferencing but are we spending five to ten minutes with someone that we love every day and this might seem very simple you'd be surprised how many people can. Go for days without having a meaningful conversation with somebody but even just that five minutes can make an extraordinary impact and that comes down to also another point about the quality time that he's been. So technology's really interesting. We can have a conversation about technology and how it's impacted our connection with one another. But one of the things that I think that many of us do now and I certainly have been guilty of this is we have allowed technology particularly our phones. To Dilute the quality of our interactions, the other people because we bring our phones off into the dinner table and we might convince yourself hey, I'm not really paying attention to it. I've got an unsigned I've put it face down I'm not really paying attention to it, but we actually know from studies that when there's phone even within sight you even if it's on vibrate and face down yeah it actually changes how people feel about the conversation in the negative way I think there are. In the book, but I would try to do is I try to share some stories that lay out some individual steps. We can thing in our lives but also. The stories that talk about what schools and workplaces. Can do an are doing already in some cases to create a culture of connection because at the end of the day mark, likely if we want to create real connection if we WANNA build a people centered life an Emmy People Centered Society it's going to involve more than programs. It's GONNA require us to shift culture men to ask ourselves what's really important. Now, if we got one group of one hundred people together on any street corner in America, my guess is if you ask them to name their top three priorities that people would be at the top of that list, people might say it's my daughter or my son or myself or my mom or my dad. But if you look at how they behave yeah. How where we put our time and Energy and where frankly society nudges US dissenter time and energy it's not usually with the people we love most it's an investing in places where we can acquire greater power reputation and well than traditional marks of achievement in modern society. I'm not saying that those aren't important or desertion be pursued the question of where are the priority list and your facebook feed or instagram or your email or. Write with those feats in particular like I think about like our childhood and about their childhood that my kids will be experiencing and you in modern childhood I think the messages, the cultural messages about what matters are just coming at you at thousand times faster and I meet so many young people who are feeling and because of this culture compares on on social media that they are not then enough that they're not good looking enough that they're not popular enough or funny enough. That ultimately that there are not enough and that has actually a very powerful insidious effect on our connection with other people, and this is one of the things I think that is not often well appreciated, which is at our connection to other people is ultimately built on having a strong connection to ourselves. What is it mean to have his trunk national? Herself it means to know that we have a sense of worth and value a means to recognize that we are human beings who have something meaningful to add to the world, and that requires a combination of self knowledge and self compassion. Now, how do we develop self knowledge? We develop it partly by living life, but not only by living life by having. Time to reflect and time to think and much of that white space in our life that many people use to ponder and reflect on things on that has disappeared it's evaporated as now in the five minutes you have between events or when you're waiting at the bus stop, we need just a letter devices and look at the news or Inbox but. Ultimately if our if we are not able to support particularly among our kids I-, healthy sense of self if we're not able to convey to them and help them understand what it is that makes them worthy invaluable and that it's not what they're wearing or how much money their parents have in their pockets or how popular they are on what parties are. Invited to. then. We are going to run into a situation where people feel less and less adequate, and then they will trust seek to be the people that they think other people want them to be. And when we do that, that's a recipe for loneliness. When we try to be something, we're not We can't inhabit our own skin. People feel lonely. What are the? What are the challenges somebody will have to actually doing this in their life? Like. Everybody would want to do this. But how how do people get over those obstacles? It's a question I. Think there are few key obstacles that come number one sometimes people feel that focusing on. Connections in their own life is somehow self-indulgent. That, they should be. On Doing more at work I'm getting that promotion on building up their bank account on taking their kids I two activities. Busy parents I think are very interesting because I think a lot of them struggle with loneliness especially in the early years you know when their kids are one, two, three, four years old before they're in school you know it can be very all consuming as a parent. To to really take care of your children in that can isolates you from others but I think this feeling that somehow investing in our connections is a luxury that itself on Delta and I think is one of the reasons why people don't do it more I think the second reason is that again, there's a sense of sham that people have and even admitting to others that they need. Some more human contact with they need some time with their friends they don't WanNa seem desperate or needy or somehow. You know again, not likeable or or can outcast in some way. So people have a hard time not just acknowledging to other people even acknowledging it to themselves and I. Think the last thing is is a structural issue as well, which is that if you look at how our lives are designed. With paying spending so many hours at work and many people have to commute. Any of those hours is there's a question of. Time that comes up, which is where where am I gonNA find the time to go and interact with other people and those questions feel. Awesome. I mean think you feel really tiring when you think about that so hard. Let me just keep going with life. But this is where I think it's so powerful and important to recognize that. The dividends at come from just a small amount of time spent in connection can last for hours days weeks or even longer, and that's why the five or ten minutes that you spend with someone that you love. Can Be really powerful. So anyway, the point is that there are reasons to not connect, but once we realized the power of even a small amount of time spent connecting with others. Once we realized that we don't need anything else to do that. We just need our intention and a willingness to show up to listen to be vulnerable and open with other people in our life. Then, we can start building that road to were living a truly connected life and I think that he's what holds the key to greater health and also FULCO. True. Thank you for doing this Ramos Bug I. Think it's it's Microsoft's with five minutes a day. Whether it's finding some old friends and reconnecting did whether it's finding a place to be of service in your community. You don't have to have some big giant community that you're building overnight but those micro steps make a huge difference and we'll help so much of the suffering in the world. So thank you. For writing this book, I want everybody to get a copy. It's together the healing power of human connection is sometimes only world I can let you can learn more about it. As website, which is a murky dot Com Viv K. M. U. R.. T. H. Y. dot com for slash together. Dash. Book even before cove in Nineteen we were facing an epidemic of loneliness. The pandemic has further shown light on the value that social connection has in our life and in our health taking steps to break out of the of loneliness or maintain meaningful connections to others a vital. Part of any wellness plan prioritize spending five to ten minutes a day intentionally connecting with others even if it's over the phone volunteering joining a class and prioritizing time with loved ones are always you can strengthen your social bonds and support your health in the process. If you enjoyed this episode of the doctors, pharmacy please consider rating and reviewing us or leaving a comment below. Thanks for tuning in. Everybody's Dr Hyman thanks for Tuning Doctors Pharmacy I. Hope you're loving this podcast. It's one of my favorite things to do introducing you all the experts that I know and I love that I've learned so much from and I'm GonNa tell you about something else I'm doing which is called marks picks my weekly newsletter and in it I share my favorite stuff from foods supplements to gadgets to tools to enhance your health. It's all the cool stuff that I use and then my team uses to optimize enhanced our health and I'd love sign up for the weekly newsletter only Senate, you once a week on. Fridays nothing else promise. And all of you go to a doctor Hyman dot com thord slash picks to sign up that's Dr Hyman dot com four sized picks Pi as and sign up for the newsletter and I'll share with you my favorite stuff that I use to enhance my health and get healthier and better and live younger longer now back to this week's episode. Hi, everyone I hope you enjoyed this week's episode. Just a reminder that this podcast is for educational purposes only this podcast is not a substitute for professional. CARE. By a doctor or other qualified medical professional, this podcast is provided on the understanding that it does not constitute medical or other professional advice or services. If you're looking for helping your journey, seek out a qualified medical practitioner. If you're looking for a functional medicine practitioner, you can visit IFM dot org and search they're fine a practitioner database. It's important that you have someone in your corner who's trained WHO's a licensed healthcare practitioner and can help you make changes especially when it comes to your health.

Doctors Pharmacy Dr Hyman Kito Dr. Mark Emmy People Centered Society Kito Service Dr Mark Dr. Kito Rwanda US Delta America facebook General Vivek Murthy Senate IFM Microsoft
Introducing: The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

Bag Man

02:29 min | 4 months ago

Introducing: The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"We choose to. Do the other thing not because they are easy, but because they are odd, hi, this is chuck. Rosenberg host of the oath podcast. I speak with people who sacrificed for the common good who believe in collective responsibility who do things that are hard. Our conversations on the youth are thoughtful, civil, respectful essential. We bring these leaders and their struggles and successes to life in the third season of the oath. You'll meet more inspirational leaders. People who took that oath made that promise and serve this. This amazing country in various ways leaders like former secretary of defense and CIA director Leon Panetta. The toughest job I had as secretary of Defense was sign deployment orders that placed young men and women in uniform in harm's way. Former NASA astronaut Kathy Sullivan in your role as an astronaut. One of the key things you're doing is helping. Make sure the pieces are coming together. The unknowns are being probed carefully. The risks are being evaluated carefully, and it's very hard on families to stand there. There and know that their loved one is writing bombs for living the highest ranking woman in the FBI Amy Hess I remember. He was kneeling down on the ground, and he was holding a baby's shoe, I knew he had young children, and I watched as he just dissolved in tears, and all of a sudden, the evil that happened there in Oklahoma City on April. Nineteenth nineteen ninety-five struck me former judge and United States. Attorney Carol Lam walked through that door. They would all look at. At me and I would think to myself I know what you're thinking about me right now, and by the time we leave this room, you're going to be thinking something else and former Surgeon General Vivek Murthy. There are fundamental core values around decency round kindness around compassion. It's part of our shared humanity. We are truly interdependent. We are stronger when we are together. We live in an uncertain world public faith in our most crucial institutions waivers when we most need those institutions to thrive. But remarkable people still take the oath. They still raise their hand serve, and they still sacrifice for the common good, despite the turmoil reminded us of the need for good and honest, public servants join me for season, three of an MSNBC podcast search for the oath wherever you're listening right now and subscribe new episodes everyone's.

Carol Lam General Vivek Murthy secretary Rosenberg Kathy Sullivan Leon Panetta Oklahoma City MSNBC NASA FBI United States CIA Amy Hess director Attorney
Introducing: The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

Article II: Inside Impeachment

02:29 min | 4 months ago

Introducing: The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"We choose to. Do the other thing not because they are easy, but because they are odd, hi, this is Chuck Rosenberg host of the oath podcast I speak with people who sacrificed for the common good who believe in collective responsibility who do things that are hard. Our conversations on the youth are thoughtful, civil, respectful essential. We bring these leaders and their struggles and successes to life in the third season of the oath. You'll meet more inspirational leaders. People. Who took that oath? Oath made that promise and serve this amazing country in various ways, leaders like former secretary of Defense and CIA director. Leon Panetta. The toughest job I had as secretary of Defense, was to sign deployment orders that placed young men and women in uniform in harm's way. Former NASA astronaut Kathy, Sullivan in your role as an astronaut. One of the key things you're doing is helping. Make sure the pieces are coming together. The unknowns are being probed carefully the risks. Risks are being evaluated carefully, and it's very hard on families to stand there and know that their loved one is writing bombs for living the highest ranking woman in the FBI Amy Hess I, remember he was kneeling down on the ground, and he was holding a baby's shoe I knew he had young children, and I watched as he just dissolved in tears, all of a sudden, the evil that happened there in Oklahoma City on April nineteenth, nineteen ninety-five struck. Struck me former judge and United States attorney. Carol Lam when I walked through that door. They would all look at me and then I would think to myself I. Know what you're thinking about me right now, and by the time we leave this room, you're going to be thinking something else and former Surgeon General Vivek Murthy. There are fundamental core values around decency round kindness around compassion. It's part of our shared humanity. We are truly interdependent. We are stronger. Together? We live in an uncertain world, public faith in our most crucial institutions waivers when we most need those institutions to thrive. But, remarkable people still take the oath. They still raise their hand serve, and they still sacrifice for the common good, despite the turmoil reminded us of the need for good and honest, public servants join me for season three of an MSNBC podcast search for the oath wherever you're listening right now and subscribe new episodes everyone's.

director General Vivek Murthy secretary Carol Lam Chuck Rosenberg Leon Panetta MSNBC FBI NASA CIA Oklahoma City Amy Hess United States attorney Kathy Sullivan
Introducing: The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

The Beat with Ari Melber

02:29 min | 4 months ago

Introducing: The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"We choose to. Do the other thing not because they are easy, but because they are odd, hi, this is Chuck Rosenberg host of the oath podcast. I speak with people who sacrificed for the common good who believe in collective responsibility who do things that are hard. Our conversations on the youth are thoughtful, civil, respectful essential. We bring these leaders and their struggles and successes to life in the third season of the oath. You'll meet more inspirational leaders. People who took that oath made that promise and serve this amazing. Amazing country in various ways, leaders like former secretary of defense and CIA director Leon Panetta, the toughest job I had as secretary of defense was sign deployment orders that placed young men and women in uniform in harm's way former NASA astronaut Kathy Sullivan in your role as an astronaut. One of the key things you're doing is helping. Make sure the pieces are coming together. The unknowns are being probed carefully. The risks are being evaluated carefully, and it's very hard on families to stand there and. And know that their loved one is writing bombs for living the highest ranking woman in the FBI Amy Hess, I remember. He was kneeling down on the ground, and he was holding a baby's shoe. I knew he had young children, and I watched, as he just dissolved in tears, and all of a sudden the evil that happened there in Oklahoma City on April Nineteenth Nineteen, ninety-five struck me former judge and United States Attorney Carol Lam. When I walked through that door, they would all look. Look at me and I would think to myself I. Know what you're thinking about me right now, and by the time we leave this room, you're going to be thinking something else and former Surgeon General Vivek Murthy. There are fundamental core values around decency round kindness around compassion. It's part of our shared humanity. We are truly interdependent. We are stronger when we are together. We live in an uncertain world public faith in our most crucial institutions waivers when we most need those institutions to thrive. But remarkable people still take the oath. They still raise their hand serve, and they still sacrifice for the common good, despite the turmoil reminded us of the need for good and honest, public servants join me for season three of an MSNBC podcast search for the oath wherever you're listening right now and subscribe new episodes everyone's.

General Vivek Murthy secretary Chuck Rosenberg Kathy Sullivan Leon Panetta Carol Lam MSNBC FBI Oklahoma City Amy Hess CIA NASA director United States Attorney
Introducing: The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

02:29 min | 4 months ago

Introducing: The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"We choose to. Do the other thing not because they are easy, but because they are odd, hi, this is chuck. Rosenberg host of the oath podcast I speak with people who sacrificed for the common good who believe in collective responsibility who do things that are hard. Our conversations on the youth are thoughtful, civil, respectful essential. We bring these leaders and their struggles and successes to life in the third season of the oath. You'll meet more inspirational leaders. People who took that oath made that promise and serve this amazing. Amazing country in various ways leaders like former secretary of defense and CIA director Leon Panetta the toughest job I had as secretary of defense was to sign deployment orders that placed young men and women in uniform in harm's way. Former NASA astronaut Kathy Sullivan in your role as an astronaut. One of the key things you're doing is helping. Make sure the pieces are coming together. The unknowns are being probed carefully. The risks are being evaluated carefully, and it's very hard on families to stand there and. And know that their loved one is writing bombs for living the highest ranking woman in the FBI. Amy Hess I remember. He was kneeling down on the ground, and he was holding a baby's shoe I knew he had young children, and I watched, as he just dissolved in tears, and all of a sudden, the evil that happened there in Oklahoma, city on April, Nineteenth nineteen ninety-five struck me former judge and United States Attorney Carol, Lam. When I walked through that door, they would all look at. At me, and then I would think to myself I. Know what you're thinking about me right now, and by the time we leave this room, you're going to be thinking something else and former Surgeon General Vivek Murthy. There are fundamental core values around decency round kindness around compassion. It's part of our shared humanity. We are truly interdependent. We are stronger when we are together. We live in an uncertain world public faith in our most crucial institutions waivers when we most need those institutions to thrive. But remarkable people still take the oath they still raise their hand serve, and they still sacrifice for the common good, despite the turmoil reminded us of the need for good and honest, public servants join me for season, three of an MSNBC podcast search for the oath wherever you're listening right now and subscribe new episodes everyone's.

General Vivek Murthy Lam FBI secretary Rosenberg Kathy Sullivan Leon Panetta Amy Hess MSNBC NASA CIA Oklahoma director United States Attorney Carol
Take Away Your Phone and What Is Left?

The BreakPoint Podcast

03:54 min | 10 months ago

Take Away Your Phone and What Is Left?

"The photographer has just revealed. Our culture's most common social pathology honest. It's like looking in a mirror for the Colson Center. I'm John Stonestreet. This us as break point five years ago photographer Eric. PICKERSGILL and his wife. Angie were lying in bed backs turn to one another looking at their phones. pickersgill dozed off and his phone slid from his hand and hit the floor. The sound jolted him awake as he told the BBC. He saw the scene from the perspective of the ceiling fan. Dan In his mind is very was hand frozen in the same position only without his phone he and his wife were so close physically but psychologically logically and emotionally so separated from one another he said this inspired a project that depicts how technology dominates our lives often to the detriment of our most most important relationships. The remarkable series of photographs is called removed. The pictures run between startling comical in one newly married couple sits. It's on the hood of a car. Mark just married staring at non existing phones instead of each other and another a crowd at auction sit gazing into their empty hands as if they were at a palm readers can mention. The photos are all posed but the project ought not be dismissed as a mere stunt as pickersgill told the BBC he didn't know I know the people in the pictures beforehand. He saw people who were looking at their phones. Explain the project and then ask them if they would be willing to pose. Perhaps the reason they agreed is that they saw themselves in the point. He was trying to make of course if any of us were photographed throughout our day. Chances are we'd be caught in similar poses. Who among us is at some level not hitched to are glowing rectangles as the displays curator put it removed lifts the veil of Contemporary Technologies. Hold hold on our devotion and also reveals how much this devotion isolates us from other people in her two thousand eleven book alone together. Mit Psychologist Colleges Sherry terkel. wrote about how the technology we think gives us more control actually controls us. Our phones are as pickersgill. graphically illustrated straighted the last things. We look at every night. The first things we check every morning and alone together terkel describes teenagers who are actually afraid of phone calls because the require a level of intimacy in spontaneity that are out of their control. Text and social media are conducted by us on our terms. Our schedule Agile and can be stage-managed honed to ensure that others see only what we want them to see in the eight years. Since Turco's book was published are together. aloneness MHM ness is only more entrenched and the psychological impact terkel described only more pronounced and more tragic. According to a recent study by the American psychological Article Association rates of Mood Disorders and suicide related outcomes among adolescents and young adults have increased significantly over the last decade and the researchers directly state that the increase in adolescent major depressive episodes began after two thousand eleven concurrent with the increased ownership ownership of smartphones and increase in digital media. Time our devotion to our glowing. rectangles is just not giving us the control. We thought it would. On the contrary it's been a key ingredient in the spread of what former Surgeon General Vivek murthy called an epidemic of loneliness which is according murphy is bad for our health as smoking. Perhaps this is why people were so willing to pose for pickersgill like smokers you know. They should quit for their own. Good maybe we understand that we really would be better off without a phone in her hands all the time. Maybe we should give it a try. Even if no one's taking our picture for breakpoint. I'm John Stonestreet.

pickersgill John Stonestreet terkel BBC Colson Center Dan Angie American psychological Article Eric General Vivek murthy Mark Sherry terkel. Contemporary Technologies Turco murphy eight years five years
Cultivate Calm During Chaos | Neil Pasricha

