35 Burst results for "General Electric"

Ronald Reagan's Evolution From FDR Democrat to 'Happy Republican'

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:29 min | 2 months ago

Ronald Reagan's Evolution From FDR Democrat to 'Happy Republican'

"He is a good friend of America first. Professor Paul kango. Welcome back to one on one. Yeah, thanks, Seth. You are in. How did you put it the in salubrious fetid swamp of D.C.? I love that. I got to write that down. That is one of my line is the in salubrious fetid swamp. Yes, indeed. So we've got to have a sense of humor. We've got to be happy warriors is Reagan taught us. But that prediction that I played, even to somebody who's not a talk radio host, somebody who looks at history, dispassionately, it seems like we may have arrived at his prediction, though. Well, it's interesting that Serrano Reagan, who had been a liberal, right? In fact, he described himself as a hemophiliac liberal, a bleeding heart liberal. And we're here talking, this would be Reagan died June 5th, 2004. So this is going on 20 years, almost the 20 year anniversary, I guess, of his death. 18 years ago, this past June. But his life, you know, he saw all of these ideologies, Seb, he had been an FDR Democrat. He had voted for Harry Truman, his father loved FDR. He admired FDR, and then he slowly, through an evolution because of a number of different reasons, among other things, working for General Electric, GE theater and seeing how private enterprise really worked. And also seeing in Hollywood communists dealing with marxists who called themselves

Paul Kango Serrano Reagan Reagan Seth D.C. America SEB Harry Truman General Electric GE Hollywood
"general electric" Discussed on Eyewitness Beauty

Eyewitness Beauty

05:04 min | 2 months ago

"general electric" Discussed on Eyewitness Beauty

"It's a lot of learning on the job. And I think founders in general are often times held to some sort of the same standard as the CEO of General Electric or something. And you're lucky if you're a founder and you've even been able to have an executive coach because that's money that the investors know is going to just like a therapist for you. You know what I mean? Totally. Yeah, and I think what your referencing, which is more broadly speaking, kind of just the challenges of running a really large startup that's been around for years, that is $1.8 billion. I mean, a lot of that is sort of underpinning the transitions we're seeing in the company, I think, whereas I think a lot of the commentary, a lot of the sort of salacious kind of almost like tabloidy news gossip tends to focus on. Here's what glossier did specifically wrong. And I think with any company, there are things people could have done better in hindsight. Honestly, it's just hard to do what they tried to do, especially after raising this much venture capital. I think it's just incredibly difficult proposition. And I don't know how anybody could sort of navigate that for as long as Emily did completely smoothly. I think it's impossible to do that. I agree..

General Electric Emily
"general electric" Discussed on MarketFoolery

MarketFoolery

03:56 min | 9 months ago

"general electric" Discussed on MarketFoolery

"The one and only Bill man. Thanks for being here. How are you brother? I'm doing all right. I'm doing all right. We've got Roblox shooting to the moon and PayPal PayPal falling from the sky. But we have to start be the right work. Yeah. Exactly. They're adding an L and they're now PayPal. We will get to that. We have to start with what I can only describe as the end of an era when the Dow Jones Industrial Average was formed in 1896, General Electric was one of the original 12 companies in the average, and it was there. Stayed there for well over a century until it was replaced by Walgreens in 2018 and this morning CEO Larry culp announced that GE is going to split into three separate companies, the healthcare unit is going to be spun off in early 2023, the energy division will be spun off in early 2024 and the aviation business will be the remaining company. And before we get to the underlying businesses and what this means for GE shareholders and potential shareholders because the stock is up on this news, I'm curious how you felt when you saw this news because I felt even though I have never owned shares of GE. And never seriously thought about owning shares of GE. I did feel a twinge of melancholy. Yeah, I felt a little sad. I felt I felt a little bit sad. I mean, General Electric company is about to become three more specific electric companies. We'll see what we'll see what they do with the names. Apparently the aircraft division and will retain general General Electric. Yeah, it's not just the end of an era. It's also the end of the great Jack Welch experiment. And the Jack belt, well to experiment, remember, at the moment that he retired, he was perhaps one of the most revered CEOs in American commerce. And I think that it has been shown ever since then that he built sand castles in the air that this was a company that was built on really a great deal of financial engineering, some things that just didn't turn out to be that sustainable. And so this has been the long denouement for that type of conglomerate where you've got the financial segment was spun off years ago. You know, it's not shocking to me given how few conglomerates really make a go of it now that this has happened. Yeah, and we saw you go back a few years when she was really running into trouble. We saw them selling off different parts of the business here and there. So this is probably where they were headed anyway. And this is going to look, this is still for all of the downside for this stock from 2004 when it was the biggest public company in America. And ever since then, where it's sort of gone downhill. This is still a $125 billion company. This is not a small business. And so it makes sense 80% from its low this year. Yeah. And it will bonkers to me. It makes sense that it would take some time to unwind all of this. Do you have an early sense of. What is going to be the most attractive part of this business? Because I look at the fact that Larry culp is the CEO of General Electric. And he has picked the business, the one of the three businesses that he wants to run..

General Electric Roblox Larry culp PayPal general General Electric Walgreens Jack Welch Bill America
GE to break up into 3 companies focusing on aviation, health care and energy

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 9 months ago

GE to break up into 3 companies focusing on aviation, health care and energy

"General Electric is splitting into three public companies focused on aviation health care and energy the company which dates back to eighteen ninety two said on Tuesday that it plans a spin off of its health care business in early twenty twenty three and its energy segment in early twenty twenty four G. anticipates keeping an almost twenty percent stake in the health care unit the company expects one time separation transition and operational costs of approximately two billion dollars related to the actions shares

General Electric
General Electric Workers Stage Walkout to Protest Vaccine Mandate

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:11 min | 10 months ago

General Electric Workers Stage Walkout to Protest Vaccine Mandate

"General Electric employees in Greenville, South Carolina. Planning a big turnout for a walkout. With their position being. We don't believe that a mandated vaccination is something that we can live with. And that's happening all over the country. I saw numbers yesterday, Derek fact check this for me, but I saw it on TV last night. Do you know the percentage of New York City firefighters? Paramedics, EMTs, and police officers? Who are so far not vaccinated? You know it's like 40%, hey, New York. What are you going to do? You're going to lose 40% of all of your first responders? Are you crazy? Americans are saying enough is enough. The madness must stop.

