18 Burst results for "General Musharraf"

"general musharraf" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:35 min | 10 months ago

"general musharraf" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"F. M. H. D. N. A. M. New York well continues out from the BBC world service on James camara saw me as a volcano just south of Manila spews lava and ash phase that toxic fumes could be heading to the Philippine capital earlier this morning nineteen Manila we've seen some level sounds coming from the main crater and extremely agitated a lot of the leaders of Libya's warring factions are in Moscow to try to cement peace Dale so what can be achieved as Queen Elizabeth house to Harry and Meghan summit why would anyone want to become a semi detached royal it is loosely drudgery meeting talking to people that you'll never get to speak to again it's very very difficult it's not as glamorous as it's made out to be and news asked him Frank's on social unrest in Lebanon all of that coming up after the news the BBC news hello I'm Gerry Smith it's as an unprecedented royal summits gets underway in eastern England the dukes of Cambridge in Sussex have denied a newspaper report that the relationship has solid over the past two years the meeting at Queen Elizabeth Sandringham estate is intended to resolve the crisis sparked by the sun six is designed to wind down that road engagements Johnny diamond looks at their prospects good creating a brand around themselves that is distinct from that of the palace to be blunt commercially that titles are important to them but it's also important to the palace nominal ready there's a clip out on a social media of Harry opinions imports union a jolt for Megan as a voiceover artist from the head of Disney was design all the panelists needs to get some sense of control of things I didn't see how it can make a deal where it doesn't in the and have some degree of control over their lives and that may be too much for them the coating punk is stone has thrown up the death sentence handed down last month to the former president Pervez Musharraf the former president's his company overseas for medical treatment so kinda Kamani is in Islamabad the death sentence handed down to general Musharraf was always unlikely to be carried out not least is he's been living outside of pockets on since twenty sixteen nevertheless it was still seen as unprecedented but both Pakistan's army and coming government strongly oppose the verdict today judges that hold high court ruled that a special court set up to try Mr Musharraf was unconstitutional he had been convicted of illegally declaring a period of emergency rule when faced by protests against him in two thousand and seven five countries that had citizens aboard the Ukrainian eyeliner show down by Ron we'll discuss possible legal action Ukraine's foreign minister that increased I cope said representatives of what he called the grieving nations would gather in London on Thursday he said all those involved in the shooting down of the plane had to be held to account not just the soldier who fought the missile early police in Tehran denied using live ammunition on for testers who gathered on Sunday the leaders of Libya's warring parties are in Moscow for talks aimed at consolidating a truce it's hope for the world to general Khalifa Haftar and the prime minister of the U. N. by two government fires also Raj was signed a ceasefire brokered by Russian Turkey is rains for it it's a continuation of last week's summit in Istanbul where president Putin and Adeline issued a joint call for a ceasefire in Libya nine months after general Haftar launched his campaign to capture Tripoli from the government of national a cold this recognized by the U. N. aside site that tentative truce is already being violated so the hope is that the top commanders will sign a formal documents enabling the ceasefire to stick world news from the BBC this is WNYC in New York I'm Richard hake there's a water main break near Lincoln center it has some streets close and it's causing subway delays the department of environmental protection says a pipe broke on Broadway between sixty second and sixty third street that's also affecting Columbus Avenue number one two and three strings are suspended between times where ninety six street Jen Chung executive editor of Gothamist says the waters making it difficult to move around the area though water is almost a.

New York James camara F. M. H. D. N. A. BBC
Death Sentence Overturned for Pervez Musharraf, Ex-Leader of Pakistan

BBC Newshour

00:43 sec | 10 months ago

Death Sentence Overturned for Pervez Musharraf, Ex-Leader of Pakistan

"The coating punk is stone has thrown up the death sentence handed down last month to the former president Pervez Musharraf the former president's his company overseas for medical treatment so kinda Kamani is in Islamabad the death sentence handed down to general Musharraf was always unlikely to be carried out not least is he's been living outside of pockets on since twenty sixteen nevertheless it was still seen as unprecedented but both Pakistan's army and coming government strongly oppose the verdict today judges that hold high court ruled that a special court set up to try Mr Musharraf was unconstitutional he had been convicted of illegally declaring a period of emergency rule when faced by protests against him in two thousand and

Pervez Musharraf President Trump Islamabad Pakistan
"general musharraf" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:42 min | 10 months ago

"general musharraf" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Overturned the death sentence given of the country's ex military ruler Pervez Musharraf the former close US ally in the war against terror case against the former president and the formation of the court itself hadn't been in accordance with the low the ruling is likely to please Pakistan's powerful military which had publicly criticized the special course conclusions the treason case relates to general Musharraf's imposition of emergency rule in two thousand and seven he's always denied wrongdoing it's unclear whether the current government will now decide to dispute the charges by means of a re trial by another court BBC correspondent Jill lingering reporting a pre dawn explosions rocked central Stockholm causing damage to buildings and parked cars but no casualties Swedish police say explosives reviews but ruled out terrorism news and analysis of townhall dot com I injure me house in travel we've got the answer this report is sponsored by geico fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance Santa Cruz mountains north seventeen at Idlewild three vehicle accident blocking the right lane one of them facing the wrong direction to truck is on the way but in the meantime quite the bank of extending to big movie curve San Ramon south six eighty four crew canton vehicle landed on its side on the shoulder so emergency crews Runcie they're blocking the right lane not much of a delay there San Jose several problems including north eighty seven after airport to vehicle accident on the shoulder then key on ramp to south succeeding a Christmas tree at the top of the ramp and old Bayshore highway on north one one two vehicle accident is off to the right shoulder that's traffic I'm.

Pervez Musharraf president Pakistan Jill Stockholm Santa Cruz San Ramon US BBC geico San Jose
"general musharraf" Discussed on First Person

First Person

12:47 min | 10 months ago

"general musharraf" Discussed on First Person

"Go ahead to two thousand eight e become the ambassador to Washington and at that point what were the most challenging aspects of your job. What was the tension between Pakistan and the US so let me back up a little in two thousand and two? I came to the United States and I came here to Krista the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and then to be a professor of international relations in Boston University and the reason was that I had been a fervent critic off gentleman sheriff and his dictatorship so it became difficult for me to stay in Pakistan. John and I came into a life exactly Musharraf as you know had massive public uprising against him in two thousand seven hundred thousand. Nate new elections were held the civilian government that was elected asked me to become ambassador. Were already based here. I was already in the United States. I literally moved from Boston to Washington. DC to become ambassador rather than moving from Islamabad to Washington at that shifts. Your Life. I mean had you liked being civilian and just teaching young. Actually with hindsight site probably would be better off remaining a civilian because I found myself in the vortex of a lot of controversies after became investor. Of course those who criticise me would argue that you know the fact that I had lived in exile for a few years and made me predisposed to seeing things from an American I who wear as I saw it as being being a little bit more objective I understood what the weaknesses in the Pakistani position. If we were going to build a democracy in Pakistan Pakistan could not be a democracy see and be home to Jihadi terrorist both at the same time. How did they entice you back? Then I mean it seems like you'd have a nice live in Boston but The civilian civilian leadership. I was very close to them in the Bhutto as our our leader and she used to meet regularly. I met regularly. We talked about it so we were the way I saw it. We had an opportunity with Musharraf. Gone the military being prepared to seat bar to the civilians. We could actually build a viable modern democracy in Pakistan and then Benazir Bhutto had been killed as you know and when she was skilled husband husband who became president had kind of an emotional advantage in asking me. You know what I know that you're going to give up a comfortable life as is a professor in the US but this is some very you would be effective and useful environment to become ambassador. And then on the American side. They were a lot of people who said to me. Hey you it would be a good interlocutor to have a life for you. Input killed though. I mean we learn French was extremely traumatic and I felt immense sense of responsibility not Because she had young Children Home v knew very well ask family and because she didn't also have to go back. Doc I mean she could have said. I've been prime minister twice. I'm going to live comfortably abroad. She also went from a sense of duty. Where were you when she was killed built in Boston? And how did you hear about it. Somebody called me actually. I was sleeping early in the morning. Eastern time the phone rang. I answered the phone. Oh my wife had gone to bacchus the Sun She ran for parliament and became a member of parliament. So somebody called me and said done on CNN and done on CNN and the news was so I called my wife who was crying and willink she was at the hospital. been had been brought after that fateful attack one up and so that was partly dri back in that drew me back in and secondly look if it wanted to do something important and something historic then you have to give up some comfort and then in twenty eleven year involved in something that came to be called memo gate. Memo Gate was a label that was invented in Pakistan for something that will not a total fabrication After the whole bin Laden raid a a lot of questions raised about Paxton's conduct as to why Pakistan had bin Laden and the Pakistani military and intelligence services that didn't like my guts anyway because I had already written a book that was published a few years earlier titled Pakistan Between Mosque and military in which I had pointed out that the reason why Pakistan has religious extremists because is the military actually cultivates them for regional political influence so the militant and the intelligence services didn't like me but after the bin Laden raid taught our. We need a scapegoat. We need somebody to blame for why the Americans were able to find bin Laden without us being able to find find him. I didn't want to answer the question. Why was Bin Laden there in the first place there? People doubt that Pakistan didn't know absolutely. I'm one of them so they decided they needed a distraction and in this environment apex American businessmen who lived in Monaco. If I'm not mistaken came up with this allegation that I had asked him to deliver a memo on behalf of the civilian government to Admiral Mullen. Who was the chairman of the Joint Chiefs and add had the MEMEL promised certain concessions to the US if the US helped the Pakistani civilians got the military down to site now the catch all of this is that while there's nothing wrong with the civilian government asserting authority over the military suggesting that a foreign country's military put pressure on the military of your own country. Cut them down to size was rock. I had nothing to with that. Memo the editor of Pakistan's as was quoted in the Guardian is calling it a slow moving coop. Yes exactly so. It was essentially an attempt to weaken can the civilian government by accusing it of seeking American military support against Pakistan's military nine bucks in the military is respected and admired. It's ruled the country for more than half its life. If and even those who don't admire it gone bad mouth even though it's a very politicized institution so it was an attempt to cut civilians downsize. This and eventually I went back to try and answer. The questions of Cassandra went to Pakistan to do that. I was told not to leave the country so I was stuck there for about three months but eventually they had to let me go because they hadn't charged with anything they have no criminal proceedings that participate in. So how long Jonquet just sit there waiting for. Where were you during so during that time I was protected by the civilian leadership of the country? I I was in the president's residents and when he became ill and had to travel abroad. The prime minister kept me in the Prime Minister's House. I was virtually ended attention in the sense that I couldn't leave. Ah premises but I was physically protected against the military to unique situation and the civilian government supported me in my position and my right to actually have all the legal protections that I was entitled to and the military and the intelligence services joining with the hardest line elements of Pakistan's media saying some treason has has been committed. This man you know. Let's just hang him and have a try litter but to actually. I was allowed to leave the country and I haven't done. Since but in January there was an arrest warrant issued Free Cassini coats issue what are known as political arrest warrants pretty frequently and the international community has now figured that out so these are centered around and they tried to get entry turnball turns them down and foreign countries. Turn them down routinely because it's now become such a sad practice it was done against Benazir Bhutto been done against which really every Pakistani political figure of any consequence. Do you live in fear I don't think so I am not easily terrified. So that's one part. The other part is that When has to say what one has to say? I mean what what's going to happen open I don't think that any international court is ever going to on a any of these allegations. These are primarily designed. Do keep the box tiny population from taking some of my writings. And my criticisms cicely lost your country as a result earliest temporarily emperor. Yeah but I'm not the only one I think the people who live there also lost family in Pakistan. I have extended family. That your wife is here. Oh now my wife and children. I want to circle US backed Afghanistan president. Trump's made it clear he wants out of Afghanistan sent will what's the endgame well. I don't think president trump has an endgame. I think he wants out and he wants out and There are people who measure military intervention mentioned by years. And those who do that say. Hey you've been there seventeen years time to come out. My point is that military intervention should always be measured against goose. Bruce what did you go for and to accomplish it or not and if you did not why not. It shouldn't be measured in time in terms of what you ended there. Therefore you went there. Because the United States was attacked on nine eleven of Coniston had become a safe haven for al Qaeda and other Islamist extremists. Jihadi the groups the idea after that was to try and make sure that of Ghanistan image it environment doesn't become a safe haven for global terrorism. They're the US went wrong. Was the Bush administration's mistake of completely trust in General Musharraf in ensuring that the Aja the groups are eliminated on the puck sunny site. So while of Vannes Stan was rebuilding. You ended up having the Taliban reorganized and become a nuisance and sort of CONISTON. Then President Obama made a huge mistake off the so-called surgeon of Ghanistan to fight the Taliban but at the same time announced the data for the vitriol as what that did was it hit the Taliban and Pakistan's supported them game. How Long America will be there the Taliban had a maxim that Milomar who was the founder of the Taliban used to say that the Americans Have Watches v half the time and basically when President Obama announced that there will be a scheduled withdrawal tied to the surge all all they did was told the Taliban to sit in their sort of funeral safe havens envied for the American withdrawal when that withdrawal didn't come the Taliban undecided to increase the heat which has now deserted and president trump. I sing who will stay as long as we need to. But now saying we are in a hurry to withdraw so in every way you look at it basically the US has not really put up the fight that should have been put up to succeed has US lost. I don't think the US has lost. I think the US has allowed the others to be able to proclaim victory by not putting up a fight Nothing has ever been done to deal with the constant back and forth of Taliban and their supplies applies from the Pakistani side of Weinstein's own government has been allowed to go in every which direction the US spent too much money on Afghanistan. We twelve necessary. I'll give you an example When I was invested I learned that there were several studies that were taking taking place here about these standards at which of public schools and I said to somebody in the the US gunman how many do these studies cost? And there's a couple of hundred thousand dollars for somebody doing a study and I said what are these studies about. You're trying trying to figure out whether schools in Ghana Stan should be more like New Jersey. Schools are Maryland schools. Something why don't you understand. You know Ghanistan. Based on before the Soviets game a decent school was a roof. A blackboard some chock a teacher and some books. Why can't we do that so when people here complain that Oh God the US visted and spent too much money in done around to them and say you didn't didn't have to you did that because that's where you make your decisions? It's not the port of this for. You could have done it all at much less cost. And so what has happened now is that. Nobody's thinking about the ordinal reason for going into Afghanistan..

