20 Burst results for "General Stanley McChrystal"

"general stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

01:44 min | 3 months ago

"general stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on Kickass News

"Thanks again to General Stanley McChrystal for coming on the podcast order. His New Book Leaders Myth and reality on Amazon audible for wherever books are sold. The flat iron school will teach you everything. You need to get a job in code data science or design. But they'll also prepare you for the jobs that don't even exist yet in school dot com slash podcast and read about graduates new careers salary ranges upcoming courses and explore these exciting new careers. You can start building your own career and coding data science or digital design at one of flat irons local. We work campuses or you can take courses online go to flat iron school dot com slash. Podcast read.

"general stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

06:23 min | 3 months ago

"general stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on Kickass News

"Was thought to be crazy but he got people not only to laugh but to cry animated figures. Well so he's at the height of his success in nineteen thirty seven he still younger than forty. You almost can do no wrong for years later. His animators who had done this amazing work for him have a bitter strike against him. And when I saw that I go. Wow they're ungrateful here through the Depression. He graded firm gave them great jobs then in one thousand nine hundred one and he reacts badly yeah he felt the same way you did. He thought that they were disloyal. In fact fused cues fuel Bombini Communists and whatnot and I thought about myself as a leader and I thought about the times when I pushed organizations really hard and I worked really hard myself. And then there were glimmers of people going. No that's not right. One of my reflexive responses was. You know you're not you don't see the big picture you know you're not you're not willing to work hard enough and when you see that it's a little bit cold. Amirah and it was interesting. The young people that helped me with this book. They were pretty hard on Walt Disney. When we first did the research and we we've had these discussions Hauer GonNa portray each person and they were ready to write him off his bad guy and I kept saying. Hey Human and the reason I was arguing that was you know there was a bit of me the same with Roberty League. He makes this amazing mistake in eighteen. Sixty one and goes to defend slavery. But you know in that situation maybe done the same thing in the context of the moon. Who's to say that's right and so I found at this point in my life. I'm a little bit more forgiving of the human side of it but in recognition of just how important and Walt Disney's a great example of the kind of visionary leader that we tend idealize like Disney. Or a Steve. Jobs who put the end goal or their product above all else and sometimes don't treat their teams very well as someone who's been in a position of power with incredibly high stakes do you relate to that relentless dedication to the mission and did you give much thought to what the people under your command thought of. You did you. Did you care about that or do you have to Kinda just not care about that? That's a really good question People ask me whether I was zealot. When I was fighting against boomer Salazar Cowan and I will say to a degree. It was really. I didn't behead people but Yeah it became a cause as much as it became a fight and so I would say that I did care what my people thought of me. I Care Deeply. I have to admit that And I care deeply about them but I was willing to push them really hard. There was a period in two thousand and five when we had to make a very difficult decision which risked destroying the force destroying J. Sock and I we had conversations about it. Said you'RE GONNA put the nation's counter-terrorist force at risk and at that point. I felt it was necessary and right I still feel it was necessary right but if I look back. I wonder whether I could have made any other decision whether I could have stepped back in been analytical and said no the risk is too high or whether I was emotionally committed to the fight at that point where I made that decision and then rationalized it. Now when you're commander of J. Sock in Iraq. You often went on night. Missions with your men Looking back do you think you would have done that again or no? You have to do that. You have to do that because you have to find out what they're doing you have to understand the conditions under it was harder and they have to understand you willing to share some of the danger etc. They know you're not going to do their job. But if you're not willing to do some of that your credibility Wouldn't last long. Yeah and I suppose that's becoming even more important these days because the commanders usually on base you try leading the charge go the days of Robert E Leeann division and corps. Commanders were under fire and so job really nowadays. You have to make a conscious effort but I think it's just as important as ever now if you were to include your own biography and leaders myth and reality. What do you think the theme of Your Chapter Might Be? Yeah that's a great one I I think it is that the most interesting part of my personal experience was the transformation J. Sock has changed an organization the nature of it. I think that it would have been about somebody who pushed a change really hard but didn't do the change themselves. I get credit for being this transformational leader. What I was was a person who was part of team that created a transformation in my contribution was to create an environment in which that transformation could and would occur and an ecosystem nurturing it and whatnot. I never had the right answer. I never smart enough but I was lucky enough to recognize the people around me could figure out the right answer and I was had enough humility to know that if somebody else had the right answer let's go with it. Yeah Wa- have enjoyed talking to you before we go. I don't want to ask you if you have any interest in politics. But is there any scenario down the line where you could see yourself running for office? Never been an ambition of mine. I'm at a point. Now where I think American Politics or at a crisis leadership at a crisis I think American politics crisis and so I don't want any American to say that they won't be a part of it. I don't want any American to say they won't vote because they don't care that they wouldn't serve that they won't run for office because we're really at an all hands on deck moment. Well I enjoyed the book. It's called leaders myth and reality. I highly recommended folks General Stanley McChrystal. It's been an honor. Thanks for talking with me. A kind had me thank you..

Walt Disney commander Depression Disney General Stanley McChrystal Amirah Salazar Cowan Hauer Roberty League Steve Robert E Leeann Iraq Wa corps
"general stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

