35 Burst results for "General Electric"

GE, AerCap join air leasing businesses in $30 billion deal

Noon Report with Rick Van Cise

00:21 sec | Last month

GE, AerCap join air leasing businesses in $30 billion deal

"General Electric has reached a deal to combine its jet leasing business with rival air cap. In a deal valued at $30 billion As G moves to reduce its debt load. The creation of a new industry giant could mean airlines get better deals on planes has a larger leasing company from Wrangel. Lower prices from Airbus and Boeing. Shares of G, though, are tumbling 4.7% Today. It

General Electric Airbus Boeing
How your brain responds to stories -- and why they're crucial for leaders

TED Talks Daily

04:36 min | 3 months ago

How your brain responds to stories -- and why they're crucial for leaders

"Maria walked into the elevator at work. She went to press the button when her phone fell out of her hand. It bounced on the floor and went straight down that little opening between the elevator in the floor and she realized it wasn't just her phone. It was a phone wallet that had her driver's license her credit card her whole life. She went to the front desk to talk to ray. The security guard. Ray was really happy to see air. Marie is the one of the few people that actually stocks and says hello to him each day in fact she's one of these people that knows your birthday and your favorite food and your last vacation. Not because she's weird she just genuinely likes people like some to feel seen she tells ray what happened and he said it's going to cost at least five hundred dollars to get her phone back and he goes to get a quote while she goes back to her desk twenty minutes later he calls her and he says maria i was looking at the inspection certificate elevator. It's actually do for its annual inspection next month. I'm going to go ahead and call that in today and won't be able to get your phone back in. I won't cost you anything the same day this happened. I read an article about the. Ceo of charles schwab while turbine injure he's describing his straight a career at university going into his last exam expecting ace it when the professor gives one question. What is the name of the person that cleans this room. And he failed the exam. He had seen her but he had never met her before. Her name was dottie. And he made a vow that day to always know the dadis in his life. Because both walter and maria understand this power of helping people feel seen especially as a leader. I use that story back. When i worked at general electric. I was responsible for shaping culture and a business of ninety thousand employees in one hundred fifty countries and i found that stories. Were such a great way to connect with people and have them think. What would i do in this situation. would i have known dotty or who are the dadis. I need to know in my life. I found that no matter. People's gender or their generation or their geography in the world the stories resonated and worked but in my work with leaders. I have also found. They tend be allergic to telling stories. They're not sure where to find them or they're not sure how to tell them or are they think they have to present data that there's just not room tell story and that's why i want to focus today because storytelling data is actually not this either or it's an an actually create this power that connects you to information differently to understand how we have to. I understand what happens. Neurologically when you're listening to a story and data so as you're a lecture or you're in a meeting to small parts of your brain are activated. We're an again broke his area. This is where you're processing information and it's also why you tend to forget fifty percent of it right after you hear it when you listen to a story. Your entire brain starts to light up each of your lobes will light up as your senses and your emotions are engaged as i talk about a phone falling and hitting the ground with thaad your in your temporal lobes are lighting up as though you're seeing that fall phone and hearing it hit with the side. There's this term neural coupling which says as the listener your brain will light up exactly as mine is the storyteller. It mir's this activity as though you are actually experiencing these things. Storytelling gives you this artificial reality if i talk to you about like walking through the snow and with each step. The snow is crunching under my shoes. And big wet flakes are falling on my cheeks. Your brains are now lighting up as though you are walking through the snow and experiencing these things it's why you can sit in an action movie and not be moving but your heart is racing though. You're the star on screen because this neuro a coupling has your brain lighting up. Though you were having that activity as you listened to stories you automatically gain empathy for the storyteller the more empathy. You experience the more oxytocin is released in your brain.

Maria Charles Schwab Marie Dottie RAY General Electric Walter
AI for Translating Enterprise Content - with Spence Green of Lilt

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

05:38 min | 4 months ago

AI for Translating Enterprise Content - with Spence Green of Lilt

"So i know. We're gonna be talking about ai for translation and clearly. That's a a workflow that you folks are impacting. Get an understanding of what it looks like. Now you get a big brand like an intel or some some large company. That's got localize all their web content. How do they do that with people. Sure so dan let me let me. I tell you a story so you can understand what the motivation for doing. This translation is so most people today are familiar with google. Translate and use it when you browse the web and you could translate chrome or you use it on your phone and you'll see this in a lot of consumer devices and that's really useful for these consumer use cases where you on translate a sign you see on the road or you see a restaurant menu or you just want to get a gist of a web page of language that you don't speak okay so that not as widely used. Google translate has had enormous impact. And everybody's familiar with that. The second case. I think it more. Broadly is in business and so our motivation for building. This company was experience. I had about fifteen years ago. I was living overseas in a country. A non english speaking country Were but were. Linguists was spoken as lingua franca. And i had a friend who didn't speak english but spoke the native language of this country and he told me that he was paid less and could not get a job because he didn't speak english. And this occurred to me as a sort of inequality that we don't talk about very much are you can learn a language but you can't control your native language. If you don't speak english it's a barrier to opportunity undertake percent okay so taking that as the premise. Now take got to business. Businesses sell their products and services. And they wanna make those available to people in different languages so that they can do their job so that they can do research for products so that they can learn and presently the way that that is done is by hiring people to type translation. There's assistance used but for the most part it's just hiring human translators to translate much the same way that transition has been done since i don't know before agricultural so what we wanted to do and no machine translation was used so this was about twenty ten when we were learning about this problem. So what we are initial idea was to emma and i met working on google. Translate to take that technology and art meant what translators do the translation. Problem is not a solved problem so we can't fully remove the human translator but we can certainly amplify what they do and if we can do that then we can make it much more affordable inefficient for companies to make all of their information available to anybody who wants it and so for comparison right now companies pay about eighty dollars for an eight and a half by eleven one and a half spaced. Page of twelve point type. So it's very very expensive. Let's ten yeah. Yeah and so we wanna use technology to drive that price down so that for a fixed budget. Companies can localize more of their information. That's good for them. They can grow their business. And it's good for the world because more people have access to the products and services that you and i take for granted. Yeah so. And i guess there's like the equality element here that you're sort of bringing in on the side but clearly it's just like if intel wants people in japan to read their stuff. There's that benefit to right. We were in english primarily we can. We can move our product. Yeah that's right. There's there's four hundred no there's about four hundred million native speakers of english there's about another seven hundred million l two speakers and then there are a couple of hundred million speaking for language. You're talking one and a half million people in the world that speak english that leaves what five and a half billion humanity. Yeah regarding of humanity right so it's it's not just for positive social impact. We're capitalists and this is an opportunity for businesses to to grow their son of customers at eighty bucks a page. I mean that's a business opportunity right the folks that we've seen working on translation of all kinds of pick their lane. Your lane seems to be sort of digital asset. So maybe we'll walk through what that looks like now. So let's say a big company knows a general electric you know they're they're got a new jet engine in they're going to sell it around the world as do normally they're going to create their when it's web pages it sales collateral you probably know the list and then and then they would hire their team of people hopefully have a relationship with who are going to a really nice fine comb job at eighty bucks a page of four for all those different assets that more or less what it looks like now. Yeah that's exactly right. So typically a business will decide we're going to do business in these markets and that's a business decision and then the choices which of their of their english experience because usually companies translating out of english four. You're going to make available in that market and so for example. One of our customers is intel. Everybody knows intel's products and intel sales. They look lies into about sixteen languages right now. And so that's everything that's until dot com product manuals technical specs marketing materials. Everything having to do with intel's products and services and it turns out that despite the fact that translation so expensive it's typically less expensive than offering new content from scratch every day work in the second sort of operational constraint is companies generally want a consistent brand across their products and services. If you're offering things in different locales you've got a lot more people involved. It's very very difficult to control the brand so it's much easier to author in one language. Control the brand messaging there and then localized into a bunch of different languages. So that's kind of the business. Motivation for

Intel Google DAN Emma Japan
Customer Experience in the Digital Age

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

04:53 min | 5 months ago

Customer Experience in the Digital Age

"Talk a little bit about this. This idea of towards an ai. I operating model. Obviously a lot of people are familiar with it's on the minds and lips of so many different executives and certainly especially technology executives. But why this topic and why ranted around the operating model aspect of his as well. yes sure. so it's been clear for a while. Now that many organizations are at somewhat of an inflection point in the realm of digital transformation with here are our clients talking about this amongst their leadership teams and we hear captains of industry like tom. Siebel another recent guests on the podcast characterizing the last twenty years as an era of mass corporate extinction for those companies that failed acknowledged that the shifting digital landscape he says something like fifty two percent of companies in the fortune. Five hundred have fallen off the list since two thousand So at the center that's inflection. Point in the surrounding discussions are a lot of digital technologies The one that we've found to be most prominent is artificial intelligence undoubtedly a trend. We've been monitoring and witnessing for some time now however Leading up to our Digital symposium in july. We noticed the the conversation around a it was a evolving Specifically it was shifting from promising use cases in functions and business units to grander scale transformations so companies. Were rethinking as you said. The entire operating model in the name of ai redefining the seems the structure of the organization to break down data silos and standing up in a lot of cases entire Auctions dedicated to identify piloting and scaling. Those use cases that were most promising Symposium in july we survey about one hundred global cio hypothesis and found that. Two-thirds had already spun up dedicated teams or entire functions to focus on identification pilot than scaling of a i use cases and for those who more yet to do so sixty sixty percents that it was actually on the roadmap so this trend originally coined as shifting to a i i buy. Google was getting legs and we wanted to capture some characteristics of organizations that are effectively navigating the shift. You're very interesting. Talk a bit about the two executives that you you interviewed palo arbor from ten healthcare. Chris gates from all states a a leader in the in the health. Space a leader in the insurance space. Talk a bit of balance. Why them and why their stories were compelling sure. While starting in the aggregate healthcare and insurance or two of the most data heavy industries and generally where there's data there's opportunities to make products and experiences more intelligent and more automated in the case of gala the cio tenant healthcare there there's an ocean of clinical and claims data available from speaking with her in the past i know they're laser focused on synthesizing that data combining it with voice of the customer analytics to help improve the patient experience and enduring the panel. She shares some really interesting nuances on how to pursue without undermining the importance of the the human side of the patient physician interaction and then just recently under the pressures of covid nineteen. She has truly demonstrated her ability to lead in a crisis and spin up new data driven solutions in near real time to help manage these most unusual circumstances and then chris gates Chief technology officer at allstate is representing a company. That is no stranger to doing innovative things with data in the space of insurance The drive wise program for example that monitors driver dilemma tree data and offers rebates to those that exhibit behaviors on the road or the similar but different mile wise program that provides a pay as you go metered billing model for auto insurance both truly examples of creating new business models on the platform data in a i and outside allstate Chris just a truly dynamic leader that brings insights and experience colored by his leadership posts at other formidable companies such as a i g under armor and various business units general electric

AI Siebel Palo Arbor Chris Gates TOM Google Allstate Chris General Electric
"general electric" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