Pakistan United States president Taliban General Musharraf Bin Laden Boston Benazir Bhutto Afghanistan prime minister Ghanistan Pakistan Between Mosque Carnegie Endowment for Interna DC Washington Islamabad John Admiral Mullen Memo Gate
"general musharraf" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

11:53 min | 10 months ago

"general musharraf" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"Go ahead to two thousand eight e become the ambassador to Washington and at that point what were the most challenging aspects of your job. What was the tension between Pakistan and the US so let me back up a little in two thousand and two? I came to the United States and I came here to Krista the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and then to be a professor of international relations in Boston University and the reason was that I had been a fervent critic off gentleman sheriff and his dictatorship so it became difficult for me to stay in Pakistan. John and I came into a life exactly Musharraf as you know had massive public uprising against him in two thousand seven hundred thousand. Nate new elections were held the civilian government that was elected asked me to become ambassador. Were already based here. I was already in the United States. I literally moved from Boston to Washington. DC to become ambassador rather than moving from Islamabad to Washington at that shifts. Your Life. I mean had you liked being civilian and just teaching young. Actually with hindsight site probably would be better off remaining a civilian because I found myself in the vortex of a lot of controversies after became investor. Of course those who criticise me would argue that you know the fact that I had lived in exile for a few years and made me predisposed to seeing things from an American I who wear as I saw it as being being a little bit more objective I understood what the weaknesses in the Pakistani position. If we were going to build a democracy in Pakistan Pakistan could not be a democracy see and be home to Jihadi terrorist both at the same time. How did they entice you back? Then I mean it seems like you'd have a nice live in Boston but The civilian civilian leadership. I was very close to them in the Bhutto as our our leader and she used to meet regularly. I met regularly. We talked about it so we were the way I saw it. We had an opportunity with Musharraf. Gone the military being prepared to seat bar to the civilians. We could actually build a viable modern democracy in Pakistan and then Benazir Bhutto had been killed as you know and when she was skilled husband husband who became president had kind of an emotional advantage in asking me. You know what I know that you're going to give up a comfortable life as is a professor in the US but this is some very you would be effective and useful environment to become ambassador. And then on the American side. They were a lot of people who said to me. Hey you it would be a good interlocutor to have a life for you. Input killed though. I mean we learn French was extremely traumatic and I felt immense sense of responsibility not Because she had young Children Home v knew very well ask family and because she didn't also have to go back. Doc I mean she could have said. I've been prime minister twice. I'm going to live comfortably abroad. She also went from a sense of duty. Where were you when she was killed built in Boston? And how did you hear about it. Somebody called me actually. I was sleeping early in the morning. Eastern time the phone rang. I answered the phone. Oh my wife had gone to bacchus the Sun She ran for parliament and became a member of parliament. So somebody called me and said done on CNN and done on CNN and the news was so I called my wife who was crying and willink she was at the hospital. been had been brought after that fateful attack one up and so that was partly dri back in that drew me back in and secondly look if it wanted to do something important and something historic then you have to give up some comfort and then in twenty eleven year involved in something that came to be called memo gate. Memo Gate was a label that was invented in Pakistan for something that will not a total fabrication After the whole bin Laden raid a a lot of questions raised about Paxton's conduct as to why Pakistan had bin Laden and the Pakistani military and intelligence services that didn't like my guts anyway because I had already written a book that was published a few years earlier titled Pakistan Between Mosque and military in which I had pointed out that the reason why Pakistan has religious extremists because is the military actually cultivates them for regional political influence so the militant and the intelligence services didn't like me but after the bin Laden raid taught our. We need a scapegoat. We need somebody to blame for why the Americans were able to find bin Laden without us being able to find find him. I didn't want to answer the question. Why was Bin Laden there in the first place there? People doubt that Pakistan didn't know absolutely. I'm one of them so they decided they needed a distraction and in this environment apex American businessmen who lived in Monaco. If I'm not mistaken came up with this allegation that I had asked him to deliver a memo on behalf of the civilian government to Admiral Mullen. Who was the chairman of the Joint Chiefs and add had the MEMEL promised certain concessions to the US if the US helped the Pakistani civilians got the military down to site now the catch all of this is that while there's nothing wrong with the civilian government asserting authority over the military suggesting that a foreign country's military put pressure on the military of your own country. Cut them down to size was rock. I had nothing to with that. Memo the editor of Pakistan's as was quoted in the Guardian is calling it a slow moving coop. Yes exactly so. It was essentially an attempt to weaken can the civilian government by accusing it of seeking American military support against Pakistan's military nine bucks in the military is respected and admired. It's ruled the country for more than half its life life and even those who don't admire it gone bad mouth even though it's a very politicized institution so it was an attempt to cut civilians downsize. This and eventually I went back to try and answer. The questions of Cassandra went to Pakistan to do that. I was told not to leave the country so I was stuck there for about three months but eventually they had to let me go because they hadn't charged with anything they have no criminal proceedings that participate in. So how long Jonquet just sit there waiting for. Where were you during so during that time I was protected by the civilian leadership of the country? I I was in the president's residents and when he became ill and had to travel abroad. The prime minister kept me in the Prime Minister's House. I was virtually ended attention in the sense that I couldn't leave. Ah premises but I was physically protected against the military to unique situation and the civilian government supported me in my position and my right to actually have all the legal protections that I was entitled to and the military and the intelligence services joining with the hardest line elements of Pakistan's media saying some treason has has been committed. This man you know. Let's just hang him and have a try litter but to actually. I was allowed to leave the country and I haven't done. Since but in January there was an arrest warrant issued Free Cassini coats issue what are known as political arrest warrants pretty frequently and the international community has now figured that out so these are centered around and they tried to get entry turnball turns them down and foreign countries. Turn them down routinely because it's now become such a sad practice it was done against Benazir Bhutto been done against which really every Pakistani political figure of any consequence. Do you live in fear I don't think so I am not easily terrified. So that's one part. The other part is that When has to say what one has to say? I mean what what's going to happen open I don't think that any international court is ever going to on a any of these allegations. These are primarily designed. Do keep the box tiny population from taking some of my writings and my criticisms cicely believers country as a result earliest temporarily emperor. Yeah but I'm not the only one I think the people who live there also lost family in Pakistan. I have extended family. That your wife is here. Oh now my wife and children. I want to circle US backed Afghanistan president. Trump's made it clear he wants out of Afghanistan sent will what's the endgame well. I don't think president trump has an endgame. I think he wants out and he wants out and There are people who measure military intervention mentioned by years. And those who do that say. Hey you've been there seventeen years time to come out. My point is that military intervention should always be measured against goose. Bruce what did you go for and to accomplish it or not and if you did not why not. It shouldn't be measured in time in terms of what you ended there. Therefore you went there. Because the United States was attacked on nine eleven of Coniston had become a safe haven for al Qaeda and other Islamist extremists. Jihadi the groups the idea after that was to try and make sure that of Ghanistan image it environment doesn't become a safe haven for global terrorism. They're the US went wrong. Was the Bush administration's mistake of completely trust in General Musharraf in ensuring that the Aja the groups are eliminated on the puck sunny site. So while of Vannes Stan was rebuilding. You ended up having the Taliban reorganized and become a nuisance and sort of CONISTON. Then President Obama made a huge mistake off the so-called surgeon of Ghanistan to fight the Taliban but at the same time announced the data for the federal as what that did was it hit the Taliban and Pakistan's supported them game. How Long America will be there the Taliban had a maxim that Milomar who was the founder of the Taliban used to say that the Americans Have Watches v half the time and basically when President Obama announced that there will be a scheduled withdrawal tied to the surge all all they did was told the Taliban to sit in their sort of funeral safe havens envied for the American withdrawal when that withdrawal didn't come the Taliban undecided to increase the heat which has now deserted and president trump. I sing who will stay as long as we need to. But now saying we are in a hurry to withdraw so in every way you look at it basically the US has not really put up the fight that should have been put up to succeed has US lost. I don't think the US has lost. I think the US has allowed the others to be able to proclaim victory by not putting up a fight Nothing has ever been done to deal with the constant back and forth of Taliban and their supplies applies from the Pakistani side of Weinstein's own government has been allowed to go in every which direction the US spent too much money on Afghanistan. We twelve necessary. I'll give you an example When I was invested I learned that there were several studies that were taking taking place here about these standards at which of public schools and I said to somebody in the the US gunman how many do these studies cost?.