General Electric Greenville South Carolina Derek New York City New York
"general electric" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

06:09 min | 1 year ago

"general electric" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"General Electric to organize workers who were in nonunionized clerical roles like her mother's. Mistura then went on to lead organizing efforts for the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers in both Oregon and California. In 2000, and nine she became the first woman to serve as AFL CIA secretary treasurer. The federation's number two official, and on August 5th of this year after the sudden passing of Mr Trump, she became the first woman president of the F L C. I O in the organization's 65 year history. And then it was about 10 days ago, You were elected by the Executive Council to fill out his term as I understand it right again. So welcome. Um, now for the ground rules were on the record, Please. No life blogging or tweeting. In short, no filing of any kind. Find while the breakfast is underway, and once the session ends at 10 o'clock, there's no embargo. We will email a rough transcript from this breakfast. All reporters here shortly after we conclude as many of you know, if you'd like to ask a question, just send me settle a signal and I'll call on as many of you as time permits Now. President Schuler, if you'd like to make brief opening remarks, the floor is yours. Hey. Well, thank you so much. And, uh, Good morning, everyone. Good to see you. Thank you for being here. I know this event has become a labor day tradition, and we intend to keep it. So, um And I know how much you enjoyed interacting with rich Trumka, who I know. Enjoyed this breakfast as much as you did. And you were right, Linda. He loved the debate, right? Um, so he has set a high bar for me, certainly. And it is my second week on the job, so hopefully you'll keep that in mind. This morning. Uh, so he did this 12 times, year after year since he was elected president, Um I will say that I miss him personally. It's been a little over three weeks since his passing. I lost a working partner of 12 years We worked side by side with one another. So I'm doing what every therapist tells you not to do, which is compartmentalized. So we're still grieving. Um, at the False see a family. But we are pushing forward and rich would want us to. And we shouldn't stay still right? So, um so we're taking it one step at a time, I will say I am humbled and honored to be president of the AFL CI. Oh, we are the largest organization of working women in the country other than the U. S military. We are the largest job training network in America and we are lead. Long overdue structural transformation. And I believe in my bones that the labor movement is the single most powerful force for progress, and I'm not talking about institutions. I'm talking about workers coming together to make change in our workplaces in our society, and that's what we do in the labor movement through the worst public health crisis in a century, the worst economy since the Great Depression. Working people stepped up. We carried communities through the pandemic. We're responding to either as we speak. We're helping evacuation efforts in Afghanistan we were are and will always be essential, and this is a moment of tremendous opportunity from tech to transportation. Working people are speaking up and taking risks. To create real change. Public approval of unions is at a nearly 50 year high, and I know we're going to get the numbers shortly for this year. But 65% of Americans, including 71% of young people approve of unions and they see unions as a solution to our broken economic system. And because of the labor movement's efforts we have Have the most pro worker administration in history and a working majority in Congress. So we must meet this moment by building a modern labor movement, a movement that is open and accessible and diverse, a movement that keeps pace with a changing economy, the she session and great resignation, a movement in every sector in Every community with women and people of color at the center, where every worker has the right to a good, sustainable union job, And all of that depends on putting working people where we belong, and that's at the center of Policy and the center of the National conversation. We are the counterforce to skyrocketing inequality. We balance the economy. Working people want to join us. Mitt did a study and 60 million workers would form a union today if they felt like they were free to do so, because right now, you know, workers are intimidated and harassed when they try to form a union, including half the tech workforce, which was sort of surprising that half the tech workforce actually is interested in joining unions. So if 60 million workers want in, why isn't the labor movement growing? Is the question right? Because the rules are broken today in America, it's easier for a corporation to stop a union than it is for a worker to form one. And.

12 years Linda Congress 12 times August 5th 65 year 2000 Mistura Oregon California Afghanistan 65% 71% Trump America U. S military International Brotherhood of E second week 10 o'clock General Electric
GE, AerCap join air leasing businesses in $30 billion deal

Noon Report with Rick Van Cise

00:21 sec | 1 year ago

GE, AerCap join air leasing businesses in $30 billion deal

"General Electric has reached a deal to combine its jet leasing business with rival air cap. In a deal valued at $30 billion As G moves to reduce its debt load. The creation of a new industry giant could mean airlines get better deals on planes has a larger leasing company from Wrangel. Lower prices from Airbus and Boeing. Shares of G, though, are tumbling 4.7% Today. It

General Electric Airbus Boeing
"general electric" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