The LEADx Show

56:41 min | 2 months ago

Cultivate Calm During Chaos | Neil Pasricha

"Would you like to accelerate your career and reach your full potential in minutes a day? Welcome to the lead x show with New York Times bestselling author and eat five hundred Entrepreneur Kevin crews. Hey Guys Kevin crews here welcome to the lead x leadership show where we help you to stand out and to get ahead at work now as you know, we like to switch things up here. Keep it interesting and continue that tradition today on the podcast instead of me interviewing an expert guest. We're GONNA have the guest deep dive into their topic. You see you'll be hearing audio from a lead x Webinar now. Of course, there are dozens of great webinars on Leadership Management Communication. Productivity and more all archived in the lead X. APP, just visit lead x dot org for more information about our Webinar archive so enough on the set up enough background information enjoy. Welcome everyone to this lead x Webinar with Neil Pastor Rita. Thank you so much for joining Neil. Past reach is the author of seven bucks including the book of Awesome. The happiness equation Awesome is everywhere, and you are awesome. His Books Are New York. Times and number one international bestseller's and have spent over two hundred weeks on bestseller lists and sold millions of copies. Neal is one of the world's top brings speakers and his first Ted Talk. The three days of awesome is wearing to one of the ten most inspiring all time. He thinks rights to an speaks about intentional living, and all of his work focuses on the themes of gratitude, happiness, failure, resiliency, and trust welcome Neil. Well. Thank you so much for having me guys. On this cold slash hot sunny slash cloudy Friday afternoon slash morning. I am in Toronto Canada. And it is cold and cloudy and the afternoon here, but I can already see people chiming in on the side Jason's. That's good morning from. Kansas, happy Friday everyone. Guys, please. Let's the chat open that box open on my screen the whole time. I would love to be reinvented time. Why because right now? During coronavirus, one of the biggest sort of needs I feel that I need and I feel like you probably feel it too, is community. Connection. betsy, high from Boulder, Sonya Hi, from California. This is wonderful for Michigan Los Angeles anyone not a not from America it'd be great to hear as well. I don't know. Who I'm talking to the other thing that would be great to salvage front before we get into our exciting conversation. Cuban a love all the texts coming in, thank you is who knows me so when I ended up. Speaking to groups of people, hundreds of people like I'm doing right now. What I don't know is who have you have read the book on some or Oj Geek from India I'm hearing these great ones Calgary. High highly shot cloudy Gog always touting car, isn't it now I'm just kidding but I almost called love. coury loved the Chart Cut Restaurant downtown props to independent restaurants bookstores. Guys got to bring him back. So I. Don't know who's read any books book Balsam the happiness equation you are. Does anybody listened to my podcast three bucks? Maybe some of you were when you get to hear me other places has anyone ever heard me give a speech a Tedtalk? Have you seen like dislike me? Know where you touched my stuff, if at all, or maybe you're like I have no idea who Zappa at me so? You quit your Yapper, but let me know so I'm seeing a seeing I'm seeing some Yeah, Berta, I've never heard of you until now. Diane says you are not unique to me, but I'm already intrigued. The says I've read the happiness equation. oh, I watched you on. Ted Ted or lead Ex. Yeah, so there's lots of I like the newest Story never heard before. Guys don't be sorry. There's eight billion of us in the world right now. I'm one person My community, which I'd like to welcome you into. Is You know one hundred thousand people? These are people that want to live a deeply intentional life. The reason I want to do that is because about ten years ago. My wife left me. My best friend took his own life. These two things happened in the span of a few weeks. I was devastated I stopped. Eating I stopped sleeping. I! Was a skeleton of myself mentally physically psychologically, and then I started a blog called one thousand awesome things, dot com, and for thousand straight weekdays I wrote an entry. Cheer myself up like old dangerous playground equipment like the smell of bakery, air or wearing warm underwear from out of the dryer. The blog took off one best log on the world two years in a row one hundred million hits. It turned into a book called the Book of Awesome so that book here the black. One came out sold. A million copies was a big bestseller I thought that's my fifteen minutes of fame. I kept my job at Walmart the whole time. I got my blog went by. Everyone gets like one viral fleet in their life and their life, but it kept going, and it turns up. I needed to when I got remarried five years later I ended up writing a guidebook to my unborn child than how to live happy life that became my book called the happiness equation more recently. Now I have three boys, five three and one very happily married my wife, lastly on lucky say, and ever in a brand new book all about Resilience Okay so you are also came out last November. On Book Two right now, but of course everything shut down that about resilience. The subtitles had navigate change, wrestle failure and live in attentional life. So what mine goal is today to you to lead acts doing this, 'cause I love what the lead x platform is all about Kevin and the people here. This is a special place. And wanted to invite you into my community. Because I think we got a lot in common, we won live intentional lives, and now there is such a spiking acute sense of stress anxiety, worry and feel fear in all of us. I'm feeling and I know you are to whether you admit it to yourself or not. Some days I don't admit it to myself. Everything's Hunky Dory I'm good. I'm I'M MR SOLIDARITY A- reopened the goddess. We're going through the first pandemic in a hundred years. We're facing economic recession. That could be depression. Every single industry for is suffering from tectonic change and I'm not talking about your industry are my energy on talking about every industry. Five point six million Americans and one million Canadians rhyme from Toronto. Canada have applied sore on employment, insurance or job loss in the last one week. A very close friend of mine lost her brother from Kobe this week. and. She's young. She's in her fifty s his her brother. suffer from a stroke after he was diagnosed and. It's real and so what I'm going to do today is take some lessons from this book to share with you and most importantly I'm going to open the phones. You're not supposed to do that on these leaks ours, but I've talked to the administrative. They've agreed to do with me. I'm going to let all of you meat yourself now. Don't amuse yourself much question, but right now in twenty minutes thinkable question. Okay because I want to hear your voice as important with each other's voices, you can, of course ask a question through the chat room right now. Cry High from Dallas Texas lawyer, says condolences to your friend. Thank you used to work at a library next to meet you. Is this the cultivate column? Drink Corona virus crisis yes and called was the blog called. The blog is called one thousand awesome things. Dot Com. and My podcast is called three bucks just the number three and the word bucks I energy. People like mocking wild while Judy blume. David sedaris about which three books changed their lives. So, number one I'm going to give you three things to do to cultivate calm during coronavirus chaos. Number One. How do you wake up in the morning? Do you do what most people do, which is our rattled awake by phone alarm clock at Children's screaming or you instinctively check your email. Ninety percent people sleep within ten feet of their cellphone. Ninety percent of people those same people check their from before bed and when they get up in the morning. Can I ask you question? If. You slept within ten feet of a bottle of wine every night. Drank a bottle of wine before bed every night. and. Sit from that ball on when you got up in the morning. What would we call you? Erin Alcoholic these days were all phone Hollick's now and we don't yes Nancy I collect. Thanks for the chat We don't realize how addicted we are one I'd like to do is at the beginning of the day. Take two minutes to grounded center yourself before the. Now you guys if you're watching with a a cell phone open or you have a pen paper to give you three prompts I want you to write them down. Number one I will let go of all type it into the as all I will let go of. Number two I am grateful for I am grateful for and number three. I will focus on. If you look in the chat room right now, you'll see that I've just written those three problems. I will let go what right now. The fastest growing in the world is actually no religion, according to national, geographic yet the Catholic combustion chamber and similar practices in Buddhism. Mormonism clan Judaism. Are Missing our society, there's a form of contemporary confession built into most world. Religions denied the Catholic Confession Chamber blessed me father for I have sinned. God believe this good to get it off your chest. We know from research in Science magazine by Dr, Brian, B. R. A. S., C., N. and colleagues. If we can minimize or grab as we age, we actually experienced greater contaminant happiness so. I will let go up. How much screen time my kids are headed right now. I will let go of feeling like a bad mom and about employees because I'm not able to do both at the same time. I will let go of the money that. I've paid for my child's tuition. That I'm not sure if I'm going to get back by really need make rent payment. I will let go the unbelievable amount of stress that my leader or my sister or my brother, or my team member is feeling around me on good when I come home at night to my husband, or to my girlfriend or to my uncle with my mom. They're stressing me. How can you let go of that? Turns out according to research, you can read it down. Number two I am grateful for I can go into the research on this deeply. Guys since trump done by McCulloch. Quickly they found that. If you write down ten things, you're grateful for a week. You're not only happier, but physically healthier after a ten week period. So. the the thing is the grunted. You're right down in the morning. Are GonNA be hard? We all WanNa, think about negative things that tower brain of all two hundred thousand years. We have an amid lots walnut-sized thing in the back of our brain that releases, fight or flight hormones all day. So to carve new kind of positive neural pathways, you need to pause and think of two or three specific things. You're grateful for every morning. Did. You Notice I. said the keyword specific. That's an important word. You know why. Because! If you write down my husband, my kid and my dog. Turns out. Your brain doesn't register that. If you write down if you're right down on sermons, looking at the chat rooms, lots of comments coming in there. If you're down. I'm grateful that my husband Antonio. Put the toilet seat down. Hannam grateful that my three year old son gave me a drawing that he painted. And I'm grateful that my dog trooper finally learn how to shake. Aw! Now, we're talking. See The difference between. The, kid and job and those three specific routes. Who's just remember just ladle? I will I am grateful for the second problem, so we cover too so far I will let go and I'm grateful for the third one is called I will focus on these days were all suffering from emotional and decision fatigue. There is so much to follow right now in the news. Be Trying to escape his great, but there's a lot going on. So what you need to do is write down one thing that you would be most proud of. Sang at the end of the day. I did this today. What is the one thing you would be most proud of saying I? Did the you know what it could be making lunch with your child? If you feel like you've been ignoring kids, it could be getting that really big. Update email out to your boss's boss. Your boss asks you to do it and you really got to put together. A plying for the subsidy for your rent in your local community that that you need to desperately save your small business, whatever that one thing is down and I will focus on ended the day. You're lucky. You'll be able to cross it off and feel that release when you don't want to have happen right now. During Corona virus during this pandemic is that you are busy all day, but you didn't get your one thing and believe me. That happens to me a lot. Happen, steel. So. Karen. As says I am grateful that I'm able to order pepperoni pizzas with Jalapeno. You know what Caryn I love that I usually get banana, peppers, hot peppers, but Allah. That's a spicy sauce I like that they were some Saracho on top or my Indian roots showing. Grew up with the spice. Although it is embarrassing whenever I hang out with a whole bunch of Indian people and they totally out. Spice me like I can't handle like the VINDALOO. That was a joke for the fourteen of you on the call that. Don't have dogged about. Number one thing I want you guys to do. The ground insiders off is take ten minutes every morning right down I will focus on I am grateful for. And I will let go. In reverse order I will let go. I'm great before I will focus on. Number two thing ready. This is a weird one I. Want you guys to have? A, new! Weird Hobby. Jason Says British guy here in living in the desert Miss Michigan Been Duluth. Thank you for the shout out Jason. guys. Why do I want you to have a weird hoppy 'cause right now in the world right now we are susceptible to something. I call mental fragility also known as cognitive entrenchment. We are grinding so hard right now. If you do one thing really really really really well, the research shows that. That you are less good at learning something new right now. There's a huge opportunity to learn something new. It could be a you, WanNa, take up painting. You WanNa play the saxophone. You've always told your child you're gonNA. Learn Origami together. You've never baked a loaf of bread whenever I want you to have a weird hobby that you can tell others that you learned during the pandemic. The benefit of this is that. You're learning. Rate is the steepest when you know the least. You're learning. Rate is the steepest when you know the least. There are studies that show that Nobel Prize winners are twenty two times more likely than their scientific colleagues to have a strange, unusual or weird hobby outside their scientific discipline. Nobel Prize winners are also making balloon animals, blowing glass or starring in the town. PLAT and I did make up. Those examples are actually from study. Tom Says makes sense teams giving me a smiley face. Leah says I will let go degree from feeling about my cat passing away this week and be grateful for his life how I'm so. Sorry we for the passing of your of your cat surpr- anyone that's experiencing the trauma of loss right now which I think a lot of us. Liz Learning, Spanish. It's not weird. Maybe because I have a French accent and she says aw, rest in peace getting. That's beautiful. Can I just say at a at the time here? At one sixteen P M, a woman named Leah who I don't know. Anyone guessing Liz does not know. Said I will Let go of degree from feeling for losing my cap at one seventeen like a minute later on the chat. She says all R.I.P Kitty. That's from Liz. Back Bacteria. That's partly what I want to do. Is have that sense of community? Thank you. People are saying I will finally learn to play my Ukulele. Tina says I'm learning TIKTOK VIDEOS BERTA says. I just thought I'd like to blame some skulls. Are you guys pitching the same What's that famous? Who's that guy that does that? Famous skull covered in jewels is a famous Damian. Given the name wrong. You guys artist. Guadalupe says I'm reading the Bible from beginning to end fantastic. I'm taking the Diana's I'm taking an online marine biology class. I'm not a science person and is ridiculously hard. To the through. Tian says I'm learning to pay wine glasses Jennifer says I've always wanted to take bird-watching Jagmeet says I not spend time at home. Building workouts baking all kinds of goodies. Emerson I'm just going to be a couple more because these are underrated. I'm taking creative bullet legs as amber. An anti says hey British guy in a gartner has a great land curry recipe under new cookbook or latest cookbook. Actually says you might need to tell people that they need to change their chat to allow everyone to read the comments. Yeah, make sure you got typing to pan. Lists and attendees I'm learning piano. I'm willing to spend on thinking at the guitar. I'm learning cooking I'm taking it in be. Guys this is awesome. Hundreds of you are applying right now, and you are telling us what Weird Hobby you're GONNA do fantastic. L. H. Org says I'm taking. p. e. with Joe every morning me to. A! We're in the same place. Guys when you comment. Just tell us where you're Tell us where you're writing from so that we can just kinda connect this way. Got Two things already. Two minute mornings in the morning had weird hobby during the day. And what's the last thing you ready? I want you to go untouchable untouchable unreachable. Unforgettable from the news and social media. Every single night. How many of you have heard from had heard of. Intermittent fasting intermittent fasting writes all the rage. You don't eat after dinner. You don't eat before breakfast low like some fancy new craze. Meanwhile, it's just like don't eat. Don't eat that the Putin Canadian reference Canadians donate the late night burger. Don't eat the late night. euros. You're in Greece. Don't eat it at tune the morning. Yeah, no, no. Big surprise right like that's obvious. But what we're not doing is the same practice with our news consumption. A friend of mine just told me that his iphone told him that. He uses his home for two hours of that the weekly report. If you have an iphone telling you your iphone usage, he said last week it was six hours a day six hours a day. His phone consumption tripled. What happens to your body when you read the news right before bad If you're like me or most people, you take on the weight and the emotional heaviness of what's happening in the world right now. It's going to be very difficult. If not impossible to even begin to process the loss of jobs, the lots of businesses, the frontline workers risking their lives, the lack of masks. That's too. That's too much process that with your morning mind if you need to okay after two minute practice after you kind of intentionally, set your mode for the day with a breakfast. Kids with that's getting dressed up having a shower I'm okay. If you read the news that just don't do tonight, and what I want to challenge you to do is stretch that time. Like taffy and try to extend. Maybe you're like me and when you try to do this, you're checking news at eleven PM. And when you check wake up at seven or whatever you check it again. You're Taffy is eight hours long. Eleven PM to seven am tried to extend it. Can you then stop checking the news at ten PM? There's research from Australia that shows if you look at a bright screen within an hour of bedtime your Melatonin production goes down. which is the sleep hormone critical for deep sleep. If, you can do ten PM conjoined in the nine pm next week. Could you check your phone at eight am next morning I give talk like this to a an organization. Recently and leader stood up. Said Hey everybody on my team. I want to make a policy. No emails before ten in the morning. Simple policy, but now we all don't me to check her email before ten in the morning. And what he's doing is allowing his team to set intentioned and get some real deep work done before the day begins. Okay, we are getting so many comments I'm learning finish. I'm I. Turn off the news at five PM each day from St Louis. is there a reason for the nighttime hours? Block on the news. Yes Susan I. Think your questions probably been answered because what's happening is. our brains go into fight or flight. So I talked about a little bit earlier, but you have some in your brain called your Amid de and. It evolved inside our brains to do two things look for problems and solve problems. That's why we rubber neck on the highway. That's why if it bleeds leave. That's why if there's an accident, we wanna see it. There's a fight and a hockey. You WanNa Watch. You don't know you WANNA watch you might not logically not WanNa Watch. You are attracted to negative news because our brains think we can solve those problems to increase our own survival part of the reason why there's eight billion of us on this planet. However if you expose yourself to problems with before bed, you can't stop thinking about and you carry them with you into your slumber. Rather you do before bed is of course. Read a book of fiction on real paper. You will slip into another conscience. As George R, R Martin wrote in game of thrones. A reader lives a thousand lives before hid is the man who never reads lives only one. Slipping into another conscious less you live in a different place time agenda culture, a totally different landscape. Maybe it science fiction your another space, and then you can fall asleep because what you're doing is inhabiting another conscience. Okay, if there's research from the annual review of psychology in two thousand eleven that shows that. if you read before bad than you're opening up in your visual Cortex, all kinds of neural pathways that are typically opened up when you look at like Netflix screen for example why. I'm s no offense to leave accident. Great online content like this. But When you read, you have to do more work you are. The characters are the voices you are the sets you are the costumes, and so you have to come up with all that your. They've done scandal. Show that even the smell areas of your brain are open. If you read a word like cinnamon and a word like leather ear, brain is doing different neural activity. Reading fiction before I will be asking you guys by the way to my book club, so every single month will send you an email which has a list of books I. Recommend each month that I've read in the past month. So now, Oh, wow, look at these things Sofia, any recommendations yet I'll send you some of my book club. Also my pockets called three bucks so on a fifteen year. Quest for the one thousand was formative books in the world. What I was finding is that I didn't trust the Amazon recommendation engine or the pile at the airport, and so I'm asking I flew down to Key West Florida and sat down with Judy. Blume I flew to New York and sat down with Chris Anderson of had nothing well I went to Detroit and talk to Mitch Albom. Flew to Los. Angeles I talked to Pete. Holmes I talked to Energy Thomas Jackson Mississippi, flying around before a gut grounded interview people, which three books most changed their lives. Why am I doing that? So I can read those books, okay? I just interviewed sergeant. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy yesterday. So that'll be probably the next episode I release. TASTIC LOTS! People's in the book clubs. A lot of people saying you have encouraged me to learn Spanish right now. I love this we've learned. Yet e-readers Kayla's what I'm opposed to the bright screens. Don't read on an IPAD or like a computer screen and oppose so because the it's the bright stream that will causing up to Bruce Nelson, readers or readers refine the other. The other research we know. Is that if you can multitask, you will meaning that if you can do a lot of functionality in your ear like senator to receive text messages for example. You probably can't on your in the than you won't readable. Text messaging okay. Zoe's is so excited to see your list of books. Yeah, I will add you. Okay Yeah Leah. Says here's an interesting question from late looks like I will have more books from you. Kneel to add to my never ending to be read list. Here's the thing if you do this news fast like I'm talking about each evening. When I call untouchable zone from the news, it's chapter eight in my new book. It's what I talk about going on touchable. Then guess what you're. GonNa make space for books. I'd like you to challenge yourself to do is ask yourself how much reading your donor day the University of California says you're reading a two hundred page book day. You know what it s instagram comments. Twitter feeds blog roles magazines newspapers. Try to cut as much that out. Delete a social media that you don't use like. Get off that soften. Have a real book on your table every night, okay? It's not easy If you want here, say Check in this article paster here. I run Article for Harvard Business Review in two thousand seventeen, that became the number one most popular article on the entire website of Harvard Business Review HP HBO. Our round just pasted the title on. There is called eight ways to read a lot more books this year if you Google it to find article from me. which tells you how I went from reading five books year to fifty bucks a year in one year. A lot of the stuff of already mentioned but there's some tips tricks new Los Angeles Public Labs I. Remember Your Article. jet. I work at a library. We have a long list reduction adding you awesome size. By. Tiffany says one if you hate reading List as you're chatting with a lot of La Public, library highlight variance. Hey, you know what I say on three bucks by podcasts feeling in the world by in for book, lovers writers Acre Sellers and Librarian so you guys will love the podcast Okay. You don't hate reading tiffany. What I want you to ask. Yourself is at in your youngest earliest memories. What did you read? Okay? Just? What did you re like? Go back your kids books. Fit Your parents or whatever start they're. Starting to comic books again. NOPE, slowly, you're okay. Now I'd like the administrator to take us off mute. It's now one thirty where thirty minutes of the way through. audiobooks refine Reagan. And I You guys will still be on mute. But you will now have a new ability. Wow allie public library rocks in this wasn't a public library you are representing must be like one hundred debut on there i. feel like a leader at the library was like. Hi, everybody. I'm going to this. That will happen. When interest my boss fascinates me, have you heard before just kidding? Okay so administrator. Please go off of new. You guys are still, but what you can do now is. You can carefully go at the bottom of your screen on meet yourself. GonNa leave a five second pause I, like the most brave. Courageous persons introduced himself. From the more vulnerable, you can be the better. I guarantee role feeling the same thing. Let's go off now. Kate Carol. You're on, you say your name where you're from. Hi Nice to see you. I'm also from Los Angeles Public Library. and. I wanted to comment and see what you think I. Listen to audio books every night to put myself to sleep so I have the phone like above my head, so the screen's not on. What do you think of that? I think that's fine. If you do a couple of things first of all thanks for the question, and scrape that we're having such a conversation about reading. That wasn't my intention, but it's really nice. It's a bump into a roomful librarians. The couple things are number one. Download the audio book vile. Don't stream it gas. The first things put onto your phone number. Two is go into airplane mode. So what you WanNa do is turn your phone ideally into black white ideally on, do not disturb ideally on the airplane. So. That you're not tempted to check that email or text, even after listening to the buffy mentally unwound yourself. Third thing I would do is I would place the book or the phone? As a as you're listening to Far, from your bed, so that after the book is on playing or you turn off, you aren't tempted again during the night and also side benefit, although research is still. Unclear, on this, it's just nice to have a technological device as strong as one away from your brain as your sleeping. Okay, I don't want to zoom into that some people will call that a conspiracy theory, but it's like there is some research that shows that having technology. Right beside your head. Especially, if it's not an airplane mode isn't great for you certainly hasn't helped. Okay. That's the first question. That was a wonderful question. Carol, thank you very much and I'm just learning this now. Can you guys come in? And raise your hands in the bottom, and then what I will do now I see people starting to do it. Yeah! I will start so now. Surely surely you were the next person and I'd love to invite you to. say your name where you're from. Can you. Hear me. Yes I can. I'm surely and from Los Angeles. I'm another L. A. P. L. Librarian. High. I, want if you can go over the. First of the three items of I wouldn't let go off. 