Pakistan United States president Benazir Bhutto General Musharraf Taliban Boston Afghanistan Bin Laden prime minister Memo Gate Coniston Pakistan Between Mosque Carnegie Endowment for Interna DC Washington Islamabad John President Obama
"general musharraf" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

04:55 min | 11 months ago

"general musharraf" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"Hello I'm Gerry Smit the Republican leader of the U. S. Senate's Mitch McConnell has cooled Wednesday's impeachment of president trump by the house the most unfair in history he said the Democrats had no Provan guilt just that partisan rage or the last twelve weeks house Democrats have conducted the most rush least thorough and most unfair impeachment inquiry in modern history now they're slapdash process has concluded in the first purely partisan presidential impeachment shows the wake of the civil war the opposition to impeachment was bipartisan only one part of one faction wanted this outcome the house's conduct research a deeply damaging the institutions of American government Republicans wants a quick trial in the Senate without witnesses the Democrats will too cool key White House officials with direct knowledge of Mr trump's conduct the Senate's democratic leader Chuck Schumer accused Republicans of showing blind loyalty to Mr trump the wounds of a dark chapter in Senate history if the Republican dominated chambers fail to try him impartially there's been a shooting near the headquarters of Russia's main intelligence agency the FSP causing several casualties in the statements the FSP said the assailants had been in its words neutralized it said one FSB officer have been killed the BBC's Peter because love is in Moscow from here on the site just a few hundred meters from the key is to be had quarters the territory it's around them by police and no one can go through according to Russian news agencies the people who attacked the she is being the building they will kill and I'm just talk to it yeah he was here it was around six PM Moscow time and he hurts a lot of shows and the people running to him from the plate so he was frightened they decided that something is happening that he runs with the with the people at least three people have been killed in India where protests against the controversial new citizenship law have spread across the country the new law phone strike citizenship for refugees from three neighboring Muslim majority countries so long as they're not Muslim amber senator religion reports in most Indian cities the demonstrations have been peaceful in the southern city of manga Lou police have imposed a curfew in parts of the city after two people were killed and officials that said they opened fire when a crowd attempted to set fire to a police station another protester S. died of alleged a gunshot injuries in the northern city of Lucknow many of the protesters say they can no longer remain silent as prime minister Narendra Modi's Percy was what they say is an aggressively nationalist agenda world news from the BBC okay sounds government has called for the dismissal of the judge who sentenced a former military ruler Pervez Musharraf to death for treason the Attorney General said the verdict was unconstitutional full judgment stipulated that it's if general Musharraf died before being executed his body should be dragged through the streets of Islamabad and hanging for three days the Lebanese president Michel Alan has designated house on the odd as the new prime minister as anti government protests continue on the streets asin B. up of former education minister received enough votes from Lebanese MPs to be chosen as prime minister Sebastian usher reports the new Lebanese prime minister has sandy up is a little known academic which could potentially play to his advantage as a key demand of the anti government demonstrations has been to clear away the existing political system but he faces a huge task first in simply forming a government and then trying to redress Lebanon's dangerously failing economy he would find it easy to win the confidence of the protest is what his nomination has already split the main political factions he's backed by Hizbollah but their suggestions but Sunni parties may not serve in his government the World Bank has warned of rising levels of debt in emerging and developing economies a new report says debt rose to a record of fifty five trillion dollars last year marking the largest and fosters increased since the Latin American debt crisis in the nineteen seventies the bank is concerned it almost half the episodes of rapid debts in the last fifty years been accompanied by financial crises police on the Greek island of say most of use tear gas against asylum seekers angry at that grossly overcrowded living conditions the camp was designed to hold about six hundred migrants mostly Africans the more than ten times that figure I'm now living that and those.

Gerry Smit U. S. Senate Mitch McConnell
"general musharraf" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:52 min | 11 months ago

"general musharraf" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's hard to do that because he says elections are complex in Georgia Athens doesn't think those rules keep homeless people from voting I'm confident that if these individuals like most individuals in Georgia wants the vote they're gonna have every opportunity to vote fewer than ten percent of people registered to Atlanta homeless agencies have voted since twenty sixteen statewide voter turnout was around sixty and seventy percent still those numbers don't capture every voter without a home thanks for males John Edwards steps up to the crossroads Mildren count he empties out a little black pouch to show me all of the documents he's received here and look what I get all right Kane there's a state ID you got your voter card two is the there and a free picture ID just for elections Edwards says he plans to use it you LL always be your voice to be heard because your opinion can affect where it's continues to vote the state won't fly him as an active but for another hundred crossroads clients that's already happened unless they contacted election officials Georgia cancel their registrations in the latest round of purchase for NPR news I'm Stephanie Stokes in Atlanta this is NPR news and good morning this is KQED public radio good morning from the BBC in London I multi ten Lynn with BBC top line a few stories we're following right not a court in Pakistan has sentenced former president Pervez Musharraf to death for high treason the BBC's secunda Kamani in Pakistan says general Musharraf is living and you buy and is not expected to return general Pervez Musharraf with accused of treason for having declared a state of emergency in Pakistan in two thousand and seven if he was facing widespread opposition to his rule despite the fact it's unlikely to be carried out this death sentence is unprecedented elsewhere the number of people in the world forcibly displaced from their homes has risen to more than seventy million many are children who cross the Mediterranean on often hazardous journeys to Europe today the U. N. is looking at the conditions in migrant camps including one on the Greek island of Lesbos their health workers like Angela mode the rally say migrant children are self harming you can see children banking that had against a wall pulling that off and in the age of twelve and seventeen we see children whose starts to top themselves Japan is considering tightening the rules on global tech giants like Google Facebook and Amazon in a bid to help small companies that would ask large online shopping platforms to reveal.

general Musharraf Google Angela president KQED NPR Amazon Facebook Japan Europe Mediterranean Georgia Athens secunda Kamani Pakistan Lynn London BBC Atlanta
"general musharraf" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

03:36 min | 11 months ago

"general musharraf" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"Pervasive sheriff used to be a dangerous man to challenge but today a court in Pakistan and sentenced the former military ruler to death General Musharraf was convicted of treason for declaring a state of emergency to extend his hold on power in two thousand seven. But today's death sentence is unlikely to be carried out. General the Sheriff has been living in comfort and Dubai since leaving power and Pakistan's powerful military seems unlikely to support an effort to hold one of its own to account in two thousand and six president. Miss sheriffs spoke with Carol about his memoirs. At the time Canadian soldiers were fighting across the border in Afghanistan. Carol took the opportunity to ask Pervez Musharraf about British reports that Taliban insurgents agents were getting help from Pakistan who in the British. They don't know anything. I'm afraid they don't understand the environment. They are very new. This very complex environment. Where is the money coming from? They keep getting their money's coming from Pakistan. You think Pakistan has the money to waste on this on the Taliban you think that not the case it is true popular. We want to throw poppy growth years. They're the biggest poppy growers who were the Taliban. Do we understand who were the Talamante month for six years from nineteen ninety five to two thousand one they controlled ninety percent of our planet staff were different Pakistan. We were different. They will want of one's locals know how your disputes that he says the Olive Garden responsibility for some of this and that who takes I want to Hamid Karzai is saying you're blaming US blaming up Ghanistan for producing the Taliban insurgency and you're saying it's Afghanistan at one point theon present cars have to work together and that you both have a problem here. We should work together. But I'm afraid he's not being honest about everything. He's concerned motor himself. Then about Afghanistan he is a Pashtun himself and he knows the realities what is happening on ground. He knows what is happening in the in the ethnic Belco tune. I have never heard. There is support from our side. There's no no doubt there are sympathizers. Because of the ethnic connectivity there are sympathizers they sympathize they wouldn't go across. I never said they don't go across. We need to check them. I have been suggesting many things I have said. Let's put a wire. `Bout wire fence outlet fence area or let us mind every so that nobody crosses. Nobody's accepting that now. This is our sincerity. You talk about yourself as a soldier and you are from Reading Your Book Your Soldier Soldier. Oh you're you've been extraordinarily warrior and a leader in in the military political leader. I don't have how many such wrong notions I noted notions to be political leader or what on motions to political leader. I'm not cut for politics excited. I'm trying to run a country. I thought the countries in total gums. Your field you can defaulted state and life could do that. But politics is not my cup of tea. House Pakistan's former military ruler Pervez Musharraf speaking with Caroline as. It happens in two thousand six today. A Pakistani court sentenced to death in absentia. He has been living in Dubai since losing power. Our.

Pakistan Taliban General Musharraf Afghanistan Hamid Karzai Dubai Carol president Olive Garden Caroline
"general musharraf" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

03:36 min | 11 months ago

"general musharraf" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"Pervasive sheriff used to be a dangerous man to challenge but today a court in Pakistan and sentenced the former military ruler to death General Musharraf was convicted of treason for declaring a state of emergency to extend his hold on power in two thousand seven. But today's death sentence is unlikely to be carried out. General the Sheriff has been living in comfort and Dubai since leaving power and Pakistan's powerful military seems unlikely to support an effort to hold one of its own to account in two thousand and six president. Miss sheriffs spoke with Carol about his memoirs. At the time Canadian soldiers were fighting across the border in Afghanistan. Carol took the opportunity to ask Pervez Musharraf about British reports that Taliban insurgents agents were getting help from Pakistan who in the British. They don't know anything. I'm afraid they don't understand the environment. They are very new. This very complex environment. Where is the money coming from? They keep getting their money's coming from Pakistan. You think Pakistan has the money to waste on this on the Taliban. You think that the case is true popular. We want to throw poppy growth. Has they're the biggest poppy growers who were the Taliban. Do we understand who were the Talamante month for six years from nineteen ninety five to two thousand one they controlled ninety percent of our planet. Staff were different Pakistan. We were different. They will want of one's locals know how your disputes that he says the Olive Garden responsibility for some of this and that who takes I want to Hamid Karzai is saying you're blaming US blaming up Ghanistan for producing the Taliban insurgency and you're saying it's Afghanistan one. What point theon present cars have to work together and that you both have a problem here? We should work together. But I'm afraid he's not being honest about everything he's concerned mode of. Okay himself then about Afghanistan he is a Pashtun himself and he knows the realities what is happening on ground. He knows what is happening in the in the ethnic Belco tune. I have never heard. There is support from our side. There's no no doubt there are sympathizers. Because of the ethnic connectivity there are sympathizers they sympathize they wouldn't go across. I never said they don't go across. We need to check them. I have been suggesting many things I have said. Let's put a wire. `Bout wire fence outlet fence area or let us mind airy that nobody crosses. Nobody's accepting that now. This is our sincerity. You talk about yourself as a soldier and you are from Reading Your Book Your Soldier Soldier. Oh you're you've been extraordinarily warrior and a leader in in the military political leader. I don't have how many such wrong notions I noted notions to be political leader or what on motions to political leader. I'm not cut for politics excited. I'm trying to run a country. I thought the countries in total gums. Your field you can defaulted state and life could do that. But politics is not my cup of tea. House Pakistan's former military ruler Pervez Musharraf speaking with Caroline as. It happens in two thousand six today. A Pakistani court sentenced to death in absentia. He has been living in Dubai since losing power. Our.