12:56 min | 3 months ago

"general stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on Kickass News

"I WANNA talk about a couple of more of these leaders that you profile in the book You include not just military leaders but also people like Walt Disney Leonard Bernstein. Albert Einstein even Coco Chanel. How much knowledge did you have about? Coco Chanel coming into this. This is a great admission. I didn't know she was a person. I thought Chanel was just brand. Name the brand Chanel number five and yet when you studier. It's amazing here is an incredible fashion designer but even more she's a branding and marketing genius. Whose an orphan at a young age work sure way up takes an opportunity to about the time of the first World War Two revolutionize fashion not just in France but around the world and then she builds an empire on that to include the fragrance number five by being both a good business person but then also being the brand herself. When people bought Chanel products they were buying Coco Chanel because she dressed a certain way she actor certainly shed a lifestyle and she invited you to be like cocoa and the best way to do it is where her clothes use her perfume embrace her lifestyle and it worked beautifully as a leader. She was a tough person. She was tough to work for. Yeah got no people loved to work for because she was special have embraced the Chanel lifestyle. That far probably the figure in this book with whom Americans are least familiar is a Chinese name. Jong who is pretty well unknown over here but in China he's revered as this great hero and today even become a symbol of China's emergence as a super power. What does young her say about. China's global ambition in the Twenty First Century. Well he says a lot. He was a fifteenth century. Figure theoretically seven feet tall with a waste five feet around he'd been castrated at age ten but then remained loyal to the to the Ming Dynasty. Which had actually killed his father and castrated him but but he led this big spoilt seven. Different voices of treasure ships out around the world and China now has pulled his memory most people in the West and didn't know who he was pulled his memory up to show that they're a global power to show that they have always be international. Most of us think of China's the last two hundred years when the Middle Middle Kingdom was very insular and to a great degree backward now Shizhong paying with the one belt one road strategy is saying. That was a very temporary thing. What you saw in. The last two hundred years isn't us? We actually were global nation. We have always been that way and here here's proof and so who a nation pulls up and makes their heroes says an awful lot about what that nation wants to communicate and I know that you're probably more often asked to comment on Iraq or Afghanistan. But is the rise of China and the state of play in the South China Sea. Something that you give a lot of thought to these days. Well I do I'm not in government but anyone who doesn't give a lot of thought isn't thinking economically or diplomatically or potentially militarily because China which again had two hundred years of I describe it as a bad weekend They are back in a big way. And what we've gotTa do is re look how we fit in the world. Most Americans have a post World War Two view in right after World War. Two America was forty six percent of the world's global domestic product which is an aberration and not sustainable. Now that we've got the rise of kingdoms like China and other parts of the world. I think we need to understand that. Our role will be interacting not necessarily opposition. But it's going to be complex and we're going to have to deal with in real not in a in a way of denying the reality but in a realistic approach you actually include of all people to many people's surprise al Qaeda and Iraq leader Abu Musab Al Sarkawi among the biographies of leaders in this book. Now this is the man that you hunted and eventually killed What can you learn about leadership from your enemy in combat? But it's it's interesting to step back. We took thirteen leaders for this book. To include Coco Chanel. Harriet Tubman Margaret Thatcher Albert Einstein. Leonard Bernstein Sweden a wide range. Because they're not just military leaders or political. But someone I had to put in there was Abba sabotage conway because I fought him as part of my task force for two and a half years and we ultimately killed him and in June of two thousand six but I came to respect him. I didn't come to like him. I didn't come to agree with him and I did more when he died. But I came to respect leader and the thing that was interesting about him and we pair him with Maximilien Robespierre the French Revolution Zarqa. We was poorly educated. Came up over the tough background and industrial town. In Jordan he became very committed to Eslam the fundamental view of Islam and believed very heavily in Jihad or holy war and wanted to be a Mujuhedeen holy fighter. And what worked for him was he became a zealot. He became someone so pious. So personally self-disciplined so obviously committed to his cause that burn like a hot flame and almost. Moths are attracted to that. We're all attracted to people who are very confident very committed and very zealot like in their leadership style as people did with ropes peer. Now the other thing about our colleagues because he was so committed he got many other people to follow him who didn't share the same level but they were willing to follow him because his obvious commitment to it and then he was also he was a good leader. He was charismatic. He did good things. Get around to to talk to his people basics and so I could disagree with his. 'cause I could disagree. He was a psychopath in terms of a murder. But I had to respect the effectiveness. He had as a leader and to be honest head to learn from it. I suppose it's easy to dismiss him as a psychopath in a monster which he probably was. But it's not a useful way to go about trying to actually defeat and kill your enemy. Sounds like you must have dedicated. A good amount of thought to getting in the mind of your enemy. Was that a pretty dark place. And what did you come to understand about him? Well it is a dark place to do that. Think what we do in war we try to dehumanize the enemy do. What right army's always do we call the Germans the Huns we tal- The Japanese? The Nips we saw Vietnamese the Kooks and that's so that they're not human so it's easier to kill him. You're not frightened of them and you. You don't feel the same empathy when actually fight against someone for a while that changes because particularly when they turn out to be very good fo you have to respect and so in the case of any enemy but particularly czar cowie. I started with this thing. He beheaded a young American nick. Berg in two thousand four hundred founded and my whole force was just emotionally furious over. We committed ourselves to kill him but over time. A few things happen. I who's very good at what he did. And then the second is you come to the realization that his perspective is his perspective and he believes it deeply. I may believe my side. I may be committed to it. But what makes me right in him wrong? And what if I'd been born in Zarqa Jordan instead of where I was what I believe? Is He did? And what if he's as right as I am just on different sides and so you start to get a grudging? I respect for the effectiveness of your photo and then you have to have a certain respect that they might just be as right as we are. The beheadings were sort of a morbid media strategy but somehow it seemed that it was effective with his own people in If you will establishing his bran or the brand of al-Qaeda and talk a little about that and how that was received within his circle sure we think that the beheadings were to scare the West and they do a little bit of that but what they really did is. They signaled to his potential followers. That he is so committed to the cause that he's willing to do things that he knows are horrific. Isis made an art form of this. They committed to people that we are after a righteous cause but our causes so righteous that we're willing to do evil to achieve it. We go back to rogue spear and the French Revolution. Here's a guy who believed writing things. He believed in the writings of Russo. But he became committed that you needed to use terror to achieve virtue. Now there's a contradiction there but there's sort of a An interesting seductive idea. I'm willing to behead nine hundred Frenchmen in five weeks in the center of Paris to build a virtuous society on the surface it looks laughable but many French believed that here. We are finally committed to making a change. We're committed to doing whatever it takes to get virtue and very similar with our Collie it just has a power to it. And Rebecca took more of a distanced approach to terror He kind of delegated that His subordinates and in some cases he probably wasn't even aware of all the people who were beheaded in his name. Call me on the other hand personally. Beheaded many people. How do you assess that? I really can't make a distinction. Because on the one hand robespierres hands were clean. Reportedly the only the first execution ever attended was his and so he kept himself slightly at arm's length but he was in fact. Part of the driving force behind it Zarqa trademark was up close. His hands were dirty. He was involved. He was doing beheadings. He wore combat. Close so to me. There's not a big distinction. Both on the positive side shared a very genuine commitment to their costs. So you really can't doubt that they were real about it at the same time. Both did some pretty horrific thing so it's hard to to judge them positively. There are no statues to rub spear around. Now you go. You won't find them with the proliferation of attacks in Iraq and colleagues ability to just elude capture time and time again. In fact you talk about. How oftentimes he traveled completely alone went through checkpoints in disguise. It's understandable that he sort of took on almost a supernatural mystique in Iraq and even among the troops. I imagined trying to defeat him from a morale standpoint for you as military leader. Did you find yourself having to fight against this ghost like persona and bring him back down to Earth in the eyes of your men sometimes absolutely because he became almost a symbol of our inability to get him and so a little like Francis? Marion the swamp Fox are mostly from the civil war. Just the fact he's able to operate is impressive. To people it makes him a little bit more powerful and it underwrites or underlines our inability to do that now as you studied leaders for this book did you find parallels to your own experience and maybe even as you read about some of their flaws and mistakes. Think to yourself Yup. That sounds familiar. I recognize that I can look back. I just countlessly almost every leader here. The one that sort of jumped out at me. That surprised Walt Disney because he had a lot of traits. You much more talented than I'll ever be. But he was a good animator and then he creates this amazing full length animated picture. Snow White and the seven dwarfs and he desert over three years by mortgaging his company mortgaging the intellectual property to Mickey Mouse and then pushing his team to create this magnificent full first full length animated movie and at the time it.

Coco Chanel China Iraq Chanel West Walt Disney Leonard Bernstein Albert Einstein South China Sea France Harriet Tubman Margaret Thatch Walt Disney Ming Dynasty Abu Musab Al Sarkawi Twenty First Century Leonard Bernstein Sweden America Maximilien Robespierre al-Qaeda
"general stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

04:50 min | 3 months ago

"general stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on Kickass News

"You support them all the things we do. And you think you've got this hard edge very objective. I and make tough decisions in reality. That doesn't correlate to performance. At all in fact we follow cereal. Failures leaders fill an emotional requirement force. Much more than they do an objective requirement. So I saw on. The military people with certain traits would be promoted and followed in heralded. In fact they weren't very good soldiers and other people who were great soldiers and were successful. They're just didn't generate the same feeling either in subordinates or senior so we want to believe that the results part and therefore who we elect we follow was the right choice but it's usually much more and more emotion than reality. Yeah and we see this. In politics. People often follow the person who speaks to their heart or gets them angry about something than necessarily the smartest guy or the guy with the the longest resume and we will stick with them long after. Yeah it's been disproven Adolf Hitler in nineteen forty four. There was an attempt on his life by German officers and the German population was largely angry at the German officers for trying to kill him. This was eleven years after Hitler took power and he had already ruined the country. I it's got to do week. Emotionally buy a product and then we love it and in some respects to give up on a leader is meeting that you made a mistake in the you were wrong so. We're always reluctant to do that. I guess I want to talk about how you went about. Writing this book and the criteria that you're looking for and leaders In selecting the BIOS to include in the book. What were you looking for? Well it's it's funny when we started. We knew we wanted to do a number profiles of leaders but it was a little contradictory because we were going to write a book about leadership that we knew one of the arguments would be. We get too focused on individuals not wider picture. And so you say well. Why are you writing about him right one? That's because that's how we've always thought them so. We WENT BACK TO PLUTARCH. The original. Biographer who done biographies of Roman Greek leaders and we use that as a basic model but the idea was we wouldn't try to compare leaders in terms of traits or what worked the real question was. Why did they emerge as leaders? What about them or what about the Times or people around them? That actually did it and pretty early. In the process we came out with a sort of recognition. That leadership isn't what we think it is and it never has been and you you referred earlier to the miss it. We came up with and we started with this recognition that we've always looked to leadership through these mythological lenses and I had this child's book that my mother got when she was five in nineteen twenty nine in Chattanooga Tennessee and she to read it to me and it was Greek tales for tiny tots. And one of my remembered with atlas and there was this hand-drawn picture of a guy in a g string standard on top of a mountain. Hold up the sky and I'd look at that and I go at strange but then as we think about it for years and years and years people assumed that the sky didn't fall in something or some bodies holding it up and knits are designed to explain what's otherwise unexplainable and so people said well if it's not fallen in somebody's holding it up atlas on stop them the mountain doing it that good excuses or explanations any and they just bought it. What we've done the same thing with leaders. We look at leaders and someone says that the person who saved the West in World War Two was Winston Churchill. And we sort of look at that we go. Okay write that down but of course. That's an incredibly simplistic description of one leaders role. He was part of this right larger equation and so we came up with these three myths which we call the the formulate. Which is the idea that? There's a checklist of how to be a great leader and when you actually look at results. That doesn't equate doesn't correlate to success in those. Don't translate across different careers in different eras and so forth and one of the reasons we pick these very different thirteen leaders for our book is because they were all leaders but other than that there are very few similarities between their background. How THEY OPERATED TIMES ETCETERA? We found that leaderships intensely contextual. We're GONNA take a quick break and then I'll be back with more with General Stanley McChrystal when we come back in.