04:18 min | 6 months ago

"general electric" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"In other words, a way of making talking pictures and the formation of RKO Pictures itself is a great story that ties directly into our history of Arcia. So the development of the sea a boat a phone technology would date back to the early 19 twenties. There was a man named Charles A Hoxie, who was working on recording Audio two photographic film as a project for General Electric, which you'll remember was one of the founding partners that created Garcia. The Hawk sees work at that time was more about preserving audio recordings for playback, not necessarily as a way of creating talking pictures but just recording audio in itself. But by the mid twenties, General Electric was thinking about applying. Hawkes is work in the direction of talking pictures. Now the desire to match sound to moving images. Dated back to the earliest moving pictures. Edison himself worked on this challenge, and a lot of different companies were taking various approaches to this problem. So, for example, Warner Brothers had created a system called Vita Phone via phone. You would record a soundtrack onto a disk similar to an LP record. And when you are ready to play the film, you would synchronize the film playback with the audio from the desk. So that was a pretty primitive approach. But it was how some early talking pictures were made, including the first one. The jazz singer, which debuted in 1927. RC a photo phone used a totally different approach. The sound was recorded in a narrow band on the side of the frame of film some actual photo reactive film, The band would be out of you. When the film was put through a projector. There is a frame on a projector that covers up the edges of the film. And the audio track is on one of those edges. The wits of this strip on the side of the film varies with the frequency of the sound that was recorded onto the film. So essentially, you have sound that's transmitted into a microphone. It is turned into an electric signal, which in turn is used to treat this this photo reactive films so that it has this Record of the frequency. It's almost like a wave form. If you were to think of that, you know, in the modern sense if you were to look at an audio file on audio editing software, so then when you're playing it back You have a bright lamp that shines light through this narrow strip and you have a photo cell that picks up the light that's coming through, and it generates an electric current that matches the amount of light that's hitting the photo cell. And that signal goes to a pre amplifier which can then boost the signal strength so I can go to an amplifier and then ultimately speakers. The lamp for reading This optical sound and the photo cell are not in the same position as the projection lamp that would just get in the way. So this is actually It creates something of a challenge. It means that the soundtrack is offset from the actual frames of the film itself. The soundtrack is either running a little ahead or a little behind the action of the film, depending upon The method that was actually used so and playback. It's all synchronized. Because if you as long as you put the film through the right type of projector, the audio track gets read through the audio system. At the same time as the video or the film. Rather, the images are being projected through the projection lamp, and it all gets synchronized together. So in playback, it's synchronized. But if you were to look at the film itself, like if you took the film out of the projector And you held it up to the light. And you saw where the audio track is. The audio you were looking at would not be the audio that occurs and synchronization with the image you're looking at. The advantage of that approach. Was that all the synchronization would be done beforehand. You didn't have to set up a disc and a film in separate chambers to try and match up to each other. It was all in one. Piece of film. But the format itself changed several times, sometimes with the optical soundtrack, running ahead of the actions of those behind the action..

RKO Pictures General Electric Charles A Hoxie Vita Phone Warner Brothers Arcia Garcia Edison Hawkes
Breaking Through as a Challenger Brand in a Dominating Industry with Michael Landa

Entrepreneur on FIRE

04:21 min | 7 months ago

Breaking Through as a Challenger Brand in a Dominating Industry with Michael Landa

"Michael say what's up to fire nation and share something interesting about yourself that most people don't know probably feared asked people my office they would not know was trying to think earlier is one thing that they definitely would not know about me and that is that up until about I'd say probably a couple of years ago I could still do a standing backflip in my office. So Yeah. I kinda grew up as a competitive gymnast when I was in high school and then I was non-american swimmer. So I mean swimming was really my main sport. But I competed a lot on the floor exercises in gymnastics as well, which is something people most people don't know about me. I've just always had this feeling that if I ever tried a standing backflip immediately tear my MC l. that's just a thought that I I don't know why I had that thought that's why I said for years ago try. Not Going to happen. So fire nation as I shared the talking all about teaching an old dog new tricks and my guest today has launched a company called New Loewe, which is a combination of the words nutrition and love. So that Super Cool New Loewe and why Michael I mean, you went to business school why did you decide to start a pet food company before the PETRIE company? Kind of the Genesis of the Food Company was a company I started? Before new I, I'd spent the early part of my corporate career working for big companies. I used to work for is your oxen in General Electric, and then most recently with universal studios in. Two thousand one that I was in L. A. and I was taking a quick break and. I found I. Don't know how many of you have been through the experience of trying to find a pet sitter for your pet. I went through an experience, sperry the detail, but basically led me to leave universal and start what became the nation's largest at home pet sitting dog-walking training business. Is based in Los Angeles and we. I spent about a decade running that company and was it was in and of itself was a really cool business about one, hundred, eighty five. Pet Sitters dog walkers doing roughly eleven thousand a month all over Greater La, and you know the significance of that was I was you know we're on the front lines of feeding a large population of dogs and cats whether parents were traveling and over the course of the decade I really started to see a huge demand for pet sitters who could administer at home insulin shots, and this is for diabetic dogs and cats, and we eventually it started to stress the business where I couldn't hire that tax and and trained my sitters to give shots fast enough and you know one thing I was trained academically as a biomedical engineer. So I I can be annoying and in my ability to kind of. Dig for root causes and that's exactly what I did in this case is you know I started asking myself like what what's happening why are so many pets getting sick why are so many dogs and cats getting diabetes and? I went out and talking to vet schools and scientists around the country and you know what I learned wasn't I'm GonNa say it wasn't really rocket science but it was you know essentially that are pets are living in in their own version of fast food nation we have you know we we have a country where four. A large large conglomerates control over eighty percent of the pet food sales in the United States and you know these are the very companies that make candy, chocolate, Jelly and cereal right. These are these are the four that control eighty percent of our pet food distribution the US. So you know. Really. The majorities are really low in meet their high in carbohydrates, these high glycemic ingredients. They're marketed very well but unfortunately, dogs and cats can't use the food for themselves otherwise, they choose products that are high in meat. That's one of the reasons you know I. Before I even gave it much thought I was leading Los Angeles moving to Austin Texas and I started new Loewe with the objective of creating a food platform. That's more species Pacific for dogs and cats at high in meet low in carbs and look like

Food Company Los Angeles New Loewe Michael Universal Studios Diabetes General Electric United States Petrie Company Austin Texas
The Club

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

03:57 min | 9 months ago

The Club

"Welcome to kiss myths and Mystery Syam, your host Kit crump today, the Bohemian Grove and a little bit about secret societies. Perhaps, you belong to a club some time in your life maybe the girl Scouts or cub scouts I was a cub scout many clubs have rules and regulations that go no further than the halls were the members gather like the elks however organizations like the PTA Parent Teacher Association can affect schools, school districts therefore students the reach and impact of. These organizations are limited and generally they're intent is not secret records of meetings of the scouts, elks in the PTA and many other clubs are available to the public. But there are many secret societies out there Yale's skull and bones founded in eighteen thirty two and has had both bushes Teddy Roosevelt and his cousin Franklin as members but a complete list of members is difficult to acquire and the intent of the club impossible to know Dan there is the barbarian aluminum. An lighten era secret society founded may first seventeen seventy, six. The BILDERBERG group is so secret that is considered by many to be a shadow world most secret societies, clubs and organizations so far flung with headquarters in different cities around the world. But the Bohemian Grove is located on two thousand, seven hundred privately owned acres located in Monte Rio California and established eighteen seventy two security at the grove is year round ex-military hired to keep out the curious high end equipment including thermal night vision cameras, and motion detectors are used. As. Part of the sophisticated detection and alarm system, they have ceremonies with strange names like the yearly cremation of care ceremony. It was revealed by a California judge during a discrimination suit brought against that grow by the California Department of Fair Employment and housing over the club's refusal to hire women when the judge that issued decision in favor of the club's practice of not hiring women stated the club members urinated in the open and that hiring women would alter the members behavior odd ceremonies and members strange conduct aside members like those. Of Yale are rich and powerful pictures of President Reagan and Nixon indicate they were members. Also, the Grove is particularly famous for a Manhattan Project Planning Meeting this took place there in September of Nineteen, forty two, which subsequently led to the atomic bomb those attending this meeting include Ernest, Lawrence j Robert, Altman Heimer, the s one executive committee heads such as presidents of Harvard Yale and Princeton along with representatives of standard, oil general, electric as well as various military officials. All members at the time oppenheimer was not an s one member. Although Lawrence, an open heimer hosted the meetings grow members take particular pride in this of and often relate the story to new attendees. However, other behavior at this famous campground has led to numerous claims and even some parody in popular culture. One such documented example was former president Richard Nixon's comments on May Thirteenth Nineteen seventy-one recording the Bohemian Grove which I attended from time to time. It is the most Fag God damn thing you could ever imagine now that's a quote from Richard, Nixon was recorded may thirteen nine, hundred, seventy one. Author, Brad Meltzer hosted a program for the history channel. It was called history coded. He hosted a team of three and during one episode sent to to infiltrate the Hebron. Grove. With the disastrous result, they were all arrested.

Bohemian Grove Richard Nixon Brad Meltzer Pta Parent Teacher Association PTA Kit Crump Lawrence J Robert California Department Of Fair Yale President Reagan California Teddy Roosevelt Monte Rio California Bilderberg Harvard Yale Oppenheimer Altman Heimer Hebron President Trump DAN
Guest Teacher  Alain Hunkins  How to Increase Your Impact and Influence by Building Your Credibility

The $100 MBA Show

09:47 min | 9 months ago

Guest Teacher Alain Hunkins How to Increase Your Impact and Influence by Building Your Credibility