'cause I was trying to write down some notes I missed part of that. Is a lot of things that's going on here In regards to. People find pick on too much sometimes. When it's not actually at work working from home like making sure every single minute of our work time. You know dedicated to pl and sometime. You know you're at home. You completely overwhelmed because you've assigned yourself so much to do known. So just trying to see, how are you go into your question? Tell me more about that feeling. Feeling overwhelmed because when you're at work, you have a particular set. You know you're doing like I'm a children's Librarian. I'm doing my story. Times am on the out out on the reference desk, working with patrons, and so every single thing is set up to be doing some kind of training working with friends or future planning so now you're doing that on a small scale, but doing these trainings, and then you reading and you make I'm making sure every single moment. That I'm at home for those eight hours is dedicated to L. EPL. where SORTA stressful 'cause I'm working from home, but sometimes I forget to take my fifteen minute. Break in those sounds crazy. or And you have people in the House with you or you on your own. No I have my when my daughter is home from. A. USD school. Because the schools to close also and husbands at home because he's working from home, so It's a lot of other people here so I'm trying to bounce all of them and work. Yeah, here's what I hear in your question. Thank you so much for your braver in your ability on the side. There's a lot of people right now. Go, Shirley! Thanks Julie. Thanks for sharing this Shirley. These are the exact kind of questions you want to hear guys. What's really in your heart on your mind? You went from a very structured environment. The physical location drove to you have a desk. You had a you know library patrons coming out. It was a very structured day. Now you're at home. There's your daughter their husband there. You're dedicated. You're all in. You're going to every seminar. You're taking notes you're committed. At the same time it's wholly new. WHOL L. Y. Not h hole. It's holy. The whole thing is new. Charles I'm trying to totally ramp up learning curve and doing so in a more isolated way, which is probably why the chat room and these questions are so great because they're connecting us about which is great, because that's really missing right now. Loneliness is spiked since the nineteen eighties doubled. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy. Who I mentioned before has seized the surgeon general hundred Brahma Obama. He's called loneliness, the next big epidemic. What's happening during quarantine and social distancing is we're seeing mental illness. metrics spiking right now you should. Obviously you're not surprised to hear that, but were all feeling that it's baked into your question. What also here is an a unit? Say That so I may be projecting or maybe trying to share to other to group. Okay, but partly hearing as I wanNA, do a great job. Also right and after hearing Anna I, WanNa be a great mom. Yes and I WANNA. Be a great partner to my husband. And I may have. Less support than Asia have I don't know about you, but like Leslie and I my wife Leslie. We can't have. A cleaning later now we can't have. A massage or visit to a physiotherapist my shoulder has. Had A major problem. Mitchell. I can't see a physiotherapist right now. I can't go to a bookstore for salvation or to a library I can't walk the streets even very comfortably so. This is stressful and I wanNA. Point out something though which is in your question. All these caring thoughts that you're having okay. Surely all these carrying bucks are coming from a place rule in yourself and I. Don't know if you have parents that you're calling as well or sisters or brothers. There's lots of stuff it's coming from a place where you have deep concern, deep love the passion right now. That's the important metric. If happen to have and listen you do, but if anyone listening happens, have aged parents or older parents that you're worried about your checking in on that, you're calling maybe that you're in a pod within your thing. The fact that you care about them. That's enough. They understand that they raised a great human a great citizens who cares about them? If you care about your work and you want to get the most I've ever call one telling you don't worry. You don't think at the moment of ever call what matters is that you care about it that you care about the route. Emotion is a positive healthy. Healthy one and what I wanted to today to a lot of you, listening I want to try to get rid of some of the Gilbey may be failing because I'm hearing from a lot of organizations. That's after right now as I wanna be I wanna be a great that I want to be a great wife husband to be a great and I'm not good at any of them right now. It's OK. All feeling that way, we are all feeling that way on the comments. Yes, I'm feel the exact same way as Shirley. Yes, Lia Neal. You hit the nail right on the head. is great, shirl. You're doing great. Be Gentle with yourself, and it's not you Shirley that we're talking to here we're talking to. An emotion. That, we think a lot of people are feeling. Now raise your hands, guys. Let's see some more questions. Five participants. Oh, five hands in the air. Okay I'm going to pick a different one Jay Singh. J. Beat. You are unneeded. He said your name where you're from. My name is g I. Am from India. Where in India? Who I am from northern part of India from Delhi. I'll Nice my data's from Emirates are. Great. Job Be Nice, my that came to Canada in nineteen, sixty six, was born in Canada nineteen, seventy-nine. Grade good to know that. All connected somehow. Yeah so, Neil, thank you very much first of all getting us all together. It was a pleasure to be connecting with you and I must appreciate your effort and your initiative on this using this setup time. You very welcome. That's on here for. Ya So my question Neil around There are two questions linked to each other. The first question is what motivates you as an individual and the second question that I would like to from you is. How can one find? What is? The home would evasion. because. Having a different motivation, so how can we find out our motivation of the towards something? Great great great questions Jake G.. Thank you so much for calling us from New Delhi India. And I don't know what time it is. They're trying to do the math. It eleven ten right now. Okay well after this, so I needed to have an hour of reading before bed. Okay sure. so here's one state of that first of all and guys. If you're looking at the chat right now, it is just exploding now. Hi J G Great Question Hygiene. while through guilt. So this is this is great, and there's a lot happening here on the side I. Really appreciate the Chat so dig couple of things here number one. There's a famous study done by National Geographic and they looked around the world to find the places where people live the longest the longest happiest fullest healthiest lives. They identified unlabeled, those seven places as the Blues Zones. Some of you may have heard of the famous. Blue Zone study. one blue zones as a place called Okinawa Japan. Some of you will know Okinawa they went to Okinawa and they discovered. That, in in the islands of Okinawa Japan turns out. There is no word for retirement in their language. The content of ceasing work completely simply does not exist. Retirement is a very western concept. Guys that came. It was invented in Germany in the late eighteen hundreds the idea that you run up to fifty five or sixty seven years suddenly stopped working and play golf forever. That's new idea. We didn't used to think that in an Okinawa and never took off. Guess what they also have an Okinawa one of the longest healthiest life bans, and this is important point. I wanted to mention to you, Gee! They have something called an icky Guy. An IKI guy is spelled I.. G. A. I'm just GONNA type it in. The Monica's just about the Blue Book. Cathy's as my godmother taught in Okinawa. When you have a conference, hundreds and hundreds, hundreds of people's mazing. How how this team humanity? We can really feel it. so I g I. This roughly translates into English. As what is the reason you get out of bed in the morning? I'm Kinda. Is it. My icky guy for neo pets reach. Is I help? People have happy laughs. Best the highest level for me. That's my writing. That's my speaking and my wife is an elementary school teacher. Hurricane Guy is to teach empathy into communities because that so clearly articulated for her. She's also able to run empathy circles, the inner city schools and run empathy with mothers. She doesn't do this for any money at all. She just gets joy because her old thing empathy for all. If you guys think I have any empathy, it's a lot of. It's coming from my daily therapies, actually my beautiful wife If you listen to my podcast, you'll hear that. She's a guest my show. Often Only remember that word taking guy now. The question is well. What is my purpose? How do I figure that out and what makes that a bad, but I want you guys to think of now I'm recording this show this leave x eleven, R, I wanNA say in mid April two, thousand and twenty. Some people who are watching now it may be may two thousand twenty may two, thousand, twenty, five for all I know. In the summer place today, a lot of people now are looking at the shifting economic landscape, the shifting employment landscape, and the Shipping Labor landscape, and they're saying Oh. What should I take out to this this see? Dinghy should take. A sailboat should take a Robo stop. My biggest council is. Don't go to see right now. There's a hurricane brewing. It's on the horizon. The waves are getting choppy and they're getting choppy. Now time to ask yourself three questions instead number one. Can Take Care of myself and my family financially right now. Answer is now let's that let that be your concern. Your goal isn't about purpose to make money. Okay so that if that's your purpose. I. Hear Ya. It's time to figure out a way to pay the bills. And that may be through grants that may be through government subsidies that may be through. Loans may be through. Finding a job. That's the last place used to work whatever it might be getting a job anywhere, right? There's lots of there's lots of labor markets like this ups and downs. First question. Can I take care of myself and my family financial? If the answer is yes, okay, the answer is yes. You know have the benefit of time one to ask yourself from that time. We're in the hammer right now. Everything's kind of lockdown won't be like this Robert, because we can't stand the economic. pent. Up Demand that's happening. However there's major health issues. So after we get through the Hammer, we have eighteen months or up the dance before the vaccine comes out there was opens enclosures, and people will be navigating. This government will be doing it differently at a state level at country level at an international level, depending where you live, I'm in Toronto Canada. It'll be. Schools may open in September up, so we'll have to go through the dance in the period of the Hammer, the kind of closure and the dance, which is the. Period until we have a new normal. In this benefit of time you, you said you just send. You could afford payments Jackie, but I'm saying if you can say that listener if you can say that. Then the question is how can I best prepare myself? What is the best option what I WANNA? Do and the opportunities in the world right now to help to change lives to be there for someone, and where can I think about the problem and work on that problem? So when we hit that new normal because we will, there is another side of this eventually, okay? There is another side of the early. We'll get to that place. You should be ready to go. Okay, so Pernille Pasha. Guess what I'm working on a new book I'm working on a whole new speech. None of which I've mentioned to you today I'm diving deep into my podcast. I started posting one new awesome thing a day right now. If you instagram page or you go to my email list, I'm posting one day. So it's just like one awesome thing, you know, today's was lying in the sun like a cat. Yesterday was like when your friend gives you an hour of entertainment for your kids. Watch another one is. You know everyone's got messy hair on the on the teleconference because it's like brawler home whenever I. Just Right One thing today so I'm leaning into my Armenians migrated because I want to be ready kind of when we get to that new normal if you are aligned Brian. If, you're surely if you're then you lean into. You're studying or your learning or your is there a technology can learn? Is this what you want to be doing? If yes, awesome, if not, now's the time to look. It's right. You have the benefit of time. A highly recommended Yale's course called besides of wellbeing. We can put a link to it on somebody who doesn't mind describing the link to that and throwing it in the chat room the Yale. Course the signs will being. It's a free course. encore Sarah this is something I recommend that you guys do if you have the benefit of time, okay now. Guys. Let's do some more questions. Fun Questions, fantastic questions. So where do I click to find the questions? Oh, here we go! Mora M. O.. R. A.. You are on. More Hi. My name is Maura. I'm from Austin Texas in. One of the things you mentioned with letting go of during this time. Part of my job includes terminating people from their jobs because. Budgets are getting cut excetera. Even though this is part of my job and I do it. And I try not to let it weigh me down and let go of it. It is just all consuming right now in. On the advice for letting go of something that big weighty during this time sure. Bake more for the question for those that didn't hear. It more is from Austin. Texas, a Love Austin. I was there three or four times last year. It's wonderful city help. You have a breakfast TACO. For me. although. I don't know if everything's open. I Love Austin. Letting go of getting, let go from. Organization is one of the most stressful things in life is right up there with moving and we know moving is at the top of that. You always hear moving top. However not far below getting, let go is letting someone go. Having a conversation where you say I'm sorry, but your role here is terminated. or you're being. Or we have had temporary. Eliminating position. Or the hotel you work at. We're closing for three months, so it's not you. It's six hundred of us. And I was in that position, too, so you guys don't know about me. That I was the director of leadership development at Walmart I work directly for three different. Walmart's e IOS as their chief of staff. And I did my MBA at Harvard business school. After a an Undergrad and business law I as my capacity record leadership AMEX FAUCI as generalist HR department another has like Oh dozens of people inside Walmart. Is Male. I was exhausted I was tired. I couldn't even sleep over. I had to have these conversations and the thing I learned because unfortunately for me and I. Don't know if it's Walmart being a big company, but it's normal is that there's a lot of things you can say a lot of things you can't say from a legal perspective. So you end up with all the legal of stiffs or robot language and you aren't supposed to sort of do this. You aren't supposed to hug the person. You aren't supposed to look them in the eye. You aren't supposed to let your eyes water. Let Yourself crack, but I'm telling you Mora. All human stuff were places the formal stuff right now. I'm not saying go out of your way to break. Laws I'm not saying that. Don't quote me on that. What I'm saying is put the papers. Put the envelope the official process the beside to look them in the eye in connect with your heart. When you do that, you guys will be a thing as we all should be connecting and as I feel we are connecting today on this Webinar and you will be on the same team, okay? And, that will be important for many reasons most important because that's all they will remember. They will remember nothing of what you said that day in the room nothing there will always remember how you made them feel and how based felt themselves when they left that road? That will remember that and they will thank you for later. And by the way I've had like Oh someone in the last month. Because the coronavirus, 'cause all my speaking canceled and have someone helps you manage all that and it broke my heart, and she wrote me a note two weeks. Saying Neil I swansea. Thank you. You treated me with almost the I absolutely. Appreciate it and I really hope our paths cross again and I hope they do two. More I just took you off mute again. In case you WANNA. Talk back to me. I just WanNa say thank you I do try to make it. It's humanist, possible inhabit connection and. You are absolutely right when I do at that piece, people tend to be very grateful that it's not just some robot or some legal things I'm I'm checking off a spreadsheet down. That is excellent advice, thank you. I appreciate it. You're you're very welcome. other hands can go up now I will mute more brenna overdue. Hail? This is Brenda from Vancouver on. Me I can hear you. Canadian. Yeah. Thank you for sharing the three things that we can do and I guess my question is around. Sort of I've been actively seeking forums and opportunities to to find ways to to bring myself at least a little bit of joy, under these circumstances, and I have a lot of friends and family that. You know might be sitting in a space of of negativity or struggling rightfully so and I'm just wondering. kind of your thoughts on sharing this content more broadly in a very compassionate way to you. To share it, and hopefully help brings some light to some people that are maybe struggling a little bit. Sure Thank you so much for your vulnerability to ask that. And by the way your comment directly reflects a lot of comments that I'm seeing on the side right now. Jason says I am feeling very anxious and paranoid about engaging with folks when I leave the house. I'm afraid to walk around my neighborhood. Anyone else. You know feeling this way, but going outside, so there's a lot of people feel like this and. Let me, use this as the final. Question and then I'll have a couple of weeks closing golf. Wanted to remember higher than anything else today here is this is an extremely. UNUSUAL, rare! Generational event is seismic in proportion. You're talking about a virus that is extremely deadly and extremely contagious, and for most of us, unless you're over one hundred years old. You have not encountered this before. In your life period, millions of people are impacted by this. This is a serious issue. When I can say. Is that we are aware of the problem. The Scientific and medical communities, let's just forget that locates. While are working incredibly hard and incredibly fast right now, and we're seeing that everywhere. I M seeing the private sector and Berry strong leader, standing up with a just into arden from New Zealand with the Prime Minister of Norway kids. Press conferences with Andrew Cuomo and new. York you're seeing leaders. Mrs, what happens is leaders are. Let me, tell you guys. Leaders have to have opportunities to come become leaders to go through a critical moment right now. Leaders are standing up. They are standing up around the world. Look to the leaders. Look to the people in your family who are being a leader. Look people in your community. News the Baker content less delivery offs that you can give a nice big took to, and you can connect with with a no on your porch. Who when can you go for a Walk Jason? That the street where the streets where you live or not busy and I know you're a believer in England. Can you go at midnight? I will tell you I have been going on midnight walks go! It is beautiful to get signed and when you do see somebody across the street whether they're walking their dog or they're going for a jog. New just wave, and we can get a little bit of connection of humanity. What you guys have done today. By coming on this Webinar by spending an hour of your time and your life engaging in a conversation here around how we're feeling, we're not being this is you've already done that? You've decided that inside yourself. You were going to take time in your life to prioritize you. You'RE GONNA. Get some tools. Some habits, frameworks and I hope I've given you those today. Do help apply to your life. You're GonNa Start Your Day with two minute mornings. You're! GonNa write down. I am grateful for and I will focus on when you start the day by the way. I pulled this out this morning mornings. This is my journal. I wrote this every day in the pit. You don't need this. You can do it on a cue card, but I made it a book, so that for me I can look back over my year, and like see what I've been stressed about. Guests is never a big deal future. That's number. One number two is. You'RE GONNA. Adopt a weird hobby I. we read them on the chat room. Right? I'M GONNA learn the Ukulele I'm taking swimming I'm taking Spanish classes. Whenever guys have something new. It's GonNa law avoid something called cognitive entrenchment or the mental fragility that comes with doing one thing. Okay you're learning. Rate is the steepest. When you know the least it will be wonderful went after we get through this. You're able to say oh, that was the time in my life that I finally took up oil painting. Guess what I now own a gallery in my sixties or whatever that is. Okay number three. You're going to create a news fast for yourself and I don't mind if it's six hours to start with, but you need to create untouchables. Were you unplug completely from ideally the news media and social media? What will you insert that time and space with? Reading. Reading twenty pages of fiction from a real book, Yes, audiobooks are kindles are fine but dry. Not The do nothing device for you can do something else. Those three habits plus the questions we gotta talk about. Today will comprise a tiny little morsel. For you. But because rendering into a relationship together, you're going to get my monthly book club. You're going to get that. You don't want no problem I. Don't do any. It's just literally books already you're GONNA. Get a for me on things that I do in my life in order to. Live a more attention grounded life, and usually who running to myself kind of right to myself. I books are all outputs of anxieties I've had. Buckle awesome was written when I went through a divorce happy when I was nervous about having a kit, so you can see that's where it comes from. And number three if you want to engage further. Listen to. My podcast called three bucks, and we'd love to have young ward. There's many ways we can continue this conversation I am but one tiny person, so we said to be I. Don't know you are hurry on one tiny person in this whole world, unearth trying to put some positive vibes there. There's many people like me. I will always recommend to you on my website. You'll see your links to other people that I love. Finding the ones that resonate with you listening connect with those people share with colleagues stayed together with your friends and your family and hang in there. Thank you so much for having me have a wonderful day. Everybody and we'll talk to you soon. Sorry I should say unless they. If you have a burning question and you didn't get out I'm here for you. Drop me a line that kneel at global happiness dot, Org Neil and the aisle at global happiness dot org and draw your line. Okay. I don't want anyone who feels something inside. Not have a chance. Thanks Take Care Bye. Friends? If you'd like this episode of the lead, x leadership podcast, please take a minute leave. A rating on itunes or stitcher ratings are invaluable for attracting new listeners and I like to convert those listeners into leaders because you know, I'm on a mission to spark one hundred million leaders in the next ten years, and if you WanNa, become boss, everyone fights to work for, and nobody wants to leave checkout the lead x platform with coach Amanda at lead x, DOT ORG and if If you have ten or more managers who could use some binge worthy training. Send me an email at info at lead x dot. Org Elliott X DOT ORG and we'll talk about getting you set up with a totally free pilot for those managers. See if they like it if they don't. That's fine, we go away. Part is friends, but if they love it, you've just found yourself a new resource for them. Remember leadership is influence. You're always leading. How are YOU GONNA lead today!