Adolf Hitler Winston Churchill Stanley McChrystal Chattanooga Tennessee
"general stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

14:40 min | 3 months ago

"general stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on Kickass News

"Retired from the US army as a four star general after thirty four years in the military and having commanded the joint Special Operations Command or J. Sock in Iraq and then he commanded the International Security Assistance Force and US forces in Afghanistan. He is a senior fellow at Yale. University's Jackson Institute for Global Affairs and a partner at the McChrystal group. A leadership consulting firm based in Virginia his previous Books Mike Share of the task in team teams were both New York Times bestsellers and now he's followed it up with his latest bestseller titled Leaders Myth and Reality General Stanley McChrystal. Thank you for your service and thanks for sitting down with me today. Thanks for having me. I thoroughly enjoyed reading leaders myth and reality but I have to confess that I usually don't enjoy books that have the titles like say. Churchill leadership or Lincoln on leadership because the moment and author identified someone as a leader to be emulated. It's just a given that. They then have to whitewash their entire biography and ignore all of the flaws and all the mistakes in order to make their case that they are a leader to him united And My thinking I guess has always been what good is a leadership book if you can't learn from the leaders mistakes as well as their successes with leaders myth and reality. You seem to be trying to change that. We are after many years of trying to learn leadership being taught it and had demonstrated to me the opportunity to practice it and then studying it and writing about it to an extent at this point in life pretty late. I came to the conclusion that I and my co-authors didn't really understand what leadership is So we wanted to go back to first principles and truly identify what is it. And why can't we get our arms around it and you talk about how your decision to throw away a portrait of Robert e Lee in the aftermath of Charlottesville actually lead you to rethink how we define leadership as a fellow west point alum. That can't have been an easy decision for you. Know is a really tough decision. In fact I had grown up with. Robert Lee is probably the penalty an example of leadership for me and There've been a personal connection. I'd grown up living near his boyhood home. I'd gone to Washington Lee High School. I'd gone to West. Point many years after robbery leap but I'd follow the same path. He served thirty two years in the United States Army. I served almost just about that number thirty four and at West Point when you arrive. There are many statues of generals and people to emulate but Robert e Lee was always special for everyone. He was this character that was nearly perfect and he was depicted that way. There were paintings of him. I lived in Lee barracks and so you couldn't be robbery leap but he could be a beacon that you could to move closer to so I spent a career thinking about that. And when I was a second lieutenant my wife young wife now forty one years of marriage gave me a painting was cheap actually was a print with painted over clear. Quick look like a painting. She paid twenty five dollars for this thing framed and gave it to me and treasured up for the next forty years. Every quarter said accorded. We lived in. I hung it up because for me. It was an example of the values that I believed in and when people came to my house it was my way of subtly telling them what I valued in leadership And then after Charlottesville in the spring twenty seventeen any my wife came into me and said I think you need to get rid of the picture and I disagree. I said No. Why would I do that? You gave it to me honey. And she goes. Now I think its signaling something you don't believe in and I said No. He's a non-political general and she goes well. Maybe he is to you. But to many people he may be a symbol of white supremacy. Were people that have hijacked the idea we we talked for about a month till I Became convinced and one Sunday morning. I took it off the wall and throw it away and that was just when we're beginning this book and so we made the decision to profile Robert Lee in the book and take a very careful re-look at how I thought about Robert e Lee and leadership in general and you said the painting was sort of a symbol for all of the qualities of leadership that you found valuable in Lee. What were some of those qualities that you use to admire about him and for perhaps still admire embarrassed about him? I still do. He was a Connecticut West Point known as the marble man by his fellow cadets. Now that wasn't completely a compliment because he was a little stiff. You're kind of guy you hung out with you said marble men not Marlboro Man. That's right this and he was very upright duty was the word he would have associated with himself who is a serious guy whereas other army officers on the On the frontier posts used too often. Drink too much or gamble. He didn't do those things. He was focused on being studious being upright he was courteous and when people would describe him they would describe him as slightly larger than life. Maybe a little too perfect kind of the STOIC IDEAL. I guess exactly but then seventeen years into his career. The Mexican war erupts and Robert. E Lee goes to Mexico. And he's a staff off Susan Engineer Officer at usually not a position where you come out a hero. But in fact in the combat of the Mexican war he shines and maybe the most respected mid grade or young officer in the army to come out of the war so much so that General Winfield Scott. The overall commander described him as the best soldier in combat that he'd ever seen. I always hear people talk about how he was so honorable and he was the consummate military officer something to aspire to and yet I mean isn't the first job of a great military leader and honorable military leader not to wage war against your own country. How do we reconcile that well? It's hard to because for years. I reconciled that he had just been loyal to his earlier association with Virginia You know I took the oath on the planet West Point to support and defend the constitution of the United States. And so did he. And the country had been founded by his role model. George Washington and so when Robert e Lee faces his plutarch Ian Moment in the spring of eighteen. Sixty one has to make a value judgment. And what's interesting is he almost doesn't make a judgment when you read the stories he said. I am against secession of the south but I will do what my native state does and Virginia was awaiting a popular vote referendum and so he basically gave his decision to the popular voters of Virginia. Who became emotional over president? Lincoln's decision to reinforce for sumter and so they voted to and so the most important decision of his life he almost didn't make and then he spent the next four years trying to destroy the United States. Yeah it's interesting that this consummate leader of abdicated his leadership duties at the most critical point in his career to voters. And it doesn't make an evil. Yeah what it makes miss human. It makes him flawed. It makes him like you and I right and to that point you open the book by comparing two different paintings of lease hero. General George Washington crossing the Delaware. There's a course that famous one that we've probably all seen and then there's another more contemporary painting tells about that second one. Sure they the Well the first picture of course is the one that's hanging in the White House and it's got Robert or George Washington in a small boat crossing the Delaware River to attack the British on Christmas night. And we've all seen it. He's standing in leaning forward and everybody else's down there row and when we talk about we said well that's a leader that's George Washington but if you really look at that picture it's absurd in a a small both that would tip Easley. He's leaning forward you standing. Yeah no no military guy. No Sane person is going to do that in an icy river at night at least twice so not too many years ago. A gentleman commissioned a painter to do a more realistic version and now it's on a flat bottom barge which is reportedly the boats that were actually used. He is standing essentially holding onto a canon. That's being moved across and it's realistic. It's how a sane person would cross a river at night the way that he's depicted in the painting. It's the way a general who wants to get killed. We're probably would've crossed the Delaware. Not a smart military commander. Try and yet. That's how we want to view our leaders. We wanted to view them. As Day. Bit beating Goliath. We want believe that they are larger than life that they are almost incapable of error and brave to the point of being foolhardy which is completely unrealistic. That's right exactly and you take apart Actually three of what you call the biggest myths about leaders in this book and WanNa deal with each of these one by one First of all. There's this idea that there is a recipe for success at West Point. I know that you must have spent gosh countless hours studying history. Great Military Battles and looking for replicable strategies. Is there something wrong with that? Well it's education and it's helpful. It's a template but it's never solution because there are no two battles no two wars new situations alike and so when people spend the rest of their career looking for a time to do what Hannibal did it. Can I or somebody else did a battle? They're going to be disappointed. There are principles that you learn but same with leadership if you if you look at George Washington and Robert e Lee or an elite leader you WanNa pick and you say okay. How were they knew right? That list of traits or behaviors. Some people even try to stand like the person that their hero. My father told me he was in the military out of Westport right after World War. Two and he said there was a whole population of patent knockoffs. Us Army officers tried to act. Like George Patton. And of course only George Patton can be George Patton but the profanity that that the pistols. And that you. You can't try to do something that worked for someone else. So there's no list. There's no genetic leadership plan in patent himself was a pretty deeply flawed military hero. And I imagine those people just completely overlooked all of those aspects as well. That's right if you look at someone like pat and you see someone who was colorful and profane an aggressive. But if you really decide why he was effective he was a student of war. He knew the battlefields from world. War One of where he fought in World War. Two people don't spend a lot of time thinking about that side of patent. They think about him yelling at people and slapping soldiers and push in tanks on and that's a superficial almost cartoon version and we do that often with leaders the second myth which is this tendency to miss attribute success to the person at the top. You said that you came to this realization when you were writing your own memoir a few years ago. What did you learn about successes in? Google gets credit when you were doing that. Yeah that we call it the attribution myth and I I started writing my memoirs in two thousand ten. When I I thought about it I said well how hard could it be? I was there so I know and I brought a young man who was about a year out of Yale University in English. Major to come help me and we worked together for two and a half years to write this and so the first thing we did was we did a detailed time line and all the significant again events. I've been a part of in many cases. I've made a decision and there have been outcome for which I received either credit or blame and that was the castle effect but when we did the work we did a whole bunch of interviews like one hundred interviews with people who are involved and the result was very humbling. Because what happened was I had a view of something and it was almost never wrong. But it was always stunningly incomplete. Like I would make decision. Then something would happen. And I'd say well that's why but then when we did the interviews we found so many other people doing so many other things that affected it more than I did of which I was totally unaware until after the fact when we did the interviews and other contextual factors that suddenly I realized that I was a figure in my memoirs but I wasn't even the central figure in the story of my life. Every situation was so complex that I was just a piece of it and that was an eye opener. That was a little humbling pretty disturbed. Yeah and if if we really made this public you know we pay. Ceo's all these incredible amounts of money for the success or failure of the company when in many cases there are much smaller factor than people want to attribute and that that plays out time and again when you study when you're studying and so understanding that leadership is actually at interaction between leaders followers and contextual factors. It's almost it's an emergent property. Almost like a chemical reaction and so it's not something that I put on my pocket and throw at you throw some leadership. Betcha instead. It's this thing that happens. And it's different every time and so it's never repeatable with exactly the same personality and whatnot and that's a second myth and then the third myth was results with right. You sort of give lie to this myth that leadership is always merit based and leaders are always chosen based on results coming up through the ranks in the military bureaucracy. Is this something that you personally witnessed probably more than a few times in fact absolutely I mean you you pick leaders you elect them you select them..