"Today's guest teacher. Huggins is the author of cracking the leadership code, three secrets that building strong leaders if you want to get the first chapter for free, hang onto the end of the episode, Show you how you can get it on the sought after trainer Speaker, consultant, and coach for over twenty years. He's worked with big brands like Walmart Pfizer, City Group General Electric IBM? GM. State Farm Insurance Microsoft and more and today. He's GonNa break down how to build your credibility, your authority with your team with your actual clients with anybody who work with some simple steps you can take. This is especially important for new to this if you are. are dealing with new clients or you have new teams joining your team. The first thing everybody's thinking about when they meet you is, is this person? The real deal? Can I trust them? Will they deliver? Are they the leader I'm looking for? Is this the business or client I want to work with and that all boils down to are you credible? Let's make sure the answer is, yes. So I'm GONNA pass it onto onto, teach you today's guest teacher lesson, but I'll be back to rabbit today's episode and share with you that linked to get the free, first chapter of allowance book cracking the Leadership Code, but for now takeaway on. Hello there, my name is Alla. Pumpkins. Thank you for joining me today. Today. You how to increase your influence and impact five building your credibility. So, let's get down to business. I'd like to start by giving you thirty thousand foot high level overview of our lesson today. We'll start by looking at what credibility is. Then take a look at why it's so important, and then look at the three biggest actions you can take to build your credibility, but let's start with a story about a leader named Clint. Clint is the CO founder of a software company that's grown rapidly over the last three years. He's smart outgoing and he's great in front of customers. In fact, the sales team is nicknamed Clinton Midas because everything he touches turns to gold. However for all of Clint's strengths, he has this tragic flaw. He's consistently late for meetings ten, twenty, thirty minutes. Late is par for the course with Clinton sometimes even more. In Clint is also the master of excuses as to why he's late. He'll say, well, this customer meeting went long or this operational issue needed my time or gosh, the traffic from the airport was horrible. However is much as Clinton tries to explain and excuse his way out of it. His team is just not having it anymore. It's having an impact on engagement morale. In fact, two of Clint's direct reports have quit in the last week. And the sad truth is clint doesn't have a clue as to why and the reason because Clinton has never stopped to recognize the importance of credibility. So let's start and take a look. What exactly is credibility. Credibility comes from the Latin word credibility, which means worthy to believed. Credibility, is the main ingredient in trust and trust is the glue of human relationship. Turns out credibility shares the same etymological root as the word credit, which means alone or a thing entrusted to another. So, let's take a look at why that is so important. So if you want to influence others, you want them to do something because it's important to you. So, how did they decide if they're going to do it? Well, it's based on your relationship credit score. If you have a high credit score, you've proven yourself as a low risk, high return person and the other person is likely to help. They think you're a good investment. However, if you're a high risk low return person forget about it, they're not going to help fact is people own their own talents and skills, and they only offer them to you on loan. So having a high level of credibility or relationship credit score is your way of proving that you're worth loaning to. For people to truly follow you. They have to believe you're worth following. And how do they decide it's through your actions or is Albert Schweitzer the Nobel Prize winner. Put it. Example is not the main thing influencing others. It is the only thing. So. If you want to increase your influence and impact and others, you need to grow your credibility. To take a look at the top three things that you can do to make that happen. The first. Showing up on. Time to lesson from Clint. If I could only choose one practice to grow my credibility. I'd say show up on time you should treat your performance in this arena is a big deal. It is think about it for a moment. Timeliness is the easiest and most visible thing to measure sure either here or you're not. Fact is lateness is about much more than just a few wasted minutes. In life being on time is the most basic social contract that of presence. When you're late, your behavior sends a clear message. I have other things going on. That are more important than you are. And when you're on time, you send a clear message that you value the other person. So you to choose what's the message that you WanNa send and know that your actions speak a lot louder than your intentions. The second thing that you can do to grow your credibility is to do what you say you're GONNA do. You see when you open your mouth and promised to do something you cr- create expectations in those who are listening to you for them that promise is now this open psychological loop of tension that seeks resolution and it stays open nagging at them as they think, will they follow through or not? The fact is people crave closure. So every time you do what you say you're going to do you strengthen the connection between your words and your deeds, which is exactly what's meant by walking the talk when you walk your talk your seen as congruent and when you don't. You're not. You're out of integrity something's off, which is what Ralph Waldo Emerson Express when he said who you are speaks. So loudly, I can't hear what you're saying. See Doing. What you say you're going to do is the precise deficit of accountability. have. You ever wondered where accountability comes from. It comes from the world of accounting in finance. There's a balance sheet, there's on one side assets. The other side is liabilities and the to need to equal each other to be in account. Well, in human behavior, the two sides of your behavioral balance-sheet are what you say you're going to do. And what you actually did. And when you follow through and do what you say, you'll do the two sides balanced out and you're accountable. So a top tip around this. Do you say what you're GonNa do is write things down. Keep a written record of what you promised to do your way better off being someone who under promises and over delivers than the other way around. This means you have to be clear on your commitments and also be willing to say no from time to time. So. We've looked at our first two actions. Showing up on time doing what you say you're going to do our third one is around being consistent. This is the practice of doing what you say you're going to do not just once, but repeatedly multiple times over an extended period of time. When you start to build the deposits in that emotional bank account, your credit score goes up. The, no. One's going to throw you a party for showing up on time. However, the little things done over time compound and have a multiplier effect. As an example, take the CEO of Campbell Soup, a man called Doug. It now doug was CEO of Campbell Soup, for ten years and in his ten year period as the leader of Campbell's. Doug wrote Thirty Thousand Personal Handwritten. Thank you notes to his employees. Now, by the way over those ten years, Campbell's only had twenty thousand employees, and if you do the math, it works out to more than eight. Thank you notes per day seven days a week for ten years. Now, that's pretty incredible to me. Now, I'm not saying you need to start writing eight. Thank you know today, but I think Doug Conan's example of the power of consistently and showing how that multiplies and compounds over time is great. It's so easy in this world to think that we're too busy to do the important things. See if you WanNa know what a person values. Look at their calendar and see where they spend their time because that is the ultimate test of what you're truly valuing because ultimately, every action that you take will either strengthen or weaken your credibility and connection between. which either strengthens or weakens your influence and your impact.

Clint Clinton Midas Doug Conan Campbell Soup State Farm IBM Walmart GM Huggins Thirty Thousand Personal Handw Campbell Albert Schweitzer Consultant Ralph Waldo Emerson Nobel Prize CEO Co Founder
Dig for Victory

Gastropod

06:06 min | 11 months ago

Dig for Victory

"To get to today's urban gardens, let's go back in time to the founding of the US, there were certainly major cities Philadelphia New York Boston, but it wasn't. Until the eighteen hundreds that more and more people move to cities and urban ization in the US really got underway. These are people who would have grown almost all their own food before, but now they live in a city. They can buy food at the market. So how many of them kept up gardening in their new urban homes? A lot of food production went on. On within city boundaries well through the start of the twentieth century, there were lots and lots of urban livestock, because people were raising pigs and cows and chicken for food within city limits anesthesia day as a historian at the University of Delaware, and she's working on a PhD about Victory Gardens. It's only really during the city, Beautiful Movement and the progressive era that city start passing ordinances that actually outlawed these forms of local food production in the name of cleanliness and sanitation and middle-class standards of respectability, because only poor people grow their. Their own food. The city beautiful movement was big deal during the eighteen nineteen in one thousand, nine hundred wealthy urbanites, all this rural migration and immigration, and of course, the rising inequality and poverty and tenements in their cities, and they were not happy. They tried to clean the city up. They built big boulevards and parks with monumental fountains, and eventually they also introduced strict zoning laws and chickens and vegetable patches were not part of these new beautiful cities urban agriculture. Something poor people needed. It had to go some cities overtime had already. Already banned maybe the animals in the streets, or even keeping certain animals within city limits, but this really solidified during the city, beautiful movement city started to enact ordinances that said no farm animals in the city at all and no front yard vegetables, either meanwhile the poor had more pressing concerns than how the city looked frequently, when bad harvests and economic fluctuations raised food prices, they could not get to eat. There were dozens of major food riots in American cities throughout the eighteen hundreds. The first urban gardening movement starts in eighteen ninety. Ninety three in the town of Detroit, because of this panic of eighteen, ninety three, there were lots of panics. In those days, the stock market was very new, very volatile and long story short, suddenly, basically overnight, forty three percent of detroiters are unemployed in what had been a booming city and the Mayor Hazel S Pingree I has to find some way to answer. The cries of his constituents. So what he does is, he starts the first urban farming movement, which is ironically happening at the same time that many productive activities within the. The city are being outlawed. In other cities, urban leaders didn't want farms in their cities, but they also didn't want riots, and so letting poor people groza food on vacant land was seen as an acceptable temporary band aid in times of shortages. The Detroit plan was called the potato, patch plan and it had pretty impressive results by eighteen, ninety, six seventeen hundred families were farming more than four hundred acres in the city, and there are letters there from local detroiters writing into mayor Pingree, saying you so much I was able to grow. Grow Food for my family and lots of the people that wrote in. It's heartbreaking, because these letters are hardly legible there in broken English. Many of them were recent, German and Polish immigrants who were taking advantage of this program to grow foods dot connected them to their home as well as to feed their families. The Potato Patch program was seen as a success, but it was never meant to be permanent in less than a decade when economic situation in Detroit started to improve urban farms kind of petered out until the next big. Big Crisis, which was World War, one, the city beautiful movement had stamped out urban gardening the Detroit potato patches were gone, but suddenly there was a huge need both for food, and for kind of coming together in a patriotic sense. At least that's how Charles lay through peck sought. He was a lumber baron from New Jersey and early on in the days of the European conflict. He wrote the US government and said people should be reason. Food would help them contribute to the war help stock shortages, and the USDA promptly said Sir. We've got better ideas going here for better uses of fertilizer and seed supplies so thanks for your input and no thanks Charles hadn't made his fortune by taking no for an answer, so he took that Fortuna and started a Liberty Garden Movement himself, and he quickly found a whole group of rich people who wanted to join him in getting Americans. Gardening again to support the war Charles and his friends created a movement. There were Liberty Gardens. Gardens on Boston Common, and in Union Square in New York and big corporations like Eastman Kodak and General Electric set aside land at their factories for employees to grow and boy scouts even had a garden at Grover Cleveland's Childhood Home in New Jersey. Even the government caught the Liberty Garden fever, and they created a school program to teach budding young home farmers how to grow food and support. The soldiers was actually one of the first nationally. Nationally promoted curricula in the country, the Liberty Garden Movement seemed to really catch the public imagination. However, there was no infrastructure for collecting numbers. The only source we have is Charles Lathrop pack himself wrote a book called the war garden victorious in one, thousand, nine, hundred nineteen, and he claims that the movements sponsored five million gardens which time when there were just over six million actual professional farmers in the US is kind of impressive but remember. Remember Charles is our only source for this number and he might have been biased. It's really incredibly hard to say, but despite its holds on the national imagination, it had nowhere near the impact of world. War Two Gardens in terms at share mount of produce ground, sheer numbers of people participating sheer difference it made in the global war effort, and that's probably why you listeners at least in the US you don't use the Term Liberty Garden. Gardens you probably say victory garden.