06:33 min | 1 year ago

"general electric" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"The acquisition of the victor talking machine company meant that RC a was now getting into the consumer Electron IX business. Keep in mind up until 1929. Garcia was primarily in the business of operating radio broadcast stations and selling what was effectively industrial equipment. But now our CIA owned the company that had created the iconic Victrola machine. And they created a subsidiary company called Arcia Victor. That company also took a majority ownership in the Japan Victor Company. Which is also known as J. V. C. Also in 1929. RKO radio Pictures released a film called Syncopation, which relied upon a new technique called RC a photo phone, which is not to be confused with the technology developed by Alexander Graham Bell. There was also called photo phoned. This was a technique of recording audio onto film for the purposes of synchronized visuals and audio. In other words, a way of making talking pictures and the formation of RKO Pictures itself is a great story that ties directly into our history of R C. A So the development of the RC a photo phone technology would date back to the early 19 twenties. There was a man named Charles A Hoxie, who was working on recording Audio two photographic film as a project for General Electric, which you'll remember was one of the founding partners that created our CIA. The Hawks is work at that time was more about preserving audio recordings for playback, not necessarily as a way of creating talking pictures but just recording audio in itself. By the mid twenties, General Electric was thinking about applying. Hock sees work in the direction of talking pictures. Now the desire to match sound to moving images. Dated back to the earliest moving pictures. Edison himself worked on this challenge, and a lot of different companies were taking various approaches to this problem. So, for example, Warner Brothers had created a system called Vita Phone. Vita phone. You had record a soundtrack onto a disk similar to an LP record. When you are ready to play the film, you would synchronize the film playback with the audio from the desk. So that was a pretty primitive approach. But it was how some early talking pictures were made, including the first one. The jazz singer, which debuted in 1927. RC a photo phone used a totally different approach. The sound was recorded in a narrow band on the side of the frame of film some actual photo reactive film, The band would be out of you. When the film was put through a projector. There was a frame on a projector that covers up the edges of the film. And the audio track is on one of those edges. The width of this strip on the side of the film varies with the frequency of the sound that was recorded onto the film. So essentially, you have sound that's transmitted into a microphone. It is turned into an electric signal, which in turn is used to treat this this photo reactive film so that it has this Record of the frequency. It's almost like a wave form. If you were to think of that, you know, in the modern sense if you were to look at an audio file on a audio editing software, so then when you're playing it back You have a bright lamp that shines light through this narrow strip and you have a photo cell that picks up the light that's coming through, and it generates an electric current that matches the amount of light that's hitting the photo cell. And that signal goes to a pre amplifier which can then boost the signal strength so I can go to an amplifier and then ultimately speakers. The lamp for reading This optical sound and the photo cell are not in the same position as the projection lamp that would just get in the way. So this is actually It creates something of a challenge. It means that the soundtrack is offset from the actual frames of the film itself. The soundtrack is either running Ah little ahead or a little behind the action of the film, depending upon The method that was actually used so and playback. It's all synchronized. Because if you as long as you put the film through the right type of projector, the audio track gets read through the audio system. At the same time as the video or the film. Rather, the images are being projected through the projection lamp and it all gets synchronized together. So and playback. It's synchronized. But if you were to look at the film itself, like if you took the film out of the projector And you held it up to the light. And you saw where the audio track is. The audio you were looking at would not be the audio that occurs in synchronization with the image you're looking at. The advantage of that approach. Was that all the synchronization would be done beforehand. You didn't have to set up a disc and a film in separate chambers to try and match up to each other. It was all in one. Piece of film. But the format itself changed several times, sometimes with the optical soundtrack, running ahead of the actions of dust behind the action. This meant the movie theaters had to invest in different equipment to play back those films properly. Because if you put in a film where the soundtrack ran a little ahead of the action, but you put it in a projector that was designed to run a film that had the audio a little behind the action. You would have Terrible experiences because the audio would not be at all synchronized with what was happening on screen. It would just be a total mess. This ended up creating kind of a format war that waged in the late twenties. After our CIA's approach debuted. It was not the only audio on film format, and it also did battle with the Vita phone approach, where it was the recorded two disc version. Now on the production side, if you were making films, it also changed how movies were made because of you watch some of the early films with sound like some of the first films that had sound in it. You might notice. People don't move very much. Shots are pretty static. Actors tend to remain in place. Well. This was largely because of the limitations of the sound recording equipment. At the time, microphones were large and bulky and typically omni directional. Actors needed.

CIA victor talking machine company Japan Victor Company General Electric RKO Pictures Arcia Victor RKO Garcia Syncopation Warner Brothers J. V. C. Alexander Graham Bell Hock Charles A Hoxie Hawks Edison
How your brain responds to stories -- and why they're crucial for leaders

TED Talks Daily

04:36 min | 1 year ago

How your brain responds to stories -- and why they're crucial for leaders

"Maria walked into the elevator at work. She went to press the button when her phone fell out of her hand. It bounced on the floor and went straight down that little opening between the elevator in the floor and she realized it wasn't just her phone. It was a phone wallet that had her driver's license her credit card her whole life. She went to the front desk to talk to ray. The security guard. Ray was really happy to see air. Marie is the one of the few people that actually stocks and says hello to him each day in fact she's one of these people that knows your birthday and your favorite food and your last vacation. Not because she's weird she just genuinely likes people like some to feel seen she tells ray what happened and he said it's going to cost at least five hundred dollars to get her phone back and he goes to get a quote while she goes back to her desk twenty minutes later he calls her and he says maria i was looking at the inspection certificate elevator. It's actually do for its annual inspection next month. I'm going to go ahead and call that in today and won't be able to get your phone back in. I won't cost you anything the same day this happened. I read an article about the. Ceo of charles schwab while turbine injure he's describing his straight a career at university going into his last exam expecting ace it when the professor gives one question. What is the name of the person that cleans this room. And he failed the exam. He had seen her but he had never met her before. Her name was dottie. And he made a vow that day to always know the dadis in his life. Because both walter and maria understand this power of helping people feel seen especially as a leader. I use that story back. When i worked at general electric. I was responsible for shaping culture and a business of ninety thousand employees in one hundred fifty countries and i found that stories. Were such a great way to connect with people and have them think. What would i do in this situation. would i have known dotty or who are the dadis. I need to know in my life. I found that no matter. People's gender or their generation or their geography in the world the stories resonated and worked but in my work with leaders. I have also found. They tend be allergic to telling stories. They're not sure where to find them or they're not sure how to tell them or are they think they have to present data that there's just not room tell story and that's why i want to focus today because storytelling data is actually not this either or it's an an actually create this power that connects you to information differently to understand how we have to. I understand what happens. Neurologically when you're listening to a story and data so as you're a lecture or you're in a meeting to small parts of your brain are activated. We're an again broke his area. This is where you're processing information and it's also why you tend to forget fifty percent of it right after you hear it when you listen to a story. Your entire brain starts to light up each of your lobes will light up as your senses and your emotions are engaged as i talk about a phone falling and hitting the ground with thaad your in your temporal lobes are lighting up as though you're seeing that fall phone and hearing it hit with the side. There's this term neural coupling which says as the listener your brain will light up exactly as mine is the storyteller. It mir's this activity as though you are actually experiencing these things. Storytelling gives you this artificial reality if i talk to you about like walking through the snow and with each step. The snow is crunching under my shoes. And big wet flakes are falling on my cheeks. Your brains are now lighting up as though you are walking through the snow and experiencing these things it's why you can sit in an action movie and not be moving but your heart is racing though. You're the star on screen because this neuro a coupling has your brain lighting up. Though you were having that activity as you listened to stories you automatically gain empathy for the storyteller the more empathy. You experience the more oxytocin is released in your brain.