Pakistan Taliban General Musharraf Hamid Karzai Dubai Afghanistan Carol president Olive Garden Caroline
"general musharraf" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Big Interview

Monocle 24: The Big Interview

11:44 min | 1 year ago

"general musharraf" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Big Interview

"Live their lives, and how that using to sort of push back. All that in two thousand fifteen year next book came up, and that was democracy. Oh that was a short story. Yes. Gone. I forgot about that. That was a short story I did really for penguin. India? It was part of their kind of turn towards e books. So I did a short story called democracy, which is basically about pervades Musharraf coup but told and fictional form with corporate of wits too. I hope so I mean, I think that's partly how you survive countries like ours. You have to have a sense of humor about things. So yes, it's the story of a general on a plane that's been stopped from landing and then little other stories around the story of a news reader who's go to go on on air until the story of a coup. So yeah that came out into that in fifteen and quite closely based on on the coupe memories are so short. I'm not sure people notice it or you'd have to be a certain age to remember the visuals of that coup, which I was an interestingly, my high school swim team was on that plane with General Musharraf which had been denied permission to land and was circling over Karachi airspace with seven minutes of fuel left before his coup was successful. So I guess we will feel personally tied up the runaways, which is your latest book, which is I think Mike -nificant piece of work, and it's clear that many many people. Agree with me. It's been beautifully reviewed. It has some contested bluffs from some very important people. And again, it's a completely different book. It's really unlike anything you've written before, and it really examines suppose, the Muslim identity young Muslim identity just gives the the premise of the book while the runaways is about not just radicalism. But I think what the world doesn't want say about the radicalized. So it's about the lives of his people very much like anyone like you mean growing up between Portsmouth and Karachi whose lives drift towards this path and the drift for very different reasons. So that several characters, but they're all young most are Muslim and their lives. I think of alien Asian isolation and a lot of millennial confusion. And so it's a novel about pain Vivian how that leads to. Things like radicalism today. I think dislocated in exile is really really important in this unin deed in in the life of anybody who feels that way. This one wonderful line. You you you right now, this is about one of the character's sunny, and his father has left luck now and gone off to live in Portsmouth of places, you write the plane is not strong enough to transport the burden of his expectation across the black waters of exile. That's just such a stunning line. And it just sums up so much of what that feels like. I mean, you go on then to talk about the smell the scent of loneliness, and I think anybody who's ever left their home country. Can completely understand what you mean by that will, you know for south, Asians, especially the idea of exile is so painful, you know, we do call it black waters because you know, at least in the Hindu tradition, which seeps into a lot of Muslim culture to coming from. India does. The idea that you knew you are polluted by leaving your country that your spirit is defiled by exiling displacement. And so people who do it do it on the expectation that something really great awaits them on the other side, you know, something beautiful has to be on the other side. Otherwise, you've just destroyed yourself really to make that journey. And so that that section that you just read from is from sonny's father who who travels really kind of glamour d- by what he sees, you know, in JAMES BOND films on expects that England is going to welcome him. And it doesn't and what he finds. Instead is the loneliness of not being accepted, not being included. I know so the shock of of poverty which exists in England in a completely different way as it exists in India and the absence of community, which no matter how long he's he stays in England four he never quite builds up in the same way on his son's experience the father. Still believes that there might be a place for him in England in Portsmouth. But the sun's experience, you know, as a second or first generation immigrant is that there isn't any place, and he resents his father for dragging him out of his own country where he might have been someone where he could have been amongst his own to this place. Never really rejects him and never really accept him either and his experience, and I've done that it's kind of plot. Spoiler to say that he is radicalized is really out of that that frustration of being in a place where he feels that. He can't flee exist isn't fully seen. He wants to be seen. And I think you really pick up on the wanna use the word zeitgeist here dislike intensely, but the whole millennials guys of needing to be seen needing to be on Instagram to be on Snapchat to be out that to be someone an eventual to be someone who does something terrible. Yeah. There's this incredible culture. I think that millennials. Whether they're eastern or western or radical not radical ascribe to which is this culture of the self, you know, and what is fascinating about today's radicals is that they don't really require secrecy or discretion because they want the same thing millennial in New York or London ones, which is to go viral. And I think in a culture where you have to be somebody. But you have to be that somebody all the time, and you have to followers, and they have to approve of you. And if the like you and you have to constantly be performing a version of popularity or significance. What does that do to people on the fringes of their society? Who are not wanted and desired who are not like, we're not popular. And who don't have something, you know, fascinating to add to conversation. Twenty four times a day every day. I think it drives you to a place of anger, really and powerlessness and that and that can that can create a really bizarre impulse. In return and so- Sanni does feed into that Unicenter. I think tries to find belonging in many different ways. He tries to find in his school. He conned tries to find in his community Kant. He goes to the mosque and doesn't even find it there because they don't understand what exactly he feels so alienated by on. He sort of groomed by cousin his groomed by cousin who comes into his life at this voluble moment and says why fighting here they don't need us here. But there is a place where you can be powerful when you can be seen and that place needs you now urgently on across this for him unin deed for the other the other characters in the book who are drawn over to the caliphate religion, really has nothing to do it. It really doesn't. You know? I think this is maybe what is not clear in the west. But for those of us who live outside has always been pretty clear that the people joining these these. Fundamentalist movements are drawn to it. Not because it feeds into a religion that they ascribe to. But because he's a cults of power and violence and like a ferocious sense of significance. But religion, actually is even according to my five is a is an insulator against radicalism. It's not a feeder to radicalism. And we see it in the news all the time in or the people who go off enjoying these organizations. Don't know the first thing about religion, you know, they're buying the Koran for dummies off Amazon before travelling on the have this kind of diluted Chinese whisper version of something they considered to be a religion, but it's never actually grounded in any religious identity belonging. So how does one address this anti Islam feeling around the world where people uneducated people unthinking people equate the religion with tears way, thinking we're seeing so much of this now after the shooting. A New Zealand. You know, many people are coming forward to say that the media's responsible for a lot of that anti-islam feeling. I think it's it's it's fed by this sort of cabal of right wing politicians. You know newspapers that just want to sell copies, and how do you sell copies of paper? How do you do click bait you terrify people? And so you have to terrify them constantly all the time and the faucets. We do that is to other an entire group of people to reduce them to some some tiny. Terrifying story, and partly why I wanted to write the runaways is to do the opposite of that to say yes, there is filing. There is this problem doesn't come from religion. And in fact, everyone is implicated in that problem, you know, the twenty year long wars in Iraq and Afghanistan are a huge feeder to radical groups. You know, the politics that we see around us, Donald Trump speeches, those a huge feeders. But it's not a slum. That does it. It's not the intrinsic experience of being Muslim. And it's a -fensive. I think it's really wounding too many of us who live in a world that isn't run by, you know, I don't know the sun or Fox News, or you know, we have a much wider experience. And it's sad. Not to see that wide experience reflected in the world around us. So I hope this novel. Does that partly an certainly there many other great writers from bison, India, Iran, the Middle East publishing, and I think we have to read more of them. Absolutely. We are going to read more of you though, because you're working on something new on popular culture. Yes. So the book that I'm working on now is not going to be a novel. It's book of nonfiction repporters on the new global pop culture's coming out on the nut coming up from the Anglo Saxon world that coming from Asia you and I have. A lot about Cape up in planning a trip to go up to career. Oh, we should as we absolutely should. Because I just for the record think we should stay that. We're obviously academically anthropologically interested in k pop while unfortunately being interested in the music. We're going to be blasting the cable craze. Before we go. I have to ask you oversee the serious question, the one you get I'm sure asked all of the time will be the next two in Pakistani parliament, you know, I always have said that politics is something I'm fascinated by always have been. But I had this other love which is books on the written word, and so long as I'm able to talk about the politics. I wish to talk about to my writing, and I'm pretty happy doing that hit the Cape. Hope. That's thank you so much. Thank you. Thanks to say. Book the runaways published by by king the pig interview was produced by Julian go fund research by ROY Goodrich. Christine Evans, and by Kennedy, scarlet and Cusi. Gilpin to Tina go train. Like listening.

India Portsmouth General Musharraf England Karachi Instagram Mike -nificant Donald Trump Vivian Asia New Zealand Christine Evans sonny Middle East Julian Sanni Iraq Amazon ROY Goodrich
"general musharraf" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