Charles Lathrop Liberty Garden Movement United States Detroit Victory Gardens New Jersey Hazel S Pingree Liberty Gardens Term Liberty Garden New York Us Government University Of Delaware Philadelphia Usda Boston
Engine Competitions for B-52 and F-15EX

Airplane Geeks Podcast

08:39 min | 11 months ago

Engine Competitions for B-52 and F-15EX

"Wings mount to the pile or the pilots of the wings, and then a complete cockpit redesign. So. They're actually asking for eight engines and think young not to Max Flank and give us much more details, but think of these are the engines that are like on the back of big business jets. Yeah, yeah. We'll. We'll talk about those in just a second I. IT might be worth mentioning that previous on even Wanna use the plans, but in some cases plans in some cases, proposals or ideas to re engine. The the B fifty. Two's did include going four larger engines at at one point, they were looking at for Pratt and Whitney pw. Two thousand engines are the military designations F. One seventeen. which is what you find basically on the seven Boeing seven five seven and on the on the C. Seventeen. At one point, there was a proposal for four least Rolls Royce rb. Two eleven engines That didn't go. there was Competition at one point proposed between that are be to eleven, P, W, two thousand and also the CFM. In jains, which is what's on the Boeing seven three sevens and some other things. But now we're looking at. It's called the commercial engine. Reengineering program will redundant. They're the commercial engine reengineering program CRP or I guess we call that. SURP- well I. It's kind of funny because we've got now a commercial space program, this is a commercial reengineering. One of the things we've talked about recently. especially with military aviation is. Using off the shelf components for whatever whatever the need is not creating a specific, a specific mission, specific platforms, specific engine or electron ix, but what using what's out there to do that? So that's really where we're going with this and like Brad said. The the engine pilots in the structure they wanna keep as simple as possible, and this has been kind of a trend in believe it or not. The warbirds circuit. The recreated emmy to six choose. That were replicas. Have the NACELLE 's built for the. Engines from world. War Two, but have more modern engines hidden underneath them so you're you're so you're getting the same look and you're getting the same thrust ratios. ETC, but you have a more powerful much better engine, so they're. They're looking to keep the eight eight engines for balance and for. If you lose one on takeoff, etc, so and so max taken away with what are our choices? Envelope, please you have from from General Electric well, there's actually to possibilities, but one is the t.f thirty four, which has launchpad said is popular on many. Many Biz jets it's also a very to that is what powers the eight ten actually So that's that's one possibility, and that's an engine that's been around for you know for a while. It's very reliable. It's a good engine. Another possibility from GE is what they call their their. Passport engine, which is a newer newer design that GEE is working on for for a regional and business jets. so that's from. General Electric from Pratt and Whitney. There's the PW eight hundred. Series, which is also a an engine for regional jets and business jets, which is produced by pregnant Canada and it actually has the common core with the geared turbofan engine, except it doesn't have the big high bypass fan, and it doesn't have the gear, but the core of the. Pragmatism you. Eight hundred series engines the same as the geared turbofan. In from Rolls Royce. We have the F. One thirty, which is the military designation for the commercial. be are seven hundred series, which is another business jet. Engine so these are smaller diameter than the high bypass turbofans you see on seventy three seven's a three thousand family series in all of the others smaller diameter, but it turns out not a whole lot different from those t.f thirty-three engines. Their stuffed into the into the beef twos will as our insider into the engine world in our ringer. Where do we put our money on the bet I'll. Pick. Pick a winner now, so so the air. Force will have a relatively complicated or complex system for evaluating the proposals. Will take into account. A number of different factors in in this case. Some of those factors will include things like fuel burn because. A more efficient engine requires less aerial refueling. That's a that's a good thing. It'll include things like maintenance costs. What are the you know? The life cycle maintenance costs a variety of different other aspects to it I don't know if engine maintenance proposals or plans, or are going to be associated with these, or or not, or if it's you know, the maintenance is going to continue as it has with t.f thirty-three terms of WHO's doing it I don't know, but it'll be A. Interesting process, this is actually the sort of the second phase of this This proposal process the the the three of them in the first phase. If you WANNA, call it. That created digital prototypes. This is very interesting I. I don't know if this has been done to this degree in the past, but the since the first round submission from the three engine makers was a digital prototype submission, but the final proposals is comes up really fast July. Twenty second is the deadline for the air force the government to receive the final proposals.

Whitney Pw General Electric Boeing Max Flank Emmy C. Seventeen Pratt Brad GE Canada
GE selling century-old lighting unit to Savant Systems

WBZ Afternoon News

00:32 sec | 11 months ago

GE selling century-old lighting unit to Savant Systems

"Hall General Electric no longer in the light ball business CBS's Jim Priscilla tells us the Boston based company has been selling off underperforming parts of its empire for years we heard now General Electric has decided to get out of the lighting business after nearly a hundred thirty years the company is selling its Cleveland Ohio based lighting unit to smart home company savant systems G. E. was formed on April fifteenth eighteen ninety two Jim chrysalis

Hall General Electric CBS Jim Priscilla Ohio G. E. Jim Chrysalis Boston Cleveland
GE Aviation to cut workforce by up to 13,000 jobs, or 25%

Rush Limbaugh

00:14 sec | 1 year ago

GE Aviation to cut workforce by up to 13,000 jobs, or 25%

"General Electric is cutting approximately thirteen thousand jobs in its jet engine business because of lost business G. E. said in a memo to its staff that it plans to cut twenty five percent of its global aviation workforce in coming

General Electric G. E.
Boston-based GE results show scale of impact from global aviation crisis

WBZ Midday News

00:16 sec | 1 year ago

Boston-based GE results show scale of impact from global aviation crisis

"The world's largest maker of jet engines a Boston based General Electric cannot hide from the sharp downturn in commercial air travel during the corona virus pandemic sales in G. E. aviation the company's crown jewel fell thirteen percent and orders were down fourteen percent

Boston General Electric G. E. Aviation
Ford, GE plan to produce 50,000 ventilators in 100 days

Steve Trevelise

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

Ford, GE plan to produce 50,000 ventilators in 100 days

"At Monday's White House briefing on the corona virus pandemic president trump announced several pharmaceutical companies are donating doses of drugs believed to help treat cove in nineteen he also announced that manufacturers will begin making ventilators to meet the increased demand for just announced just a little while ago that they will produce along with General Electric healthcare fifty thousand ventilators and they're gonna be doing it in less than one Hundred Days the number of confirmed cases has continued to spike across the country there were over a hundred and fifty nine thousand cases nationwide as of this

Hundred Days White House President Trump General Electric
Jack Welch, legendary former GE CEO, dead at age 84

America's Morning News

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Jack Welch, legendary former GE CEO, dead at age 84

"And Jack Welch who transformed a General Electric into a highly profitable multinational conglomerate has passed away at the age of eighty four well it's becoming one of the nation's most well known and highly regarded corporate leaders during his two decades as a G. easy chair and chief executive he personified the so called cult of C. E. O. during the late nineties out when G. E. soaring stock price made it the most valuable company in the world this is an amazing legacy and that he leaves

Jack Welch General Electric Chief Executive C. E. O. G. E.
Longtime CEO of General Electric Jack Welch dies at age 84

News, Traffic and Weather

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Longtime CEO of General Electric Jack Welch dies at age 84

"Retired longtime General Electric chief Jack Welch passed away at the age of eighty four Jack Welch's first job G. E. the company would eventually run and remake was as a chemical engineer by the time he was forty five feet engineer his way to the top spot chairman and CEO in charge he had a simple rule for all of G. E.'s divisions if they were market leaders there are three choices fix it close it or sell it during his twenty year tenure from nineteen eighty one to two thousand one G. E.'s value jump from twelve billion dollars to over four hundred billion also part of his mantra cutting payroll G. E. shed over a hundred thousand workers in his first five years on the job Jerry Preston ABC

Jack Welch Engineer Chairman And Ceo General Electric Jerry Preston Abc
Jack Welch, GE's legendary CEO, has died at 84

Marketplace

02:27 min | 1 year ago

Jack Welch, GE's legendary CEO, has died at 84

"Jack Welch died yesterday the long time chairman and CEO of General Electric one of most celebrated executives of his day was eighty four years old the legacy well sleeves is complicated it will be debated and case study to four years in particular the way he changed what American companies do profits above all shareholder value first in line marketplaces Katong has them General Electric once upon a time explicitly serve many masters workers research labs and last of all shareholders that's according to company documents in the fifties by nineteen eighty one in came a new boss Jack Welch he slashed underperforming divisions and workers he spoke at MIT in two thousand six you bring a man you say look this isn't working you're in the bottom ten United again in my money here let's over the next year get your move on my then cutting costs and pleasing shareholders was in vogue in Wall Street and work for G. its stock way out perform the market during the Welsh decades of the eighties and nineties Nicholas Heymann is long time G. analyst at William Blair she had no problem redefining the landscape and what would work and in that sense standout became kind of the Paul Bunyan of shareholder value creation shareholder value often came at a cost to workers it undid the post war corporate social contract says Rick warts but not the Drucker institute his book is the end of loyalty G. and vaporized about a hundred and seventy thousand jobs under Welsh up until that time only the term downsizing it really entered the American vernacular yet these kind of huge mass layoffs were still seen as pretty scandalous when will step down in two thousand one jeep your allied heavily on its finance arm GE capital which will build up and when the financial crisis came years later the company got hit hard law professor Margaret Blair at Vanderbilt's is that's when we'll just tone seem to change as the company got into trouble he conceded that maximizing share value is not always the smartest thing to do D. adage suggests that he changed his mind over time he must have begun to see if there were big problems in the underlying business well she may have been on to something today leading groups including the business roundtable blackrock and the Davos World Economic Forum are rethinking the shareholders first model in its

Paul Bunyan Professor Blackrock Vanderbilt Margaret Blair Ge Capital Drucker Institute Rick Warts Jack Welch William Blair Analyst Nicholas Heymann MIT Katong General Electric Chairman And Ceo
Jack Welch, GE''s legendary CEO, has died at 84

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

Jack Welch, GE''s legendary CEO, has died at 84

"And Jack Welch has died he was the chairman and chief executive of General Electric from nineteen eighty one to two thousand one and transform the company into one of the world's most valuable public conglomerates CBS news business analyst Jill Slazenger says while she had many fans his accomplishments are legendary but not everyone liked his methods when Jack Welch took a hatchet to the staffing levels at G. E. firing people he was known as Megatron Jack the C. E. O. who would be willing to cut jobs and sacrifice people to the overall mission of the company Jack Welch was

Jack Welch Chief Executive General Electric Jill Slazenger E. O. CBS Business Analyst
Jack Welch, GE''s legendary CEO, has died at 84

Bloomberg Markets

00:53 sec | 1 year ago

Jack Welch, GE''s legendary CEO, has died at 84

"Police wages in corporate management has died Bloomberg's Bob Boone has this look back at the life of former General Electric CEO Jack Welch my last company wide meeting I thank all of you for what you've accomplished and even more for children in the future general electric's values Bloomberg's Tom Keene recall grew four thousand percent in twenty years on it is legendary executive people forget now here was a Jack Welch who invented how you do business which is don't make mistakes make as few mistakes as you can within the manufacturing process which now sounds like the but the time was revolutionary many workers took another view branding him neutron Jack for ruthless factory shutdowns and layoffs false kindness is the dumbest thing in the world it's the coolest thing in the world Jack Welch retired in two thousand one Bob moon Bloomberg radio Jack Welch dead today at the age of eighty

Bloomberg Bob Boone Jack Welch General Electric CEO Tom Keene Executive Bob Moon
"general electric" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