Maria Charles Schwab Marie Dottie RAY General Electric Walter
AI for Translating Enterprise Content - with Spence Green of Lilt

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

05:38 min | 1 year ago

AI for Translating Enterprise Content - with Spence Green of Lilt

"So i know. We're gonna be talking about ai for translation and clearly. That's a a workflow that you folks are impacting. Get an understanding of what it looks like. Now you get a big brand like an intel or some some large company. That's got localize all their web content. How do they do that with people. Sure so dan let me let me. I tell you a story so you can understand what the motivation for doing. This translation is so most people today are familiar with google. Translate and use it when you browse the web and you could translate chrome or you use it on your phone and you'll see this in a lot of consumer devices and that's really useful for these consumer use cases where you on translate a sign you see on the road or you see a restaurant menu or you just want to get a gist of a web page of language that you don't speak okay so that not as widely used. Google translate has had enormous impact. And everybody's familiar with that. The second case. I think it more. Broadly is in business and so our motivation for building. This company was experience. I had about fifteen years ago. I was living overseas in a country. A non english speaking country Were but were. Linguists was spoken as lingua franca. And i had a friend who didn't speak english but spoke the native language of this country and he told me that he was paid less and could not get a job because he didn't speak english. And this occurred to me as a sort of inequality that we don't talk about very much are you can learn a language but you can't control your native language. If you don't speak english it's a barrier to opportunity undertake percent okay so taking that as the premise. Now take got to business. Businesses sell their products and services. And they wanna make those available to people in different languages so that they can do their job so that they can do research for products so that they can learn and presently the way that that is done is by hiring people to type translation. There's assistance used but for the most part it's just hiring human translators to translate much the same way that transition has been done since i don't know before agricultural so what we wanted to do and no machine translation was used so this was about twenty ten when we were learning about this problem. So what we are initial idea was to emma and i met working on google. Translate to take that technology and art meant what translators do the translation. Problem is not a solved problem so we can't fully remove the human translator but we can certainly amplify what they do and if we can do that then we can make it much more affordable inefficient for companies to make all of their information available to anybody who wants it and so for comparison right now companies pay about eighty dollars for an eight and a half by eleven one and a half spaced. Page of twelve point type. So it's very very expensive. Let's ten yeah. Yeah and so we wanna use technology to drive that price down so that for a fixed budget. Companies can localize more of their information. That's good for them. They can grow their business. And it's good for the world because more people have access to the products and services that you and i take for granted. Yeah so. And i guess there's like the equality element here that you're sort of bringing in on the side but clearly it's just like if intel wants people in japan to read their stuff. There's that benefit to right. We were in english primarily we can. We can move our product. Yeah that's right. There's there's four hundred no there's about four hundred million native speakers of english there's about another seven hundred million l two speakers and then there are a couple of hundred million speaking for language. You're talking one and a half million people in the world that speak english that leaves what five and a half billion humanity. Yeah regarding of humanity right so it's it's not just for positive social impact. We're capitalists and this is an opportunity for businesses to to grow their son of customers at eighty bucks a page. I mean that's a business opportunity right the folks that we've seen working on translation of all kinds of pick their lane. Your lane seems to be sort of digital asset. So maybe we'll walk through what that looks like now. So let's say a big company knows a general electric you know they're they're got a new jet engine in they're going to sell it around the world as do normally they're going to create their when it's web pages it sales collateral you probably know the list and then and then they would hire their team of people hopefully have a relationship with who are going to a really nice fine comb job at eighty bucks a page of four for all those different assets that more or less what it looks like now. Yeah that's exactly right. So typically a business will decide we're going to do business in these markets and that's a business decision and then the choices which of their of their english experience because usually companies translating out of english four. You're going to make available in that market and so for example. One of our customers is intel. Everybody knows intel's products and intel sales. They look lies into about sixteen languages right now. And so that's everything that's until dot com product manuals technical specs marketing materials. Everything having to do with intel's products and services and it turns out that despite the fact that translation so expensive it's typically less expensive than offering new content from scratch every day work in the second sort of operational constraint is companies generally want a consistent brand across their products and services. If you're offering things in different locales you've got a lot more people involved. It's very very difficult to control the brand so it's much easier to author in one language. Control the brand messaging there and then localized into a bunch of different languages. So that's kind of the business. Motivation for

Intel Google DAN Emma Japan
Customer Experience in the Digital Age

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

04:53 min | 1 year ago

Customer Experience in the Digital Age

"Talk a little bit about this. This idea of towards an ai. I operating model. Obviously a lot of people are familiar with it's on the minds and lips of so many different executives and certainly especially technology executives. But why this topic and why ranted around the operating model aspect of his as well. yes sure. so it's been clear for a while. Now that many organizations are at somewhat of an inflection point in the realm of digital transformation with here are our clients talking about this amongst their leadership teams and we hear captains of industry like tom. Siebel another recent guests on the podcast characterizing the last twenty years as an era of mass corporate extinction for those companies that failed acknowledged that the shifting digital landscape he says something like fifty two percent of companies in the fortune. Five hundred have fallen off the list since two thousand So at the center that's inflection. Point in the surrounding discussions are a lot of digital technologies The one that we've found to be most prominent is artificial intelligence undoubtedly a trend. We've been monitoring and witnessing for some time now however Leading up to our Digital symposium in july. We noticed the the conversation around a it was a evolving Specifically it was shifting from promising use cases in functions and business units to grander scale transformations so companies. Were rethinking as you said. The entire operating model in the name of ai redefining the seems the structure of the organization to break down data silos and standing up in a lot of cases entire Auctions dedicated to identify piloting and scaling. Those use cases that were most promising Symposium in july we survey about one hundred global cio hypothesis and found that. Two-thirds had already spun up dedicated teams or entire functions to focus on identification pilot than scaling of a i use cases and for those who more yet to do so sixty sixty percents that it was actually on the roadmap so this trend originally coined as shifting to a i i buy. Google was getting legs and we wanted to capture some characteristics of organizations that are effectively navigating the shift. You're very interesting. Talk a bit about the two executives that you you interviewed palo arbor from ten healthcare. Chris gates from all states a a leader in the in the health. Space a leader in the insurance space. Talk a bit of balance. Why them and why their stories were compelling sure. While starting in the aggregate healthcare and insurance or two of the most data heavy industries and generally where there's data there's opportunities to make products and experiences more intelligent and more automated in the case of gala the cio tenant healthcare there there's an ocean of clinical and claims data available from speaking with her in the past i know they're laser focused on synthesizing that data combining it with voice of the customer analytics to help improve the patient experience and enduring the panel. She shares some really interesting nuances on how to pursue without undermining the importance of the the human side of the patient physician interaction and then just recently under the pressures of covid nineteen. She has truly demonstrated her ability to lead in a crisis and spin up new data driven solutions in near real time to help manage these most unusual circumstances and then chris gates Chief technology officer at allstate is representing a company. That is no stranger to doing innovative things with data in the space of insurance The drive wise program for example that monitors driver dilemma tree data and offers rebates to those that exhibit behaviors on the road or the similar but different mile wise program that provides a pay as you go metered billing model for auto insurance both truly examples of creating new business models on the platform data in a i and outside allstate Chris just a truly dynamic leader that brings insights and experience colored by his leadership posts at other formidable companies such as a i g under armor and various business units general electric