Robert e Lee George Washington Virginia United States West Point Robert Lee Yale University Washington Lee High School Charlottesville Delaware officer Robert George Patton commander Lincoln Stanley McChrystal United States Army senior fellow Lee barracks
"general stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

02:14 min | 3 months ago

"general stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on Kickass News

"Hi I'm Ben. Mathis welcome to kick ASS news. General Stanley McChrystal served for thirty four years in the US. Army rising from a second lieutenant in the eighty second airborne division to a four star general in command of all American and coalition forces in Afghanistan. During those years he worked with countless leaders in pondered an ancient question. What makes a leader great? He came to realize that. There's no simple answer because leadership is not what you think it is and never was not in a new book called leaders myth and reality McChrystal profiles famous leaders from a wide range of Iranian fields from corporate CEOS to politicians and revolutionaries to explore how leadership works in practice and challenge the myths. That complicate are thinking about leaders. And today I'm honored to have General Stanley McChrystal on the podcast to share. How he came to reassess the legacy of his own hero Robert e Lee in the aftermath of Charlottesville. How he personally learned that. The man at the top often gets credit that he doesn't deserve and why in the military and in other fields leaders aren't always judged by their results. He discusses the Fifteenth Century Chinese. Admiral who's become the symbol for that country's global ambitions. He didn't realize that Coco. Chanel was a real person and one leadership flaw that he shares with of all People Walt Disney he reveals why he decided to include his former enemy in combat Abu Musab Al-Zarka we in the book. And what it was like to get into the dark mind of the Cato in Iraq leader and eventually hunt him down and kill him plus he says he has no specific political ambitions. But you won't hear any Sherman esque statement from this general and he gives the reason why coming up with General Stanley McChrystal in just a moment Stanley McChrystal.

General Stanley McChrystal Chanel Mathis Afghanistan Walt Disney US Cato Robert e Lee Abu Musab Sherman Iraq Charlottesville
"general stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