14:08 min | 1 year ago

"general electric" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"By pricing our American auto industry been so tired it's harder in the block the bad news messenger and third company to General Electric and I know you want to talk about that I was you know it's a it's fascinating amity your discussion the point you raise follow precisely the outline I have in front of me I don't need my outline he you instinctively you just know where I would love to go next so of course G. eat is exactly what I want to talk about because in the background during LBJ JFK and Nixon administration in the background is a B. grade actor who becomes of course the president Reagan and tell us if you can briefly but include all the juicy details how General Electric a fortune five hundred company one of the most trusted companies in America if not the world what in the world did they have to do with delivering president Reagan to us and I should mention before I turn the microphone over to you is that I mentioned earlier LBJ was driven by and guided by Roosevelt J. F. K. he was guided by you to a substantial degree the brain trust the best and the brightest from Marvin Nixon seem to be guided by Nixon and Reagan as we will learn was guided by Frederick Hayek Austrian economist and he was when he started amity and you'll take over now when he started he was a rock ribbed Democrat in the Franklin Delano Roosevelt mold so tell us about General Electric and president Ronald Reagan it's a wonderful story well yes and it starts not even with Reagan but with the company General Electric companies have sold their white people and GT sold like fighting he on the one hand with kind of a bunch of bad men who were quite cynical and thought a lot about marketing at this point I meet in the early sixties and wanted the whole wall and create login and good distribution and make money and work with government very cynically you know G. with the provider soldier by the Tennessee Valley Authority which is not recommended yeah on the other hand though there's the old G. E. which was very individual Thomas Edison a man alone in a lab comes up with an idea that changes the world and that man works better when he's really all alone and you get to pick anything about who's going to buy the product certainly not about the next contract he concerned about unions actually they were concerned American innovation out of its own market there was a fellow named Lambeau where it's completely forgotten but he was kind of the crew were there and I think when you give money away anywhere might want to think about the console where was making it actually at an intellectual policy her cell and walked back which is he needed to train people the merits of free market capitalism with a history she no Edison and Charlie Kaufman the original mantle innovator with a company by reminding them where growth com well that is it's like sending money on backing a capitalist history book it's what level where the executive a GP one three and ability to keep the workers more than a hundred thousand people all about half full and heat it had little pamphlet about hi yeah remarks here and about what would work he has led to pop your eyes and higher and you know pop them all about how are you home out and handed all this out and it seems like you're ready and won the thing to hold where did why hi you're aging actor who was not very popular and as you mentioned was a rocket Democrat at that time Democrats long awaited open for all the capitalist ideas and break in need of a job in the like the job but he wasn't really sure about the capitalism at first he went around on the rubber chicken circuit and gave a lectures workers that in town hall about the American capital and gradually Reagan's this actor nothing more than a PR point became the ideas that one reason why he followed the GT bought stock or bond he wait markets worked in the beauty of compounding and if you things like that and at the beginning of the book what happened and she got caught up in it so divided sold the property for executives at G. he had been polluting it legally in violation of American law with Westinghouse and other company in their industry I was in charge too much to the TV at all my gosh she even cheating the American tax payer so every bloody court case actual GP executive jail one usual anti trust union road with laughter and is this by G. easy stock when in the toilet our and Mr Goldberg department as little propaganda bell fell part with your ball where retired your rating inspired in his show G. are part of a propaganda effort was cancelled so you think it's all washed out and what's interesting is that right remember it all but even if he wasn't a G. E. anymore and he got a Michael on politics against give speeches about market and what was wrong with the socialization that and so on and hit the ideas and his performance took home so though this long shot propaganda philosophy effort by Boulware paid off sometimes you undertake a project the political or for legislation he did not pay off for ten or twenty years it doesn't pay off till after your death but it does mean being that your rations name the undertaker the court well where each investment it's great getting free market ideas paid off exponentially for those investors over quite a long period so I like that and I like the way great store business hello it was a blow job look around think about politics and he did correspond with people where where the van for governor excellent political effort and extremely successful for L. one California so that's all in the book of breaking start got down to eat dark out down but they do well later and what's fascinating is ball where who had his goal the education first of the workers then with the G. E. theater and early black and white television program in the drink I guess the fifties and early sixties wall words goal was to educate the public and the not only did the educate the public body educated a president or a soon to be president beyond his wildest dreams so I'm just reinforcing amity what you said about sometimes you plant a seed and it's the jazz station period is very lengthy but sure enough up grows a sequoia tree or redwood tree and talk about an accident the accident of ball where trying to educate workers on the merits of capitalism and ends up giving us a two term president who becomes president of course at exactly the right time we were in the economic pets when Reagan took office and not bold wears teaching but the teachings of the Austrian economist of high tech and bash your do of course was French in the eighteen fifties their teachings is what guided Reagan through the eighties add up and many if you could take a step back and we look at this arc we look at John C. in though who the damage the economy with his guns and butter policy perhaps but spending on great society thought clearly it was a failure it gave us the seventies Nixon impose wage and price controls and as you said increase spending for Medicare so Nixon damage the economy along comes Reagan and fixes everything in the glorious economic eighties why wouldn't that and now they ask you to go beyond the scope of the book why wouldn't that have ended the argument why wouldn't that show here we lived through several decades we tried one approach it failed another approach it succeeded why are we not still in the Reagan economic era what happened to the country you're an observer that cause us to now forget that comparison between the sixties and seventies and bad economic approach and the eighties and a different economic approach amnesia word word or casual PMR orange and sat we can't remember how bad that's the big thing how bad if you were one of the with one hand not employed in the seventies if you were unable to buy the house you needed a member of the seventy people fought houses would have to become ever smaller but what we thought we could never turn the thermostat up seventy eight yeah because you didn't have enough energy and we never would have what comes back you know Cheryl bowl OPM here to be in a sense of the word how may we help you the dark hi so what we don't have the background so long people for retiring now live locally in the fall market after he just to give out the listeners one measure very we tend to think of the ever rising stock market is our kind of birthright you put the money in the five twenty nine plan it will grow by act and your child will have some money for universe the Dow Jones industrial average was flat and I'm not even counting the inflation from the mid sixties all the way three eighty almost two generations the did not want to cross the outline it's a very different experience you can go back in the dividends if you want to get the better number but there was the average paid the one thousand and that nominal so well when you could be big inflation is much lower so that's what it was like and we forgot that okay the aspen brands nothing is new as in fashion social is not new social failure or commercial my thinking tell you those are not get what we need too long ago and that many Americans have been served over he they haven't seen communism or economic trouble they have a good dinner plates for the money doesn't work under a lot of those so so that the change but we do have this evidence if only we can recall it one of the things that I if you don't mind me mentioning is we yeah I work at the Calvin Coolidge foundation and what we do is try to remember the past with that just to make dinner find a Wagan like where we understood the importance of market with the importance of federalism under strain breaking news we like to praise him government did well under Reagan under college the government actually shrank and your listeners you're sophisticated services that real amateurs that nominal the government really shine in real terms so wow how did the president shrink the government and not nearly can change the world quite a mention mention of going family we ought to mention of.

General Electric
"general electric" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

08:34 min | 1 year ago

"general electric" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Extraordinary. I mean one of the one of the One of the most significant family trees so to say Can can can essentially was born from General Electric. And I. I wonder how how is the culture changing As as the organization becomes a bit smaller as you noted before a bit more focused. I'm curious what aspects of historical culture remain versus those things that that have been pressing forward into the future Saturday. Yeah you're spot on one of the most eye-opening things when I got here was how many people out in industry you could suddenly just call and because you had that genie connection how many people worked here at some point in their life. You can lean on and it's proven to be an invaluable resource From me I I think the company is changing but the core culture isn't it. It's a company that for a long time has been committed to excellence and focusing on its customer and the highest level of integrity. And I don't you know for example when you first get here one of the first things we do as we go through across the spirit and letter if teaching how we think about integrity and how we think about security going forward and how you apply that To your everyday life same thing with excellent we make machines that people count on oftentimes for their very life the healthcare or aviation And you know that the responsibility that deeply baked into the culture of the company and taken very seriously I think what is changing around the places. It's a culture that embraced embraced being a generalist for awhile over. Maybe being a deep domain expert and I think that's something you're starting to change Larry. Arnn Dr Larry culpepper new. CEO comes in and really pushing our businesses to be a bit more stand alone and a bit more independent than their thinking thing not necessarily their structure. But they're thinking that's I think shift you're starting to see I even see it in our. It teams starting to see still a lot more movement movement. It happened more within a business. Maybe crossed I'm a little bit Kinda have my forecast in the future hat on because we'll we'll see how it ends but I think that's one of the first the things you've seen is really a push on domain expertise versus kind of generalist expertise but the core pieces of excellence training integrity. They've they really haven't gone anywhere. In fact I think there are a lot of what is driving the company through the challenging times. We're going through right now. I think without those those who are out of the culture probably a very different place. That's interesting as you as you continue recruit. Ge I'm curious as you as you mentioned during a time of change a challenging time entries how what is the. What's the recruiting process? Look like. Now what's the what's the pitch to the talent that you need clearly In order to continue to fill all you've described. How do you make that picture these days? Yeah and I I think we we make it vigorously because I think like most people who have my job other companies Attracting talent is job one and and getting harder and harder which has a citizen. I love that people are employed. Avoid gainfully growing but as an employer is really frustrating. When you're trying to hire people so you know we we kind of have a twofold approach Ritchie? The first is I mean in just before. We don't make them my poison. lightbulbs anymore but the first part is really educating And this may be unique to us but educating our potential leave of how deeply impactful we are to the world because frankly people I I love our lighting division and I love our aviation heavy in our division that we sold but it was a bit harder to get if people excited to come in and work on on those products when you start talking about the way we change lives within healthcare or within aviation by helping people see their families always make connection or power. Bring power to places in the world that haven't had it before that they're really compelling story so our first challenge is really connecting employees to that core mission. Ah You know we talked to move power cure the world. We really talk about getting them behind that mission That's the first step is to get them to realized a real challenge here. That's exciting to them and that they can make an impact on whatever. PC The world they happen to be working in and then after that it's really around leading letting them talk about what the experience is going to be like as an employee and how much they have the ability to use digital technology to change those business. I think industry as a whole in the United States will have been a bit behind the technology curve with the technology's been more focused in the factory and in the products themselves. Oh and that's really transforming that transformation started. I know you know my predecessor Jim. He really doubled down on changing that. And I'm continuing that by bringing that technology out to our customers and that an interesting story for people to their applications work on here that are going to be in the hand. They'RE GONNA drive business results. They're gonNA drive. Hi changes to our customers and people get excited about that. So our biggest challenge is quite frankly finding the time weeding through the noise of all the employers out there who are looking for Alan to get that opportunity to tell our story and interiors. Also we've talked about some of the cultural changes that have been foot some of the new strategies that you in the organization more. Broadly are pursuing as you continue to think about modernizing. It what other steps that you're undertaking whether it's people practices processes technology. Yeah but that's a long list but I'll I'll pick out a few of them in the first is we. It comes back to what we were just talking about which talent it and again I can't take credit for starting it but I will take credit for continuing it. We really made a decision. A A probably under our Jamie Miller Jim regime to really start investing in icy talent and continuing to do that I think like many companies maybe even g led the way in outsourcing technology. It was Something back office function that someone else worried about and it was a very kind of straight out of business school. haw Hof comparison. Hey they can do transaction for two cents cheaper so move it to them and when someone else can do it for a penny cheaper and then move it to them. And that's just not aligned to digital world world that that outsourcing of that core piece so we've really been on a mission over the last several years to double down and investing growing that capability within the company We've hired hundreds of thousands of people over the last several years to really build that up and that takes some time That's really been a pieces to rebuild that muscle and make sure that that muscle becomes a core competence of the General Electric Company. Going forward another area that we've really really spent a Lotta time transforming it kind of aligns the way we think that it's developers are so important in our end user technology space that was and it's wrote mundane people don't like talking about it because it's not kind of not the report of of the CEO's job right historically. But I think it actually is. I think as as we talk about the modern employee who's very dependent on digital tools. The fact that your average corporate person in America gets a better experience experience at the apple store than they do at their employer. Technology is a big problem. So we've invested heavily over the last several years really transforming bad experience we've been very successful with it And really embracing that. We have to treat our employees at the consumers that they are as the innovators that they are and and give them A. I don't even call it on user but give them a holistic technology experience that rivals. You know that APP Alaska that Microsoft or software that consumer APP experience. Because I think that's a key piece of enabling the other stuff you want to happen and nothing really changed because people really we just outsource fat And we had to really think about it from the ground up and we do it Chris. Google thank you so much for joining me on Tech Ovation evasion today very interesting conversation about the evolution of of General Electric the significant role that. It is playing in that and the innovative things. You and your team are doing. Thank thank you so much I appreciate having. Thanks for tuning in. Please join me next week. On my guest will be Andre exclusively the chief executive officer of a Yes..