Neil Pastor Rita WanNa Walmart Jason Toronto Canada India Okinawa Texas Judy blume New York Lia Neal Michigan golf Shirley General Vivek Murthy Liz Learning Nobel Prize
TOGETHER: A Doctors Prescription for Health and Happiness

The Next Big Idea

50:09 min | 3 months ago

TOGETHER: A Doctors Prescription for Health and Happiness

"Hey next big idea listeners. Do you love the next big idea, but wish you could listen without the interruption of ads? How about if you could listen ad free plus have early access to the next big idea? Episodes plus tons of additional add free one re originals well now you can with one three plus go to one. DOT FM SLASH NBI P L U S to upgrade your listening experience today. The summer of Nineteen Ninety two is an unusually quiet hurricane season in southern Florida month after month without so much as tropical storm. But as forecasters like to say, it only takes one to ruin your year again, Andrew now near the shore of Southeast Florida at this hour, the center of the hurricane is located about forty miles due east of Miami. Hurricane Andrew was supposed to hit central Florida, but then unexpectedly it takes a different tracking the storm barrels toward the southern tip of the state where a fifteen year old boy, and his family and thousands like them are taking shelter in their homes. The storm rages through the night. Teenager and his family are among the lucky ones. They all survived. But when they leave their house in the morning, their neighborhood looks like a war zone. It's. Almost unbelievable to why we see entire homes and communities level. There's nothing but devastation for miles around. Hundreds of houses destroyed, trees uprooted power lines down telephone pole snapped like toothpicks a mile inland from the ocean. The boy finds crabs blown across the pavement and sees fish hanging from the trees. The survivors are left without electricity at the height of a steamy Florida summer, no running water just a few days worth of food and no clear way forward, but then something happens. Something even more surprising than Hurricane Andrew's sudden change in direction. We came down with a load of stuff. This is our second trip down. In wherever we go, people come running after us for water. This is like the out pouring of generosity. You need anything. These. Supermarkets opened their doors. Leading residents take what they need for free neighbors barbecues to share the meat in their freezers, perfect strangers bringing in truckloads of supplies. Hundreds of people have been showing up here at the broward mom plantation, bringing all of their non perishable goods, their water, their baby food their diapers everything they can get their hands on. They're bringing from their own homes. Share with the people in Dade, county. Hurricane Andrew will turn out to be one of the most destructive storms in American history, but it's far from the deadliest. The number of lives lost will be counted in the dozens, not hundreds or thousands and part of the reason is the help. Survivors give each other friends, neighbors and complete strangers. It's a lesson. The teenager will carry with him through his life. People are much stronger when they're together. A couple of decades later Vivek Murthy will be in a perfect position to put that lesson to us when he's sworn in as the nineteenth surgeon general of the United States. Working remotely. I think pretty much. All of us are these days with Sen pro online from pitney bowes. You can easily print postage stamps and shipping labels. It couldn't be more convenient especially when you're trying to avoid unnecessary trips to the post office, as you may be right now for as low as four dollars ninety nine cents per month you'll get access to special discounts and save up to forty percent off USPS priority mail, plus being a listener of the next big idea, well done good choice, you'll receive a free thirty day trial to get started and a free ten pound scale to make. Make. Sure you'd never overpay. We send pro online. You can calculate exact postage online print labels from your PC. That's handy schedule package pickups and track shipments from departure to arrival. You'll also save up to five cents on every letter and up to forty percent off USPS priority mail go to PB DOT com slash big idea to access special offer for a free thirty day trial, plus a free ten pound scale to get you started. That's P., B., dot com slash big idea to experience a savings in your shipping costs with a free trial of send pro online from Pitney Bowes. From one DRI I'm Rufus Krisztian and this is the next big idea. I founded the next big idea club with Malcolm. Glad well Susan Cain Daniel Pink and Adam grant to connect people to some of the boldest thinking, shaping our culture and our future. Each week on the podcast we bring you one idea with the power to change the way you see the world this week. Togetherness not just as a pleasant thing to experience, but as the foundation for National Public Policy. As we heard up top that fifteen year old boy who survived Hurricane Andrew with help from the kindness of strangers went on to become Surgeon General Vivek Murthy was thirty seven, when he was appointed in two thousand fourteen after three years in the post. He's now a civilian again, and he just wrote a powerful new book called together the Healing Power of human connection in a sometimes lonely world. Before he became Surgeon General Dr more he founded, or CO founded several organizations designed to improve and expand public health one, which he started with his sister, while he was still in medical school was a peer to peer HIV AIDS education program that reached tens of thousands of students in the United, states and India, another trained Indian, women living in villages to become healthcare providers and educators. Another call doctors for America, has eighteen thousand physician and medical student members who advocate for quality affordable health care for all. After Moore was appointed surgeon general by President. Obama toward the United States. He asked Americans what they needed help with. He got some answers. He expected opioid addiction, anxiety, depression and one. He did not expect people were lonely. He decided to put it on the public health agenda. When Dr Moore was writing his book, he interviewed next big idea curator, Susan Cain about her book on introverts called quiet, and now Susan gets to return the favor for us. They spoke during the coronavirus lockdown in May. Welcome today to be the next big idea podcast. It is so thrilling in such an honor for me personally to be here with you. Repetto chance to speak over the years I've been a longtime when mirer of your work, and it's also just really exciting for the next big idea club to be championing your book, which is really a profound book for those of you who are listening. Haven't read it yet I. Urge you to open it appetizers. We're done with this conversation. Welcome. Thank you so much Susan. I'm so glad to be doing this together. So as I said this book, it's really profound. And there were so many times when I was reading it that I experienced goosebumps reading about your own personal story, and so many of the different stories that you. We've really skillfully throughout the book but I thought we could start by talking about. This age of corona that we're in right now and what the connection is between these issues of loneliness that you've been writing about for all these years are thinking about for all these years and the age that we find ourselves in now because I know when you first started thinking about this book, no one could have seen that. There was a pandemic around the corner that was going to be isolating us. Insider owns so I'd love to hear your thoughts on that. Yeah. No, it's really interesting question at this particular moment in time, and you know we'll just say it is so much fun to be starting this conversation with you because I've also been a longtime admire of your work, and as an introvert lifelong introvert. With it a lot reading quiet was a was very empowering for me, and it was imperative for my wife to so thank you for that contribution Susan. I started writing this book and thinking about the topic of onus before corona visors on the scene, because I was worried about this deep well of loneliness that I had seen in the hospital as a doctor, taking care of patients, but that I also saw all across the country and around the world when I served a searching general. What have worried about with Kobe nineteen is that there are several factors at play here that threatened to worsen our loneliness in a first of all, there's fear during pandemics we look around at other people, and we wonder if they're vectors of infection and the worst, the illnesses, the greater our fears, and that has a chilling effect on our interaction with other people and to compound matters. There's the physical distancing that we're being asked to observe in order to slow the spread of Kobe nineteen, and while from a public health standpoint. That's important to do because we had no other tools. In our toolbox that connects seen or medicine, it has a consequences well, which is that it separates us just at a time of great stress when we actually need each other more than ever, so that has been the the double whammy. If you will of Covid nineteen so with all of this together Susan I worry about a social recession we may incur. That would be just as consequential for our health, our happiness and well being. Being as the economic recession, we may be faced with, but the good news is. I don't think it has to be that way. I think that if we are intentional about how we approach each other and our social connection in this moment, if we are thoughtful about how we use technology to strengthen our connection, improve the quality of our relationships with each other than we may be able to come out of the pandemic with in fact. fact, stronger connections and a greater commitment and recommitment if you will to our relationships in even before the pandemic began. Yeah, I think one of the life experiences. You had that you wrote about that led you to. This topic is your experience with Hurricane Andrew in Nineteen ninety-two He'd been caught in this terrible hurricane, and you witnessed the way that your community came together as a result of that tragedy, and I want you to tell. Tell us about that experience, but also to contrast it to what we're living through now where your day I went out to take a walk, and I found myself veering away from any neighbors who saw whether I knew them or not, because it just felt like that was the right thing to do, and it felt like the exact opposite of what I've been reading about your experience with Hurricane Andrew. So can you talk about that? I lived through Hurricane Andrew Ninety, two in the summer in Miami Florida. Hurricane Andrew is a category five hurricane that swept through the state and Ordinary gamage and this was pre cell phone era. It was really pre email era as well and so communication was really limited to the phone and to going and seeing people enter writing them letters. It was a devastating storm and we were out of power for three weeks and we didn't have phones for six weeks. And Gas was nowhere to be found for your car So this was a really difficult time, and to give you a sense of just how isolating. It was just even physically because neighborhoods were destroyed in the roads were all obstructed. You couldn't drive anywhere news even hard to walk. A short distance from your house, so many of us were truly isolated in our homes with few lifelines to the outside world. But what happened was almost magical I. during that kind of intense hardship, which is at neighbor, started emerging from their homes to help each other, I recognize that we all had shared needs. People would help each other. Clear their yards. They would ask if everyone was good on water, and if someone wasn't that, we would all share some of our water supply with them and our food supplies well. Within our house, it was my parents and my sister and I we didn't have anything else that we could do. Even though we had to lie to do it at home, so we just did things together. We ate together every night. We sat together in the evenings. Untold Stories We worked together side by side in the yard clearing debris. During the day it was hard times, but it was also this time of beautiful fellowship, and there is an opportunity to strengthen bonds that we hadn't experienced before, so it was it was this amazing time, and would interesting about Hurricane, Andrew, Susan is that this phenomenon is not unique to Hurricane Andrew. It happens during times of natural disasters where people. People show up for each other. They come together to support one another into to rebuild their community the challenges what happens in the weeks that follow after the last houses rebuilt the last piece of debris has been removed, and what happened in Hurricane Andrew is that while some of those bonds remained many of them, Abdus we reverted back to our old lifestyle, pre hurricane, Andrew and one of the things that's been on my mind ever since then he's. How do we hold on? To that connection that we experienced during times of disaster, had we not forget once again that those relationships are not only so important to our survival, but they feel good when we're enjoying them. And that was one of the reasons I wanted to explore that deeply in this book and with Covid Nineteen. Also I think we have this trauma. Really that is being visited upon people across the world, and while we can physically see each other and are fearful at time to contracting the virus from one another I have seen. A similar spirit that I saw in hurricane, Andrew with people sewing masks, and then dropping them off at hospitals with people dropping food off to their neighbors, with people leaving signs up thanking healthcare workers in grocery store workers who are in the frontline putting themselves at risk. I've seen donations. Food banks go up as even though people are struggling with job, loss themselves. They recognize many in our community. Community or worse off out they're contributing to hunger causes so I do think that spirit of humanity is alive, and well in us. I don't think that our deepest instinct is just look out for ourselves I. think that in push comes to shove. We do stand up for each other. We show up for each other. The real question is how do we sustain that long after this pandemic is over? So, when you were surgeon general, and this was obviously long before the age of Karuna you started out by taking a listening tour to hear what people's concerns were, and this was as you were deciding. What were the aspects of healthy? We're going to be focusing on during your term. And it was during that listening tour that you decided that loneliness was this unstated unrealized epidemic. Can you talk a little bit about what you heard that listening tour might lead you to that conclusion. His Susan, this was unexpected for me. You know I hid. Testified before the Senate during my confirmation, hearing had delicious out priorities that would work on. I had listed obesity and substance use disorders and a number of others, but at the beginning of I term I did go on this listening tour to there's there's something inside me, that said. Let's let's go ask people what they need. Before we build and launch a massive campaign, and it was part driven by the training that we get in medicine, which tells us not to jump to a diagnosis by to pause, and to listen fully to what a patient is saying. It's interesting. It's not that doctors and all of us necessarily do that all the time although we should but that is part of the court training I remember a professor. Professor of mine in Medical School saying if you listen to a patient long enough, they'll often tell you what the diagnosis is. It's when you jump in and make assumptions that that you start to lose that threat, and so that was part of the thinking here, so I spent the first few months traveling around the country, asking people simple question. How can I help and trying to listen to what came now in one level? Some of the answers that I received were not entirely surprising, although they were incredibly helpful and informative, I heard stories about people struggle with addiction I heard heartbreaking stories of parents who lost a child to an opioid overdose. I heard people who were struggling with violence in their communities. Parents who are worried about the impact of technology on their child's mental hell. I heard about community leaders who were concerned about rising rates of obesity and heart disease and didn't know what they should be doing to address that. But I also heard that I didn't expect were these threads of loneliness that seem to weave their way through so many of these stories and Susan. It wasn't people coming and saying in Ohio Vivier Kayem Susan I'm lonely. They would say things like this. They would say. You. Know I feel. I. Have to carry all these burdens entirely on my own or feel. If I disappear tomorrow, nobody would even notice. Or feel invisible. And hearing that again and again from parents. From. Kids in school from students in universities from. Farmers from people in fishing villages in Alaska from members of Congress in Washington DC behind closed doors, it struck me. The loneliness I had experienced in my own life. In the loneliness I had seen so often in the lives of my patients. Were not unique to my experience. But there were more representative of a deeper well of loneliness that I was seeing all across the country, and in later years that I would start to see all around the world there is literally no subject that I touched on of all the many subjects I worked on a surgeon general that resonated as deeply in viscerally people as a subject of loneliness and social connection, and that was a powerful powerful to me. It was a sign that people paradoxically are united by this experience of loneliness. They just didn't know it. Because the lonelier a person gets the harder it is to make connections the breakthrough for the new surgeon general with seeing this epidemic of loneliness as a public health problem one that can be solved by public action. There are so many benefits to lifelong learning. That's why I love the great courses, plus and know that you listen to. This podcast will enjoy it as well with the great courses, plus you can expand your curious bond. Build upon your skills. 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Free Join US AT NEXT BIG IDEA, club dot com slash podcast. As Surgeon General Dr Vague Murthy was shocked by the degree of loneliness, people described to him, but based on his own childhood, not really surprise. Can you share with us? Some of the loneliness? You've experienced in your own life that perhaps allowed you to be opened to. The underlying message wasn't in your life that prime that way. Susan as an introverted child, who is also extremely shy. Ahead of hard time making friends when I was in elementary school, and any really seeped into my day to day experience so even going to school each morning I would feel this Peter Fear, welling up inside my stomach, and perhaps the scariest time of the day for me. Susan was lunchtime when I would go into the cafeteria, but be worried that there may be nobody to sit next to. And I just couldn't wait until three o'clock every day. When the bell rang to go home, because at home I knew I was loved I had a wonderful family, and my sister was amazing, but school was really different experience, and even though I was able to build stronger connections later in life, and it was blessed with some deep friendships that really transformed my life. I, never quite forgotten that experience as a child because there were also times in adulthood after my residency training, even during my time in search in general when I felt those deep pangs of loneliness return for different reasons under different circumstances. But it was loneliness than the less because in medical school. Susan I wasn't really taught how to deal with loneliness or identify it, but then I started seeing patients who had come into the hospital alone, and it really difficult moments when we had to give them a really difficult diagnosis I would often ask somebody I can call so that we can have this hard conversation together. And so many times they would say there's nobody we can just do it alone. You even at the time of death. Susan for so many patients. It pained me that I and my colleagues in medicine were often the only witnesses to their passing. So all of these were on my mind when I was encountering these stories of loneliness while I was surgeon general. You have this incredibly loving family, but even with these worm lovely amazing parents. You didn't want to tell them what you are feeling at school or about your loneliness because you felt a sense of shame about it. Are you like as a kid? Absolutely? When did you first open up to them? Was it with the publication of his book was at some time earlier. Can I confess something. Susan, we still have talked about it. Other the reasons you're slightly different now. When I was a child I did not talk to them about being lonely because I was deeply ashamed of it felt that it meant that I was inadequate in some way, I wasn't able to make friends. Something was broken in me. Show and frankly I was embarrassed. There was one moment I remember when my father brought this up because he noticed that I wasn't playing with other kids. arison standing in a corner of the playground by myself, and he asked me why I was in playing with the other kids and you didn't know what to say. I just sat there tongue tied and and I still remember just how. Deeply uncomfortable in a shamed I was in that moment, so I never told him as a child later on as an adult, I didn't tell them because I didn't want them to feel bad. I didn't want them to think that somehow they had. Failed The pick up on something or that they hadn't given me something I needed as a child. Because the truth is, they were in are extraordinary parents who did so much for me who continue to do so much for me, but really who gave me the foundation for building a connected life, but this shame that I felt was not unique to me. I came to realize in years later that despite how common loneliness is so many of us when we struggle with it feel that we are alone in our loneliness, because we look around us, and nobody's talking about it and everyone seems to have perfect lives are. Everyone seems to have very social lives in fact, particularly be. Judged by their posts on social media, so it's easy to think very quickly that we're the only ones, and as you have written about so beautifully in your work Susan. We live in a world that tilts toward the extroverted, and that champions, an extroverted culture, and I think all of these things combined together to to make it hard for people who are lonely to feel that they can say anything about it and that I think deepens the loneliness that we feel precisely at the time when we need to reach out to others, we need to be open and vulnerable, and we need to deepen our connection. When of the things that I think makes new such a compelling human and makes your book so moving is that it's clearly informed by these personal experiences that you've been through, but then you also have this enormous empathy that has allowed you to take your own personal experience with loneliness and. Kind of have your heart open to people experiencing loneliness in all different kinds of ways, and they're just so many moving stories. You tell through the book one of them. Maybe we could talk about for minute is story of a guy named Richard Lopez who was a gang member who had never wanted to be in a gang in the first place, but joined out of loneliness, and maybe you can tell us little bit about his story. Yeah. I had come to see when I was hurt. In general that loneliness was the great masquerader. What I mean by that is that it doesn't often look like the stereotype. The type of loneliness is a person sitting in the corner of a room at a party all alone, but loneliness can show up as ability in anger. Making can show up as sadness as withdrawal as depression as anxiety I and can contribute to so many other challenges, people struggle with whether it's substance, use, disorders, or violence, or other chronic illnesses and I found. Found this to be part of the story that Richard told me now Richard Lives in southern California, and by the time I spoke to him, he had been out of federal prison for several months, but he had spent many years in prison after being arrested for gang related violence, and he was part of an organization now called the Anti recidivism collective air see. An organization that was billed for people who had gotten out of prison, and it was meant to help them rebuild their lives so that they could be happy fulfilled, and certainly so that they would not end up on a pathway back to prison. Who was really amazing about? Richard is I i. asked him what it was. That led him to join a gang initially. And, he began to tell me this. Poignant story about his childhood, and about how he felt alone so often as a child that it seemed that he had to fend for himself, and found himself looking for some sort of community in gangs were the natural place to go. The game was a family. It was a place where you had support gay people who had your back? And people who value. But he resisted joining for a long time because he knew that it could be dangerous at times and their consequences, but would he kept humming again again in his story is just that the. Feeling of loneliness, and that gnawing pain inside just never went away such finally one day, when he was with his friends, and a car drove by them, and slowed down as it approached, and these other gang members poke their head on, asked him which gang he was from. He felt compelled in that moment to shout out the name of a gang. Again the his friends were surprised. He said he was part of because I knew he wasn't part of any gang. When he felt that Deep Pang of being alone in not belonging to anything. When he was asked effectively, who is your family? He responded with again, and that began this path for him over the next several years of fellowship for sure, but also deeper deeper engagement in violence, and ultimately he ended up in prison for some of the crimes that he committed during that time, but what was really striking is when he came out of prison, he talked to me about just how he recognized now the importance of building human connection in his life. About how he wanted to invest in the relationships around him, recognizing that so much of what drove him to seek out gangs, even as dangerous as life threatening as they were, was that deep sense of loneliness that he did not WanNa feel again in the last thing that I remember from him in particular Susan is. When we were talking about his life. Now this beautiful life that he has with his wife and his son, and he spoke so lovingly about his son, and now it's it's conversations with his son that make him met making. Realize what he's missed, but also what he wants to hold onto, he kept using the word love, and so I asked him about it. I said it's typical for someone who. Who is in a gang for years, and it's just how to prison to talk as much about love as you do. Is it? And he said no, he's like most of my contemporaries on talk about levees at, but the reason I do is because I realized that the opposite of loneliness is love. And when we have love in our life, we find true connection. We find true connection whenever alone. Into that is become the foundation for him on rebuilding his life, but it was a powerful reminder to me that they need for us to be connected to each other is so deep so instinctual. The we will sometimes cells in harm's. In order to feel that connection, which explains why people may remain in dangerous situations whether it's being part of a gang or being a part of an abusive relationship, if it makes him feel that they belong that somebody sees them in that they're connected to another human being. We live in such a philosophically materialist society that I think there's almost nothing more persuasive than the idea of how physically? Destructive loneliness is for us. Can you talk a little bit about Broken Heart Syndrome what that is and how you've seen that? Come up in your life. Will when I was. In tenth grade. My grandfather passed away after having a a massive heart attack, but he's brother. who he was extremely close to came to visit him. After, he passed away and his brother and he were so close because. Their mother had passed away when they were young, and the stepmother that their father married did not take a liking to them. And she would often not give them enough food. They were often physically beaten and had to stick together. That's how they survived. Even after they grew up, they always remain very close. And so when his brother died, my grandfather's brother showed up at the house is so distraught in. He looked at my grandfather lying there and he said. Leaving me. You have gone. Leaving me you have gone. And, then he clutched his chest with his hand fell to the floor. Passed away even before bamboo could arrive. He had a massive heart attack to. It was a double hit for our family and extremely painful, but it was only years later when I was practicing medicine that I came to realize what may have happened to him. Because I think he may have had Tucker Subas Cardiomyopathy Tonka Suba Syndrome is also called broken heart syndrome, and a describes what happens to the heart when there's an extraordinarily stressful moment that causes a tremendous outpouring of stress hormones in the body, and at high levels, those stress women's can be directly toxic to the heart, and they can cause what's called an epochal ballooning syndrome where the heart balloons and then pumps ineffectively. Someone, who has chocolate? Subas cardiomyopathy can look like they're in heart failure, and if you have the ability to get medical care quickly, they most people survive in their heart returns to normal, but unfortunate. That wasn't the case for my grandfather's brother, but at Subas. Stuck with me because I ended up seeing a number of cases of talk Subas during my time practicing medicine, and it was always a reminder to me that our emotions really do matter. They have a powerful effect on our physical health, and we have I think tried in society, and even in medicine to too neatly divide what happens in our head, and what happens in their physical body, but our head, our heart and our body are also deeply connected and Takasu Bose's is a prime example of that I. Think the opposite is true. Though as well I think the relationship that my grandfather and his brother enjoyed for all those years I think was deeply healing to both of them and enable them to overcome pretty severe trauma. and I wonder especially given all the data. We know now about social connection and help if he didn't perhaps allow them to live longer and better lives as well. So losing a friend or a loved one can kill you and making a friend or carrying deeply about someone can make you stronger and healthier. Assuming you prefer option B.. How can you make that happen in your own life? Today's episode of the next big ideas brought to you by Athletic Greens the all in one daily drake to support better health and peak performance even with a balanced diet. It's tough to cover all of your nutritional bases. That's where Athletic Greens can help their daily. Drake is like nutritional insurance for your body that's delivered straight to your door packed with a data Jones for recovery, probiotics and digestive enzymes forgot health and vitamin, C. and zinc citrate for Abune Support Athletic Greens is an easy all in one solution to help your body meet its nutritional needs. It's also diet friendly whether you eat Paleo, vegan dairy, free or gluten, free or a slightly. Slightly less healthy diet like mine, and you get it all in a drink with less than one gram of sugar that tastes. Great Been Drinking Athletic Greens for a month now, and it is delicious, quick and easy to prepare. I can almost feel the nutrients permeating every cell of my body. Now's the time to try Athletic Greens for Yourself. Visit outside of Greens dot com slash big idea to claim a special offer just for listeners of our show of twenty free daily travel packs with your first purchase. A seventy nine dollar added value again as authentic Greens dot com slash big idea all in one nutrition in seventy, five highly absorbable ingredients. maxine chasing is worried about her dad. He retired recently. He's recovering from a heart bypass. He barely wants to get out of bed in the morning. This is nine hundred and eighty seven in a small town in South Australia the country's been hit hard by global recession. When trading opened Australian exchanges this morning, they were no Baas on the board. The result was the greatest single full Australian stock market of. The big local dairy is closing. Lots of men are out of work, and just like vaccines, Dad, they're depressed. They're lonely and they're driving their families crazy. MAXINE works at a Social Center for older people except it's always older women. She looks out at the parking lot and sees all the husband's each sitting alone in his car, reading the paper waiting for his wife while she's taking exercise, classes or cooking lessons spending time with her friends. So maxine hatches a plan. It involves a retired carpenter named Al Stokes and his dog. She offers alf the use of a shed by the center. Is Inside. His dog parks himself outside for the local blokes. It's like an open invitation if the dogs they're. They know they're welcome to come in. Soon men's sheds have sprouted across, Australia? People can come and talk. and. Tell the wolves if they got any wolves, but it's also a place where people can have a lot of day. There are men's sheds all over the world. Some of the guys recovering from stroke sought. Some of the guys that. The thing is with any difference you. Bad ones in Scotland in Ireland. There are sheds for men with diabetes and Alzheimer's in Australia. The movement is now an official public health initiative. Men Get together to garden or keep these or make time for local kids. Sometimes they learn new skills like first aid, but as more Intel Susan Cain. It's not really about what the men do and the sheds. It's that they do it together. Some of us like to have relationships by launching right into the deep stuff, but there's some people who want to have connections and relationships, but it's not necessary to have them on an extensively deep level, and what I'm thinking about here is the story told about the men's shed movement. So can you talk about what that was like? And that this movement that reached out to a group of lonely retired men who really do not like to talk about their feelings. Absolutely I had a conversation with the founder of the men sheds a a woman actually named accede chasing in Australia. When she was younger, and her father ended up suffering a severe illness, and had to quit his job or retire early as a result of it, and the combination of those two factors, being ill, and having to retire, plunged her father into this deep well of loneliness, but he didn't necessarily call it that and didn't certainly speak of it in that way, and said his loneliness manifested is being irritable and grumpy. maxine realized that her father was lonely in that it was social connection that he needed, and so she came to realize that men and women. Women may have different experiences when it comes to how they manifest loneliness, but also different solutions that are required to address it. It's not always the case at men and women are so different, but broad brush with which she painted. This problem told her the following it told her the women face to face, and men talk shoulder to shoulder. That became one of the mottoes, in fact that the men's shed, and again a vast generalization, but was true for so many of the Monday serve their spouses and families notice that they were appreciably more fulfilled. And the idea of their sheds spread like wildfire throughout Australia with their now nearly thousand sheds, to the UK, where there are hundreds and hundreds of shed so many countries in Europe to the United States as well and again. It's a very simple premise that giving people an opportunity to work together to be together in a low pressure situation can help cultivate a sense of community, and they also tracked health outcomes related to this they found in. In the UK that people have participated in these sheds, dramatically lower levels of loneliness that their experience of anxiety was significantly diminished and other health indicators seemed to improve as well all of this point Susan to something that we have talked about all along in this conversation, which is extraordinarily power of human connection to heal and what I've come to realize is that at the heart of this conversation about human connection is very important subject of love. Because that's what these relationships are about that love me, show up as compassion or kindness or generosity or warmth. But it's hard. It is love. And the reason I think this is so important to be explicit about is I. think that for some reason over time we've come to look at love as a source of weakness as namby-pamby thing, that isn't what real men certainly talked about or strong people, but I think when we look more deeply. We realize that love is in fact, our greatest source of strength, and that's our relationships are so central to our health to our wellbeing to our fulfillment. If I headed a simple Credo Susan for the book, and for all of these efforts on the as it would be three words that I only came to me at the very end long after the book was actually in print, and those words are put people first. Because that to me feels like the Credo that I wanna live my life by now. It's the Credo that I would love to have at the heart of the society in which I live in which we raise our children. Were talking. I was thinking about. One of my proudest moments as a mom I don't know how old my son was at the time, maybe six or something, and he drew a picture of the two of US hugging and the caption underneath was love is great with lots of exclamation. Beautiful Yeah, and that's really what you're talking about. That's an alternative three words. Love is great I loved to anything. It's so striking your Sunday though because I think we tell young boys. IS THEY GROW UP? They're being real men is about. Not expressing emotion, not being vulnerable, not depending on anyone else. I think the reality. Is that whether you're a man or woman? That all of us have a need to feel and experience to receive and to give love. This is actually something that I felt my parents did for me when I was growing up, they would show up so readily for people who were in need whether that was their patients or or their friends. If a family member or friend had an urgent issue, they would step away from the dinner table often to deal with it. If it was an emergency and sometimes we would get annoyed. We'd say Gosh. We could all just hang out together whether they get on the phone again. But I now realized that they did judiciously, they didn't do that all the time, but they did it. When a friend was in crisis and came to appreciate that overtime, they really lived by sort of Credo, of a people centered life, and it took years for that really deeply seep in, but ultimately affected how my sister and I lived our lives. Can you tell the story of them waking you up in the middle of the? The night to go tend to not your father's patient, but the grieving widow of your father's patient, I so struck by that story. It's a story that took place when I was perhaps seven years older so and my mother woke me up suddenly in the middle of the night, and brushed me into the car, and my sister was there bleary, eyed in sleepy, and my parents began driving us to a trailer park in Miami. And on the way they explained that their patient Gordon who had struggled with many years, metastatic cancer had just passed away. and. They were worried that his wife Ruth would be grieving alone. They wanted to check on route. Will Never Forget that image of my mother walking up the steps of routes trailer she was dressed in her traditional Indian sorry and the door open that I saw ruth come out with tears streaming down her face with these black glasses on. In the moonlight, shining on both of them, as they embrace each other, and that image has been permanently etched in my mind, and what I think about now when I recall that moment is that my mother and ruth came from such different life experiences. But in that moment they were family. The kind of family you are born into the build for yourself, and that was how my parents practice medicine. That's how they lead their lives, and the truth is they did that because that's how they grew up. Because in their hometowns in India in the modest families, in which they grew up when I say modest, I mean in my father's case in particular were very poor. But even though they were poor materially. They were rich and relationships. He didn't know what loneliness was when he lived in India. The families in the village that had been there together for generations. And they all looked out for each other and took care of each other. What was that people got along all the time, but they always felt there were part of something, and I saw that same spirit that night, when my parents went to see ruth to console her to be with her, and her moment of great need, and so that remains my inspiration today to build that kind of people centered life. And to hopefully help my children do the same. Thank you. This has been absolutely beautiful to listen to you and to read the book. He wrote and cannot recommend it highly enough, and thank you so much for being in the world, and for doing the work that you do who is so nice to be able to have this conversation with you and especially meaningful to be able to do this with a friend. Thank, you says. DRI This is the next big idea. If you have thoughts about together or any of the other books in our series, we'd love you to join the conversation with me Susan. CAIN VIVEK MURTHY and other writers in this series at next big idea, club dot com, it's a lively community of lifelong learners where you can interact with top nonfiction writers and get audio video and text summaries of their key ideas China for three months for free at next big idea, club dot com slash podcast. If you like our show, please give a five star rating and a review and be sure to tell your friends subscribe on Apple. PODCAST spotify, or wherever you're listening right now. listen AD free. Join one, plus at one three plus dot com. In the episode note you'll find some links and offers from our sponsors cleese support them. Special, thanks this week to Dr Vague more. His book together. The healing power of human connection in the sometimes lonely world is available wherever books are sold, or you can get a copy for free when you join us at next big idea club dot, com. I'm your host Chris. This episode of the next big idea was written by made Mukarram. Sound design by Jake Gorski are associated producer is Caleb Kissinger. Our series producer Michael, Cobb, our senior producer is Jonathan. Miller executive producer. Stephanie Jen's Marshal, Louis and Hernando Pez for wondering. Hi I'm David Brown host, wondering show business wars we go deep into some of the biggest corporate rivalries of all time in our new exclusive series, were taking business wars after dark to the heyday of the nineteen seventies, when playboy and penthouse rule, the adult genre, and the line between sexy and obscene starts just below a woman's belly button, but when it comes to the boundaries of good taste, how far will founder Hugh Hefner and Bob Guccione Goto expand their erotic empires. Check out the exclusive season of business wars, playboy versus penthouse on one, plus in the one three APP download it today.