31:58 min | 1 year ago

"general musharraf" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"Welcome to the president's inbox a see if our podcast about the foreign policy challenges facing the United States. I'm Bob McMahon. Managing editor of see if our dot org, and I'm sitting in for Jim Lindsey to discuss this week's topic, India and Pakistan. With this week to discuss India-Pakistan relations and the recent violence in Kashmir is Alissa airs elicit, see if our senior fellow for India, Pakistan and South Asia before she joins the afar, she served as deputy assistant secretary of state for South Asia from two thousand ten two thousand thirteen more recently just last year. Eliza published a book on India's rise on the world stage, titled our time has come how India is making its place in the world, Melissa thanks for joining us today. Thanks for the invitation Melissa were were talking here because of a flare up in Kashmir on an issue. You know, all too well, but this last one has gotten a lot of attention because it's considered by many observers to be more serious in decades wise, it the most serious what's going on. Can you talk a little bit about how we got here. There are a couple reasons this is the most serious esscalation between Indian Pakistan in in a longtime. First of all there is a tack a terrorist attack which set off this chain of escalation and that took. A place on February fourteenth. It was a vehicle that was filled with explosives drove right into a convoy of Indian forces the central Reserve Police Force, which was moving troops and material into Kashmir. And this resulted in more than forty troops killed in this particular attack of the same day of the attack a terrorist group, which is headquartered in Pakistan, a group named Josh a Muhammed our army of Mohammed claimed responsibility for this and released video now the suicide attacker, we should talk about this later. But the suicide attacker was from Kashmir the Indian part of Kashmir, but he had proclaimed his allegiance to this group based in Pakistan and created a essentially a suicide video in advance of this attack. But why was this the most dangerous attack? It the esscalation in some decades. First of all, this was probably the most lethal kind of attack that had taken place in Kashmir since let's say. Nineteen ninety nine or two thousand with more than forty the last time. There was a terrorist attack that resulted in significant esscalation was in September twenty sixteen with more than twenty dead's. This is twice the number. The second thing is that once India decided to use airpower which did India launched airstrikes on what they described as a non military target on February twenty sixth so more than a week after the terrorist attack took place the target that they selected was a target that Indian intelligence in the Indian government said had been identified as a place where this terrorist group had training facilities and was grouping planning potentially for another attack. That location was not in any part of Kashmir, including Pakistan-administered Kashmir was actually inside Pakistan, what people often refer to as Pakistan proper. It was in the province of Khyber them qua-. So this was going way. Across the line of control. Now it is unclear whether India's planes crossed the line of control or whether they conducted these airstrikes from what's referred to as a standoff distance. There's been a lot of different information about what actually happened on February twenty six twenty seven th so I think we don't know the answer to that. But what we do know for certain is that the air strikes targeted a location that was within Pakistan itself is sending a message that this is different this time, sending a message. This is different. If you have a terrorist training facility, we will look to take it out. It's all unclear now exactly what happened in that facility where the strike successful. What was destroyed? It's actually kind of morass of varying different stories here, and it's become quite confusing for an outside observer to try to make sense of it. What we know for sure is that there were air strikes on a location across in the province of Hiber Poston qua- now sources attributed to the. Ian government have said they were up to three hundred deaths. The government never made a statement like that. But the Indian media had all kinds of reports early on that made claims like this is not been corroborated by any information on Pakistan side, Pakistan has claimed all along and remember as this crisis unfolded, the first news of it came from the Twitter account of the official spokesperson of the Pakistani army. So having the news come out by tweet was a little surprising. The news that subsequently came out by tweet from the same Pakistani spokesperson account included, some photographs of what they said, we're the locations of where Indian planes had crossed the line of control in Pakistan scrambled their jets to chase them out and that as the Indian planes left in haste, they dumped their payloads, and they offered some photographs of essentially what looked like some dirt and some pine trees Pakistan is not allowed reporters access to the location. So there's been no independent verification. At it kind of ground level. But the Galatian was such that it immediately. It raised a great deal concern on watchers of this situation in the west as well as in the region Schiller because of the detention of further escalation, and then it's often mentioned again between the two nuclear armed rivals. So why why the the concern about this moving so quickly from an air strike to attend some something nuclear it seems to come come into the discussion very soon when involves India Pakistan. Well, it did move very quickly. Once India took the decision to launch again, what they referred to as this non-military airstrike. And by non-military, they only meant the target Pakistan launched air strikes the following day. So that was a very fast cycle, February twenty seventh. We saw Pakistani airstrikes on. What were what they said were targets of Indian military deploys facilities for holding material in that process. Ian, jets scrambled to push out the Pakistani jets. There was actually a mid air dogfight an Indian pilot was down in Indian plane was downed and he ended up in custody of Pakistan for three days, the reason people worry about what comes next as you can see how quickly this escalated, it went from a terrorist attack to a quote unquote, preemptive air strike on a terrorist facility to all of a sudden it another cross-border airstrike that Pakistan launched to having down pilot. And so what would be the next step that that week of these two airstrikes? I was when the world really sat up and said, wait a minute. What could come next now Indian Pakistan both have nuclear weapons they have different nuclear doctrines, Pakistan. Does not have a no I use doctrine. India has a no I use doctrine. I think the question that's out. There is if you have a country that has been employing terrorist groups, not shutting these groups down allowing these groups haven as sensually part of their security approach Pakistan now has the fast. C'est growing nuclear arsenal in the world matched with this. No, no. I use doctrine it raises. The question of what comes next. And so that is what has everyone so concerned in this. No, I used doctrines seen as part is nullified the conventional military superiority that the Indians have visited Pakistan, or that's one of the that's one of the the sumptious is that Pakistan sees this as a way of just sort of taking a little bit of that off the table because they're saying they're not afraid to use nuclear weapons. Yeah. Actually, people who work on these nuclear doctrine issues are now extremely focused on what this means is this allow for deterrence is this not a scenario of deterrence to terrorism activities actually have increased since both countries went nuclear in nineteen ninety eight some people are reviewing there's a very good academic essay recently published that asks whether India is in the process of reconsidering the fact that it has a no-first-use doctrine. What would that mean if they do? So it does raise a lot of questions about the Ma. Title here of possessing nuclear weapons during the Cold War, this was sort of mutually assured destruction right? This was a deterrent to conflict. Well, the situation between India Pakistan is a little different doesn't seem to be an absolute deterrent to all kinds of conflict. It certainly hasn't deterred the use of terrorism. So that that is a real and alive issue that theorists as well as a journalist and security planners are all looking at as now, then return to basically ten status quo in and around Kashmir. In terms of where the two sides have deployed forces potentially some cross-border shooting things like that and crackdown within the various admit certainly with an Indian administered. Kashmir. According to latest reports, right? That's absolutely, right. So things have returned to normal. I'll use air quotes on normal meeting. It's actually pretty tense. It's as tense as it usually is there's been cross border shelling person was killed, you know, civilian in the cross border shelling. This is terrible. That happens with this cross-border, shelling unfortunate. That is how both sides maintain this line of control from time to time. India has crackdown further within Kashmir meaning that they've deployed more security forces certain people who have been part of separatist political movements. Earlier had security protection protection has been removed. I should note that as part of the international scrutiny on Pakistan, and the fact of these designated terrorist groups, still by designated. I mean, the group that claimed responsibility for what happened on February fourteenth is a group that's been on UN Security Council terrorism lists since two thousand one they've been on United States terrorism list since two thousand one so we shouldn't be soft-pedaling. What is was a terrorist group or not? But in any case Pakistan has responded to the international pressure on this issue of ongoing terrorist groups that have safe haven in the country, and they have launched their own crackdown on groups within Pakistan. Now, what remains to be seen is? Whether that crackdown we've seen crackdowns before in other words, as I mentioned, these groups have been on terrorist list since two thousand one. So the fact that we're now twenty nineteen still talking about indicates that earlier crackdowns haven't been to effective. So before we go on further on of the India-Pakistan amick, and what happens next let's step back and talk about the region known as Kashmir maybe establish a few context here. It's it's a it's a region divided into into three parts this point, India, Pakistan, and China actually has pushed under Chinese control. Let's talk about how the partition of Kashmir. And then and then sort of walk us through what has continued to feed the tensions, and why it has been in his been so frustrating and so difficult to resolve Indian Pakistan. Both claim the entirety of what was known as the former princely state of Joe in Kashmir. And it's hard to really do deep dive on this without a map. So we're regretting on the podcast. Not having a map the map really helps so partition divided. What had been British India into Muslim majority provinces some? Former provinces of British India were divided into to create India and Pakistan. Notably the states of job was divided into two. There's an Indian job in Pakistani job, and what had been Bengal was divided into east Bengal, which became East Pakistan and West Bengal, which is still West Bengal in India. Now, not all of the territory of what is today's India in today's Pakistan. Today's Bangladesh was actually under the governance of the British Raj. Dishes, the former East Pakistan. That's exactly right in any case. There were princely states that had the option of where they would like to go to they go to India or they go to Pakistan and the former princely state of Jomo in Kashmir was Muslim majority had a Hindu ruler. Who did not for either India or Pakistan at the time of Pearl's indecision xactly, so it gets so actually Joan Kush Maher was not partitioned at the time of partition what then happened was a group of referred to as tribesmen came across from Pakistan and began to invade the former princely state of German Kashmir, and the former ruler of this former princely state, I keep referring to that to try to be legally. Correct. Contacted the prime minister of India are narrow and said, please protect me will you protect me for which he then agreed to exceed to India. Now, what happened then is that a certain amount of territory was occupied. By these tribesmen. What you now see today what's administered by Pakistan, what's referred to as Gilgit Baltistan, which is far in the north involves the Himalayan range and an area that Pakistan refers to as Assad Kushner that was part of this process. India took this to the U N. There was a UN resolution passed about the eventual outcome of this particular territory, which again, India claims all of it Pakistan claims all of it and plebiscite has never been held in part because the first step that would be required in order to hold a plebiscite would be that Pakistan would have to withdraw all of its troops and personnel from the territory, and it has never done that. So that is kind of a kind of necessary. But that's you often hear for two as the line of control. That is defective order. Right. So that's not defined as an international border. But it is defacto. What is functioning as a border between these two countries fifty miles four hundred. Something like that. It's pretty long it's very long. I mean, it's also kind of if we had a map it'd be easier to explain it goes up at around and then heads up and kind of stops and it stops and disappears because it runs into the Seattle. Glacier, which I it is my understand this glacier is the highest territory in the world where you've got armies deployed. I mean, this is absolutely no man's land. In a sense at the top of the world. So it's terribly complicated. This issue Pakistan, ceded some territory to China. That's a portion that's known is excite chin. It's difficult to see what the eventual outcome will be of all of this. It is in a sense a frozen conflict in that. It's very difficult to see what could be a possible outcome. There have been some peace plans put forward over the years and things have run aground Grammy that seemed most recently that India and Pakistan were very close to reaching a possible agreement. This was actually under when Pakistan had its President Pervez Musharraf, and he. The Indian side it was prime minister, Dr Manmohan Singh, and they had a back channel that was quite effective it appeared as if there was a possible peace solution. And of course, the moon by attacks happened. It was our thanksgiving two thousand age November twenty six two thousand eight and this was another case in which Pakistani based terrorist plotted this attack and carry it out hundred sixty people it was a large death toll sixty six the Indian response was seen as generally restrained. Restrain? There was certainly there were no air incursions or anything like that. So which which is counted in the in the lore of these of the inflection point say there were three wars, I think four wars three focused on this region. Fourth nineteen seventy-one was the secession of East Pakistan component the liberation of what became bungle Daesh. And so as you say there, would they were seemed to be close these are countries with two very different political systems. And I wanna talk a little bit about the domestic. Specht here because it's we're now entering to period India where they've just actually announced elections there. They're very long vast election. Vases phases starts in April. So it's eleven. The point is been made that prime minister Modi is run on the nationalist card a jingoistic hard. Some of said, how do you see that playing into now the tensions that have arisen over the attack in Kashmir and the response, and what kind of position is is he in or what should we expect from him certainly through the election season, the elections as kind of backdrop, certainly creates a context where nobody wants to look weak, and you've got an Indian prime minister who talks about how he's strong and talks about, you know, his chest measurements as a kind of barometer of how he's going to be a strong leader how he's a strong leader. So I think there's that. That's definitely a component. I think also a component hair. Look, India's a very diverse political environment. There are a lot of people who are big supporters of prime minister moldy. There are a lot of people who do not like prime minister movie, but what I see in India right now is sort of across the board. Everyone is very frustrated by the problem of cross-border terrorism from Pakistan. And so I think what you've seen is in have Aleutian. I think from from really the Kargil conflict in nineteen ninety nine moving forward. We're now looking at twenty years of these ongoing kinds of attacks and people in any are fed up. They may differ with their government. They may dispute what the appropriate response should be. But I think people generally feel that diplomacy has not delivered a solution for them that protects their country and stops terrorism. So I think that's also really important operative framework here. It's not only that you have the prime minister who prides himself on being strong, for example. But you've also got a general background where there have been so many different terrorist attacks and people don't know short of what next how do they get this problem to be solved once and for all from a political vantage point, then does how much does does prime minister Modi need to continue to point to Kushner as as these. Elections unfolds throughout the spring. He's laid out a marker so to speak their ongoing tensions to what extent. Do. We do. We see this playing into the elections further. Do we see strengthening hands of Hindu nationalists? Or is it a little bit more complicated than that? If we had just seen the February fourteenth attack. And if the February twenty six airstrike had gone off without a hitch. I think that sort of would without question have strengthened the BJP hand and prime minister movies. I think it became a little bit more complicated with Pakistan's retaliation on every twenty-seventh in the downed Indian pilot, and it just became a more complex scenario in the fact that it's a little bit unclear. Exactly what India struck unfettered twenty six. And again, I think the importance of the red light crossing that threshold demonstrating resolve I think many of these supporters see that as certainly the right step and the strong step. But I think you've got people in India who are also saying, wait a minute. Was this too much risk to take on was at the right thing to do. We're not sure what the right thing to do would have been. But was this it, not sure? So I think you're starting also to see a pretty significant political debate about that in India's. Well interesting, and then I mentioned Pakistan different system have prison Iman Khan still fairly new to the job. But this is a country in which the military calls the shots on. There's this continues to be this kind of opaque relationship to ASO. They I intelligence service. You talk just briefly about Pakistan and sort of decision making as it pertains to the existence because there was a lot of interesting messaging coming out after this attack. Yeah. Very interesting messaging coming out so Pakistan has elections its military plays outsized role both in the formulation of its foreign policy and national security, but frankly, and it's a Konami as well. And it turns out in it's politics as well. So you've really got a scenario in Pakistan where civilians are not calling the shots in Ron con is widely. Believed to have been selected as the military's favored son in the election that took place in July, former prime minister in the UAE Sharieff who had been in power and was disqualified from holding office in his now in prison in a very strange series of events corruption scandal, you see judicial processes that many people allege are actually kind of processes taken at the behest of the military. You don't feel is if there is a strong civilian governance mechanism in Pakistan, and that has been born out over the years. So if I'm Ron con would like to push back on the military. It's hard to see whether he would be able to do that or not on the schrief had done. So and now he finds himself again in jail. It's just a very different context than for India where frankly if civilians don't like their government, they kick them out and vote in a new one you see this all the time in India. You've got a really robust democratic process there sits they are very different systems and pocket. Son's military prides itself on its ability to keep fighting what they describe as the constant efforts by India to weaken, Pakistan. So they're fighting against what they see is an enemy, my own view is that if Pakistan or not constantly creating problems with the use of terrorists any would be focused on economic issues its challenges with China its ambitions on the world stage, and it probably would not be focused on Pakistan at all. Okay. So we've established the arena a bit. What's to the United States in the past anything close to this type of altercation? You would have had high level if not White House level contact coming in very soon, and sort of being involved in in in trying to to create a path to peace in if not pressuring both sides and so forth. Can you talk a little bit about traditionally with the US has done in in cases of escalation between the impacts on. And then walk up to to the present day. The most. Famous example of the United States taking a role in de-escalating conflict was in nineteen ninety nine when Pakistan was another General Musharraf special in nineteen ninety nine Pakistan had a Szekely used what they described as irregulars militants not formally part of the Pakistani army, but it was it was part of this northern light infantry infiltrated across the border in started to look to seize territory. Very northern part of Kashmir this created a situation. Remember the country's had both tested nuclear weapons just a year. Earlier very fast esscalation the world was worried what might be happening here. You ended up having India deploying their forces forward to beat back this four deployed, Pakistan military, they were disguised not in military uniform. But to look as if they were tribesmen President Bill Clinton got involved, he called Noah schrief who was prime minister at the time to. To Washington for what was eight referred to as the Blair House summit on the fourth of July weekend. And he told him that PA is going to have to pull their troops back. This was not acceptable. So that was the first time you really saw a US playing a very strong public role in calling very specifically for Pakistan to withdraw to retreat, and that was a little bit of a turning point in in the way, people in the region perceive, the United States role because the United States had previously had this very long alliance relationship with Pakistan, despite all Pakistan's many problems at a much more strange relationship with India. So that was a good example now after the Mumbai attacks in two thousand eight you also saw a very energized US response you had people refer to shuttle diplomacy Condoleeza Rice secretary of state of the time at a trip to the region of the national security advisor at the time. Stephen Hadley, very involved, very active, if I'm not mistaken, the deputy secretary of State John Negroponte also made a trip that you had very visible. Efforts on the part of the US government to try to de escalate this crisis. And I think what you saw in this case with the Trump administration was either a delayed response or not a lot of focus on briefing out to the media what they were doing. So it wasn't clear. What was happening? If things were happening just keeping people informed of how the US was both regarding the incident as well. As what it was doing to try to to de-escalate, exactly. And that may be a feature of what's happened with the fact that we don't have White House briefings anymore. Writ large not just about South Asia. But on anything and the State Department also has dramatically scaled-back used to daily press briefings, and you hardly see them anymore. So it was hard to know. What was happening? I mean, I I was surprised not to see a lot happening right after the immediate terrorist attack. You saw apparently the national security adviser Basseterre bulletin called his counterpart in India. We know that because he tweeted about it. Then we saw tweet from secretary pump peyot the White House press secretary. And the State Department also issued press statements about this condemning the attack very strong statement condemning the attack and calling upon Pakistan to crack down on terrorists in its country in the Trump administration, and it's move forward with the the warming of ties with Indian terms of announcing they were part of the strategic quad. It also issued pretty strong warning. It's Pakistan and leveraged aid in terms of making tinge it on back San cooperation for what sounds familiar supporting terrorists on their on their territory that were attacking into Afghanistan, right? We'll Pakistan has a problem with terror. I mean, Iran is also angry with Pakistan because of a terrorist group that is responsible for attacks in Iran. So you've got three countries on all of Pakistan's borders that are extremely upset with it for the problem of terrorism emanating from Pakistani territory, so there's that dimension. The Trump administration has scaled back, in fact, suspended all security assistance to Pakistan, pending, a greater evidence that Pakistan is taking steps to really crack down on terrorist groups in its country. You see a kind of? Strong focus on getting the terror issue. Much more under control. Are you seeing other parts of the US establishment getting involved in India, Pakistan issues anymore, say congress, it's usually the executives sort of taken the lead? It seems like on this. But you do see congress taking a bigger role as well is clear that the executive branch did kick into gear with more particularly around the air strikes. We saw the president when he was in Hanoi for the Kim Jon UN summit made made a statement to the press that they were working on something they hope that it would be resolved. And it does seem that secretary palm peyot got into higher gear made calls to counterparts in both India and Pakistan shortly after that Pakistan repatriated Indian pilot who'd been in their custody. So I think that did help lower the temperature on the United States also was working within the UN Security Council. France took the lead on this. The Security Council issued a press statement on twenty second that did speak about condemning the terrorist attack and calling upon Pakistan to do more on this tear. Issue. So you did see much more engagement kind of in the second half of the more dangerous escalatory half of that. We haven't seen action from congress yet in terms of holding hearings or calling upon the executive branch for specific hearings. We haven't seen anything like that yet. Many members of congress issued statements shortly after the terrorist attack. In fact, it was universal that these statements from various members condemned the terrorist attack and called upon Pakistan to more on terrorism. I keep repeating that. But that's also the pattern that you saw actually around the world different governments issued statements that were remarkably similar in that same vein, so congress I would expect to be focused on this. But they haven't held hearings yet. That's where you typically see a deep dive on issues. So as the the US has formed ally status with Pakistan, it's partner status with India. India seems to be more part of the future vision for what caused the Pacific region. Yeah. A big piece of the dope. Pacific framework. How do you see any of that shaping US further US involvement in trying to bring about a better relationship a ratchet down tensions between India and Pakistan? Is it really something where outside powers are only ever have a peripheral role, or is it something where the US can be furthered. India's very clear that they do not want outside assistance in their bilateral tensions with Pakistan. Although India welcomes outside pressure on Pakistan to deal with this terrorism problem once and for all, I think that's entirely appropriate. And you do see now much more of a consensus around the world that this terrorism cannot continue ending the terrorism in Pakistan is a necessary, but not sufficient condition for attaining real peace in Kashmir was we spoke earlier is a large area. There's a, you know, arrested. There's an insurgency that's in the valley area. There are other parts of Kashmir that nobody ever talks about really there's a Buddhist area that's called dock. There is a Hindu-majority area. That's Jomo the part that has an insurgency is is in the valley where the capital is shredder a resolution to this long. Standing problem. Is likely not going to have an outside mediator involved. It will require a political solution. It will require the Indian government of the day to be able to craft a solution with Kish Mary politicians. We haven't yet seen that happen in all these years. It is also the case that over the decades various Indian governments have been used excessive force have talked elections to produce governments in local governments in their favor. It's interesting that the current situation in Joan Kushner is that it is under in India. What's known as president's rule. Previously, the BJP that's the party that's in power in the central government of India was in a power-sharing arrangement with a party in Kashmir called the People's Democratic Party that power sharing arrangement fell apart. So now Kashmir JFK is under president's rule when they announced the election schedule yesterday, they didn't announce a legislative assembly election for Kashmir. So I don't know. Know how long the Indian central government plans to keep it? Under president's rule prisons rules. Not a great scenario, obviously. Because it denies people the self-governance that of course, democracies have. So that's a real problem. There's also been problems of excessive force, and it's a, you know, humanitarian crisis to think of when we see some of these stories the use of pellet guns, for example, in crowd control that have caused blinding and some children when you read these stories in just wanna cry. It's just how could this happen? So India needs to find a way to get to political dialogue with citizens of Jomon. Moore of India who are living in Jamaica Kashmir on top of needing to find some sort of solution to this international issue of Pakistan's claims and finding a solution to that. And I think that's a pretty tall order. I think this is likely to remain a situation of conflict. Unfortunately, it would be better. If there were some sort of a dialogue process between the Indian. Government and politicians and citizens in and Kashmir to work out some sort of solution right now, it just seems to be increased tension. That isn't good for anybody on that sober note. We're going to close up the president's inbox for this week. Thanks for being here. Remember to subscribe to the president's inbox on apple podcasts or wherever you listen. And leave us a review the help us get noticed and improve the show opinions expressed on the president's inbox or solely those of the host or guests not C four, which takes no institutional positions. Today's episode was produced by Zoe calls, the senior producer, Jeremy Sherlock. John Fletcher was a recording engineer and special. Thanks to Corey Cooper for his assistance. This is Bob McMahon. Saying thanks for listening and thanks for joining.