General Electric Company Jamie Miller Jim regime Dr Larry culpepper Google United States Ritchie Chris Andre Alan America Microsoft Alaska
"general electric" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

06:23 min | 2 years ago

"general electric" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Fountain square, and now we're going to eliminate about one hundred positions at the vice president level and up to save some one hundred million dollars is the problem is that the way I look at it as ban if you can't make money now when the economy's good what's going to happen when things start to sour little bit. How we look in as mardi would say not good and what happens though, too. I don't know how many of those jobs are Cincinnati-based the VP level. Once a lot of these positions. I know have moved to New York. But what does that do the local economy here when you have people making wellness six figures who are now unemployed Nathan backtrack from simply money gives some perspective this morning and Nathan this is not exclusive courts of the retail industry. But we care a lot because it's Macy's, and that's a Cincinnati company. Yeah. You betcha. And anytime that a local story about people losing their jobs comes across the news wires. Just what you think? What is you know? What would it be like if I walked into work tomorrow, if you walked into work tomorrow and the boss said, well, we decided that we need to restructure and make sure that the shareholders are getting the the scene stock rise. So you you're here then you start thinking. Wow. The bills to I have an emergency fund. How long would last worldwide go? So these are these news headlines, always become my opinion, very personal because you kind of go, gee, am I just one slipped from off a banana peel from financial disaster? And that's kind of what comes out here. And then of course, what some of the comments are just priceless. Like listen to this. The the CEO said, oh, we're going to get rid of the vice presidents because we have found out. Oh, ready for this. Big windup. Here's the pitch. Loney? Sales associates seem to be more important than vice president. We always say their sales the people who sell stuff right seemed to be more important than the people who put your man, the paper about the people who sell stuff, right? The people have produced stuff at the bottom are more important, the people who just say simply acknowledge one another kiss each others butts. Oh, yeah. So then they found in a few places when they added a couple of associates are buckle your seatbelts. I'm making this stuff up, right? Sales went up. Customer services king hits it. It's just not believe. What were these guys thinking the sad part about this story? And maybe the dangerous part for Macy's is that this seems to be like the swallows these birds at once a year come to Capistrano, and then disappear again, it seems that the end of every year Macy's wakes up and goes, let's see sales. No. Who therapist let's reorganize? And so this is only the sixth year in a row that at the end of the year along with earnings announcements, we get a reorganization for Macy's death and back Rackham simply money this morning on seven hundred wwl w and acute hearing centers dot com hotline and Nathan the impact here that I don't know gonna these hundred jobs are based in Cincinnati, but they want to save one hundred million dollars. Now, basic math will tell you that saw one hundred jobs at a million each one hundred million dollars. But but clearly, it's not just VP's. It's a whole bunch of support staff to was well 'cause I don't think all the VP's are pulling down a mill each they probably got assistance, and assistance to assistance, and that's really what hurts to is. Because he may be able to survive you got a little golden parachute or something like that and your vice president. But if you're the I dunno a special assistant to the vice president or the assistant to the assistant vice president now, you got some real problems there. And this is what what? I wonder how the impact it's going to be felt locally is a number of these jobs are going to be local. Well, we'll have some you got to remember Macy's has got some perations and a few other places Atlanta, and certainly lots of people left at New York from the days when Macy's was Macy's before Federated Department Stores bought them a long time ago, go far enough back, and you've got Lazarus from Cincinnati which started the whole deal and Shintos which some of you might remember from a little ways back if you're of the day. Yes. It certainly going to have an impact. I don't think that it's going to be as as big here in Cincinnati as we might think good, which is it's good. And it's bad. I mean, we're still a very, vibrant and growing town here. You know, we just reported yesterday. They have the money to to businesses secure is one of the other on escapes me blue eyes. They're bringing in a hundred two hundred thirty jobs between the two of them for the average job out there. Going to be seventy thousand dollars at the high tech firm and blue ashes going to be one hundred and nine thousand dollars. I think what it brings up. Sometimes is you know, when you maybe maybe worked at General Electric or General Motors in a plant, and you sit there with your son and your daughter, you go, you know, I hope you'll go to work plant your kids. Look at you, go. Yeah. I hope you'll go to work in the plant programming. Computers, writing the code right and figuring out all the technology to get the computers running on time and admit robots worry, and that's how where the jobs will be moving forward. So it's it's sad to see these jobs. This appearing this in Cincinnati was the front and center for what Macy's strategy is. And that is they're going to get rid of stores that aren't destination stores the way I translate that look at the top fifty centers where you got a lot of wealthy people who or or solid upper middle to upper middle class people who will buy what's at Macy's. And they're gonna and on top of that they're going to focus on the things that are good. Which is a makeup and find and jewelry fine menswear. This would be a good for you. If you ever go. Now, I'm fine with it. I'm I'm I'm good where my tracksuit, my jeans, my t shirts shorts. I like that. That's my. So the challenge the challenge though, is that the average family in America has got less than thousand dollars to handle an from these people. I I would hope would have the money to handle the emergency. You're you're absolutely spot on the support staff. That's where it's where it's going. And you would Macy says their earnings are going to be flat this year. It's like, okay. So I guess Amazon it's like going showing up the Olympics. And you're going to run in place Williams on takes off down the down the track. You know, like, oh, really? Yeah..

Macy vice president Cincinnati VP Nathan New York assistant vice president mardi Loney America Capistrano CEO Williams Amazon Olympics General Electric special assistant Federated Department Stores
"general electric" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"general electric" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"I'm Ameri for totally New York. General Electric is facing a ninety two billion dollar sales backlog, a backlog in general is a a good thing or bad thing. And depends on what's in it. And for GE. That's the big question is what's in it? You don't know. It's an because they're commercial grievance between whoever's buying products and services from g so there's a little bit of a mystery Wall Street Journal reporter Thomas, Greta has the details in just a moment. But first here are some other top stories. We're following a federal judge has voided Paul manafort's plea agreement saying the former Trump campaign manager made intentional false statements to investigators even though he agreed to a plea deal requiring him to tell the truth. Prosecutors accused Manafort of breaching the September agreement saying he had lied many times in sessions with investigators and before the grand jury. The ruling voids the government's obliga- shins under the plea deal to offer leniency Manafort is set to be sentenced on March thirteenth. Democrats on the White House are at odds over how to enforce trade. Rules ahead of a congressional vote on the North American Free trade agreement. Democrats want to make sure Mexico will enforce environmental protections and allow workers to unionize by adding provisions to the current agreement that could delay approval of the deal, which requires ratification in the house and Senate as well as legislatures in Canada and Mexico. That's if the deal is to replace the original nineteen Ninety-four NAFTA agreement between the countries the latest self reported data from Thomas car companies show, the technology is progressing, but so.

Paul manafort General Electric New York Wall Street Journal White House Mexico Thomas car companies NAFTA Senate Manafort reporter Trump Thomas Canada Greta ninety two billion dollar
"general electric" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"general electric" Discussed on KTOK

"Had General Electric, General Motors, Westinghouse TRW Aerojet general nuclear onyx and McDonald Douglas on such advance highly classified eventually canceled projects such as nuclear aircraft vision infusion rockets since nineteen sixty seven he has lectured on the topic of UFO's. He's been all over the country all over the world. Stanton Friedman was with me and Michael Shurmur on the Larry King show a few weeks ago. Hey stanton. How are you? Well, it's a good morning here. I figured out some puzzle some happy it's good to have you with us. And Dr Michael Shurmur, of course, is the founding publisher of skeptic magazine. He's the director of the skeptics society, a monthly columnist for scientific American the host of the skeptic's distinguished science lecture series at the California Institute of technology, also edits skeptic dot com. Dr Shurmur received his degree in psychology. From her dine university is Emma in experimental psychology from California State University and his PHD in the history of science from Claremont graduate university. He to us with a sun coast to coast. Michael, welcome. Gentlemen to have you both west. Of course, when we were on the Larry King show, Stanford and Michael in the corner swinging at each other I had to break it up only kidding guys. Kitty. Chairs Michael how did you have good time on the king show? Would you think those shows are always frustrating because they're fairly short and everybody talks over one another. I found one of the most amazing things was emails. I got days afterwards from fellow skeptics who said the other guys can't talking over you. How come you weren't more aggressive, and then from USO people had said, how can you kept interrupting the UFO people you were so rude to aggressive. We also filter these things through our own diocese. I think Stanton. How 'bout you? What kind of a time? Did you have on the king show? Well, it was a frustrating is a good word for it too. Many people no chance to finish thoughts. I got asked why the cover up I gave I said, they're six reasons in the article on my website, and I gave one and suddenly we were someplace was press strating and. You know, I it's not a good way to get it. True. When you got so many people talking so quickly on such a diverse collection of topics. You know, I I admire Buzz Aldrin, but I didn't think a lesson on how the rocket works was, you know, very useful in that was going to go on and on and on to. Tonight. What we'll do is. We'll have a friendly discussion on why Stanton you believe in the existence of US owes you have chosen you, Michael. Y you believe that we don't. But you look at things are you a bunker or skeptic? There's a big difference. Big difference skepticism is just a tool. It's it's not a thing. It's not a position you take. I don't think of it as a man and think of it more as a verb that it's just a way of analyzing claims, you can be skeptical of acclaim, you can be skeptical of the skeptic's global warming, certainly comes to mind there people that are skeptical of global warming, and there are people that are skeptical of the so-called global warming skeptics, and that's that's a nice example. I think of a current event that shows it really is just a way of analyzing claims and people can different how to use the tool so in the case of UFO's, and and steady and so forth. You know, it isn't a position to take. There's you know, several different questions to ask. Are they out there have they come here? What is the quality evidence for each of the different kinds of claims, and you have to take them one at a time, and it would be obviously dogmatically close minded to say. Well, I just don't believe period. You don't believe what I mean what he has to take them one at a time. And that's what we try to skeptic with all the different things like alternative medicine. I mean, there's thousands of planes. You can't just say, I don't believe any of them. You have to look at each one. We've got a lot of time on this program..