13:42 min | 3 months ago

"general stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

"Stop so don't be afraid of trion stuff and have it not work because that's part of figuring out what what will in will not and. I felt very uncomfortable. Because I'd gone in command. And that's very tribal organization that the Special Operations World and I was from one tribe arranger and so the other tribes look at you with a fair amount of skepticism and so I- I worried about my legitimacy and then I said well and if I stand up and tell people I got no idea what we should do. I'm not going to get this a huge vote of confidence. I think what happened? Was I think people one understood how confusing it was and to appreciated that? I didn't try. To assume that didn't try to say okay. Here's the deal. And they also like to be part of the solution because talented people in an organization. Want to have some say in in how things are done. They were the people with the most expertise to the most experienced. Not May you started doing an hour and a half daily meeting and for seven and a half years you are running this meaning when you were running counter terrorism and then in Iraq and then Afghanistan. How do you avoid burnout? When you're on that kind of intense footing for that long like how do you turn from being sprinter to a marathoner without slowing your pace yes? That's a great question. I'll go on a personal level in log on an organizational level as well a personal level. What I found was I had to devote myself completely to it so I took this command. It was supposed to be two years. I stayed for five Jay sock and then I came back for ten months and then went back and took Afghanistan. I felt the during that period. That command needed all of me so I basically went and stayed deployed and part of that was because to keep my own focus and part of that was to demonstrate to the command that I was that committed. It was that important. I couldn't ask them to do things unless I was willing to do it. I'm blessed with a wife that her calculus on this was. I understand this do this until the task is done and then come home. I tried to set myself a complete focus but then on a daily sort of cyclic basis. I knew certain things were critical to me. I knew I have to work out every day. If I don't I'm an ugly person and I'm not that good anyway so is better if I do. I had to set aside about an hour and a half to work at every day and that starts my day whenever it was in Iraq. That happened to be late morning because we worked all night. Went to bed right at dawn and then. I'd sleep until late morning in the workout. That's sort of put me in the right mindset and I do operations and connect with people I would try to pace myself so that I got a predictable by sleep. It was only about four hours tonight but in that environment that felt about right and I tried to keep my focus even keeled and to be honest. I didn't do much back home. I had my son in college and my wife back I e mailed. My wife wants a day but I didn't do any other distractions because in my standpoint that was very important for me to focus now for the command. This was even more important because different from most forces. Special Operating Forces are in the war all time. No so what they do. Is You have these elite forces and you rotate them by squadron. And so they'll go over there for four months at a shot and they'll come home but they'll be back on alert back when they're in the United States. So they're really not unplugging from the war. What you had to do was try to set it up so that everybody sprinted when they were in the area of operations in Iraq Afghanistan. And then when they're back there you try to set it so that the pace is slow enough so that they could meet her that with their families and physically on one hand. It got hard on the other hand. It was easy because it was simple. We fought the war. We worked out. We ate and we slept. We doing out. There was no other foolishness involved. You can't do that in most jobs but there are times when you take incredible. Focus on the part of an organization and at that time I think one of the key things for leader to do is to offer real priorities and when I say priorities someone says well. Here's the priorities of what I want the organization to hear the top twenty parties and I just start laughing if you have twenty priorities. You don't have parties if you've got three you've got priorities. The real courage and a leader is not in telling people what to do. It's telling them what it's okay not to do. Because there's a whole bunch of other things that they kind of think they should do and the leader has to sign up. Say if you don't do any of these I'm okay with that as long as you do these things that really matter. Yeah prioritizing at these times becomes more and more essential and being intentional about every step that you're taking I can already sense in some of my conversations with execs. I don't know whether you feel this at all. But a sense that they've absorbed the first blow the first shock of the crisis right and they've kind of settled into this new reality like they've figured it out and maybe the urgency and the speed that marked the first few weeks is slowing down a little bit. And I'm curious. Is that a trap. How do you instill agility? That's not transient. But that is this sort of constant marathon approach Bob. That's exactly what we're seeing and we describe it as at the interface. One what happened? Is We have this? Approaching PANDEMIC AND ECONOMIC IMPACTS. And then everybody had to work from home and revenue stopped for a lot of companies. And they did that. And there was a period of two maybe three weeks and then suddenly people were able to communicate from home. They could get their systems to work in a lot of normal things that they were doing seemed to work and so everybody kind of pats themselves on the back and go. This is not that hard I got it? I think two things. One is in many cases organizations. Aren't doing a lot of things that have to be done long. They are doing sort of the basics right now the bare minimums operating from home. They haven't yet been developing strategy. They haven't been doing longer term leader development. They haven't been doing things that have to be done over the long haul and they haven't dealt a lot with in many cases customers. They haven't tried sales over this so I think that it is a trap. You start to say well okay. We got this. The reality is that the economy's in this Cup right now and as soon as it starts to sort itself out certain organizations are going to sprint ahead. Because they've been figuring it out. They've been going to school on this. They've been preparing for a changed market and they are going to come out of the starting gates. Some we're GONNA try to go back to status quo ante and they are going to be absolutely crushed because you're going to go back to a time that no longer exist others are going to dog paddle in circles kind of where they are now trying to figure out what it works and they will be left at the starting gates. I think that organizations have got to understand now that there's a temptation to focus on the here and now the crisis. The crisis is true. But you still have to do all of the long term things you still got to push the organization Ford for the future and I think people have got to put senior leader eyeballs at and the focus of the organization on that kind of Ford Movement. And it's almost like you see there's going to be sort of three different groups. The folks who are really getting this are going to be that much further ahead when we get to the other side some folks are just not gonNa make the transition and all and others are. GonNa Kinda become secondary also rans because they didn't really adjust to the new reality. I think that's exactly right because many things of the new reality are more subtle than we think. They're not just working from home and talking to people on your computer. They are doing many things about product development this way about building teams because we're still operating off muscle that was built up before many organizations went home and they're working from home but they all know each other. They spent years together in offices. They built up relationships. They built trust. They build things they do. Take this a year to in the future or create an organization in this model. You don't have any of that shared background. You don't have those relationships suddenly. There's a different dynamic. That's gotTa be used same with dealing with customers fire suppliers. The longer we go from what was before the more. We've gotta be adapting to what we think will be the new normal. You talk a lot about leading with compassion and in this time. There's a tension because you feel like Oh. This is a doer. Di Moment Right. If there's any time that I should go all the and work twenty four seven and ask everything of my people now as it. 'cause there may not be tomorrow for my business on the other hand you want to take care of your team. You want to be compassionate you understand. The people are stressed out. How tolerant can be. How do you find that line? I think leaders. Now it's a careful balance point because we send people home and we may go home to a pretty Nice Home Office and we're pretty well situated. But what if your employees goes home and you say we still got a job? They should be thankful for that. What if they got two or three kids? Who Schools of closed? They live in a small apartment so the kids are underfoot. Their spouse has lost their job. Apparent has cova nineteen suddenly. It's a much more complicated environment for them and working from home is not that easy now. Work is at home so you're always at work so I think at first takes a fair amount of empathy that people are actually under more difficult working conditions than they were in an office or a plant or whatever even though they might not be directly exposed to dangerous covert nineteen. So you start with empathy. Empathy only gets you so far. Empathy is not sympathy. Empathy is being able to put yourself in the other person's position to understand it. Good leaders in the military have to understand how a private feels when they don't know what's going on. They're frightened their feet hurt. They're carrying a heavy load. It's really hard. The leader still has to say this is what we have to do. This is the task in front of us. I can't make the hill and the smaller. I can't make your pack any lighter. I can't make the enemy less dangerous. All I can do is tell you. That's what we have to deal with. So I think leaders do have to be tough enough now but a lot of that starts with being absolutely upfront with people. I think in small organizations now every small businesses under pressure. You have to get in front of your people. We got in front of the people in my company and said here is the economic reality here all the numbers. Exactly what it is. Here's what we have to do. Everybody needs to understand that. And if that changes will let you know and so I think leaders have got to be brutally candid with their team members but not to the point of being unable to either make tough decisions or push people when we need to push hard use. Use this phrase creating a shared consciousness among your troops. And you know it's not something people expect to hear from lifelong military man and I kind of phrase but this idea of common purpose you feel like is particularly valuable in getting teams to operate and getting organization to operate under any kind of crisis or any other condition. Absolutely my father. He was a soldier as well as his father had been. So we had a lot of old barracks sayings and one of my dad used to joke says. Put your brains in the footlocker. I'll do the thinking around here but that was the opposite away. My father really was and the opposite of what works with soldiers if you tell everybody what tasks to do but don't paint them a picture of what you're trying to do what the purpose is what the intent is then. It's really hard for one to them to believe in their task. Because it may seem narrow and mundane but also they can't adjust so what we found is if you give people contextual understanding of the situation of what we're trying to do and what a good outcome would look like. And then they go forward to execute in many cases. What you mind of envision them. Doing for specific tasks may be very different from what was really needed in. Afghanistan. We developed this rule because we knew that we came up with this brilliant strategy in Kabul and we sent it out to everybody. But when you get in the hills and valleys of Afghanistan. The conditions are very different than we might have envisioned and so we said when you get on the ground if the order we issued you is raw execute the order. We should've issued you. And you're saying wow that's required them to use their judgement. Well that's right because they got a Lotta judgment but only if they understand the big picture and so in.

Afghanistan Iraq Special Operations World trion Kabul United States Ford PANDEMIC Jay product development Bob Ford Movement cova
Retired Army general Stanley McChrystal to review Boston's emergency plans

WBZ Afternoon News

00:38 sec | 4 months ago

Retired Army general Stanley McChrystal to review Boston's emergency plans

"Boston Boston mayor mayor Marty Marty Walsh Walsh bringing bringing it it out out big big gone gone to to try try to to help help the the city city deal deal with with the the coronavirus coronavirus crisis crisis WBZ's WBZ's Karen Karen regal regal as as that that part part of of the the story story the the city city of of Boston Boston is is hiring hiring a a consulting consulting firm firm to to tighten tighten the the city's city's emergency emergency response to the covert nineteen pandemic the goal is to update our plans and service to reflect our needs of our residents who have today prevent any gaps in service that might arise in court make the best use of our resources moving forward it's a team being led by four star general general Stanley McChrystal among what's being done examining how city agencies and direct and communications to residents well she could not say the cost

Marty Marty Walsh Walsh Karen Karen Boston Stanley Mcchrystal
"general stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"general stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

"And I think that if people feel that that responsibility. I sometimes talk about marriage. I'm not an expert in marriage. I've been married all of once for forty two years. But if you go back to the age of out on the frontier a man in a woman get married, and they have a family. They need each other. You know, every relationship goes up and down, you know, you go through when you're deeply in love and periods irritated. But if there's a send you that bind you it's combined responsibility for the children of the farm. You can't survive alone. I think that that helps keep you focused. Doing more difficult periods. Well, that covenant ideas. Exactly, right. I think is that I was talking to divinity professor at Cambridge University. And we were talking about this is sort of relevant. I suppose to the discussion of Martin Luther King to we're talking about the exodus narrative, which of course, was used as a as a what would you call it? A metaphorical re restatement of the problem of the slaves of the United States. And so the exodus narrative is often read as escape from tyranny into freedom something like that. But it's not a it's it's a scape from involuntary covenant. That's the tyranny into something approximating voluntary covenant, which is what's ranged with Jawa in desert. So there's no there's no chaos and directionless nece or or that's portrayed as the desert and the solution to that is to enter into a new covenant. And that covenant is something like a long term promise. And that that's also what you see in marriage and the advantage to that. Is that the disadvantages that it constrains you right? And so that's why people think about this as as burdensome duty. But the advantage is that it gives you direction, and and shelters you from excess uncertainty doubt and the commitment that goes along with marriage. Is is something that should be regarded as aspirational to right? Look, we know this is going to be difficult. And we know that this is limiting your possibilities. Like limiting your possibilities of mate choice down to one person. But you commit yourself to it and in that commitment, and that adoption of that covenant arrangement. That's where.