AI Siebel Palo Arbor Chris Gates TOM Google Allstate Chris General Electric
"general electric" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"general electric" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"In other words, a way of making talking pictures and the formation of RKO Pictures itself is a great story that ties directly into our history of Arcia. So the development of the sea a boat a phone technology would date back to the early 19 twenties. There was a man named Charles A Hoxie, who was working on recording Audio two photographic film as a project for General Electric, which you'll remember was one of the founding partners that created Garcia. The Hawk sees work at that time was more about preserving audio recordings for playback, not necessarily as a way of creating talking pictures but just recording audio in itself. But by the mid twenties, General Electric was thinking about applying. Hawkes is work in the direction of talking pictures. Now the desire to match sound to moving images. Dated back to the earliest moving pictures. Edison himself worked on this challenge, and a lot of different companies were taking various approaches to this problem. So, for example, Warner Brothers had created a system called Vita Phone via phone. You would record a soundtrack onto a disk similar to an LP record. And when you are ready to play the film, you would synchronize the film playback with the audio from the desk. So that was a pretty primitive approach. But it was how some early talking pictures were made, including the first one. The jazz singer, which debuted in 1927. RC a photo phone used a totally different approach. The sound was recorded in a narrow band on the side of the frame of film some actual photo reactive film, The band would be out of you. When the film was put through a projector. There is a frame on a projector that covers up the edges of the film. And the audio track is on one of those edges. The wits of this strip on the side of the film varies with the frequency of the sound that was recorded onto the film. So essentially, you have sound that's transmitted into a microphone. It is turned into an electric signal, which in turn is used to treat this this photo reactive films so that it has this Record of the frequency. It's almost like a wave form. If you were to think of that, you know, in the modern sense if you were to look at an audio file on audio editing software, so then when you're playing it back You have a bright lamp that shines light through this narrow strip and you have a photo cell that picks up the light that's coming through, and it generates an electric current that matches the amount of light that's hitting the photo cell. And that signal goes to a pre amplifier which can then boost the signal strength so I can go to an amplifier and then ultimately speakers. The lamp for reading This optical sound and the photo cell are not in the same position as the projection lamp that would just get in the way. So this is actually It creates something of a challenge. It means that the soundtrack is offset from the actual frames of the film itself. The soundtrack is either running a little ahead or a little behind the action of the film, depending upon The method that was actually used so and playback. It's all synchronized. Because if you as long as you put the film through the right type of projector, the audio track gets read through the audio system. At the same time as the video or the film. Rather, the images are being projected through the projection lamp, and it all gets synchronized together. So in playback, it's synchronized. But if you were to look at the film itself, like if you took the film out of the projector And you held it up to the light. And you saw where the audio track is. The audio you were looking at would not be the audio that occurs and synchronization with the image you're looking at. The advantage of that approach. Was that all the synchronization would be done beforehand. You didn't have to set up a disc and a film in separate chambers to try and match up to each other. It was all in one. Piece of film. But the format itself changed several times, sometimes with the optical soundtrack, running ahead of the actions of those behind the action..

RKO Pictures General Electric Charles A Hoxie Vita Phone Warner Brothers Arcia Garcia Edison Hawkes
Breaking Through as a Challenger Brand in a Dominating Industry with Michael Landa

Entrepreneur on FIRE

04:21 min | 2 years ago

Breaking Through as a Challenger Brand in a Dominating Industry with Michael Landa

"Michael say what's up to fire nation and share something interesting about yourself that most people don't know probably feared asked people my office they would not know was trying to think earlier is one thing that they definitely would not know about me and that is that up until about I'd say probably a couple of years ago I could still do a standing backflip in my office. So Yeah. I kinda grew up as a competitive gymnast when I was in high school and then I was non-american swimmer. So I mean swimming was really my main sport. But I competed a lot on the floor exercises in gymnastics as well, which is something people most people don't know about me. I've just always had this feeling that if I ever tried a standing backflip immediately tear my MC l. that's just a thought that I I don't know why I had that thought that's why I said for years ago try. Not Going to happen. So fire nation as I shared the talking all about teaching an old dog new tricks and my guest today has launched a company called New Loewe, which is a combination of the words nutrition and love. So that Super Cool New Loewe and why Michael I mean, you went to business school why did you decide to start a pet food company before the PETRIE company? Kind of the Genesis of the Food Company was a company I started? Before new I, I'd spent the early part of my corporate career working for big companies. I used to work for is your oxen in General Electric, and then most recently with universal studios in. Two thousand one that I was in L. A. and I was taking a quick break and. I found I. Don't know how many of you have been through the experience of trying to find a pet sitter for your pet. I went through an experience, sperry the detail, but basically led me to leave universal and start what became the nation's largest at home pet sitting dog-walking training business. Is based in Los Angeles and we. I spent about a decade running that company and was it was in and of itself was a really cool business about one, hundred, eighty five. Pet Sitters dog walkers doing roughly eleven thousand a month all over Greater La, and you know the significance of that was I was you know we're on the front lines of feeding a large population of dogs and cats whether parents were traveling and over the course of the decade I really started to see a huge demand for pet sitters who could administer at home insulin shots, and this is for diabetic dogs and cats, and we eventually it started to stress the business where I couldn't hire that tax and and trained my sitters to give shots fast enough and you know one thing I was trained academically as a biomedical engineer. So I I can be annoying and in my ability to kind of. Dig for root causes and that's exactly what I did in this case is you know I started asking myself like what what's happening why are so many pets getting sick why are so many dogs and cats getting diabetes and? I went out and talking to vet schools and scientists around the country and you know what I learned wasn't I'm GonNa say it wasn't really rocket science but it was you know essentially that are pets are living in in their own version of fast food nation we have you know we we have a country where four. A large large conglomerates control over eighty percent of the pet food sales in the United States and you know these are the very companies that make candy, chocolate, Jelly and cereal right. These are these are the four that control eighty percent of our pet food distribution the US. So you know. Really. The majorities are really low in meet their high in carbohydrates, these high glycemic ingredients. They're marketed very well but unfortunately, dogs and cats can't use the food for themselves otherwise, they choose products that are high in meat. That's one of the reasons you know I. Before I even gave it much thought I was leading Los Angeles moving to Austin Texas and I started new Loewe with the objective of creating a food platform. That's more species Pacific for dogs and cats at high in meet low in carbs and look like