Dr Michael Shurmur Stanton Friedman Larry King skeptic magazine UFO General Electric Buzz Aldrin Claremont graduate university Westinghouse TRW Aerojet California Institute of techno McDonald Douglas General Motors California State University US founding publisher Stanford
"general electric" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:20 min | 2 years ago

"general electric" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"This morning has the midterm elections. Get underway. Investors, kind of bracing for any fallout. A right now, the S and P five hundred down a point the Dow out of the gate, fourteen points, lower the NASDAQ composite index is down about three points. Among the most actively traded General Electric shares. They are up right now about one point four percent Advanced Micro shares down three tenths and apple shares are up four tenths of upper sent. And that is a Bloomberg business flash. Tom pinch Tucker. Thank you, so much ingredients screen on this election day. Sinn Hooper with the style. Invesco looking at the strategy of what to do with your money Christine. If you started your year end bible, your publication January. But it's going to be hard to actually finish it into these midterm elections. Turn out. Okay. The elections turn out you really get to work tomorrow morning nine AM, you'll be on it. And then you've also got to see what the economy does. Don't you? Absolutely. I mean, certainly this jobs report was positive, but it may have been positive especially where wage growth is concerned. And so we do have to ratchet up expectations about the fed. What does that mean that you believe that they will raise interest rates how many times in two thousand nineteen? What I would say is that it makes it a complete that the fed raises rates in December. I wasn't entirely sure of that until I saw that last jobs report. And I think it it suggests that the fed is likely to to come out of the gate and twenty nineteen and continue raising rates probably one or two times before it takes pause and reassess his economic data, and perhaps before economic data shows, some signs of weakness. Do you believe do you believe then that we'll see a larger increase in yields and a big selloff in the bond market? We could. I mean there are so many variables at play right now. So much of this has to do with midterms and the kind of legislative agenda that comes out of mid terms that I believe will play role and whether investors receive the agenda to be pro growth to nature, but of course, fed policy will play a very large role. And and we could certainly see bump up in yield. Okay. But just to just to be clear here, if the Democrats are able to take control of the house of representatives and President Donald Trump is able to use the power of veto is it likely that the Democrats will be able to advance any of their agenda. And also if this is the situation then won't that mean that the current state will prevail for the next two years? Actually, if the Democrats take over the house, I think there are two possible hybrid agenda items that a Republican Senate and a democratic house may agree on one is a clawback of trade powers. Keep in mind, the US congress at the US, congress was given the power over leading tariffs by the constitution over the last eighty or so years they've given away a lot of those power she'd executive branch, but we could see an effort on the part of Senate Republicans and House Democrats to take back. Those powers, particularly if economic data suggests that the current trade policy is causing problems. Certainly we've seen some Canarian Canaries in the coal mine from earnings, and so as that continues, we could see some effort there to take back some care towers. Okay. But but hey before you get to the second point. But let me just push back there. But isn't that? One thing that it seems that Democrats Republicans are allied on is that they are both looking at China and the loss of US jobs to low cost producing regions of the world. It's not as if the Democrats have run on a globalization platform, neither had the Republicans haven't. But what they should recognize is that they current trade policy agenda is creating a lot of issues for economic growth from pie chain disruption to hire input costs. Certainly there is a way to pursue a trade policy agenda that doesn't involve tariffs. In the joy of October, Christina there's a linkage of equity markets into bonds. What did you study in the bond market as you looked at new volatility in equities? That's a great question. And what I really look to is actually the ten year because to me that is such a better gauge of fear than for example, equity volatility. And so it seems as though markets have gotten a bit more relaxed, right? We've seen the ten year bump up, but to me what we've seen is an awful lot of volatility and in bonds as well. And so I think what we're looking for is direction after the midterm elections. I think.

fed US Christina congress General Electric Sinn Hooper Tom pinch Tucker apple Bloomberg Donald Trump Christine Republican Senate Senate China President
"general electric" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"general electric" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"Ask the expert to most in-depth midterm coverage. Since here on WGN Y presented by kiss kiss tire on the corner of Albany shaker road in Letham. I'm Joe Gallo gar. A what is the temperature? There's I appreciate hearing. Yourself up over the temperature. Please. Half your age. It is forty one degrees, you rat. Okay. Let's get back to the dentist. Fagan? Dennis. Are you there from Vegas socio just finished the book electric city? It's about the history of General Electric. It's interesting. Some of the things, you know, I knew about the GE realty plot. That was for the higher ups and g. Also. But I also found out that there was a man by the name of Carmen who worked there who then collect Carmen fire department and carbon little it's all named after that guy that was part of General Electric as far as I can tell from the colony Carmen, no comments in Rotterdam is it. Okay. So pets connected. He though whole thing. I mean, and then like Schenectady locomotive with the family, and they were very big and then Ellis hospital and all these things in the Ellis has the Westinghouse's lived here as well. Did you know that if they did I didn't know that I know about? I'm not sure that I think that's what I got out of the book. Sometimes I get things mixed up as you can look at my final exam scores. But anyway, those have really interesting book, and it had the whole history of I mean, not whole history. But it said W G Y came about to keep in touch with the employee of General Electric, so interesting. Well, those those employees are getting less and less. Beg your pardon. Started reading around nine dollars and twenty nine cents a share.

General Electric Joe Gallo gar Carmen GE realty Letham Ellis hospital Fagan Albany Vegas Schenectady Ellis Westinghouse Dennis Rotterdam forty one degrees nine dollars
"general electric" Discussed on The Critical Path

The Critical Path

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"general electric" Discussed on The Critical Path

"Should be General Electric or frigid air or or Gilani. Oh, I'm not familiar with that. They're yogurt maker. Oh, but it's, it's something that that you know if if you think about maybe yogurt as well walls kind of goes through its s curve, but the. These these appliances had to be the, you know, had to diffuse into into the households. And also at this point, I mean, they've been talking about it for a little while the, you know, the billion user Mark either I phones or I o s devices, and so you know, yeah, there's more to go, but they they're getting close to saturate. Right. Well, there's a billion one point, three billion. The last count is the number of devices in use in this is this is including phones, tablets, Macs, presumably maybe apple TV, anything that Ping's a server somewhere that's made by apple, and this was the number though they were getting these unique things. They were counting them and they said, okay, there is a point point. Three billion than there was one billion two years earlier. So we kinda saw three hundred million new devices. Now being bearing in mind that a lot of devices are retired or put it nicely retired or or or discarded or perhaps broken or coast hand. Or become coasters or or. But this this, this install base includes devices that are handed down or sold of sold as secondhand, or even third hand. And this is something that apple gains no, no revenue from well, they don't fail the device. But anyway, I think we're we're getting to is that services are really becoming a huge drive for that. Well, that's right. That's the point is that at services plus excess Aries, which are other products in that would include, for example, the watch would include the bands for the watch. It would include cases it would include keyboards and mice and other things that go along with max, the people may want to upgrade to. And so you know, you go to an apple store and I don't know what portion of the of the stores filled with with excess re's, but it's significant, of course not..

apple General Electric Gilani Ping Mark one billion two years
"general electric" Discussed on Twinovation

Twinovation

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"general electric" Discussed on Twinovation

"Though, what was it again? GIO? I see you. Oh, I see you. Hyphen. There's no hyphen. So on the GAO ICU. You may say it's the same as. Sounds the same as actually saying all the letters GIO ICU GO. That's actually that's a great guy. With your gyco with. That way to get someone to remember your company gyco commercials, hey, for fifteen years Stanley, it's like that. But just change is a guy coup g. Bad guy. They're going to sue. You. Jio. Yeah, I'm dropping. I see. What is Jesus in for General Electric. She still censored graphical, it's just what's the eastern shore. It's part of the graphical just dropping shop in the l. just can't drop the, they try to. Gee, I see. 'cause you want it to be. Yeah. Geico, but with the u. at the end. So the companies like gyco with the u. at the end or if you're looking for us, that's how you find us gyco with the UN. It's like if I were to start a company called Dunkin, Joe. Well, you couldn't even do. Don't. No s at the end kind of sounds like a dragon ball, z character a little bit Keiko. Good guy. Let's should we. We're both for guy q. nine coming at the price of four hundred ninety nine one time fee for each ball. Yeah. Purple purple. I like it. I'm into also fan of the tape though. I'd like to see. Taping on. See, we were all shocked. He didn't choose the tape. I thought about the tape earlier today, which is why I don't want to go back to it. Okay. Fair enough. Interesting. As a customer and investor miles,.

gyco GAO ICU Geico General Electric UN Gee Keiko Dunkin Stanley Joe fifteen years
"general electric" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"general electric" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"Important. Embarrassing sometimes too. But anyway. Zack you found out that on the phone NBC's, Nancy G E C, which is generally electric company, which is what w g Y was way back in the early twenties. So there's the folk Lord saying that because General Electric founded NBC's parent company, the Radio Corporation of America that GE was still the largest shareholder at over thirty percent of NBC stocks. That's why was g. So nobody. Denied it or well, but w g why was the radio station they had here in channel six and it says right here W G Y Schenectady New York also lays claim to the idea and its fiftieth anniversary celebration in nineteen seventy two reported broadcasting the notes g e c on a piano in nineteen Twenty-three. The initials stood for the station owner, General Electric Corp. So there you go. So that reforms when I said for the most part, I claim I'm a millionaire ride a resume true. Oh, no, it very well could be that's actually pretty cool. Right. Sure. Another non-believer. Okay. Oh, hey know, what Joe you are old as you are wise. So I take your word. Okay. I like to say a few words back to you. But unfortunately, the national association of broadcasters, the FCC and the upper management of iheartmedia would not appreciate just give you a compliment. Yeah. Right. I hill of a backhand, but it was a complimentary if you're going shopping day. Here's a very important message. Gentleman..