Martin Luther King Cambridge University United States professor forty two years
"general stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

04:30 min | 1 year ago

"general stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

"Spring of twenty seventeen I did a lot of thinking about it. And the reality is I came to the conclusion I had to write about Robert Lee because he'd been so important to me, but now had this conflicted relationship with I in many ways, he was the near perfect exemplar of leadership. But in a very fundamental way, the fact that he betrayed his country, and he did it for the cause of slavery. You can't overlook and so I tried to take that one on because for me it was a complex purse. Thing. And I came to the conclusion I still admire so much about him. But not think of him as a mythological hero. I think of music human being just like you I flawed, but if you can look at each of these leaders that way get them off their pedestal. But yet don't medically put him in a ditch and say, they're valueless because Abbott Mustafa's are carry who my force killed, and I was happy. We did. I'll be honest, I admired his leadership skills. So what about the what was it about him that you felt was compelling? Well, he he came up in a tough background from an industrial town in Jordan, very little education. He went became a Jihadist in Afghanistan when that was popular. Many got thrown in prison back in Jordan for five years during that period. What he did was he became really pious really disciplined really focused, and he didn't have the advantages other people do, but he found he was more committed than other people if he was more. Fanatical about the 'cause the people would follow him and show his zealotry became sort of white hot burning flame that people were tracked into, but he was genuine and so when he came into a rock, and we fought against him for two and a half years. Here's a guy who was terrorist Matic. He was completely focused on his 'cause I disagreed with this cause, but the reality is maybe in his position, I would have believed it as well. And who's to say, I'm right, and he's wrong and his ability to motivate people and to live the values that he decided to adopt is pretty impressive. And the the frightening part about it was many of the people who followed in didn't share his level of fanaticism. But because he was so overtly competent confident because he was so overtly committed because he was willing to walk the walk people followed him anyway. And that's that really says a lot more about us as followers than it does about him as a leader. Well, it also deal. So indicates part of the non verbal element of deciding who constitutes a competent leader like we definitely associate confidence and the ability to keep negative emotion under control with the ability to lead because we're looking for people who have a direction that's the first thing because we need a direction, but then we're also looking for people who can maintain control over anxiety in particular because that indicates that they're stable in their orientation in the world, and that's a tractive. If you don't have time to do a detailed analysis of their ethos, the nonverbal cues of confidence and direction are a decent pointer to someone who's competent even though they're not they're not infallible pointers. That's exactly right in combat. What you find is young leaders young Lieutenant young charges. The first thing that happens in the first round fires all the young soldiers look to you. They look to see how you're going to react because they wanna know how they should we, you know. Young children do the same thing with their mothers. So if for example, if a baby the young child three years older, so is in a room. Let's say with their mother and most runs across the room. And they've never seen the mouse. The first thing they'll do is. They'll look at the mouse because it tracks tension, and then the look at their mother, and they read off her face what the mouse means, and if she's up on the chair screaming, then of course, the child is going to be terrified. So they they call that referencing. And so it's very interesting to see that replicated on the battlefield, right? So it's instant search for model for immunization, exactly. Okay. So what what other people that you wrote about really struck you in a particular way. That's interesting to talk about. Well, very interesting. Harriet Tubman was unlikely she was a middle aged African American slave who escaped.

Abbott Mustafa Harriet Tubman Jordan Robert Lee Afghanistan three years five years
"general stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

02:23 min | 1 year ago

"general stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

"I would also use the word humility because you come in. And you don't think you have a solution. Instead, what you do is you listen, you you show, some empathy to understand why people do what they do because then you can divine the right kind of leadership that situation because it's always different. There's a there's a research showing what makes a physician ineffective diagnostician. And one of the markers is the number of words that the patient speaks compared to the number of words, the physician speaks in the first fifteen minutes of their interaction. And the more words the patient speaks the higher the diagnostic accuracy of the physician, and I really liked that idea of humility, you know, you you have to walk into a complex situation knowing that you don't know anything. Including what the problems are. And then if you have the possibility of listening, if you have the opportunity, listen, then and people trust you that which is a real crucial issue and something that's may be central to leadership that people will actually tell you what the problems are what's actually going on. And that seems to be a prerequisite for for solving. The actually have to know what the problems are. I think that's exactly right. When I took over enough ghanistan in two thousand nine I been in Afghanistan a lot before. But now, I was in charge in the first thing, I did was this listening tour, and it was essential. Because you have to start with the assumption that they are rational actors that they do things a certain way for reason when you see it from afar, you say they're corrupt though, this that when you get up close if you were in there shoes, the reality is you probably would do it very similar to the way they do. And so it's a certain amount of just showing respect to go. And listen and understand. Okay. Why are we doing at this way? There may be a better way, and you may be able to help. But if you walk in with a bag of solutions, I think they're almost always wrong. And as you say it's hard to build trust. We'll the problem with walking with the bag of solutions is that you have the steering wheel. But it's not connected to any of the mechanism. That's exactly right. You can have I tell young people I work with now having the right answer in the room. Mm-hmm. Is no longer the secret. You can get the right answer often on the internet. But the reality is it's getting the people in the room to accept the right answer and implemented. Yeah. So okay. So that's the next thing that seems absolutely crucial that so if you if.

Afghanistan fifteen minutes
"general stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"general stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Back. Everyone general Stanley mcchrystal is in studio. He's written a brand new book loan with Jeff Eggers. And Jason man Jones. As Aymaran Ryan, go man, go former marine leaders, he's called leaders myth and reality. And you went back in history to make sure you had it right and Utada confessional year. You didn't have everything right in your first tweet to leadership bucks or you. Learn more. Well, we certainly didn't have some things right now. I thought about leadership, and so we went back to look at these fertile leaders in history and to see what about them. We didn't really understand it. So we did these pairs of John row. We did geniuses in reformers, founders powerbrokers, and we tried to look at thirteen fairly diverse leadership experiences by people and see what it is leadership. Really is. Can I throw some an-and you please look at Walt Disney would you want from Walt Disney struck down with cancer early? Probably would have been even bigger and greater, but man is legacy. He lives on and his name has never been stronger. What did he do? Well, it was extraordinarily is a very talented animator in his early years. He created this studio, they created Mickey Mouse, and really technological breakthroughs. But then from nineteen thirty four to thirty seven he drove his team, but produced Snow White the first full length animated feature, and it was extraordinarily successful. Even though we had to mortgage the company and mortgage, the IP Mickey Mouse to fund the picture when it was hugely successful four years later. He is a bitter strike for many of those same animators because the company had grown had gotten more corporate the structure and the bureaucracy had changed and suddenly the kind of leader he'd been at a smaller more family. I company he couldn't do here, and he couldn't grow. He couldn't adapt to that new reality what really happened. His brother ROY ran the corporate side of the Disney studios from then on Walt Disney focused on things like. Disneyland. So he was great in imagining things and focusing on his projects his brother became great at running a big impart. So if Stanley mcchrystal looking Walt Disney in his forties, thirties and forties. Do you try to get more due to try to broaden out Walt Disney or you just try to get somebody with the skill set to match the problem? Well, that's a great. That's a great question. I think the first thing you do is try to get Walt Disney to adapt. But there are some people who can't or just are not interested in adapting. And then what you've gotta realize. He's not the right leader for the new reality of the Disney studios. And then you bring somebody anyways a little bit like apple originally with Steve Jobs. See those bakery insurgency on a company that he created when he came back. He even said he was better suited for that job. That gets exactly. So he grew the leader is all in context, the followers and the situation determine the leaders effectiveness, Margaret Thatcher. She was strong convictions. Believe very. Strongly, and certainly conservative ideas. And because she was so unwavering in that she became very very appealing to the British who went through the very difficult nineteen seventies. She became a very popular prime minister. And then after about eleven years the arc of her leadership. She became more autocratic, the very firm confident style, she had before began to wear thin on people, and she was essentially politically assassinated now wasn't that she had lost it. It was that the times had changed the context it changed her followers had gotten weary of her style. And they essentially pushed her aside. I hate to boil everything down the sports, but how many great coaches hit the ten year more coaching the same team. And just all of a sudden, they don't listen. They stop listening need a change. And the next person you bring in is totally different. Bob, lemon replaces Billy Morton. You know, you have. You have the Pittsburgh coach who who is now out who is Bill Kaur is now out doing it as broadcast to when he had all that success. He says the guy stopped listening to me parcels seems to move on the year before he has to because he sends his they heard my act before I think that's true. Plus, there's always the danger that the leader starts to think they've got all the right answers. They've had the success. They hear the press. They start to believe there's really smart, they lose.