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Wondery presents The Next Big Idea

Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

07:13 min | 3 months ago

Wondery presents The Next Big Idea

"Never in human history, have we been so bombarded with information new ideas? Come at US every day from a thousand different directions. Where do we even begin? You can start with wondrous podcast the next big idea from business and science to health and culture. The next big idea brings you fascinating conversations about a new world changing idea every week. These are big ideas that will change the way you live work and think fast episodes of tackled topics like decision making overcoming racial bias and the biological power. Power of friendship this, Week Adam Grant speaks with award winning writer. Olga Kazan about viewing being called weird as a badge of honor, and how being an outsider in a world that prizes insiders is a superpower. You're about to hear a preview of the next big idea while you're listening subscribed to wonder is the next big idea on apple podcasts, spotify or wherever you're listening now and get ready to open your mind because the right idea at the right moment has the power to transform your life. From wondering, I'm Rufus Chris and this is the next big idea. I founded the next big idea club with Malcolm. Glad well, Susan Cain Daniel Pink and Adam grant to connect people to some of the oldest thinking shaping our culture and our future each week on the podcast. We bring you one idea with the power to change the way you see the world. Week how being weird can work to your advantage. Has On is a staff writer for the Atlantic who covers health and science? She says she knows hand about being weird. She grew up a Russian, Jewish, immigrant in a small conservative town in Texas and her outside identity stayed with her. In seven years of writing about weirdness, she says she has come to realize that there are unexpected upsides that her weirdness is in part responsible for her success. So when you think about being weird, you think about it more in terms of being a misfit in your context than having just quirky qualities as a person. I really struggled with how to define weirdness for this book, because there's the research on weirdness, but you're right. It does tend to focus on like the person who was wearing a red jacket instead of the black jacket, but I wanna do focus on something that was more consistent, so I wanted to focus on people who were different from everyone. Everyone else around them as opposed to just had a quirky hobby, because if you think about it, if you have a quirky hobby like writing a unicycle, you could join a club of UNICYCLISTS and suddenly not be weird anymore. In fact feel very comfortable and not alienated at all, so I didn't WanNa pick something that was just generally thought of as unique. I wanted to pick something that was more enduring obviously right now we have a ten polarization in the US in a lot of right versus left conflict, and some of the people that I interviewed for the book, actually were trump supporters who moved from California to Texas that they could be more accepted by. Trump supporters and they felt like you know if they were wearing trump, t shirts, or praying or something like that openly in California that they wouldn't be accepted, so actually hooked up with this organization called Conservative move, which helps Californians moved to Texas, so they can be with other Republicans. It sounds far fetched, but it's actually now like a business model, so you interviewed some really fascinating people for the book. I would love to hear in particular about an Amish Woman that you wrote about Emma Amish Woman that I interviewed grew up in this really conservative Missouri Community, and if you WanNa, be amish you have to. To buy in to the idea of being honest, it is not like a half-hearted thing. You basically are educated through eighth grade. Then you stop going to school and if you're a woman, you have babies with a guy who is one of five boys that you can choose when you're sixteen to Mary, and you basically Cook and clean for the rest of your life and Babysit. She looked at that future and she was like I don't want to do this. It's not just the technology thing. It's not just the like farming lifestyle that doesn't appeal. It's like I don't want my opportunities to be this limited. She always felt this feeling of doubt inside of her. So when she was sixteen or seventeen, she just walked out of her family's farmhouse, and she had smuggled a cell phone and used it to call this friend of a friend who basically took her down to Texas to South Texas where they happen to live, and she kind of started life all over again. She was a US citizen who didn't speak. English because they speak Pennsylvania Dutch. She didn't understand any social rules or norms. She was completely alienated from the Internet technology how. People interact on a day-to-day basis, and it really just goes to show how awful it can be both to feel like an outsider in your community, but then even when you try to break out of that community and be more free or join a different community that period of transition is still. Still really difficult. So what did you learn from her? About coping with being outside or going from being an outsider in one context to then living that in another, she really was one of the most difficult stories in the book. She had one of the rough times, but I found that she really use this strategy of changing the way she thought about being an outsider. It went from being where she was trying to hide that she was Amish or apologize for. For it especially among the modern Americans or whatever you WANNA call them that she was meeting. She kind of reestablished herself. She had to kind of learn to think about her outsider dumb in a new way in a more positive way, so she now is out. She's like a normal twenty-something, so she's dating and meeting people and she has to be like look being amish, having this extremely traumatic and difficult thing that I went through made me who I am it's. It's not the entirety of WHO I am. You can't make amish jokes about me because that's not cool but I'm now tougher and stronger. Because I went through this, and once she started asserting herself in that way. Things got a little bit better for her than when she was apologizing for her differences. That was just a preview of the next big idea. Be Sure to subscribe to wonder he's the next guy idea on apple podcasts, spotify or wherever you're listening now. We used to go to the mall and do. Not because they are easy, but because they are odd, I'm Chuck Rosenberg on my podcast, the youth I speak with those who sacrificed for the common good who believe in collective responsibility who do things because they are hard. Our conversations on the author thoughtful, civil, respectful essential, we bring these leaders and their struggles and successes to life this week. Former Surgeon General Vivek murthy their fundamental core values around decency, round, kindness, round compassion this part of our shared humanity. We are truly interdependent. We are stronger when we are together. Join me for season. Three of the oath and MSNBC podcast search for the oath wherever you're listening right now and please subscribe new episodes every Wednesday.

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MSNBC presents The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

WeCrashed: The Rise and Fall of WeWork

03:22 min | 4 months ago

MSNBC presents The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"You're about to hear a preview of the oath and MSNBC podcast hosted by former US attorneys senior FBI official and acting head of the DA Chuck Rosenberg. The oath is a series of revealing one on one conversations with fascinating men and women who took an oath to serve America. Interviews include former Secretary of defense and CIA director Leon Panetta Kathy, Sullivan. The first American woman to walk in space. Former US Surgeon General Vivek Murthy and more. These captivating stories about what shaped these leaders exemplify what's best about our country integrity, civility, service, humility and collective responsibility. Their stories feel more relevant than ever in these extraordinary times. If you enjoy the preview search for the oath wherever you're listening right now to subscribe new episodes, drop every Wednesday. We choose to go to the mall and do the other thing, not because they are easy, but because they are hard. Hi, this is Chuck Rosenberg of podcast I speak with people who sacrifice for the common good who believe in collective responsibility who do things that are hard. Our conversations on the oath are thoughtful, civil, respectful essential. We bring these leaders and their struggles and successes to life in the third season of the oath. You'll meet more inspirational leaders. People who took that oath made that. That promise and serve this amazing country. In various ways, leaders like former secretary of defense and CIA director Leon Panetta the toughest job I had as secretary of defense was to sign deployment orders that placed young men and women in uniform in harm's way. Former NASA astronaut Kathy Sullivan in your role as an astronaut. One of the key things you're doing is helping. Make sure the pieces are coming together. The unknowns are being probed carefully. The risks are being evaluated carefully, and it's very hard on. On families to stand there know that their loved one is writing bombs for living the highest ranking woman in the FBI Amy Hess I remember he was kneeling down on the ground, and he was holding babies shoe I knew he had young children, and I watched as he just dissolved in tears, all of a sudden, the evil that happened there in Oklahoma City on April, nineteenth nineteen ninety-five struck me former judge and United States Attorney Carol Lam. When I walked through that door. They would all. All look at me. I would think to myself I. Know what you're thinking about me right now, and by the time we leave this room. You're going to be thinking something else and former Surgeon General Vivek Murthy, there are fundamental core values around decency round kindness around compassion. It's part of our shared humanity. We are truly interdependent. We are stronger when we are together. We live in an uncertain world public faith in our most crucial institutions waivers when we most need those institutions to thrive. But. Remarkable people still take the oath. They still raise their hand to serve, and they still sacrifice for the common good. Despite the turmoil they remind us of the need for good and honest. Public servants join me for season three, the oath and MSNBC podcast search for the oath wherever you're listening right now and subscribe new episodes everyone's.