General Electric Corp NBC Nancy G E C Zack Radio Corporation of America Schenectady FCC Joe New York thirty percent
"general electric" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

08:28 min | 2 years ago

"general electric" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Folks it is always good to be prudent Sorry Great. Song Welcome back it's the. Ray program a leading recessionary indicator is, flashing red what investors don't appear. To care They're obviously you're talking about, the yield. Curve it's flattening out. And just about every time you have. A flat to inverting yield curve You end up with a recession but this is part, of, the problem. Number I was talking earlier about the half. Life of investment strategies or the half-life of just about anything medical knowledge technology et cetera And and and the fact is that just because, it used to happen this way doesn't necessarily mean it's gonna happen this. Way it may not be that an inverted yield curve predicts, a recession ahead it could be a trade. War could be something else and this is why everybody must have some kind of a plan b I'll tell, you, what else This whole subject of diversification has become far more compelling in the. Very recent past those so-called stock pickers I'm mentioned three stocks three while. Two very popular and one stalwart supposedly let's start with, a stalwart General Electric have you seen what g. has fallen to a. Nine year low General Electric G. e. was the original Dow stocks And it's. Falling what, the twelve bucks. A share that's like I don't know two thousand and nine price More recently Tesla's been in the news j. p. Morgan is expecting tesla shares. The fall, back to one, hundred and ninety five bucks Representing a thirty six percent. Downside to like last week's. Close which is already down. What seven percent forty some odd percent decline that's what they expect Because Elon Musk had an evidently unfunded plan to go private and now is in. Trouble with the SEC Yeah and without Elon Musk who knows if there is a tesla I don't know But he. May be, asked to step down from the board etc I don't know I wouldn't, I'd say you. Know. Slap the guy on, the wrist and let them keep planning, but is tesla An automobile company are they, a battery company Are. They gonna take flight Tesla's to. The moon I don't know Facebook We we saw a big blow up and Facebook a week or two. Ago we don't. Know this is why you have to be. Diversified half the be. Diversified. Okay let's move on to a couple of. Things IRS provides guidance on five to nine, plans All right so. The treasury has given. Us. Some guidance based on the tax cuts and. Jobs act first distributions from five twenty nine Can. Now be. Used to pay up to a total of ten thousand dollars of tuition per beneficiary regardless of the number of, contributing plans Each year that's every year ten grand at an elementary or secondary public private. Or religious school of the beneficiaries choosing This is big remember I don't know months. Ago I talked about how you could. Set up the future grandchild's five twenty nine plan all of a sudden it's starting to make a lot more sense to me so. You can name anybody you want as, the beneficiary if. You're the owner of the contract And you can always change that so if you name your grandchild as the beneficiary and the grandchild. Is already in college got us scholarship You could keep it in the grandchild, name when that grandchild gets married and has a great grandchild for you you can change the name to the great grandchild by the time. The great grandchild wants to go to the parents. Want he or she to go to say a parochial school or a private high school they can tap into the. Five twenty nine plan you may have set up for your grandchild or maybe even your, child who knows So ten thousand bucks per year It's pretty good. It's no longer secondary college education. It can. Be for elementary school it's fantastic Next in another chain stemming from last year's tax reform the IRS and treasury are permitting. Funds, to be rolled over from a designated beneficiaries five to nine plan to an able. Account now able. Accounts are tax favored accounts for. Those who become disabled before age. Twenty six They're. Designed to enable the disabled and their families to save and pay for disability? Related expenses The rollovers from twenty five twenty nine plans together with any. Able contributions which I think are like fifteen thousand bucks a year are for those designated beneficiaries The third change which involves tuition. Refunds that can be rolled back into a five twenty nine plan the change allows a student who receives a refund of tuition or other qualified education expenses Often as, a result of dropping classes mid semester to, Rican tribute the tax refund to any of his or her five Jeanine plans within, sixty days so. Make a note of that and those changes if you have a five twenty nine plan Okay we gotta go to break shortly but there are two things I need. To cover when we come, back one is the tax planning sweet spot that you may be in right now and if you're not it's important that. You know about it and then some things you should do in anticipation. Of the next downturn not that we anticipated downturn but if in fact a downturn comes what you should have in place and that's coming up next on the Ray program also emails you can Email me right now go to raylucia dot com. R. a. y. l. u. c.. I a. dot. Com and take on the ask Ray button What ten things successful retirees do Community engagement, robust social network Part-time work fulfilling, hobbies well thought, out plan positive family relationships, mentoring someone, or coaching them physical activities supporting a cause.

Tesla Ray Elon Musk IRS treasury Facebook General Electric SEC Jeanine Morgan R. a. y. l. u. c g. ten thousand dollars thirty six percent seven percent sixty days Nine year
"general electric" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"general electric" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Into where crucial industry stand today and where they may be heading next good morning to you six, twenty on Wall, Street and we welcome Karen noble heart senior analyst at Bloomberg intelligence carrying good morning I found myself second guessing just how important General Electric's earnings are today but blue chip or not you've got to admit it's still an iconic stock in the minds of many investors others are waiting for management to get. Things turned, around enough and cough up the return on investment they were counting on based on what we've seen leading up to these latest results are those GE loyalists diehards, likely to be disappointed door sued by latest performance redone well it'll be interesting some people think that they will cut their dollar dollar seven number they probably should cut. The The number they've they've only earned about eighteen cents. In the first quarter I'm and there's always a lot of noise GED so earnings. Are, always interesting but. That's not really what I don't think it's going to matter the. Stock they've made their beginning What. They're going to do they're going to sell healthcare they're selling? Some other smaller things they're just? Keeping a couple of handful of businesses will, want some more color, on that the whole restructuring they announced late. June we will have a lot incremental information I'd say the. Big thing people focus on is is what what. Is cash flow look like, that also looks like a high guidance to and but you know GE always. Tries to hang on They don't dare deliver any, nasty, surprises though I, would think that, if they were going to they probably. Would have hinted at that on? On the big call when they announced the asset changes okay so investors would, just? Be, pleased I think. By some relative calm at this point. And I think the other thing I'd say is power is, the one, the business that's a real mess were. Now almost a year into some of it cost cutting maybe, we'll see some stabilization, stabilization and margins there but you. Know, the big news on GE's not really. What does this quarter look. Like the investors are looking. For more of an improving cash. Flow less complex.

GE Karen noble senior analyst Bloomberg intelligence General Electric
"general electric" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:41 min | 3 years ago

"general electric" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"That shave twenty years earlier edison had become was yeah she went to bill gates of his time to steve jobs of his time he was the inventor who wouldn't granted the invention factory and she was the head of his own company called general electric which now is general electric universal owning comcast owning movie studios owning nbc she was ahead of that and so he was now one of the corporate mega mogo in the united states and when he announced that he was working on a device to contact the dead he was subjected to the most horrific blow back from politicians from other corporate executive and from the entire religious community that accuse him of technology and so brightened his board of directors it general electric of his family members remember his son was going to uh i was going to be the governor of new jersey and so it's so frightened old with people who who really own view fortunes to edison that they forced it that they forced him to back off his theories even though he's still kept working on this machine and in his journal they excise the journal semi only copy of the chapters on white units and reincarnation hand sperm mia ufos and extraterrestrial or those chapters only turned up any french translation of the journal from the 1930's and then that was weak translator back into english and that's what i found it while is there any similar a sort of reaction from the tesla loyalists i i think that the tesla folks would be more open to this and in the in the book you have a quote from tesla's journals where you say he wrote physics extends beyond what is scientifically known today the future will show we now call a cold or the supernatural is based on a science not yet developed that's exactly right instead of a blow back to tesla the only grow back to task believe it or not came from the united states government we can talk about later but it was the us government that was really on top with catholic toward the end of his life but in terms of his iq and and also when he was building his radio tower septa though a white perform.

united states executive new jersey tesla edison bill gates steve general electric nbc twenty years
"general electric" Discussed on KELO

KELO

02:56 min | 3 years ago

"general electric" Discussed on KELO

"From his published journal in other words is family edited out although we call them now uh paranormal chapters and one of the reasons was there that um in the decade up his life edited was no longer just an inventor should cut a wet that twenty years earlier what editor now had become was a uh a good she went to kill gay took his time to steve jobs of his time he was the inventor who wouldn't granted the invention factory and he was the head of his own company called general electric which now is general electric universal owning comcast owning movie studios owning nbc she would he would go ahead of that and so he was now wanted to corporate mega mogo in the united states and when he announced that he was working on a device to contact the dead he was subjected to the most horrific blow back from politicians from other corporate executive and from the entire religious community that accuse him of duma knowledge and so brightened board of directors it general electric out his family member who remember his son was going to uh i was going to be the governor of new jersey and so it's so frightened all with people who who really own dear fortunes to edison that they forced it that they forced him to back off his theories even know he's still kept working on this machine and in his journal they excise journal really only copy of the chapters on right units and reincarnation hand sperm mia ufos and extraterrestrial or those chapters only turned up any french translation of the journal from the 1930's and then that was weak translator back into english and that's what i found it while is there any similar a sort of reaction from the tesla loyalists i i think that the tesla folks would be more open to this and in the book you of a quote from tesla's journals where you say he wrote physics extends beyond what is scientifically known today the future will show we now call a cult of the supernatural is based on a science not yet developed that's exactly right instead of a back to tesla the only grow back to tackle a believe it or not came from the united states government we can talk about later but it was.

editor united states executive new jersey tesla steve general electric nbc edison twenty years
"general electric" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

02:53 min | 3 years ago

"general electric" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"By from his published journal in other words his family edited out all grown we call them now uh our normal chapters and one of the reasons was there that um in the last decade up his life edited was no longer justin inventor colonel west that shave twenty years earlier what edison add com was it a f a she went to bill gates have harmed steve jobs of his time key ways the inventor who wouldn't granted the invention factory and she was the head of his own company called general electric which now is general electric universo owning comcast owning movie studios owning nbc she would go ahead that and so he was now wanted to corporate mega mogo in the united states and when he announced that he was working on a device to contact the dead he was subjected to the most horrific blow back from politicians from other corporate executives and from the entire religious community that accuse him of dum analogy and so whitened his board of directors it general electric of his family members remember his son was going to are always going to be the governor of new jersey and so it's so frightened all with people who who really own dear fortunes to edison that they forced it that they forced him to back off his theories even though he still kept working on this machine and in his journal they excise journal for me only copy of the chapters on white units in reincarnation hans permier and ufos and extraterrestrial or those chapters only turned up any french translation of the journal from the 1930's and then that was weak translated back into english and that's what i found it while is there any similar a sort of reaction from the tesla loyalists i i think that the tesla folks would be more open to this and in the in the book you have a quote from tesla's journals where you say he wrote physics extends beyond what is scientifically known today the future will show we now call a cult of the supernatural is based on a science not yet developed that's exactly right instead of a blow back to tesla the only grow back to tackle a believe it or not came from the.

colonel west com united states new jersey tesla edison bill gates general electric nbc hans permier twenty years
"general electric" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:54 min | 3 years ago

"general electric" Discussed on KTRH

"Of the reasons was there that um even aware decade up his wife edited was no longer just an inventor colonel west that cave twenty years earlier what it is it had become was a f a she went to bill gates of his time scoop jobs of his time would be granted the invention factory and she was the head of his own company called general electric which now is general electric universal owning comcast owning movie studios owning in dc ahead of that and so he was now wanted to corporate mega mogo in the united states and when she announced that he was working on a device to contact that get he was subjected to the most horrific blow back from politicians from other corporate executives and from the entire religious community that accuse him of juvenile with you and so and board of directors it general electric of his family members remember his son was going to uh i was going to be the governor of new jersey and so it's so frightened all with people who who really own view four edison that they hoisted that they forced him to back off his theories even though he still kept working on this machine and in his journal they excise journal privy only copy of the chapters on white units and we're gonna cry news shen han's sperm year and us frozen extraterrestrials although shockers only turned up in the french translation of the journal from the 1930's and then that was weak translator back into english and that's what i found it while is there any similar sort of reaction from the tesla loyalists i i think that the tesla folks would be more open to this and in the in the book you of a quote from tesla's journals where you say he wrote physics extends beyond what is scientifically known today the future will show we now call a cult or the supernatural is based on a science not yet developed that's exactly right instead of a blow back to tesla the only grow back to tackle a believe it or not came from the united states government we can talk about later but it was the us government that was really a couple of catholic toward the end of his life but in terms of his iq and and also when he was building his radio cowesett go a why quang island at white a quick long island which.

dc united states new jersey shen han tesla quang island bill gates general electric twenty years