Walt Disney Margaret Thatcher Stanley mcchrystal Steve Jobs Disney Jason man Jones Bill Kaur Aymaran Ryan Utada Jeff Eggers cancer ROY John Disneyland Pittsburgh apple Bob Billy Morton eleven years
"general stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"general stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on Kickass News

"Go to the days of Robert E leeann division and corps, commanders were under fire, and so's Robert Ely nowadays, you have to make a conscious effort, but I think it's just as important as ever now if you were to include. Your own biography and leaders myth and reality. What do you think that theme of your chapter might be? Yeah, that's a great one. I I think it is that the most interesting part of my personal experience was the transformation J sock as we changed an organization the nature of it. I think that it would have been about somebody who pushed a change really hard. But didn't do the change themselves. I get credit for being this transformational leader what I was was a person who was part of a team that created a transformation in my contribution was to create an environment in which that transformation could and would occur and creating an ecosystem nurturing it and whatnot. I never had the right answer. I never was smart enough. But I was lucky enough to recognize people around me could figure out the right answer. And I was had enough humility to know that somebody else had the right answer. Let's go with it. Yeah. Of enjoyed talking. To you before we go. I don't want to ask you if you have any interest in politics. But is there any scenario down the line where you could see yourself running for office never been an ambition of mine. I'm at a point now where I think American politics or a crisis leaderships at a crisis. I think American politics or crisis. And so I don't want any American to say that they won't be a part of it. I don't want any American to say they won't vote because they don't care that they wouldn't serve that they won't run for office because we're really at an all hands on deck moment. Well, I enjoyed the book it's called leaders myth and reality, I highly recommended folks general Stanley mcchrystal it's been an honor. Thanks for talking with me kind head me. Thank you..

Stanley mcchrystal Robert Ely Robert E
"general stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

03:26 min | 1 year ago

"general stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on Kickass News

"And then we love it. We in some respects to give up on a leader is meeting that you made a mistake in the you were wrong. So we're always reluctant to do that. I guess Zach. I want to talk about how you went about writing this book and the cry. Not that you were looking for and leaders in selecting the bios to include in the book. What were you looking for? Well, it's it's funny when we started we knew we wanted to do number profiles of leaders, but it was a little contradictory because we were going to write a book about leadership that we knew one of the arguments would be we get too focused on individuals not or wider picture. And so you say, well, why are you writing about him right one? That's because that's how we've always thought them. So we went back to Plutarch the original biographer who had done by of Roman Greek leaders, and we use that as a basic model, but the idea was we wouldn't try to compare leaders in terms of traits or what worked the real question was why did they emerge as leaders? What about them or what about the times or people around them that actually did it and pretty early in the process, we came out with it sort of recognition that leadership isn't what we? I think it is. And it never has been and you you referred earlier to the the myths that we came up with and we started with this recognition that we've always looked to leadership through these mythological ends is. And I had this child's book that my mother got when she was five in one thousand nine hundred twenty nine and Chattanooga, Tennessee, and she's to read it to me, and it was Greek tales for tiny tots and one of my remembered with atlas and there was his handwriting picture of a guy in a g string standard on top of a mountain, hold up the sky, and I'd look at that. And I go at strange, but then as we think about it for years and years and years people assumed that at the sky didn't fall in something or some bodies holding it up and knits are designed to explain what's otherwise unexplainable. And so people said, well, if it's not fallen in somebody's holding it up atlas on stop them out and doing it that good excuses or a good at. Explanations. Any and they just bought it. What we've done the same thing with leaders. We look at leaders and someone says that the person who saved the west in World War Two is Winston Churchill, and we sort of look at that. And we go okay write that down. But of course, that's an incredibly simplistic description of one leaders role. He was part of this, right? Larger equation. And so we came up with these three myths, which we call the the formulate myth, which is the idea that there's a checklist of how to be a great leader. And when you actually look at results that doesn't equate doesn't correlate to success respect was in those don't translate across different careers in different eras, and so forth. And one of the reasons we pick these very different thirteen leaders for book is because they were all leaders, but other than that there are very few similarities between their background how they operated times at cetera. We found that leader. Ships intensely contextual. We're going to take a quick break. And then I'll be back with more with general Stanley mcchrystal when we come back in just a minute..

Winston Churchill Zach Stanley mcchrystal Chattanooga Tennessee
"general stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

03:23 min | 1 year ago

"general stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on Kickass News

"Stanley mcchrystal retired from the US army as a four star general after thirty four years in the military and having commanded the joint special operations command or J sock in Iraq. And then he commanded the International Security Assistance force and US forces in Afghanistan. He is a senior fellow at Yale university's Jackson institute for global affairs and a partner at the mcchrystal group. A leadership consulting firm based in Virginia his previous books, my share of the task in team of teams were both New York Times bestsellers. And now he's followed it up with his latest bestseller, titled leaders myth and reality general Stanley mcchrystal. Thank you for your service. And thanks for sitting down with me today. Thanks for having me. I thoroughly enjoyed reading leaders myth and reality. But I have to confess that. I usually don't enjoy books that have the titles like say Churchill on leadership or. Lincoln on leadership because the moment and author identifies. Someone as a leader to be emulated. It's just a given that they then have to whitewash their entire biography and ignore all the flaws and all the mistakes in order to make their case that they are a leader to be him United. And my thinking, I guess has always been what good is a leadership book, if you can't learn from the leaders mistakes as well as their successes with leaders myth and reality, you seem to be trying to change that we are after many years of trying to learn leadership being taught it and headed demonstrated to me, and then the opportunity try practice it. And then studying it and writing about it to an extent at this point in life pretty late. I came to the conclusion that I and my co-authors didn't really understand what leadership is so we wanted to go back to first principles and truly identify. What is it? And why can't we get our arms around it? And you talk about how your decision to. Throw away. A portrait of Robert E Lee in the aftermath of Charlottesville, actually lead you to rethink how we define leadership as a fellow West Point alum that can't have been an easy decision for you know, is a really tough decision. In fact, I had grown up with Robert E Lee is probably the penalty an example of leadership for me. And there've been a personal connection I'd grown up living near his boyhood home. I'd gone to Washington Lee high school I'd gone to West Point many years after Robert Lee, but I'd follow the same path. He served thirty two years in the United States army. I served almost just about that number thirty four and it West Point when you arrive there are many statues of generals and people to emulate, but Robert E Lee was always special for everyone. He was this character that was nearly perfect. And he was depicted that way, they were painting seven my lived in Lee barracks. And so you couldn't be Robert E Lee, but he could be a beacon that you could try to move closer to. So I spent a career thinking about that. And when I was a second Lieutenant my wife young wife now forty one years of marriage gave me a painting. It was a cheap actually a print with painted oval clear acrylic to look like a painting. She paid twenty five dollars for this thing framed and gave it to me. And I traded it for the next forty years every quarter set a cordage we lived in. I hung it up. Because for me. It was an example of the values that I believed in and.

Robert E Lee Stanley mcchrystal Washington Lee high school Lee barracks Virginia US International Security Assista West Point New York Times Yale university Iraq Afghanistan United States army global affairs Churchill partner Lincoln Jackson institute Charlottesville twenty five dollars
"general stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on This Is Success

This Is Success

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"general stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on This Is Success

"For general Stanley mcchrystal. This is success. I want the company the organization to be confident in themselves. If I got hit by a car, they'd say, we're going to miss stand. But guess what? In his honor. We're gonna move forward mcchrystal lead America and satellites in the war in Afghanistan before retiring as a four star general in two thousand ten he revolutionized the joint special operations command j sock and he's best known for taking out the leader of Qaeda in Iraq. Crystal just published a book called leaders myth and reality he explains how revisiting the legacy of confederate general Robert E Lee helped him realize it was time to redefine leadership. I grew up figuratively. Speaking with Robert Lee grew up in Virginia. I grew up in northern Virginia not far from his boyhood home, and I went to Washington high school, and then when I got seventeen I went to West Point as Robert Lee hit, and when you go to West Point, you don't. Escape properly. I lived in the barracks there were paintings property. And while every other leader at West Point is famous and taught he special and then when I got older, and I was retired. And I had this picture that my wife had given me forty years before my wife had paid twenty five dollars for when I was a second Lieutenant and hung it proudly number set of quarters we ever had because for me it represented. This is what I believe when someone came into my quarters, they'd seal robbery lead. Those are the values that he believes it, and I was proud of that. Then after Charlottesville in my wife, any we'd been married forty years at the time. She goes, I think you ought to get rid of that picture. And my first response was you gave it to me. Honey, I can never get rid of that. And she says now, and I said, well why? And she says, I think it's communicating something you don't think it is. And I said, what do you mean, he was general officer? He just did his thing. He was a military guy out of politician or something she said, you may think that but people in our home may not think that they may think you're trying to communicate something deeper white supremacy and all those things so one morning, I took it down literally threw it away. And it was it was a pretty emotional moment for me. And then as we started writing this book and we'd already begun the initial work. I realized I couldn't write a book about leadership. I wrote about Robert Ely. And I knew that was dangerous because robbery Lee become a controversial character. There's a part of American society that is just passionate in his defense part of it that is passionate against him. And everybody's going gonna weigh in. But you know, I'd grown up with Robert Ely. Both as a person in my mind, but also is an ideal and just recently I walked down just to walk the distance between his childhood home and the slave trading house in Alexandria, Virginia. Which was the second busiest slave trading house in the United States. And this is where northern African Americans were bought some Friedman were were captured, but others were bought from farms that were profitable and shipped to the deep south where cotton was so profitable. And so it was right in front of him. It was ten blocks from his home..