General Vivek Murthy Secretary Chuck Rosenberg MSNBC Kathy Sullivan US FBI CIA director Leon Panetta Kathy Leon Panetta Amy Hess America NASA Carol Lam acting head Oklahoma City official United States Attorney
MSNBC presents The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

Business Wars Daily

03:22 min | 4 months ago

MSNBC presents The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"You're about to hear a preview of the oath and MSNBC podcast hosted by former US attorneys senior FBI official and acting head of the DA chuck, Rosenberg the oath is a series of revealing one on one conversations with fascinating men and women who took an oath to serve America. Interviews include former Secretary of defense and CIA director Leon Panetta Kathy Sullivan the first American woman to walk in space former US surgeon general. Vivek Murthy and more these captivating stories about what shaped these leaders exemplify what's best about our country integrity, civility, service, humility and collective responsibility. Their stories feel more relevant than ever in these extraordinary times. If you enjoy the preview search for the oath wherever you're listening right now to subscribe new episodes, drop every Wednesday. We choose to go to the mall and do the other thing not because they are easy, but because they are hard. Hi, this is Chuck Rosenberg hosts of the youth podcast. I speak with people who sacrifice for the common good who believe in collective responsibility who do things that are hard. Our conversations on the oath are thoughtful, civil, respectful essential. We bring these leaders and their struggles and successes to life in the third season of the oath. You'll meet more inspirational leaders. People. Who took that oath? Oath made that promise and serve this amazing country in various ways, leaders like former secretary of defense and CIA director Leon Panetta the toughest job I had as secretary of defense was to sign deployment orders that placed young men and women in uniform in harm's way former NASA astronaut. Kathy Sullivan in your role as an astronaut. One of the key things you're doing is helping. Make sure the pieces are coming together. The unknowns are being probed carefully. The risks are being evaluated carefully, and it's very. Very, hard on families to stand, there know that their loved one is writing bombs for living the highest ranking woman in the FBI amy. Hess I remember. He was kneeling down on the ground, and he was holding babies shoe I knew he had young children, and I watched, as he just dissolved in tears, all of a sudden, the evil that happened there in Oklahoma, city on April. Nineteenth nineteen ninety-five struck me former judge and United States. Attorney Carol, Lam when I walked through that door, they would. Would all look at me. I would think to myself I know what you're thinking about me right now, and by the time we leave this room, you're going to be thinking something else. And Former Surgeon General Vivek murthy there are fundamental core values around decency round kindness around compassion. It's part of our shared humanity. We are truly interdependent. We are stronger when we are together. We live in an uncertain world public faith in our most crucial institutions waivers when we most need those institutions to thrive. But remarkable people still take the oath. They still raise their hand to serve, and they still sacrifice for the common good. Despite the turmoil they remind us of the need for good and honest. Public servants join me for season three, the oath and MSNBC podcast search for the oath wherever you're listening right now and subscribe new episodes everyone's.

General Vivek murthy Hess Chuck Rosenberg Secretary MSNBC US Leon Panetta Kathy Sullivan FBI CIA Lam Kathy Sullivan director Leon Panetta DA America acting head NASA Oklahoma official Attorney
Federal agents with no identifying insignia pull Portland protesters into unmarked vans

All In with Chris Hayes

50:39 min | 2 months ago

Federal agents with no identifying insignia pull Portland protesters into unmarked vans