Food Company Los Angeles New Loewe Michael Universal Studios Diabetes General Electric United States Petrie Company Austin Texas
"general electric" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"general electric" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"The acquisition of the victor talking machine company that was now getting into the consumer electronics business. Keep in mind up until 1929 was primarily in the business of operating radio broadcast stations and selling what was effectively industrial equipment. But now our CIA owned the company that had created the iconic Victrola machine, and they created a subsidiary company called Victor. That company also took a majority ownership in the Japan Victor Company. Which is also known as J. V. C. Also in 1929. RKO radio Pictures released a film called Syncopation, which relied upon a new technique called RC a photo phone, which is not to be confused with the technology developed by Alexander Graham Bell that was also called photo phone. No. This was a technique of recording audio onto film for the purposes of synchronized visuals and audio. In other words, a way of making talking pictures and the formation of RKO Pictures itself is a great story that ties directly into our history of Arcia. So the development of the sea a boat a phone technology would date back to the early 19 twenties. There was a man named Charles A Hoxie, who was working on recording Audio two photographic film as a project for General Electric, which you'll remember was one of the founding partners that created Garcia. The Hawks is work and that time was more about preserving audio recordings for playback, not necessarily as a way of creating talking pictures but just recording audio in itself. By the mid twenties, General Electric was thinking about applying. Hawkes is work in the direction of talking pictures. Now the desire to match sound to moving images. Dated back to the earliest moving pictures. Edison himself worked on this challenge, and a lot of different companies were taking various approaches to this problem. So, for example, Warner Brothers had created a system called Vita Phone via phone. You would record a soundtrack onto a disk similar to an LP record..

RKO Pictures victor talking machine company Japan Victor Company Vita Phone General Electric Syncopation Alexander Graham Bell Warner Brothers CIA Charles A Hoxie Edison J. V. C. Arcia Hawkes Hawks Garcia
The Club

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

03:57 min | 2 years ago

The Club

"Welcome to kiss myths and Mystery Syam, your host Kit crump today, the Bohemian Grove and a little bit about secret societies. Perhaps, you belong to a club some time in your life maybe the girl Scouts or cub scouts I was a cub scout many clubs have rules and regulations that go no further than the halls were the members gather like the elks however organizations like the PTA Parent Teacher Association can affect schools, school districts therefore students the reach and impact of. These organizations are limited and generally they're intent is not secret records of meetings of the scouts, elks in the PTA and many other clubs are available to the public. But there are many secret societies out there Yale's skull and bones founded in eighteen thirty two and has had both bushes Teddy Roosevelt and his cousin Franklin as members but a complete list of members is difficult to acquire and the intent of the club impossible to know Dan there is the barbarian aluminum. An lighten era secret society founded may first seventeen seventy, six. The BILDERBERG group is so secret that is considered by many to be a shadow world most secret societies, clubs and organizations so far flung with headquarters in different cities around the world. But the Bohemian Grove is located on two thousand, seven hundred privately owned acres located in Monte Rio California and established eighteen seventy two security at the grove is year round ex-military hired to keep out the curious high end equipment including thermal night vision cameras, and motion detectors are used. As. Part of the sophisticated detection and alarm system, they have ceremonies with strange names like the yearly cremation of care ceremony. It was revealed by a California judge during a discrimination suit brought against that grow by the California Department of Fair Employment and housing over the club's refusal to hire women when the judge that issued decision in favor of the club's practice of not hiring women stated the club members urinated in the open and that hiring women would alter the members behavior odd ceremonies and members strange conduct aside members like those. Of Yale are rich and powerful pictures of President Reagan and Nixon indicate they were members. Also, the Grove is particularly famous for a Manhattan Project Planning Meeting this took place there in September of Nineteen, forty two, which subsequently led to the atomic bomb those attending this meeting include Ernest, Lawrence j Robert, Altman Heimer, the s one executive committee heads such as presidents of Harvard Yale and Princeton along with representatives of standard, oil general, electric as well as various military officials. All members at the time oppenheimer was not an s one member. Although Lawrence, an open heimer hosted the meetings grow members take particular pride in this of and often relate the story to new attendees. However, other behavior at this famous campground has led to numerous claims and even some parody in popular culture. One such documented example was former president Richard Nixon's comments on May Thirteenth Nineteen seventy-one recording the Bohemian Grove which I attended from time to time. It is the most Fag God damn thing you could ever imagine now that's a quote from Richard, Nixon was recorded may thirteen nine, hundred, seventy one. Author, Brad Meltzer hosted a program for the history channel. It was called history coded. He hosted a team of three and during one episode sent to to infiltrate the Hebron. Grove. With the disastrous result, they were all arrested.

Bohemian Grove Richard Nixon Brad Meltzer Pta Parent Teacher Association PTA Kit Crump Lawrence J Robert California Department Of Fair Yale President Reagan California Teddy Roosevelt Monte Rio California Bilderberg Harvard Yale Oppenheimer Altman Heimer Hebron President Trump DAN
Guest Teacher  Alain Hunkins  How to Increase Your Impact and Influence by Building Your Credibility

The $100 MBA Show

09:47 min | 2 years ago

Guest Teacher Alain Hunkins How to Increase Your Impact and Influence by Building Your Credibility