Robert E Lee officer Stanley mcchrystal West Point Virginia robbery Robert Ely Alexandria United States Charlottesville Qaeda Washington high school Afghanistan America Iraq Friedman forty years twenty five dollars
Retired General Stanley McChrystal on new book

The Big Biz Radio Show

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

Retired General Stanley McChrystal on new book

"Our retired US army four star general out with a new book and some new ideas on how to bring civility back to politics USA radio's Timberg with the story Stanley mcchrystal's a former US army general he served for over thirty four years in the military. He has a new book out, titled leaders myth and reality. It's funny almost can't give advice to politicians because they're responding to the environment. They learned that if they are civil in the other person's negative the other person wins and the further to the edges that they moved better for them. We've gotta look in the mirror as Americans and say, we're all complaining about it. The only way we. Fix. It is to change things with voting with demanding people more in the center, they may not be as exciting. But the reality is if we're going to make the government work, we've got gotta move it towards the center from both

United States Stanley Mcchrystal Timberg Thirty Four Years
Army General Weighs In On Trump's Order To Send Troops To Border

Bucket Strategy Investing

01:23 min | 1 year ago

Army General Weighs In On Trump's Order To Send Troops To Border

"A four star general weighs in on. The president's latest move to combat an immigrant caravan that's making its way from southern Mexico to the United States with more. Here's USA's Timberg. The Pentagon announced they're sending over five thousand troops to the US Mexico border. The troops will be helping to build fencing assists border patrol agents in hot hotspots and provide support as the government braces for the migrant caravan heading towards the United States. I had a chance to chat with retired US army general Stanley mcchrystal he also has a new book, titled leaders myth and reality. And I asked him about the president sending troops to the border wherever you use the US military. There is a practical side of it. And then there is a symbolic part of it. You know, they announced we're sending five thousand troops to the border. It almost sounds like we're going to relieve the Alamo where we're going to defend the borderline if that's what we're gonna do. We're gonna shoot the bikers when they come then that's one sort of middle picture people. Get. And so didn't use our military in something like that always carries great risks of symbolizing something we don't want our nation or military to be. So I would urge real caution here. I would urge you know, we've got some time before the convoy gets here. We've got a decide how we want this to play out. It's a chance for the United States to show our values in very overt way.

United States Stanley Mcchrystal President Trump Mexico Alamo Pentagon
"general stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

The Jordan Harbinger Show

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"general stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

"A list of things you can do. And the reality is we found no cases where a set of attributes Equality's at work for someone or transferable. There are things that that work in others, but every situation is so unique every time is so unique. And so even for the same leader to be a leader on Monday in a certain way and then try to use exactly the same techniques. The next day often is a loser. You say, well, then you'd have no consistency. Another reality is your consistency as your ability to adapt to the situation of the moment in our study that the leader who comes out as the most adaptable. Interestingly enough is Dr Martin Luther King junior, he constantly adapts how we respond to situations in requirements in doing that. The second myth, the attribution biff is really reinforced by things like biographies because it says that individual was the man of their times. Churchill shaped the outcome of World War Two or ABRAHAM LINCOLN won the civil war or you name it. And as we studied that, what we found was that's always a gross oversimplification. They may they may have had a significant role in it. But as we look through the lens of history, we tend to sharpen that focus. So the only sharpening on that person. Sorta like putting the spotlight on them. And so when all we're seeing his actions of that person, we tend to not be as aware of all the other things happening. And so. The danger of the attribution Memphis. We start to think all we gotta do is get a good leader in the problem is solved. And the reality is that's not true. It's actually the organization, the followers, the context of the situation that matter. So what as we studied this, we also found that a leader who does something in one place in his move to another place and tries to repeat it almost never succeeds. And so as a consequence, we find that it's very contextual into what the leader does, and that is reinforced. The last myth is the result Smith, and that is the idea that we are clear eyed, calculating people, and so we follow or select or elect the leader, who will most give us what we want. It will make the most money in the company when the most victories on the battlefield accomplish the most politically and the reality is that's not. Sure, either in reality, what we find is. The actual performance in outcomes. Measurable outcomes by many leaders is got nothing to do with how successful they are in terms of being selected, elected promoted, that sort of thing. There's something that our connection to leaders is more human. It's more organic. We, we want certain things from leaders that they provide in. It's not that strict outcome. Bottom line results were willing to tolerate some pretty negative or disappointing results from leaders if they fill some other need us, and it'll be interesting as we get in the age of big data, artificial intelligence as we can amass more data on people's the outcomes associated with someone's performance. And it'd be interesting to see whether we really use that in our people selection processes, or whether we'll let the human side of continued to guide us. You're listening to the Jordan harbinger show with our guest general Stanley mcchrystal, we'll be right back after these brief messages..

Dr Martin Luther King Stanley mcchrystal Memphis ABRAHAM LINCOLN Churchill Smith
"general stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

The Jordan Harbinger Show

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"general stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

"All right, here's general Stanley mcchrystal. The books that I've read from you are really well researched. It's not just say, hey, as general and all this stuff. There's a lot of stories. There's a lot of history, especially in leaders, myth and. The newest one in it's it's an intimidating, read, man, I got this book general, and I thought this is like a twenty three hour long audio book. It's a big Thome. There's a lot in there. That's exactly right. And it was intention that I mean, we don't want it to be intimidating, but we wanted to have real content. What we didn't want to write was one of these superficial things. Here's what we think we actually wanted to do the the research in NFL for way. I thought it was interesting. It's loaded with a historical examples of leaders. I thought it was really an unusual choice or maybe interesting for some other way that you choose general Lee is one of the first examples talk about picking a controversial figure and then just throwing that out in front. We wanted to do a Plutarch based study of leadership, go back to sort of first principles because we realized we really didn't think we understood leadership. Like we thought we did. And so as we try to assemble a number of people that we would profile. We figured out who should we do. And at one point we said, well, we should have John res- and we determined that powerbrokers would be one. Geniuses would be one in heroes would be one and in heroes I had grown up with Robert E Lee is one of my heroes. I'd go into Washington Lee high school. I'd grown up near his boyhood home. I gone to the same college as he had West Point. I'd followed a career in the military is he had many parallels, except obviously he did better all those things and I did. So he'd been a hero mine and I realized that I could write a book about leadership. But if I didn't include Robert E Lee because he has become controversial, it'd be a cop out because I essentially be denying the fact that for much of my life, I wanted to be as much like Robert is as I could. In fact. For forty years. I had a picture in my office or different places in our military quarters that my wife had given me and it was a painting or it was meant to look like a penny. It was actually an inexpensive print that they'd painted over with clear acrylic to look like a painting. And I was very proud of this framed painting in my quarters for many years because it represented to anybody who saw and reminded me that this is what leadership should look like. And this is why ought to try to be like. And so for forty years, I, I really followed that. And then as we got in the last couple of years and you saw Charlottesville and and people starting to to raise questions, my wife told me, she says, you should get rid of that picture. And I said, but I can't because you gave it to me. I love it. Robbery lease a hero mine, and she says, I don't think it means to other people what it does to you. I think it symbolizes to other. People something that you don't believe him and that is things about white supremacy and whatnot. I said, no, no, he's just general. She said, no, he's a symbol, and you got to be careful about what unintentional message you said. So we went back and forth for about a month, and then I did more study and I thought long and hard about it and I came to conclusion. She was absolutely right. And so at age sixty three. After having this picture for forty years, I took it off my wall and threw it in the trash. Oh, wow. It didn't even make it to the garage straight to the trash straight to the trash. And at the same time we were starting to write this book and I said, but still I can't duck studying and writing about robbery these. So as we studied it more gave me the chance to to really think more deeply about what Robert represents. Because at West Point, he represented leadership in excellence and loyalty..

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