Pakistan British India Kashmir prime minister United States president East Pakistan Indian government Bob McMahon China India South Asia UN Security Council Pakistani army BJP Pervez Musharraf Joan Kushner
"general musharraf" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

06:49 min | 1 year ago

"general musharraf" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"Thousand troops we have less than ten thousand troops. Now. There's a lot of other changes of occurred juicy that one as one of the big areas of progress that Afghan military gets cited repeatedly as the. Or cable for even if they're taking heavy losses. The is that a is that one of the biggest achievements? You think in the last thing, it is one of the biggest achievements. But I believe that the Obama administration reduced the force too much too rapidly. And as a result, the balance shifted. I I believe that what is needed is to adjust that balance. But the key requirement is to get the title on to a situation where that can be a peaceful negotiations and as long as the balance is shifting in their favor, and they believe that times on their side. They're not going to be willing to to to negotiate that's one key requirement. But I think more importantly show over the longer term is what conditions are going to be helpful to promote negotiations and one of the key acquire men. It's is the sanctuary issue in Pakistan as long as there is a sanctuary. We face to choices highest to Harlan help hard than Afghantistan against the Taliban, which may take a lot of effort and time still after fifteen years more time and effort or we need to become proactive in shaping Pakistan's calculations. So that it can use its influence, which is quite considerable to encourage the Taliban in effect until the Taliban will help you to negotiate a reasonable settlement. But we can't let you use our territory to attack coalition forces because not only add forces NATO forces and the Afghan forces. And I believe that we do not have a record of success. Over the last fifteen years in shaping that sort of decision in Pakistan because the various dilemmas that we face in dealing with Pakistani talk about them, Mr. bastard, because obviously the fact of the Taliban have sanctuary in Pakistan has been one not the only, but certainly important factor in their ability to carry on the insurgency, you mentioned the dilemmas of US policy in in Pakistan, being one limiting factors. But I think your broader characterization is I think shared by most people, which is we haven't had a lot of success in getting the government in his Lama Bod to essentially close off the frontier and the sanctuary. It's not clear to me to what extent that is a willful choice by the Pakistani government or simply an expression to their inability to do it. I mean, I don't agree with that that any ability to do it. It's one thing if these. What a few people hiding in some mountain top the headquarters of the Taliban is in a city in Pakistan. It's called the Quetta shoora quite as large city another council that runs the Taliban is based and push. Our again, another major city. I think this is a an excuse often used by Pakistan with people who don't know much about the insurgency and to say, oh, we have a long board. There. We can't we do not control it if they moved against headquarters training facilities. Then the issue that maybe some people can get across the board. There would be more credible. I I believe that the Pakistani intelligence and Buxton military is very Mike knows what's going on. I think they have reasons which we could discuss why may not want to move or why they are doing this. But. If we believe what they say that they don't really know where they are. And they don't control it. It's like the whole time that they were pursuing a nuclear program, and they were denying that they were pursuing a nuclear program. So I don't think that a review can be based help. At least administration is not going to base it through based on assumption that Pakistan may not know what's going on. And that it's territory is being used by the Taliban without the knowledge and support and acquiescence because I also say one other thing that fighting the United States and over a hundred and fifty sixty thousand Afghan troops, his not a small effort takes logistics that the resources it takes training it takes recovery. And you can't do that spontaneous. When you don't with Pakistani officials with officials that you thought were the most worthwhile and speaking to in terms of the power brokers there, we're talking to civilian government. We're talking about SS or the military in particular is the those are the. Ones that that any results. Well, when I was a Macedonia that to what together because you had General Musharraf as the president. I remember complaining a lot of President Bush about the sanctuary because Pakistan was face. Confronting the challenges. Because on the one hand, it was helping us on I'll cry the shoes we would over frying their territory to bomb targets and Afghanistan. We were using landlines to transport goods. So the president was reluctant to come down very hard on shot up who also developed very good relationship with Colin Powell or sectors state and with the president. So finally, the president said to me is all I'm going to do something for you. I'm going to call them and say that you're coming to talk to him because I was giving a lot of details of what was going on in Pakistan, and where the facilities were and kind of where the Taliban where Malone is likely to be and so forth. And so when I went there see president shot was kind to me initially until I got this subject. And and you said they're all new Taliban in Pakistan that was as give me that phone numbers. Give me their address. And I said the same thing that I mentioned a few minutes ago mister president the leadership. Sure is based in Quetta an for and here are the training areas. And he believed the that. No, no. This is not true. This is all. So this is been they show right now. I think just the civilians may be more inclined in Pakistan towards a an accommodation with Afghanistan. The military appears not to be the case and the military is the one that decides