"Today's guest teacher. Huggins is the author of cracking the leadership code, three secrets that building strong leaders if you want to get the first chapter for free, hang onto the end of the episode, Show you how you can get it on the sought after trainer Speaker, consultant, and coach for over twenty years. He's worked with big brands like Walmart Pfizer, City Group General Electric IBM? GM. State Farm Insurance Microsoft and more and today. He's GonNa break down how to build your credibility, your authority with your team with your actual clients with anybody who work with some simple steps you can take. This is especially important for new to this if you are. are dealing with new clients or you have new teams joining your team. The first thing everybody's thinking about when they meet you is, is this person? The real deal? Can I trust them? Will they deliver? Are they the leader I'm looking for? Is this the business or client I want to work with and that all boils down to are you credible? Let's make sure the answer is, yes. So I'm GONNA pass it onto onto, teach you today's guest teacher lesson, but I'll be back to rabbit today's episode and share with you that linked to get the free, first chapter of allowance book cracking the Leadership Code, but for now takeaway on. Hello there, my name is Alla. Pumpkins. Thank you for joining me today. Today. You how to increase your influence and impact five building your credibility. So, let's get down to business. I'd like to start by giving you thirty thousand foot high level overview of our lesson today. We'll start by looking at what credibility is. Then take a look at why it's so important, and then look at the three biggest actions you can take to build your credibility, but let's start with a story about a leader named Clint. Clint is the CO founder of a software company that's grown rapidly over the last three years. He's smart outgoing and he's great in front of customers. In fact, the sales team is nicknamed Clinton Midas because everything he touches turns to gold. However for all of Clint's strengths, he has this tragic flaw. He's consistently late for meetings ten, twenty, thirty minutes. Late is par for the course with Clinton sometimes even more. In Clint is also the master of excuses as to why he's late. He'll say, well, this customer meeting went long or this operational issue needed my time or gosh, the traffic from the airport was horrible. However is much as Clinton tries to explain and excuse his way out of it. His team is just not having it anymore. It's having an impact on engagement morale. In fact, two of Clint's direct reports have quit in the last week. And the sad truth is clint doesn't have a clue as to why and the reason because Clinton has never stopped to recognize the importance of credibility. So let's start and take a look. What exactly is credibility. Credibility comes from the Latin word credibility, which means worthy to believed. Credibility, is the main ingredient in trust and trust is the glue of human relationship. Turns out credibility shares the same etymological root as the word credit, which means alone or a thing entrusted to another. So, let's take a look at why that is so important. So if you want to influence others, you want them to do something because it's important to you. So, how did they decide if they're going to do it? Well, it's based on your relationship credit score. If you have a high credit score, you've proven yourself as a low risk, high return person and the other person is likely to help. They think you're a good investment. However, if you're a high risk low return person forget about it, they're not going to help fact is people own their own talents and skills, and they only offer them to you on loan. So having a high level of credibility or relationship credit score is your way of proving that you're worth loaning to. For people to truly follow you. They have to believe you're worth following. And how do they decide it's through your actions or is Albert Schweitzer the Nobel Prize winner. Put it. Example is not the main thing influencing others. It is the only thing. So. If you want to increase your influence and impact and others, you need to grow your credibility. To take a look at the top three things that you can do to make that happen. The first. Showing up on. Time to lesson from Clint. If I could only choose one practice to grow my credibility. I'd say show up on time you should treat your performance in this arena is a big deal. It is think about it for a moment. Timeliness is the easiest and most visible thing to measure sure either here or you're not. Fact is lateness is about much more than just a few wasted minutes. In life being on time is the most basic social contract that of presence. When you're late, your behavior sends a clear message. I have other things going on. That are more important than you are. And when you're on time, you send a clear message that you value the other person. So you to choose what's the message that you WanNa send and know that your actions speak a lot louder than your intentions. The second thing that you can do to grow your credibility is to do what you say you're GONNA do. You see when you open your mouth and promised to do something you cr- create expectations in those who are listening to you for them that promise is now this open psychological loop of tension that seeks resolution and it stays open nagging at them as they think, will they follow through or not? The fact is people crave closure. So every time you do what you say you're going to do you strengthen the connection between your words and your deeds, which is exactly what's meant by walking the talk when you walk your talk your seen as congruent and when you don't. You're not. You're out of integrity something's off, which is what Ralph Waldo Emerson Express when he said who you are speaks. So loudly, I can't hear what you're saying. See Doing. What you say you're going to do is the precise deficit of accountability. have. You ever wondered where accountability comes from. It comes from the world of accounting in finance. There's a balance sheet, there's on one side assets. The other side is liabilities and the to need to equal each other to be in account. Well, in human behavior, the two sides of your behavioral balance-sheet are what you say you're going to do. And what you actually did. And when you follow through and do what you say, you'll do the two sides balanced out and you're accountable. So a top tip around this. Do you say what you're GonNa do is write things down. Keep a written record of what you promised to do your way better off being someone who under promises and over delivers than the other way around. This means you have to be clear on your commitments and also be willing to say no from time to time. So. We've looked at our first two actions. Showing up on time doing what you say you're going to do our third one is around being consistent. This is the practice of doing what you say you're going to do not just once, but repeatedly multiple times over an extended period of time. When you start to build the deposits in that emotional bank account, your credit score goes up. The, no. One's going to throw you a party for showing up on time. However, the little things done over time compound and have a multiplier effect. As an example, take the CEO of Campbell Soup, a man called Doug. It now doug was CEO of Campbell Soup, for ten years and in his ten year period as the leader of Campbell's. Doug wrote Thirty Thousand Personal Handwritten. Thank you notes to his employees. Now, by the way over those ten years, Campbell's only had twenty thousand employees, and if you do the math, it works out to more than eight. Thank you notes per day seven days a week for ten years. Now, that's pretty incredible to me. Now, I'm not saying you need to start writing eight. Thank you know today, but I think Doug Conan's example of the power of consistently and showing how that multiplies and compounds over time is great. It's so easy in this world to think that we're too busy to do the important things. See if you WanNa know what a person values. Look at their calendar and see where they spend their time because that is the ultimate test of what you're truly valuing because ultimately, every action that you take will either strengthen or weaken your credibility and connection between. which either strengthens or weakens your influence and your impact.

Clint Clinton Midas Doug Conan Campbell Soup State Farm IBM Walmart GM Huggins Thirty Thousand Personal Handw Campbell Albert Schweitzer Consultant Ralph Waldo Emerson Nobel Prize CEO Co Founder
Dig for Victory