"Night on all end Donald Trump send secret police to snatch Americans off of the street and stuff them into unmarked cars tonight Oregon's governor says the president is invading. Portland as an election stunt. She joins me. Live Ben Former Surgeon General Vivek Murthy on. The White House lies about rising Cova deaths. Plus why is the White House blocking the CDC from my hearing unsafely reopening schools as the president focuses on trucks and beans, joy, Reid on where this race really stands and what she has planned for her new show. Starts Right now. Good evening from New York. I'm Chris. Hayes there are secret police operating on the streets of American city under the direction of the president. In the past week they have been recorded snatching a protester off the street, and forcing him into an unmarked car and shooting another peaceful protester with a nonlethal round in the head. This is all happening in Portland Oregon. Where on Saturday night a twenty six year old protester named Donovan La Bella was standing across the street from unidentified federal officers, holding nothing but a speaker. Just standing there. Rolled away a canister thrown his direction and then this happened. The reason you see him collapse. Their Donovan Labelle was because he was shot in the head with a round meant to be nonlethal is fellow protester carried him away as his blood pooled on the ground. His mother said his face and skull fractured that he finished facial reconstructive surgery early Sunday morning. He still has a tube in his skull to drain the blood. She told the Oregonian on Sunday The shot into his head was fired by the federal agents that the president deployed the streets. Portland against the wishes of the mayor and the governor. These agents have been driving unmarked vehicles and teargassing protesters while refusing to identify themselves. Oregon Democratic Senator Ron, Wyden tweeting a peaceful protest in Portland was shot in the head by one of Donald Trump secret police now trump and Chad wolf or weaponized department of Homeland Security is their own occupying army to provoke violence on the streets of my hometown, because they think it plays well with right wing media. Guy That Center, wide mentioned there Chad Wolf. He is the Acting Secretary of Homeland Security. To justify what Donald Trump is doing. He tweeted out images of himself viewing graffiti that had been put on buildings in Portland. The DHS put out a statement. Pointing to the buildings it said had been graffitied by quote. Violent anarchists listen to how he explained it on trump TV last night. We need to make sure that we're supporting our law enforcement officers here. And making sure that they're going to continue to protect the federal court. House here. That's what D H S does. That's our mission. We're not GONNA advocate. Our mission our responsibilities. However whatever the local leadership is here is telling us. So the mission of the Department of Homeland Security is to deploy secret police to the streets of American city to stop. Graffiti. And some light property damage. And as part of that mission to protect the federal courthouse, apparently also need to abduct people as well. What are you doing? Use Your words? What are you doing? What are you doing? Use your words. What is going on? We need to know who are you? Mental we'll get you out. What's your name your name? Okay. You're fine. We'll get you out. We've got you. Got You. Don't. You just violated their rights. Violated their rights. Yeah, kidnapping people snatching them off the streets, stuffing them to unmarked vans in America. That is just one of a number of videos and accounts out of Portland of unidentified federal officials, just plucking people off the street and driving away. Just like that. One came from twenty nine year old Mark Pettibone. WHO said that? When he was abducted, he got did not know if the men were even police. He thought they might be far-right extremists. I was terrified. He told The Washington Post. It seemed like it was out of a horror. Sci Fi like Philip K. Dick novel. It was like being preyed upon. After terrifying car ride in which is hat was pulled down over his head, so he could not see he was put in a cell, and what he later learned was a federal courthouse. He was later released without any record of why he had been picked up in the first place. A DHS. Put Out Defensive Statement. Claiming they had been suspect, had been suspected of either assault or vandalism. They were not sure which evangelism. DHS's patrolling vandalism the agency after nine eleven the created after nine eleven. They're going after vandals really. Let's be very clear here. This kind of armed federal presence does not help. Anyone that is why local officials do not want it. These men in their Cammo with their guns and their riot gear. They are not coming things down in Portland. They are not bringing order to Portland. They are making things in Portland worse. They are provoking people and violating the rights, which is precisely why Sean Hannity let his show with images of alleged violence as a way to distract. Desperately tried to convince people to think about anything other. Than the one century catastrophe that Donald Trump as ushered in. Remember when the president and attorney general embar had police violently expelled protesters peaceful protesters. Lafayette Park Right near the White House that Donald. Trump could have that ridiculous photo. OP The church. That was reportedly ordered in part because and I, quote here. Bar was concerned about graffiti on the Treasury Department headquarters. Prophetic. Federal officers in riot shields with guns and tear gas and batons being deployed because someone tagged a wall. And now it's the same excuse. They're using Portland. Remember after a secret police cleared a path. Donald Trump's strolled past that graffiti mafia park for pathetic photo, awkwardly holding a Bible to boost his political standing. Well, this is the same thing all over again. The president has authorized the occupation of a major American city in an attempt to create a propaganda victory for right wing media. They are performing fascism for the base. Only they're not just performing. They are really doing it. They're literally abducting people. Because the only trick, they seemed to have left as from slides further, and further behind the polls as the virus rages across the country is to lay waste to the rule of law, and whether it is grabbing people off the streets, and stuffing them to unmarked vans, or trying to stop mail in voting or calling into question, the legitimacy election or pardoning is crooked friends and Co. conspirators is a full-scale assault on the very pillars of liberal democracy as reelection strategy. Joining, now Organ Governor Kate Brown was asked the federal government to remove these unmarked agents from the streets or lemon governor. Thank you for joining me tonight. I want to just say that I am confused about the situation. I've been reading reporting on it all day. What is your understanding of what is going on in your state right now? That's a great question. We are certainly facing challenges with Covid nineteen and I've asked the federal government for help, both in terms of testing supplies and financial resources, we have citizens across the state that have been very hard hit by this virus, and we can't get either the financial support or the medical help that we need instead the federal government chooses to. Deploy troopers on our streets as you mentioned which is purely political theater. It's not about public safety, and it's certainly not about problem solving. Well I just detail wisely did Chad from digested anyone's call up you or one of your status? As governor were sending a bunch of folks out into the streets, they might be shooting non lethal rounds at some Oregonians. They might be teargassing some of them. Just a heads up. Would you like us to do this? Is Their communication or you just watching this? Happen. That's a really great question. I got a call from Secretary Wolf. Stay as you are well aware. That was several days after they'd always already almost killed a young man, a peaceful protester in Portland and the conversation I had with him was very very clear. Remove your federal officers from the streets of Portland. You are escalating an already challenging situation, and frankly in Oregon. We saw problems by de escalating and dialoguing. This is a total and complete distraction from the trump's administration failure to lead a national covid nineteen response. I saw reporting that some of these. Officers federal officers are vp custom border protection and I know this is gonNA sound sort of Snarky, but I want to say for the record. Portland's not on the border, right? Will you know your geography well, probably better than a lot of vice presidential candidates. In certain parties, but yes. We know that there are federal officials as you mentioned they are driving unmarked cars. Media reports. Tell me that they literally are renting. Vehicles from local rental agencies, but I ask them to go home. The mayor has asked them to go home. Our congressional location has asked them to go home and if not. I ask them to comply with the same restrictions that the Portland Police Bureau is. The federal courts have placed restrictions on the city of Portland Police. Force, in terms of their use of force, federal officials should be required to comply with these absolute same restrictions. Americans ought to be outraged in Oregon liens are. This is absolutely unacceptable. This was purely a photo opportunity for political theater for the trump administration. He is trying to distract If they were trying to problem solve, they would have called US and said. Let's have a conversation. Let's work collaboratively late to tackle these issues. They're not interested in problem solving. They only want to escalate. They WANNA dominate the streets, and they want to score political points with their base. Yeah, you wrote. The trump is looking for confrontation Oregon. Hopes of winning political points, Ohio, or Iowa your state, a kind of a theater backdrop for the president. Of course, there's real people there, and there's a real young man who really had facial reconstructive surgery, and really had his blood pool on the street after he was really shop with a nonlethal around by a federal official who he doesn't know what to this day. We don't know what entity he came from I. Mean One question. I have for you and for the citizens of state. If two men come up to me with guns in camouflage and Grammy to put me in a car. I'm not going with them. I don't know who they are. I don't know if people that just bought camouflage in a store and a police badge and have a gun. Authority they have. This is terrifying for the citizens of the city of Portland in surrounding communities. Obviously, it is definitely like pouring gasoline on a fire. This is not how we saw problems in my state, and it's absolutely unacceptable. The circumstance you just showed complete violation of civil rights and a violation of our Constitution certainly federal law enforcement officials should be forced to abide by these at the very least. A governor. Kate Brown of the State of Oregon as you can tell, she has been asking. The federal officers who've been deployed to her state onto the streets to leave. Thank you so much for your time. Tonight Governor. Thank you be safe. Try I want to bring now. In a Senator Jeff Merkley Democrat Oregon who tweeted at the president earlier. Get your. Lackey and uninvited paramilitary actions out of my state, our communities, and not a stage where your twisted reelection campaign and Senator I wanNA. Talk about the legality here an oversight, so we have some news on that front. The ACLU has already assumed the Portland police local police and I would just note that that Portland Police. Department has had some real excesses and there's a reason that they're hundred federal. Constraint in terms of what what what kind of use of force they can have, but the judge said the ACLU can add federal agencies to at and a US. Attorney for Oregon. The Justice Department has called for an investigation into those protester arrests. Is that enough does more to be done to figure out what the heck is going on here? Or more has to be done I. mean every American should be offended. What they had seen tonight actually terrified. Trump is using these federal forces as a personal paramilitary force. That is what dictators do. That is not what presidents of A. Democratic Republic. Do and I can tell you that we pursue this question of who are these people and I talked to the US Marshal's office they. They said that they were they were marked. And then it appeared that these folks were customs and Border Protection agents those were the ones sweeping people off the street and we got a reply for mark. Morgan Mark Morgan. The Commissioner for CB Says No. No, no, they were clearly marked as federal law enforcement officers. Ucla's pictures you. You see the word police. That's where the Portland police were they someone who just as you said bought some camouflage and some police badge mark Penna Bone, who referred to? He said he was terrified. He knew that some of the the white power extremists have come to try to harass protesters in Oregon and it was going through his mind was well. It could be these extremists are taking the are are kidnapping me I against absolutely unacceptable to have unmarked. Unmarked this is like stormtroopers. This is completely unacceptable. There's no accountability. If you don't know who people are, and now, our federal government is a lying to us, not coming clean I, met with them. About what are the rules of engagement? Who were the decision? Makers about what weapons would be carried and what tactics would be used. They said Oh. It's all in some book somewhere. We have protocols well well yet. Protocols for different places. You make decisions who makes those? Those decisions who who coaches the team before they got the street all now. It's all in a book somewhere. There are absolutely no transparency. The term secret police or personal presidential paramilitary force seems seems appropriate and then look what they're doing. Grabbing. Somebody who left a peaceful protests was walking back to his car, sweeping him into a van Roy prison cell later, releasing him never telling him who they were or why he was stopped again. This is unacceptable in America. I have to say that in my career. Covering politics I have heard countless lectures from conservatives and Republicans about federalism states' rights. Local control the federal government we want the federal government coming in and telling us what to do there. I just don't understand what even why is this the business? In any way shape or form or see vp whoever graffiti wall whether they were ANWR ICUS are not. We have local law enforcement in this country. The DA doesn't run around arresting everyone who graffiti something just seems like no actual grounding for this other than the president wants a show of force. Will we certainly in in Portland had conflicts between white extremists and others who are protesting. The. The city commission and the the mayor and the police chief and teams have tried to figure out how to keep them separated. Keep him from being violent exchanges. As stop any form. Of destruction is, it is not always easy, but it gets much harder when you have unidentified agents coming in using impact munitions, shooting a peaceful protester in the had so I, asked about the rules of engagement I said you have roles assay. You can shoot somebody in the head with these these impact, munitions, rubber, bullets or something of that nature. They said well we have. We had rules where you get me a copy. No, that won't give me a copy well. We'll think about getting me a copy I said you'll have rules like like if we use these. We only use them for endangered A. A. We never shooed above above the chest up. It's absolutely the governor had it right. It pours gasoline on this fire this tension so here we have everyone working to deescalate to any form of violence or property destruction and the federal stormtroopers, trump's personal para-military force coming in here in a secret police style just making everything so much worse. He he has to get them haul. It does seem like from a legal point of view that this type of unidentified sweeping people off the street. No probable cause is a violation of civil rights and look president. Would we expect that from president trump. Yeah, it's it's intolerable. Folks should go read about how the founding fathers felt about this kind of policing action. They were not very very supportive. In fact, it's part of what sparked Revolution Senator Jeff Merkley of the State of Oregon. Thank you very much. If you're going to be. Next for now witnessing a rise in the number of people dying from the coronavirus, each day I'll talk to the former surgeon general, the US about the. Costs of the trump administration's easily preventable failures right after this. We choose to go to the. Do the other thing not because they are easy, but because they are hard. I'm Chuck Rosenberg on my podcast. The oath I speak with those who sacrificed for the common good who do things because they are this week, former National Security Council official Fiona Hill, we can ourselves have a serious rational discussion about where we want the relationship with Russia to go, but we have to stop using Russia as part of our domestic politics, join me for season, three of the oath and MSNBC podcast search for the oath wherever you're listening right now and please subscribe new episodes. Everyone's Day. Hey It's Chris. Hayes this week on my podcast. Wise is happening. I'll be talking with political campaign veteran, Luke, as also my brother about what it's like to be running campaigns. In this moment there's a frustration out there with the American electorate and just American general like things are not going well and that the response is underwhelming, so I think there's a predisposition to being like why is this also? Why are these things not working the way they should be and that's only compounded over the last few. Few years for some of them like they lost their job in the great recession, they lost their pension ends like these people that quote unquote played by the rules they got screwed on. The mortgage screwed on. Their job screwed on the engine. You know I voted for this guy and my life material change all that much I think people are just frustrated with the system of not addressing the needs. That's this week on. Why is this happening? Search for wise's happening wherever you're listening right now and subscribe. Exactly one month ago vice. President Mike Prints the head of the coronavirus task force was telling anyone who would listen about the great success of his coronavirus task. He tweeted today less than six percent of Americans tested at the virus. Cases have stabilized over the past two weeks averaging twenty thousand down from thirty thousand April hospitalizations are declining, but working closely with states to safely reopen America capitalists capital our capital. Today, the country set a new record with more than seventy three thousand reported cases, and in the same way when daily cases were around twenty, thousand and pence ran, has premature victory lap. The administration in the last few weeks has been crowing about the low fatality rate. The one thing I would note is that when you look at the mortality rates? We're seeing that our efforts here at the federal government have been working. But as sure as night follows day, fatalities follow cases so after the recent. UPTICK IN CORONA virus, cases deaths are now starting to rise to in the last several days. Arizona Texas and Florida all set record numbers of daily deaths look those charts. Were now creeping back up two thousand deaths a day. Nearly one thousand Americans are losing their lives every single day. And that lag between diagnosis and death that had been set in motion weeks ago. Which means the die has already been cast for how many people will die from this virus over the next several weeks? Each of those people a fellow American, who's been failed by the governor? From. Rea- Surgeon General Vivek Murthy. Is Irving the fact that we have screwed up this up worse than anyone? He said on Monday. Quote our response strategy as country has been frankly embarrassing. We have the capacity, the knowledge, the resources to mount the kind of response that a pandemic like this meriden instead were behaving like a failed state. Dr Vivek Murthy former US surgeon general the Obama. Administration joins me now. I want you elaborate I on that point Dr. Murthy it's great to have you. This has been a metaphor that people were throwing around of the beginning, but I think the further we go, and the more that we sort of stick out among all nations, the harder it is to argue that there's something deeply deeply wrong here. Well thanks for. It's good to be with you tonight. This is the wrong way for America. To be exceptional. We do in fact know how to take on pandemics, pandemics, and even though this is a unique one. We have handled other outbreaks in the past and we know that you've got to bring together. All of the resources in the public and private sector you've got gotTA communicate with one voice lead with science and get resources to people on the front line was tried and true principles have pandemic response. Time and time again. We failed to do that. Kind we're paying the price in lives loss in an economy that has been badly damaged and. In in parents and children who are uncertain about whether they can go back to school so this is extraordinary and think about this for a moment. Just about every other industrialized country hasn't been able to seek aces. Go Up, but then bring them back down. Here is really only one other country other than the United States that has gone up. Only come down a little bit, and then surged once again because they haven't been able to get the job done, and that's Iran. We are that is a category that we're in now. We have far more resources and experienced any ron it. We find ourselves at the bottom of the chart in terms of our pandemic response, and that is frankly unacceptable. I remember early in the in the pandemic when people were pointing to China's response as a sort of. Example of the the failures of Chinese government, right that the Chinese Communist Party was centralizing information that they were stopping on science that they were hiding things from the public right, and that was part of what made the response so bad, and that was a true critique in the beginning right, and I saw similar critiques of Iran's initial reaction. The idea was look when you don't have states that are transparent that are accountable to their people. They will screw this up. What does it say about the United States that we are in that category? What it's points to is the importance of leadership. You can have the best scientists in the world you can have a great deal of expertise in the public and private sector you can have pharmaceutical and biotech companies that are capable of making manufacturing extraordinary vaccines aerobatics, but he don't have the right leadership. He will flounder. It's very similar to to think about a car for a moment. You can have a Ferrari sal engine. You can have the world's best a safety features and invest the best GPS system. If you've got a driver who doesn't know where he or she is going. Then! You'RE NOT GONNA succeed. You're going to crash, and unfortunately that's what we're seeing in our pandemic response. Leadership really matters, and we do not have the leadership we need to see is pandemic. I hope somebody steps up in our federal government, because lives are at stake, many of the lives that are lost now our lives. They did not have to loss. We could have and should have done better. That? Of course, the lies we are losing every day a nearing one hundred forty thousand total fatalities. That's the highest price being paid for this failure of leadership and I want to just. On this question of the of fatalities, there was a long period in which cases were going up and fatalities were declining. Most people said look. This is just this is the lag. This is the time between the lightning and the thunder. This is how it works other said well. Maybe we're getting more. We're catching people. Earlier and younger people are getting this so maybe fatality rates, but it now appears that we are destined for several very very brutal weeks in terms of the fatality, the virus. Is that your view? Yes. Unfortunately, this is going to get worse before it gets better. In terms of the death toll increasing, and unfortunately this is what many public health experts were were saying months ago and they were worried about. And they were talking about specifically allowed. We know that when people the first step is people go out and they get exposed. The next step is at after some period of days of potentially a two weeks. They may start to develop symptoms then after that they'll go and get a test some days after that a result will come back then you'll see er visits. Visits, and hospitalizations increase, and then about two weeks after that you'll see debts increase, so think about all of these steps you've gotta recognize a want to see. The number of cases started. Go Up and the hospitalizations up. You're going to see death rates likely. Go up unless you got a blockbuster drug. That is a game changer. We don't have that right now. So, this is unfortunately somewhat. Predictable, but it's it's. It's the reason that we have to recognize to critical things. One is that you cannot take your foot off the accelerator. When it comes to pandemic response, you can't step back and rest thinking. It's all done. It's not done until it's done, but the second thing you have to keep in mind here. Is that when it comes to these kind of of pandemic responses. You've got to be honest with people because public trust is what you need in pandemics like this. If you don't have public trust, people aren't gonNA. Listen to you. They're not going to wear masks. They're not going to distance themselves. They're not going to reduce their activity and right now we have states that are thinking about pausing reopening because of the surge. In cases they're having. D They need to be thinking about pulling back entirely, not just pausing pulling back because half-measures don't work with Kobe nineteen. You've got to go all the way. Otherwise. Prolong the pain and that's the pain. We're living through right now. Final question for you. We're beginning to see some behavioral changes happening in states like Arizona that has been had one of the worst outbreaks, we maybe case new cases starting to bend the curve a little bit there, but when you look at the map when you look at what sort of transmission level is. It's pretty terrifying right now. I mean it's not just Arizona Texas and Florida and South Carolina, but all kinds of states look like they're in the earlier stages. You know two or three weeks behind them, and that train is just barreling down the tracks. that. Is True an unlike March? When we had the worst of Covid, nineteen contained to a few states including New York. We are now seeing this trajectory all over the south in the West and we're starting to see mid West. Also start to turn in the wrong direction, so all of this emphasizes the fact that we have to address this pandemic on multiple fronts. We've got to be working on the behavioral changes pulling back on social interactions pulling back on. An in person engagement particularly in indoor settings restaurants in bars. We've got to have mandatory public mass quarters all over our country and we are still hesitating to do that. Despite the death toll we're seeing here's a key point, Chris. It has to be a company. I A parallel effort to increase testing and contact tracing capacity. We were saying this in March. We were saying this April and yet here we find ourselves today still with turnaround times for tests that are six. Six seven eight days with people, waiting hours and hours in line, unable to get their tests. That shows is that our government has not learned from the mistakes of March everybody in pandemic response will. My will fall at some point they'll. They'll stumble. They'll make a mistake that is understandable, but what you cannot do is fail to learn from those mistakes and make the same mistakes again and again. That is unfortunate what we see ourselves doing. We've got to do better. Do We have to Dr Vivek Murthy. Thank you so much. Course thank you. Next the president's disastrous handling of the coronavirus pandemic is costing him supporters. He can't afford to lose the down ballot. Races are feeling the pain. My new primetime colleague Joy Reid joined me to discuss just ahead. The Cook Political Report has been lect been in the election, predicting Bible for decades analyze elections and campaigns, and they make predictions generally pretty conservative, pretty hedge pretty sober today. They did something they appear to never have done before. They moved twenty house races at the same time all in the direction of the Democrats. The reflection of political reality right now something appears to broken among a certain kind of persuadable voter because of Donald Trump's abject failure with the corona virus it showing up everywhere you look in a sinking approval ratings back in January had an forty-nine percent approval rating five months later at the end of June in the midst of a pandemic is at thirty eight percent. Head to head matchup Joe. Biden is beating Donald trump by an average of nine points. It's in his corona virus approval rating as well specifically. If people trust what he says about the virus, a new poll shows only thirty four percent, said they trust Donald trump a good deal on the coronavirus two-thirds almost two-thirds of come true wapping sixty four percents that they do not trust him much or at all. Now this is all hurting him across a lot of demographics for one group Donald Trump won in the last election. The is tremendous vulnerability with now are seniors. Choices explicit told. Rice getting older Americans the hardest. Throwing America towards. Democrats are looking to press advantage with ads like that and joining me now the host of the new seven PM show on MSNBC starting on Monday my friend and colleague joy, Reid of the readouts, congratulations. Joy I am so thrilled about this next chapter. Thank you so much Chris I really appreciate it. It's going to be so much fun being your lead it. It's going to be really great. You. You and I have talked been been having conversations on air and affair, since trump was elected about this kind of persistent way, in which there's kind of this defying gravity right, which is that? He, he was never popular wasn't even really popularly elected he more people voted against him. He's had this approval. Rating hovered around forty, four or forty, three or forty four percent, and yet from this position of weakness, or what would be weakness for other politicians. He's kind of defy political gravity that appears to be changing now or have changed. Do you bike? Do you think it has changed in some fundamental way? Why Chris from our conversations. I think that I've been very cynical. You know that I've been very very cynical about you. Know the electorate, and and the reasons. Why Donald Trump got elected, you know. Had you know it's something to do with misogyny and people just not wanting to let Hillary Clinton because they had this long standing. You know sort of crazy view of her, but also. Also there's a sense that Donald trump could restore a version of white privilege that would take it back before political correctness made you know white people feel like they had to be more polite about race than they wanted to be. He just was a free and candidate. He was sort of an Avatar for allowing people to strike out against non white immigration to strike out against you. You know the changes to lgbt writes. It ought to strike out against it and have a cover, but here's the problem that that whole reason for elect Donald Trump, that's not impervious to the fact that your grandma has covert or that your son has cove it or that you can't go. See your mom like the the problem is Donald Trump's base among white voters are not impervious. Impervious to Kobe some of them think they are. They think if I just don't wear a mask and I just say it isn't really won't get it, and they still get it, and so the problem is Donald Trump has finally confronted something that he can't explain away. Disease and death, and it is disproportionately hurting people who look like me, but it's also killing white Americans and Republicans. There is this fascinating poll on the sort of cynicism question, right which persists I think. Because you know people have sort of PTSD from sixteen. MONMOUTH. Does this poll a Pennsylvania and they find Biden winning by this like crazy number a fifteen sixteen point something like that, then they pull pennsylvanians about who they think will win Pennsylvania and they say we think trump's GonNa win even after they just told the pollster by huge margins like I'm voting for Joe Biden and they ask other secret trump voters in your community. Yes, fifty seven percent, no thirty five percent, so people still have this suspicion right and I think in some ways that ends up working to the Democrats advantage, because no one is not people I know are complacent about this election. That's right. Absolutely you know what helped Donald Trump? And he and I think we have to always remind us. He didn't win the election right. He won the electoral college because he won a small margin. Seventy something thousand votes in three states, but now everyone understands that saying today. I don't feel like you know Hillary Clinton. I didn't like her enough. Excuses that people were able to use to wriggle out of voting against Donald Trump, in two thousand sixteen. No one no one is taking it for granted now. People who even are gently supportive of Joe Biden are determined to crawl over broken glass to vote for Jill Biden. Joe Biden's sort of Teflon status right now, and the election is because of trump. It's because now. Trump has been seen inaction. He's not the theoretical guy from the apprentice may be fun to have a wacky president who's been a Reality Star? No now he's the guy who presided over one hundred and thirty five thousand deaths. That's more depth than in World War One. We're approaching war numbers eventually so I mean I think that his incompetence is sheer incompetence and also his increasing weirdness. Answer's simple questions the way he goes after Fau. Cheesy the way that he just talks about things seem so odd that he certainly is A. There's a buyer's remorse I think factor even among Republicans I know who just they just can't do it again, yeah! Yeah it's funny, because in the absolute terms we're talking about you know three out of every hundred voters for out of every hundred voters five, maybe at the margin. That's still an enormous amount of the you know when you're looking at election like we have an election in America I want I want to ask how you're feeling about the new show. What what you have planned and particularly in this moment I mean you know I've been talking to people? We are right now in midst of the most tumultuous momentous year in American Life since at least nineteen, sixty eight, or arguably since nineteen thirty two I think you could make a case. These cabin wants a lifetime. How are you feeling? And what? What do you got planned? Yeah it's it's sixty-eight. If George Wallace had one right. That's what we're experiencing right now. What's what would have been like then? And you know one of the things that I really WanNa do is to, and you started the show tonight with the show with the story. That is alarming me right now. The kind of descent into autocracy, the fact that we're now talking about fascism as a thing, we have to discuss in terms of America. One of the things I WANNA do is to drill down into talking to some of the people who. Who are on the ground there, activists there who may not always come across on the local news, they may not always be seeing. They may not always get airtime, but there in the middle of this and I think we need to talk to those people we need to bring forward. Some of those voices and the opportunity of having somebody from my point of view, who's always been cynical about the police like I've never had any jaded view. That Barney Fife was real. I never thought that was realistic at all, so I WANNA come. Come and bring that sort of that idea. Really questioning the reality that we're being given by our politicians and questioning them and being in DC is going to be a huge advantage to being able to do that to be able to catch them while they're hot. As soon as they come out of that capital, we want right in front of us right now to answer questions because the last thing I'll say. Is that what we're seeing in the streets? Right now is going to be in the halls of Congress in January. These young folks. Folks are not playing around there still marching. They're still demanding as long as they say. In the streets, they have power, and that means we may actually see changes to policing. We may actually see real changes to things like healthcare, but to make that happen. They're going to have to move that power off the streets, and into the halls of power, and so I think you and I. WE'RE GONNA probably having a lot of those kinds of conversations about how do you then turn that activity in that action into actual change in power? That is a great question fact my next guest is. GOING GONNA. Talk about that with So thank you for teeing up a tease joy, Reid my colleague here at. Who is the host of the brand spanking new show? The readout starts on Monday night. It's one hour before us five nights a week. Tune in, thank you joy, I'm so psyched. Thank you. I'll be waving to you across the tees now as we get to eight o'clock so Chris. Really appreciate you having me on tonight. All right coming up, the massive challenge to school this fall, but no one's really addressing the at a former middle school principal. Who looks like he's about to go to Congress to do something about it. My wife teaches elementary school and I'm the founding principal of a community school and in northeast Bronx. Educators, we face the most damning challenges every day we work with children and families who suffer from. Asthma from pollution homelessness lack of healthcare. My name is Jamal Bowman. I'm a Democrat. I'm running to be your congressman new. York's Sixteenth Congressional district. Last summer when Jomon release that video he looked like all blong shot to win that seat, a real long shot, the incumbent the guy was running against was Eliot Engel Angles, a sixteen turn, incumbent spending, Congress, nine, nineteen, eighty, nine, a member of House leadership, the chair of the Foreign Relations Committee. Did Not have any money. He did not have any institutional backing us. A middle school principal. Congressman Angles endorsed by Hillary Clinton and Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi even. The Congressional Black Caucus PAC endorsed angle. And then in the middle of the campaign, there was a pandemic. Nobody could really campaign. But then Jamal Bowman begin to catch fire through grassroots, fundraising and Eliot Engel making some huge missteps like getting caught at a hot mike at a district event responding saying if I didn't have a primary, I wouldn't care. And the end Jim Bowman did not just eke out a victory today. The Associated Press declared it for him by a double digit margin now full disclosure. We have not covered this race at all. What was happening? Not once because I have a very clear conflict, which is that my brother manageable moments campaign. But now the race is over. It's my pleasure to welcome to all. Democratic nominee for New York's Sixteenth Congressional district congratulations Mr Bowman. How are you feeling? After this finally got called about three or four weeks later? In a pretty awesome feeling, good feeling, relieved feeling excited feeling like I can finally celebrate a bit for a few days before getting to work. It struck me when I saw your video I thought to myself. You don't see a lot. Look, prince, middle school principal. It's actually pretty good training to be a politician or or or run for office you. You have to be deeply connected to the community. You know what's going on. You got to be kind of public figure a bit of an authority figure. You gotta get people like listen you. Take you seriously. Curious. What made you want to run for office? And how you think that background does or doesn't prepare you for what what looks like your congressional career going forward? I was tired of children dying in the bronx literally during the twenty seventeen twenty and eighteen school year, thirty four children died within the K. twelve school system in the bronx, and seventeen died via suicide and right here across the street in coop city across the street from my school, a young girl ninth grade jumped off the building after being bullied in school, and in New Rochelle which is also in the district. One young girl stabbed another during a conflict during lunch break at new, Rochelle, high school, so kids were literally dying in the streets, and there are still dying in the streets now just from. From police brutality, but because they live in communities that have been historically neglected marginalizing disenfranchise, suffering through poverty and toxic stress and chronic trauma, so after work in education for twenty years and being a middle school principal for ten years. I just got tired of it. I spoke to people throughout the district about Congressman ingles leadership. We continued to hear that he was absent. He was disengaged and they felt it was time for change. So after the work in education that I've done is ing beyond. The walls of the school decided to jump into this race, and thankfully we were able to pull out a victory. You I took a lot of interesting race, because obviously familial connection to it, but it became quite a national story as well one well thing I noticed is most people that run for office are coming from more of a background where their lawyers and they're sort of politically connected. You kind of learning curve and I'm just curious as a person who went from being a a normal person to now probably member of Congress Senate candidate. What was that experience like? What did you learn in doing the the reps day in day out of learning how to be a candidate? Well once we hire luke as that transformed the entire campaign I mean he coach to being trained be up. To make the best candidate I can be. Nobody in all serious. He was a tremendous help to justice Democrats. Where tremendous help and you're right about the learning curve kind of had to go back to school. This to download all of the policies that were being pushed in Washington things happening at the local level, both at the state level and city level, and just connecting with grassroots organizations that have been doing the work right here on the front lines with with regard to immigration reform, housing, reform, economic and environmental justice. I just plugged into all of the groups. Doing the work did as much as I could to learn. About the issues, and then just use the skills that I learned in education, just connecting with people meeting with people listening carefully being learner throughout the process, and just rooting everything that we talked about everything we did in our common humanity whether we're talking about foreign policy. Domestic policy was happening a ride New York. What's happening in Riverdale? was happening in in the Bronx. It's all about our common humanity, and that's what our campaign was rooted in from the beginning. You you've you've sort of coming from the Progressive Wing of the Party you've support Medicare for all. Green you deal. I think your foreign policy views. Were were at odds with some of Elliott Angles who is for instance, oppose. Iran deal voted for the Iraq. The Iraq war. What do you? What do you see as the future of the Democratic Caucus right now? In terms of there's an emerging group. In the. New York Delegation of folks that have politics close your own. A lot of fresh new blood is going to be in there. What does that mean? The progressive. Moven is growing not just in this district, but across the country I mean we were able to secure fifty six percent of the vote in the district that many people would have called moderate before race, so the progressive movement is growing because of this pandemic and because of the George Floyd. Lynching people are really ready to fight for racial and economic justice in a very real way and deal with institutional racism and the railway as well so not just focus on police, brutality, mass incarceration, but also. Also. Universal Healthcare, a green new deal fully investing in our public schools, and just centering the needs of those who are most marginalized and disenfranchise censoring working class. The working poor hold on Wall Street, the wealthy large corporations accountable. The American people are demanding this level of change, and that's why we were able to pull out the victory. So that's what the Democratic Party needs to be all about in this moment. This is a unique moment in American history, and we have to take charge and respond urgently to this moment. Unique moment, and and and the the district you are GonNa. Represent most likely has been hit hard by all of those forces I. Know it very well, because it's a my home district Jamal Bowman. Thank you so much for making time tonight. Thank you for having me Chris. Right final thought before we go tonight as a parent, I feel like almost every conversation I had these days is about schools because we're in the midst of a pandemic, that is very much not at all under control. The conversation has been about how to open up our schools, so kids and teachers can be as safe as possible, but it strikes me. That is different goal than absolutely maximizing community safety. I mean given the competing imperatives right getting kids back into school for Socialization Services and education on the one hand and minimizing viral transmission on the other lots of places have proposed a kind of half a loaf hybrid model small classes in schools a few days a week and remote learning the rest of the time. If we do that, which is what New, York, city is planning with Chicago public schools among others what they propose today. Then figuring out childcare is going to be a major issue. Working parents are going to drop off their kids at other people's houses Deger's friend's cousin's grandparents. With one family, hosting a few kids at their house, so that say those maybe nine kids at the off the books neighborhood school pod slash daycare could maybe bring the virus back to their nine separate classes. And then if that happens right with this alternate system, have you really reduced community exposure transmission? It's an modeling problem I am not qualified to answer, but I am really not sure. The fundamental problem here is that schools cannot solve this on their own. Because there are at least three problems we face and schools are only in charge of one of them. One problem is education. The welfare case that is what schools are in charge of kids needs education. They need to be around. Kids for Socialization and Development and there's no question about that, but there are two other problems that schools cannot fix. One. Is the virus itself which we are letting run out of control in this country, and in places with extremely high levels of transmission. It is almost impossible to imagine how you can open up school safely. The other huge problem is what to do with children who are at home if they are home learning. It was one thing. The country lockdown for several months and everyone thought we can get through it, but it's out forever. But it is not indefinite solution for childcare in America. And if you thought about trying to federal government for help, think again today, political reports the white. House is blocking officials from testifying next week at a Congressional hearing on reopening schools. The trump administration is blocking the scientific experts from publicly-held. Reopening schools. And it seems like everyone. Every school administrator every principal. Every Superintendent every mayor every parent has been basically left to work this out on their own and I'm telling you right now. It is not fair, and it is not going to work. That does it for all in. You can catch every weeknight at eight o'clock on MSNBC. Don't forget to like us on facebook. That's facebook dot. com slash all in with Chris. Hey, everyone is Chris Hayes. Thanks for listening now. I want to invite you to talk to us here. AT MSNBC WE'd like to know more about you and the topics you would be interested in hearing about as we look to launch new podcasts text podcast, two, six, six, eight, six six, and we'll talk to you a link to a short survey again text the word podcast, two six, six, eight, six six standard text messaging rates. Apply your input matters, and we're looking forward to hearing from you.

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35:33 min | 7 months ago

Is There Really a Loneliness Epidemic?