Pakistan Taliban president Quetta President Bush Pakistani government Afghanistan Obama administration NATO General Musharraf Colin Powell United States Harlan Buxton Mr. bastard Macedonia Afghantistan US Malone
"general musharraf" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

06:50 min | 1 year ago

"general musharraf" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"Hundred thousand troops we have less than ten thousand troops. Now, there's a lot of other changes of of occurred juicy that one as one of the big areas of progress that that Afghan military because it gets cited repeatedly as the. Or cable, even if they're taking heavy losses. The is that a is that one of the biggest achievements? You think in the last thing, it is one of the biggest achievements. But I believe that the Obama administration reduced the force too much too rapidly. And as a result, the balance shifted. I I believe that what is needed is to adjust that balance. But the key requirement is to get the title on to a situation where that can be a peaceful negotiations and as long as the balance is shifted in their favor, and they believe at times on their side. They're not going to be willing to to to negotiate that's one key requirement. But I think more importantly show over the longer term is what conditions are going to be helpful to promote negotiations and one of the key acquire men. It's is the sanctuary issue in Pakistan as long as there is a sanctuary. We face to choices higher to Harlan help harder than Afghantistan against the Taliban. Which may take a lot of effort and time still after fifteen years more time and effort or we need to become proactive in shaping Pakistan's calculations. So that it can use its influence, which is quite considerable to encourage the Taliban in effect until the Taliban will help you to negotiate a reasonable settlement. But we can't let you use our territory to attack coalition forces because not only add forces NATO forces and the Afghan forces. And I I believe that we do not have a record of success. Over the last fifteen years in shaping that sort of a decision in Pakistan because the various dilemmas that we face in dealing with Pakistan. We talk about Mr. bastard, because obviously the fact of the Taliban have sanctuary in Pakistan has been one not the only, but certainly important factor in their ability to carry on the insurgency, you mentioned the dilemmas of US policy in in Pakistan being one limiting factors. But I think your broader characterization is I think shared by most people, which is we haven't had a lot of success in getting the government in his Lama Bod to essentially close off the frontier and the sanctuary. It's not clear to me to what extent that is a willful choice by the Pakistani government or simply an expression to their inability to do it. I mean, I don't agree with that that any ability to do it. It's one thing if these. What a few people hiding in some mountain top the headquarters of the Taliban is in a city in Pakistan. It's called the Quetta shoora quite as large city another council that runs the Taliban is based and push. Our again, another major city. I think this is a an excuse often used by Pakistan with people who don't know much about the insurgency and to say, oh, we have a long board. There. We can't we do not control it if they moved against headquarters training facilities. Then the issue that maybe some people can get across the board. There would be more credible. I I believe that the Pakistani intelligence and Buxton military is very Mike knows what's going on. I think they have reasons which we could discuss why they may not want to move or why they are doing this. But. If we believe what they say that they don't really know where they are. And they don't control it. It's like the whole time that they were pursuing a nuclear program, and they were denying that they were pursuing a nuclear program. So I don't think that a review can be based help. At least administration is not going to base it through you based on assumption that Pakistan may not know what's going on. And that it Steph is being used by the Taliban without the knowledge and support and acquiescence because I also say one other thing that fighting the United States and over a hundred and fifty sixty thousand Afghan troops, his not a small effort takes logistics that the resources it takes training it takes recovery. And you can't do that spontaneous. When you don't with Pakistani officials with officials that you thought were the most worthwhile and speaking to in terms of the powerbrokers there we're talking to civilian government. We're talking about s or the military in particular is those are the. Ones that that you're gonna get results. Well, when I was in Macedonia to what together because you had General Musharraf as the president. I remember complaining a lot of President Bush about the sanctuary because Pakistan was face. Confronting the challenges. Because on the one hand it was helping us on the shoes we would over frying their territory to bomb targets and Afghanistan. We would using landlines to transport goods. So the president was reluctant to come down. Very hard on shut up who also developed very good relationship with Colin Powell or sector of state and with the president. So finally, the president said to me is all I'm going to do something for you. I'm going to call him and say that you're coming to talk to him because I was giving a lot of details of what was going on in Pakistan, and where the facilities were and kind of where the Taliban where Malone lot is likely to be and so forth. And so when I went there, see President Musharraf, he was very kind to me initially until I got this subject, and and he said, they're new Taliban in Pakistan that was as give me that phone numbers. Give me that address. And I said the same thing that I mentioned a few minutes ago. Mr President, the leadership sure is based in a an infrastructure or and here are the training areas. And he believed the night that no no, this is not true. This is all. So this has been they show right now. I think just the civilians may be more inclined in Pakistan tours, a an accommodation with Afghanistan, the military appears not to be the case and the military is the one that decides

Pakistan Taliban President Musharraf president Mr President President Bush Afghanistan Obama administration Pakistani government Quetta NATO Colin Powell Mr. bastard Harlan United States Steph Buxton Macedonia Afghantistan
"general musharraf" Discussed on FT News

FT News

07:54 min | 2 years ago

"general musharraf" Discussed on FT News

"This podcast from financial times supported by rocket mortgage by Quicken Loans, introducing. They're all new rate shield approval. If you're in the market to buy a new home, Quicken Loans will lock your rate for up to ninety days while you shop to get started. Good rocket mortgage dot com. Slash f t. Hello from the newsroom of behind times in London. I'm AME roughneck voices and Pakistan when elected new national parliaments on Wednesday on today's podcast, Johnston sing talks to the FTC, Karen Stacey on why the election is being described as Pakistan's dirtiest in years. Kid? Why are these elections particularly important in Pakistan's history? This election is historic for a couple of reasons. Number one, it should only be the second time that one civilian administration has handed over power to another. Of course, in Pakistan that tend to be coups are the people sees power administration's fall apart. So this a peaceful transition of power from one civilian government to another will in itself be historic for Pakistan. The second reason it's very interesting to watch is because the man who was prime minister until just a few months ago, that's no Sharieff who has been prime minister three times. He is now in jail serving a ten year prison sentence for corruption charges. So the battle is on between his brother ship Sharieff an Imran Khan whom listeners might know as the former Pakistani international cricket kept it. So who do you think is going to win? Is this Imran Khan's moment. The polls suggest that it's a dead heat. The PM. That's no one Sharief's party is roughly tied with Imran Khan's PTI. Now in the past, what has happened is that Marin Connors, let these huge rallies tens of thousands big. This happened before the two thousand thirteen election, for example, but then faded and the reason he's faded is because he hasn't got a foothold particularly in Punjab, which is what the peon has. Now, it looks like for variety of reasons including this long corruption trial against Noah. Sharieff. The pianist started to lose its foothold in Punjab. If the PT is able to make enough in roads, it should be able to grab power. However, I don't expect either power to be able to govern alone. I don't think either piety is going to get a majority, therefore in the few days after the election, we'll likely see a lot of coalition haggling. It'll be very interesting to see what other minor parties and up in government also. And what about former prime minister? Beena Zied, Bhutto's Pakistan, peoples spotty. Is that no win the picture Benazir Bhutto's husband. Sally's Dari and her son Bill, I will Bhutto in charge of that party. Now it is nowhere in this election. It is coming a distant. Third. It has a stronghold in Sindh, which is the province where Karachi is. So it does have at least one area it shouldn't lose but is pretty much nonexistent across the rest of the country. One of the reasons for that is as follows. A diary particularly has been facing corruption charges. He denies those charges, but they have definitely tarnished his reputation Bilbao will Bhutto. Meanwhile, the feeling is among most Pakistanis that he's not quite ready for the leadership yet. He's quite a young man. He's in his early thirties and he hasn't been able to make the impression that I think he would have hoped on most Pakistani voters. This has also been called one of the dirtiest elections in Pakistan. Why this election is probably the dirty is not necessarily in Pakistani history, but certainly since two thousand and two when General Musharraf was generally regarded to have engineered a result in his own favor. The reason it's being seen as dirty is that says. All of the parties have said that their candidates are being harassed and threatened and being told that what they should really do is join him. Run cons PTI. Now, there have long been rumors that the army backs Imran Khan, his people deny this. They say, there is no collusion to coin a phrase between the PTA and the army, but it does seem that in certain places, there are people call them the establishment, colon, the intelligence services, whatever who want the PTI to win an using dirty tricks to try and make that happen. Other things are happening also. So for example, international observers, whether from the EU or the Commonwealth spent weeks waiting for their visas to be clear now this never happens. Normally, all of this is dealt with plenty of time so that they can get on the ground and see what's happening before the election. This time around this didn't happen. And in fact, the observers of only been on the ground for few days before the election. They simply haven't been able to look at what is going on. And I think that is more evidence if it were needed that things are going on, particularly in. Areas that are quite anti-democratic. So what will each of the major candidates do if in power? It's an interesting choice. So Imran Khan has campaigned on a platform festival of anti corruption. He says he's going to rid the Pakistani state of corruption. Well, that might be easy to do at the top if you are clean yourself. But I think he'll find it harder to tackle some of the endemic corruption in Pakistan public services. I was talking to a voter, for example, who said that him Ron Carne is going to stop the police, asking him for bribes. Well, I doubt him run con is going to be able to do that at least not in the immediate future. So that's number one. Number two. He's talked about setting up and Islam, ick welfare state. So he wants to boost the tax base and improve public services like health and education, three on foreign policy. He is much more strident in his attitude towards the USA. So this could set up a very interesting dynamic. We already have President Donald Trump in Washington who has taken quite. An aggressive stance towards Pakistan. We might be about to get a Pakistani prime minister who takes a similarly aggressive stance back what that means for cooperation on the so-called war on terror, and particularly in the war in Afghanistan is yet to be seen. But I would suggest that President Trump's push to end the war in Afghanistan by putting more troops on the ground, there will be made all the harder among is in power. Now, what do we expect if Shabazz Sharieff is empower, presumably more of the same agenda as his brother undertook, we expect more financial reform more business orientated leadership. The family are business people, and that's how they've govern the state of Punjab. And let's see what happens. We might also see a little bit of distancing between the civilian government and the armed forces because what you'll have had is a prime minister in Noah's Sharieff who pretty much went into battle with the army, so to speak. He opposed them on things like relations with India and economic reforms, and if his party wins that will put the army in a much week. A position than there used to being. So who knows? Shabas reef might, for example, decide to make a big outreach to India, the kind of outreach that wouldn't have been possible if the army was in control of foreign policy. We'll see if that actually happens. He's talked about getting closer to the army and keeping them on board, but this will put him in a very powerful position. If he does what. That was Jetsons thing talking to Karen, Stacy, the f. t. South Asia correspondent in New Delhi. Thanks for listening. We'll be back with more news later this week. In the meantime, do you take a look at our latest FT subscription offer for podcast listeners which you can find f. t. dot com slash. The right hire can have such an impact on your business. That's why you should post your job. I'm linked in it intelligently targets candidates based on their skills, recommendations, even how open they are to new opportunities, insights that are only on the linked in network. So your post is matched to the best people for the job. That's why new hire is made every ten seconds using Lincoln go to linked dot com slash f. t. podcast for fifty dollars off your first job post that's linked in dot com. Slash f. t. podcast terms and conditions apply.

Pakistan Imran Khan prime minister army Benazir Bhutto Quicken Loans Shabazz Sharieff Karen Stacey Noah Punjab President Donald Trump London General Musharraf South Asia Sindh Afghanistan Marin Connors New Delhi
"general musharraf" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"general musharraf" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That i will i mean meriem novas i'm backed by the military there's a twenty two years struggled behind me her father was no one picked up by the military and made a jeep minister and the prime minister i have struggled for twenty two years if you if if anyone tells you about on twenty nine th of april we had the biggest rally in pakistan's history half a million people turned up when you have people with you you don't need any crutches someone like nevada sherie he was picked up by the army he did not have any number one i want to make that clear secondly talking about the army look the army depends upon the army chief general army would be different general musharraf's army would be different general while who's the current ahead of the military his army's different so i decided gentleman sheriff's army because i did not i was against pakistan sending its troops into the tribal areas okay you get on general budge while the current chief of the armed forces or at you've made that clear then your position on the army i also want to put another thing that is you've made it to tell you why general bhadra i was not bringing any criticisms in general by tomorrow night back just asking you to speak up more about some of the the rocks in apples in the armed forces and the actions that they carry according to human rights organizations another thing that he said about just very quick the i oppose the army going be sent to the tribal areas why because whenever you send army into civilian areas they will always be human rights violations you how can they not be the army's not fighting another army it's in their villages their people human beings living there so i posed the war what general budget by the reason i think that he's the first army general army chief he has categorically stated his he stands with pakistan's democracy he stands with pakistan's constitution and he's trying to clear up the mess created by general musharraf when he sent me into the tribal areas thank you for clarifying that or i want to put to you another thing that he said about your pillow for instance the co leader of the opposition p p p party says that you all the.

prime minister pakistan army general musharraf nevada army general army twenty two years
"general musharraf" Discussed on The Assassination

The Assassination

06:39 min | 2 years ago

"general musharraf" Discussed on The Assassination

"I didn't see the body. They had the coffin back. I didn't want to that. The least pursued could win tonight. Benazir Bhutto's body was in a wooden coffin as an airbase near where she was killed. It was surrounded by his three teenaged children and nearby husband Asif Zardari. We will be. Absolutely. In a days to know what to do. Benazir had to be buried as soon as possible. Put the Bhutto family mausoleum was almost two thousand kilometers away. The militry provided a C one thirty transport plane to get her body and her family in place for the funeral. For Benazir son Balau. That night is still vivid. Eventually we when we the body into a cargo plane, bang, and we flew to sucker airport from the transfer, the body to the helicopter and flew to the Kanas airport. And from there, me and my father went with the body in an in an ambulance. I say ambulance. This was a lodged ten cannon. That sort of Ricky to all the way to our house. And I was in the back with the body innings in the in the front seat. Tens of thousands of Pakistanis were making the same journey to the village of Larkana the Bhutto ancestral home. Many travelled and coaches others on foot, and all around them. There were scenes of fire and fury as people took to the streets violently, protesting the assassination. I was driving my car in London when I heard she'd been killed. My mind started racing with what had happened when someone crashed into me. It wasn't actually my fault, but I was so determined to get to Heathrow as soon as possible. I let it go. Don't worry about it at all. The driver of gotta go. I had a funeral to attend in Pakistan. From the BBC World Service, This is how in bed at Jones with the assassination. All with that, I administration on security at Patasse's off people who want be out of the way. Before dose us as a nation. I've been prevent. What went wrong. This was not. Is secure. The intelligence people knew it. Crime applauded co must be brought to justice. Egner. Episodes seven The funeral. Events moved extremely fast in the hours after Benazir's death. These of source stock hotseat but most of my being a deal with Dole President Pervez Musharraff's immediately declared three days of national mourning youth whom we need. Got don't got this cruelty. He said is the handiwork of the same Turner assume we are fighting. And these intelligence agencies were gathering evidence to back that up. The following morning, A little over twelve hours after Benazir was declared dead. More monitoring phonecalls foresee heard something important. The intelligence agencies were recording it. Mankahlana Guatemalan video ready kicked up, said this to the it was two men speaking Pashtu language used in the Taliban strongholds in Afghanistan and north-west Pakistan. It sounded like one of the men was the leader of the Pakistani Taliban Bartolome assert. The other was talking about a job well done now the assassination of Benazir Bhutto. Whoa. Whoa, whoa. Big. Give me who levy or whether they are men set the Taliban leader. Yes, they were us came the reply. Oh. On the market about what it was a tremendous effort, said, the Taliban leader, They were really brave boys who killed and the reply. When I come out, give you all the details. The cool lost it in little over a minute. A transcript of the recording was quickly sent up the chain of command. On the other side of the world in a television studio in Washington, DC CNN's Wolf Blitzer Show is preparing a major scoop one that would point the finger at General Musharraf fears of an assassination have now come true. And only now can I reveal to you what I know? This is a story. She wanted Blitzer had an email written by Benazir to be released in the event of her death. The email had been passed to him by Benazir's long-time US aid Mark Siegel few days after the Karachi attack. She sent me a very troubling email. Basically instructed me on what to do Schumer. And this is what the emails said. You have to hold new Scharf responsible for this. None of the things that are happening to me could be happening without his green light without his instruction. She wrote that two months before her death. When I got the email, I was obviously very troubled they're called her a back. Said down, you shouldn't be thinking this way And she said, while I am And then I and I said, Well, why me why this is? This is a pretty heavy responsibility. And she said because I know you would know what to do when you wouldn't be afraid to do it. You sorted Wolf Blitzer. Yes. So that he would just waiting to see what up by goes. I was hoping I would never hear about it again. That Bhutto's request Mark Siegel, forwarded that email to me today received it back on October twenty six but he told me I could not report. I'm it Unless Bhutto was killed.

Benazir Bhutto Wolf Blitzer Taliban Pakistan Asif Zardari Mark Siegel Benazir Scharf General Musharraf Bhutto family mausoleum Schumer BBC World Service Kanas Ricky Patasse London Turner Washington Dole President Pervez Musharra Afghanistan
"general musharraf" Discussed on The Assassination

The Assassination

05:26 min | 2 years ago

"general musharraf" Discussed on The Assassination

"The US cable say President was Sheriff's national security adviser, fighting the US ambassador the day before the planned rally The US to get Benazir to call it off. So the ambassador did cool Benazir to express quote deep concern for her security. Benazir's reply is pretty amazing. She said she expected to be it. But I will precede she said the goal ended. If Benazir couldn't be dissuaded she could be stopped. Police backed by armored vehicles. Cordoned off our home before she could leave for the rally. So now Benazir Bhutto was under house arrest her home surrounded by barbed wire. Can I get blockades that again? Of course, Still the cameras came to her like moths to a flame Nazi of Ocis behind barbed wire in this house arrest giving interviews to the global media, Rome so sky. And this is an American reporter who was in close contact with Benazir almost acting as a comfy Dole. And suddenly Bhutto is being seen as the vessel of democracy in this most troubled region of the world, the stuff of hope marches around the world. But also in Pakistan. Her number start to rise. She sang and the phone. 'cause we talked at night. She said Iran, It's amazing people see democracy in me. So we have many conversations late at night, and she was thinking about the history of social unrest and civil disobedience talking about Martin Luther King in Mahatma Gandhi. What did they do? How did they manage moments of crisis? Not different so much as the one I'm in. That was what was going through ahead. Indovest I know to New York paper then three r Imach. Uting that she the next prime minister of Pakistan. Benazir's rising stock rattle General Pervez Musharraf. I don't know who has given you this impression How you have conquered this, what she asked windy, like if party wins the elections. Dan only really going to other stayed away there to see who is going to be the prime minister. It was clear. He really didn't want her around. In fact Benazir Amber Sheriff had been thrust together in a deal brokered by the. British and the Americans, the western powers thoughtless Sheriff was losing legitimacy, and that was undermining his capacity to implement his pro-Western security policies. If he could bring Bhutto onboard, That would give him the support base he needed. Remember, Benazir had fled Pakistan to avoid a string of corruption charges against her. The Sheriff ah, taken power in a coup resumes Charvis a leader with great courage and vision must Sheriff. It enjoyed American patronage under President, George W Bush and his nation is a key partner in the global coalition against terror. So really they wanted Benazir to keep the sheriff in power. I was aware of the secret negotiations at the time and thought it could never work. Benazir has ever wanted one job in Pakistan the top one So to within the sheriff and they despised each other. So how could they work together? Curious as to how the UK had come up with such a tough plan. I submitted the Freedom of Information request, an FOIA to the foreign office, asking for papers relating to the negotiations. Officials routinely blocked these requests and I didn't expect to get at a thing. But I learnt from a contact inside the system that the Minister responsible approved my request. It was too good to be true. But then senior civil servants blow up the request without telling the minister. I know this because my insight source told me what was going on. But I couldn't complain without compromising by Seoul's so afraid I had to let it go. The. In November two thousand seven in the face of mounting pressure from Benazir and others, General Musharraf ended the state of emergency and agreed to stand down as the head of the army. Let me. That was a big ceremony. It marked the beginning of much Sheriff's slow march from power. Resource

Benazir Benazir Bhutto Benazir Amber Sheriff Pakistan General Musharraf prime minister house arrest US President Dan Seoul Martin Luther King New York Iran Mahatma Gandhi reporter UK George W Bush Uting partner
"general musharraf" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"general musharraf" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"What a few people hiding in some mountain top and the headquarters of the taleban is a city and pakistan it's called the quetta sureau quite the that lower city another council that runs the taleban his base than push our again another major city i think this is an excuse often used by pox on with people who don't know much about the insurgency and to say all we have a long border there we can't we do not control it if they move against headquarters the training facilities then the issue that maybe some people can get across the board there would be more credible i believe that the pakistani intelligence and pakistani military is very might knows what's going on i think that they have reasons which we could discuss why they may not want to move water why they are doing this but if we believe what they say that they don't really know where they are and they don't control a dislike the whole time that they were pursuing a nuclear program and they were denying that they were pursuing a nuclear program so i don't think that a review can be based i hope at least administration is not going to base its review based on assumption that on may not know what's going on and add that tori is being used by the taliban without the knowledge and support than we essence because i also say one other thing that fighting the united states and the over one hundred and fifty sixty thousand afghan troops he's not a small effort it takes logistics it takes resources it takes training it takes recovery and you can't do that spontaneous you deal with pakistani officials with officials are you saw were the most worthwhile and speaking to terms of the powerbrokers there were talking civilian government we're talking about isis or or the military in particular those are the ones that are really results well when i was the ambassador to work together because you had general musharraf as the president at a member complaining allowed to president bush about the sanctuary.

taleban quetta nuclear program tori united states musharraf president pakistan bush