"So Eric when you read an article that says more than half of all Americans say they regularly experience exit motion or only twelve percent of Americans feel such and such What is that experience like for you as a as a sociologist writes about half the time I think. Wow that's pretty interesting in about half the time. I'm pulling out my hair thinking. No don't don't say that Eric Kleinberg is a professor of sociology at New York University. Unfortunately what I find that journalistic reporting will use survey data when it's useful for the story and they don't care that much about whether the data underlying it is reliable and what's wrong. With survey data. A lot of survey data is based on a sample. That's not really worth generalizing from a lot of surveys ask questions that will work for a particular time and place but might not work very well after that which means you can get a snapshot of a moment in time but not really a dynamic portrait something over time. Would you like an example of how survey data gets used in the media? Okay here's an example. A top doctor calls it a national health crisis not obesity or heart disease a condition that is so common you actually may not think of it as a mental health problem loneliness. That's right loneliness. People who struggled with loneliness and up living shorter lives and they also had increased risk for heart disease. Depression dementia anxiety and a host of other conditions. And that is the top Dr who rang the alarm on what he calls the loneliness. My Name Is Vivek. Murthy and I was trained as an internal medicine. Physician recently served as surgeon. General of the United States. Morty is the author of the forthcoming book about loneliness. It's called together while if you told me several years ago that I would be talking about and thinking about within the I would have said. You're probably wrong when he was surgeon. General morty met with many people suffering from chronic illness and addiction but I found that behind many of those stories were stories of a deeper emotional pain and that pain was often manifesto loneliness and realize that. There's something very important happening here. Which is that people. All across the world are experiencing a sense of disconnection from the people in their community from the more abstract society that they're supposedly part of. I became curious about why that was about what its consequences were for their health. These consequences are said to be dire perhaps best evidenced by one jarring statistic that made its way through the media loneliness it turns out. It is a strong predictor of early death. Maybe as much as alcoholism and smoking fifteenth cigarettes fifteen cigarettes fifteen cigarettes a day today on freakonomics radio. How real is the loneliness epidemic? And is it really that risky? Are there any upsides to loneliness? And are there any solutions to it? That's coming up right. After this from stitcher am w productions this freakonomics radio the podcast. That explores the hidden side of everything. Here's your host Stephen. Duffner UH-HUH TRACEY. Crouch is a member of parliament in the UK paid an MP since two thousand ten and also. I was formerly the world's first loneliness minister. Why did the U K feel compelled to have a loneliness minister? Lighting shows no prejudice. It doesn't matter he wore has successful. You are how rich you are where you live in the country whether you work with you. Don't work the simple truth. This loneliness can hit at any given time. And why should loneliness be the government's concern because his that she something that can have an enormous public health consequence? I think we are in loudness where we were with mental health a decade ago. People didn't talk about mental health whereas now we are removing the stigma around mental health. And that that we can tackle some of the issues relating to mental health and that was very much say with loneliness is about removing the stigma of being low knee and thinking. Well how come show that people stay connected to society. The very idea of a loneliness minister struck some people as comical. This is so British. The American Comic Stephen Colbert for instance. They've identified the most ineffable human problem and come up with the most cold bureaucratic solution but tracey crouch didn't mind at. She thought that it was a really good opportunity to get the message out there that we in the United Kingdom recognize that the issue of loneliness is something that is serious and that was recognized by the number of countries. Got In touch with us to come and talk about how they too could tackle lowness not included by the way the former chief medical officer from the United States that former chief medical officer. Being Vivek Morty. That's right yes. Morty had found compelling argument that loneliness was increasing and that loneliness can be damaging even physiologically damaging the mechanisms for how it works and for how it impacts our lives. I think are still in the very early stages of being understood and so we have a lot of data that shows strong associations between loneliness and health outcomes including shortened life spans and conditions like heart disease. We have far less of are the kind of studies that beyond the shadow of doubt prove causation But when stories about loneliness hit the media that Dow tends to be glossed over. Consider the much reported story acquainting loneliness and smoking. Researchers say suffering through it can be as lethal as smoking fifteen cigarettes a day. That statistic is often cited. So let me give you a little background of where that came from. That is Julian hotlines dead. And I am a professor of psychology and neuroscience at Brigham Young University Portland's Dad was a lead author of two thousand ten paper. Where that fifteen cigarettes? A day comparison came from she and her co authors. Did what's called a Meta analysis rolling up nearly one hundred and fifty earlier studies that covered more than three hundred thousand research subjects so this. Meta analysis really wanted to look at the overall effect of being socially connected or lacking social connections on overall risk for premature mortality. Some measures of social connection our objective marital status instance or network size. Or whether you live alone and others are more subjective like feelings of loneliness. Yeah so it's good to define loneliness upfront. Because I think it's used very loosely and can often be used interchangeably with social isolation and other related terms. So how does her field define loneliness? Loneliness has been defined as that subjective discrepancy between our actual level of social connection and our desired level of connection okay. That's a pretty concrete definition. And maybe not what you were. I might typically consider loneliness. Let's hear it again that subjective discrepancy between our actual level of social connection and our desired level of connection with that definition. You can see why loneliness may have spiked lately with the rise of social media. It's easier than ever to see other people doing things that you'd like to be doing being with people you'd like to be with but it's also important to note the difference between loneliness and social isolation and so someone could be objectively isolated and feel lonely but it's also possible that you could be objectively isolated and not feel lonely so you may take pleasure in that solitude and conversely someone may have many people around them and yet still feel profoundly lonely okay so loneliness and social isolation are not the same thing and in their. Meta analysis loan stat and her colleagues looked at whether there was a relationship between mortality and social connections generally including loneliness social isolation marital status etc. In other words how important is social connection to how long you live? The participants in the rolled up studies were on the older side average age nearly sixty four and they were followed for an average of seven and a half years. So what did Lund said find? What we found was that those who were more socially connected across these various indicators had a fifty percent increase odds of survival and the researchers controlled for socio demographic differences as well as a person's initial health status and cause of death so what that means is that these studies followed people over time and they were fifty percent more likely to be alive at the follow up than those who lacked social connections or had insufficient social connections. Okay so that looks to be strong evidence. That longevity is at least strongly correlated with social relationships. But you could imagine that. The Causal Relationship isn't so airtight. It could be for instance. The people with fewer social connections may have other issues personality or behavioral issues or whatever that make it harder to maintain social connections and my concern. Was that by simply just stating the fifty percent increased odds of survival the the general public and to some extent even perhaps the medical community may not necessarily know what to make of that or how to contextualized that in other words. Holt didn't want to contribute to sensationalized reporting we are constantly bombarded with the latest health findings. And it's hard to know what to take seriously and whatnot to take seriously but she also didn't want her research finding to get lost so she and her colleagues tried to draw specific numerical parallels between the risk of low social connectivity and more common physiological risks things like alcohol consumption obesity air pollution and and smoking. Judging by the media's response to the fifteen cigarettes a day comparison the message got through but the nuance was lost. Oftentimes people will say that. Loneliness has a greater risk than smoking. Up to fifteen cigarettes per day and of course loneliness was one of the indicators. But it wasn't the only indicator remember. The researchers looked at a whole basket of social connections. All of which by the way can be measured more tangibly then loneliness but in the media reports it was loneliness that stood out now. This doesn't necessarily mean that loneliness doesn't create health risks so tell let's start by asking a different question. Where does loneliness come from? So the late John Casio argued that loneliness is a biological drive. Cassiopeia was one of the founders of a field called social neuroscience much like hunger and thirst biological drives so hunger motivates us to seek out food thirst to seek out water. That loneliness is a biological. Drive that motivates us to seek out others and being around others. Cassiopeia argued was a key to survival so we gain added resources by being around others. There's protection from predators there's protection from the elements on the flip side. Then when we're alone we have to be more vigilant and so throughout human history being around others has an essence ben a form of protection and more effective use of effort. So when we are alone. What's happening to us? So this activates regions of the brain that intern signal our physiology to adapt to these situations to handle whatever situation. We're in loneliness is our bodies cue that we need to get out in the world and participate in social life that again is the nyu sociologist. Erik Kleinberg. So if you experience some loneliness in your life that's not necessarily a bad thing. That can be restorative. And it's not something. We NECESSARILY WANT TO ELIMINATE. Because loneliness is what motivates us to reconnect socially the problem becomes when it becomes chronic loneliness places us in a threat state and that again is former surgeon. General Vivek Murthy. And whenever you're in a state of threat you are concerned about self preservation. Morty believes this is how chronic loneliness can lead to bad health outcomes. The psychological stress of being an elevated threat state can lead to biological responses like higher blood pressure and inflammation. You might also become hyper vigilant about potential dangers. Like the proverbial man eating lion lurking in the tall grass of our ancestors savannah. And that's good. Because I want to err on the side of thinking it's a real threat because my survival may depend on it but in modern day world. If you're in an elevator threat stay for a prolonged period of time. Not only is exhausting. But that focus on yourself and that greater suspicion if you will of people and events around you can actually be a turnoff to other people. It was morty who as far as we can tell I called loneliness an epidemic back in two thousand seventeen which would seem to imply that the threat is not only large but growing quickly. We don't exactly know how quickly loneliness is growing but we do know is that in. Multiple studies have shown that loneliness is incredibly common. So for example if you look at Study that was published by The economist Couple of years ago they would peg the percentage of adults in the United States. Were struggling with loneliness as above twenty percent the UK is similar range between twenty to twenty five percent. The number of people struggling with loneliness in the United States is in fact greater than the number of adults who have diabetes. It's greater than the number of people who smoke for this reason. I think it's worth investing more and understanding in greater depth the consequences of loneliness. Who's at greatest risk of loneliness and most importantly what we can do to address coming up after the break yes? Let's look into what can be done to address loneliness but it's also try to figure out if loneliness is really is Communist. We think you're listening to freakonomics. Radio Steve Governor will be right back. Freakonomics radio is sponsored by the capital. One Walmart rewards card with the capital one walmart rewards card you'll earn unlimited five percent back at Walmart online. That's five percent back at Walmer online when you grab new shades for your beach trip new boots for your hiking trip for noise cancelling headphones. When you need some vacation time you'll also earn two percent in Walmart stores restaurants and travel in one percent ever else when you want all that you need the capital one Walmart rewards card. What's in your wallet? Terms and exclusions apply capital one and freakonomics radio is sponsored by ziprecruiter. Hiring is challenging. But there's one place you can go. Were hiring simple fast and smart. The place is ziprecruiter dot com slash freak. Ziprecruiter sends your job to over one hundred of the Web's leading job sites but they don't stop there with their powerful matching technology ziprecruiter scans thousands of resumes to find people with the right experience and invited them to apply to your job. Ziprecruiter is so effective that four out of five employers who post on Ziprecruiter get a quality candidate within the first day and right now to try ZIPRECRUITER FOR FREE. Listeners can go to ziprecruiter dot com slash free. That's ziprecruiter dot Com Slash F. R. E. AKA ZIPRECRUITER DOT COM slash. Free Ziprecruiter. The smartest way to hire a radio is sponsored by Microsoft surface. We encourage freakonomics radio listeners. To discover the hidden side of everything including technology. That's why we are excited. Introduce you to the all new surface. Go It's the smallest Microsoft surface ever at just over one pound with a ten inch. Touchscreen the ultralight surface go gives you laptop performance with tablet portability. So go ahead run your favorite APPS or binge. Watch your favorite show on the surface. Go were portability meets. Affordability praises start at just three hundred ninety nine dollars Eric Kleinberg. The sociologist has come to hold a fairly nuanced and somewhat contrarian view on loneliness but he didn't start out that way. The story begins in one thousand nine hundred five in Chicago after a terrible heat wave. Seven hundred thirty nine people died. Kleinberg was just starting graduate school at Berkeley but Chicago was. His hometown is my city. I cared about it and Chicago. Prides itself as being the city of neighborhoods city of tight social connections? And this was such a big puzzle to me. You know why did so many people in the booming American metropolis in the nineteen nineties dive? This heat wave. After first semester in Berkeley he went back home. I started digging around and looked at all the data and there was this puzzle that the epidemiologist picked up. Which is that. They had models that would predict how many people would die given certain climate conditions and and the deaths in the heat wave were far higher. The weather didn't explain it the physiology of people in the city and explain it so I came up with the idea of doing what I call the social autopsy right. I was going to open up kind of skin of the city just like a doctor. Doing an autopsy opens up the skin of body and try to diagnose the Oregon broke down and the first thing I learned is that people died alone in the heat wave because so many people were living alone that basic fact he said was something that people weren't really talking about the sad thing about a heat. Death is it so easily preventable. If you're with someone else who recognizes it one of the most maybe the most important risk factor for dying in the heat wave was living alone. He ultimately wrote a book about the tragedy called Heatwave and this team of people living alone and dying alone was one of many themes in the book the Kleinberg knew he had stumbled onto even bigger idea and he planned new research project and it was my conviction that what the heat wave had uncovered for me. Is this incredible spike in loneliness isolation. Disconnection where I thought I was going to discover in this. New Project was in America. That had become so individualistic so atomised so disconnected by the twentieth century marketplace the decline of public institutions that. And even though you haven't used words to say at the tone of your voice implies that that's a purely negative of everything I mean. You think it's bad out there but I was going to show you just how bad it was. We have destroyed social ties. I was down man I was. I thought things were falling apart. And there is a tradition by the way in kind of American intellectual life that seized decline right. That sees we're bowling alone. It's the fall of public man. You know the lonely crowd. I do think that the heat wave allowed me to see something that really had not gotten sufficient attention which is the fact that we have embarked on one of the most significant social changes in the history of our species. You know the rise of the one person household what I learned in Chicago which the demographers in my field called attention to which you know cultural historians and not pay attention to but which is incredible fact about the world is that for the entire history of our species we lived in groups out of necessity. We needed to protect each other. We need to get food for each other. We needed to divide labor in. This amazing thing starts to happen in the early twentieth century and to really take off in the nineteen fifties which is that for the first time in the history of our species. People start to settle down on their own and to live alone for long periods of time. And now we've gotten to the point where in the most kind of affluent societies on earth. They're enormous numbers of people living alone. This makes it sound as if living alone is in some cases a luxury or at least a choice a preference according to two thousand eighteen estimates from the US Census Bureau Twenty eight percent of all us. Households are single houshold that compares to just nine percent in nineteen fifty by the way. This could help explain. Why real estate so expensive in so many cities even if the population isn't growing there's demand for more units in Manhattan Forty. Four percent of households are single households. This trend is also strong in places like Denmark. Sweden Norway so I'm not pollyannish about this. I really think this is a potentially a very big social problem but if you look at the big picture here there's something far more interesting at work. What's interesting Kleinberg says? Is that the choice to live. Alone does not necessarily create loneliness because one of the surprising things I discovered is that there are people who are living alone than ever before. Actually people who live alone are surprisingly social. They're more likely than people who are married to socialize with their friends with their neighbors. They are more likely to participate in all kinds of shared social activities going to the gym going to concerts going to libraries cafes things like this even vague morty cautions against equating aloneness with loneliness. I don't think it's as simple as that. I think just because you live alone does not mean that you're consigned to a life of loneliness just because you live alone doesn't mean you're somehow living an inferior life. People live alone firm many different reasons and a lot of times because they choose to live alone but I do think like with all decisions we make in our life. That they're upsides and downsides and here's the other thing Erick Kleinberg has also convinced that living with someone does not necessarily insulate you from loneliness. I interviewed many people who had lived with a romantic partner. We're now living. And they said to me one after the next as lonely. I sometimes feel when I'm on my own. There's nothing lonelier than living with the wrong person there's no feeling more lonely than having a domestic partner with whom one was once intimate with whom once had a feeling of trust and connection and coming home and feeling disconnected from that person so Kleinberg wrote another book. This one called going solo the extraordinary rise and surprising appeal of living alone. This led him to ask an important obvious question. How does our current level of loneliness compared to levels of loneliness at other historical moments his answer? This is an area where there's all variety of data all kinds of surveys of different quality. And if you just read journalism you would have no idea. Favorite example is commonly cited statistics from G. S. or General Social Survey which has been administered by the National Opinion Research Center since nineteen seventy two is a high quality survey. It's done repeatedly and there's a famous problem of one year and the US where the measure of social isolation went awry to measure social isolation. The asks people if they have close friends or confidants with whom they can discuss topics of great personal importance. The reason for this specific somewhat odd question is that social relationships can be really hard to pin down in a survey but having. No Confidante is a pretty specific marker for some reason and there's a lot of debate about this in the two thousand four general. Social Survey People reported a much higher incidence of having no confidant for decades only about one in ten people said they had no confidante in two thousand four about one in four respondents said that and how big a deal. Is this finding if you happen to be a sociologist? This is a blockbuster finding in sociology. I mean if you think about big changes in American social life like if you go to the demography meetings and someone finds like a three percent shift in fertility. Were high fiving each other in the hallway. Someone's ordered a keg to the hotel room. It wasn't just this shocking. Finding about no confidence that got a lot of attention. It was the explanation published in an academic paper on the GSA survey for why this was the case. So what's the big thing that happens in our cultural and social life between nineteen eighty five and thousand and four Internet the Internet exactly? So how amazing the story? Now the thing that's going to make us better connected than ever before the thing that's going to create meaningful social relationships for turns out to make us more alone than we've ever been. My favorite thing about the Internet is that it is the single best thing to blame anything. That's right and it's such a big part of the story of why we're all talking about isolation and loneliness these days but it turned out. There was an issue with this amazing new finding well. We're now pretty sure that there's a problem with the data. That's an anomalous result. Some of the survey data had been misquoted. Many answers that went into the. No Confidante Column should have actually gone into the decline to answer column. So what did the know Confidante Finding Look like on subsequent surveys? We haven't found it on subsequent general social surveys. But what's the truth? Then what's the Empirical Truth About? How much quote Lonelier we are today so the sad thing is. I don't think we know. I think it's a mystery so before I came to the studio today I wanted to check into. What's the latest? Has there been some survey? That's come out recently that I don't know about maybe. The research is getting better so I found a study that got a lot of news attention in December of two thousand eighteen and it reported that Americans are more than twice as lonely as we used to be. This study was done by researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine and in the first few lines of the article. We read that estimates of America's level of long yesterday vary from seventeen to fifty seven percent of the population and one of the big problems. We have in the loneliness debate. Is that our measures of Loneliness. Have very dramatically over time when people ask whether there is this epidemic loneliness that again is the Brigham Young Psychologist Julianne Hotel Instead. It's a tough question because it's not entirely clear weather. This is something that we're finally just recognizing or whether it's something that is increasing in part of that problem is because loneliness has not been systematically measured in the population and various surveys may use different kinds of methodology. So just to give an example just in two thousand eighteen there was the CIGNA survey the BBC survey and the Kaiser surveyed that all had different prevalence rates of loneliness in the US. And we have worried about loneliness since the rise of industrial society since we started moving away from the village and we agglomerated into towns where we didn't know as many of our neighbors. We worried about loneliness. We worried about the loneliness of farmers we worried about the loneliness of apartment dwellers of people driving in cars of people who went to movies of people who've got the telephone instead of going into social life and so that is by no means to say that the loneliness is not a social problem or that. We shouldn't worry about people who get isolated. But if you think that's the only part of the story you're missing something. I think it's safe to say we have been missing something especially if we get most of our loneliness news from breathless TV reports and bombastic headlines but still even if loneliness isn't growing some people suspected is even if loneliness is not as damaging as some people believe it is the fact that means that loneliness while it may be a useful biological signal loneliness can also be hurtful unwanted. Social isolation cannot be a good thing. So let's hear about some solutions. Anyone good ideas number. One IT TURNS OUT. Is that service serving? Other people is a powerful back door if you will out of loneliness. That's the former Surgeon General Vivek Murthy and one of the things that's powerful about service. Is that it shifts. The focus away from you and on other people and it also reaffirms for you that you have value to give and to share with the World Tracey. Crouch the. Uk's former loneliness minister wants to see an increase in what's called social prescribing. Say What we found. Is that one in five. Doctors Appointments are solely to loneliness robin other medical conditions so we started using social prescribing in the UK for variety things for example with obesity. So rather than just prescribing people pills that which hopefully suppress appetite. We'd actually get them to do walking clubs or in light sporting activities and so now we rode out social prescribing. We have linked workers in our doctor surgeries that can have a whole list serve organizations locally that people can get involved with to effectively. Try and make sure that they remain connected in society as for Eric Kleinberg. He thinks the best loneliness solutions have to do with. How communities are conceived an organized. He wants to see better social infrastructure as he calls it the gathering places that are public accessible. You know the libraries and parks and playgrounds public transit systems. That work. Well this is the idea. Kleinberg plays with in his latest book called Palaces for the people but also real investment in public housing and subsidized housing and shared housing units. Their programs that do kind of a CO OP. Housing for older people like one place. I went in Stockholm place. Called far. Not Been which definitely is not how it's pronounced but that's how I say it and on the first floor. There's this big open kitchen and dining area and if you live in the building you commit that three nights a month you will contribute to the cooking and cleaning for the collective and every morning everyone in the building can sign into that night. You never have to be there but you always have the option to have a shared meal. I think what this conversation should be opening. Our eyes to is the sense that there are actually all variety of ways to organize a society. There are all kinds of ways for us to settle for us to invest in public goods for us to share or be private and we are locked into a very narrow band of choices right now. Coming UP NEXT TIME ON. Freakonomics RADIO WHY are so? Many millennials gravitating towards socialism over capitalism. I say Scandinavia you say Venezuela. It's become a political buzzword. But what does socialism actually mean? I personally would not use the word socialist by find the word socialism in the US context kind of odd almost anachronistic gel to live in a socialist society. We don't think about what we talk about when we talk about socialism that's next time on Freakonomics Radio. Freakonomics radio is produced by Stitcher. And W productions this episode was produced by Daphne Chen our staff also includes Alison. Craig Low Greg Rippin Zach Lipinski. Hickey Perry Huggins and Coron Wallace. We had helped this week from James Foster intern. Isabel O'Brien or theme. 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United States social isolation General morty Erick Kleinberg Eric Kleinberg UK General Vivek Murthy America Walmart tracey crouch New York University intern Chicago General Social Survey Ziprecruiter Microsoft freakonomics Depression Stephen