Gastropod

06:06 min | 2 years ago

Dig for Victory

"To get to today's urban gardens, let's go back in time to the founding of the US, there were certainly major cities Philadelphia New York Boston, but it wasn't. Until the eighteen hundreds that more and more people move to cities and urban ization in the US really got underway. These are people who would have grown almost all their own food before, but now they live in a city. They can buy food at the market. So how many of them kept up gardening in their new urban homes? A lot of food production went on. On within city boundaries well through the start of the twentieth century, there were lots and lots of urban livestock, because people were raising pigs and cows and chicken for food within city limits anesthesia day as a historian at the University of Delaware, and she's working on a PhD about Victory Gardens. It's only really during the city, Beautiful Movement and the progressive era that city start passing ordinances that actually outlawed these forms of local food production in the name of cleanliness and sanitation and middle-class standards of respectability, because only poor people grow their. Their own food. The city beautiful movement was big deal during the eighteen nineteen in one thousand, nine hundred wealthy urbanites, all this rural migration and immigration, and of course, the rising inequality and poverty and tenements in their cities, and they were not happy. They tried to clean the city up. They built big boulevards and parks with monumental fountains, and eventually they also introduced strict zoning laws and chickens and vegetable patches were not part of these new beautiful cities urban agriculture. Something poor people needed. It had to go some cities overtime had already. Already banned maybe the animals in the streets, or even keeping certain animals within city limits, but this really solidified during the city, beautiful movement city started to enact ordinances that said no farm animals in the city at all and no front yard vegetables, either meanwhile the poor had more pressing concerns than how the city looked frequently, when bad harvests and economic fluctuations raised food prices, they could not get to eat. There were dozens of major food riots in American cities throughout the eighteen hundreds. The first urban gardening movement starts in eighteen ninety. Ninety three in the town of Detroit, because of this panic of eighteen, ninety three, there were lots of panics. In those days, the stock market was very new, very volatile and long story short, suddenly, basically overnight, forty three percent of detroiters are unemployed in what had been a booming city and the Mayor Hazel S Pingree I has to find some way to answer. The cries of his constituents. So what he does is, he starts the first urban farming movement, which is ironically happening at the same time that many productive activities within the. The city are being outlawed. In other cities, urban leaders didn't want farms in their cities, but they also didn't want riots, and so letting poor people groza food on vacant land was seen as an acceptable temporary band aid in times of shortages. The Detroit plan was called the potato, patch plan and it had pretty impressive results by eighteen, ninety, six seventeen hundred families were farming more than four hundred acres in the city, and there are letters there from local detroiters writing into mayor Pingree, saying you so much I was able to grow. Grow Food for my family and lots of the people that wrote in. It's heartbreaking, because these letters are hardly legible there in broken English. Many of them were recent, German and Polish immigrants who were taking advantage of this program to grow foods dot connected them to their home as well as to feed their families. The Potato Patch program was seen as a success, but it was never meant to be permanent in less than a decade when economic situation in Detroit started to improve urban farms kind of petered out until the next big. Big Crisis, which was World War, one, the city beautiful movement had stamped out urban gardening the Detroit potato patches were gone, but suddenly there was a huge need both for food, and for kind of coming together in a patriotic sense. At least that's how Charles lay through peck sought. He was a lumber baron from New Jersey and early on in the days of the European conflict. He wrote the US government and said people should be reason. Food would help them contribute to the war help stock shortages, and the USDA promptly said Sir. We've got better ideas going here for better uses of fertilizer and seed supplies so thanks for your input and no thanks Charles hadn't made his fortune by taking no for an answer, so he took that Fortuna and started a Liberty Garden Movement himself, and he quickly found a whole group of rich people who wanted to join him in getting Americans. Gardening again to support the war Charles and his friends created a movement. There were Liberty Gardens. Gardens on Boston Common, and in Union Square in New York and big corporations like Eastman Kodak and General Electric set aside land at their factories for employees to grow and boy scouts even had a garden at Grover Cleveland's Childhood Home in New Jersey. Even the government caught the Liberty Garden fever, and they created a school program to teach budding young home farmers how to grow food and support. The soldiers was actually one of the first nationally. Nationally promoted curricula in the country, the Liberty Garden Movement seemed to really catch the public imagination. However, there was no infrastructure for collecting numbers. The only source we have is Charles Lathrop pack himself wrote a book called the war garden victorious in one, thousand, nine, hundred nineteen, and he claims that the movements sponsored five million gardens which time when there were just over six million actual professional farmers in the US is kind of impressive but remember. Remember Charles is our only source for this number and he might have been biased. It's really incredibly hard to say, but despite its holds on the national imagination, it had nowhere near the impact of world. War Two Gardens in terms at share mount of produce ground, sheer numbers of people participating sheer difference it made in the global war effort, and that's probably why you listeners at least in the US you don't use the Term Liberty Garden. Gardens you probably say victory garden.

Charles Lathrop Liberty Garden Movement United States Detroit Victory Gardens New Jersey Hazel S Pingree Liberty Gardens Term Liberty Garden New York Us Government University Of Delaware Philadelphia Usda Boston
Engine Competitions for B-52 and F-15EX

Airplane Geeks Podcast

08:39 min | 2 years ago

Engine Competitions for B-52 and F-15EX

"Wings mount to the pile or the pilots of the wings, and then a complete cockpit redesign. So. They're actually asking for eight engines and think young not to Max Flank and give us much more details, but think of these are the engines that are like on the back of big business jets. Yeah, yeah. We'll. We'll talk about those in just a second I. IT might be worth mentioning that previous on even Wanna use the plans, but in some cases plans in some cases, proposals or ideas to re engine. The the B fifty. Two's did include going four larger engines at at one point, they were looking at for Pratt and Whitney pw. Two thousand engines are the military designations F. One seventeen. which is what you find basically on the seven Boeing seven five seven and on the on the C. Seventeen. At one point, there was a proposal for four least Rolls Royce rb. Two eleven engines That didn't go. there was Competition at one point proposed between that are be to eleven, P, W, two thousand and also the CFM. In jains, which is what's on the Boeing seven three sevens and some other things. But now we're looking at. It's called the commercial engine. Reengineering program will redundant. They're the commercial engine reengineering program CRP or I guess we call that. SURP- well I. It's kind of funny because we've got now a commercial space program, this is a commercial reengineering. One of the things we've talked about recently. especially with military aviation is. Using off the shelf components for whatever whatever the need is not creating a specific, a specific mission, specific platforms, specific engine or electron ix, but what using what's out there to do that? So that's really where we're going with this and like Brad said. The the engine pilots in the structure they wanna keep as simple as possible, and this has been kind of a trend in believe it or not. The warbirds circuit. The recreated emmy to six choose. That were replicas. Have the NACELLE 's built for the. Engines from world. War Two, but have more modern engines hidden underneath them so you're you're so you're getting the same look and you're getting the same thrust ratios. ETC, but you have a more powerful much better engine, so they're. They're looking to keep the eight eight engines for balance and for. If you lose one on takeoff, etc, so and so max taken away with what are our choices? Envelope, please you have from from General Electric well, there's actually to possibilities, but one is the t.f thirty four, which has launchpad said is popular on many. Many Biz jets it's also a very to that is what powers the eight ten actually So that's that's one possibility, and that's an engine that's been around for you know for a while. It's very reliable. It's a good engine. Another possibility from GE is what they call their their. Passport engine, which is a newer newer design that GEE is working on for for a regional and business jets. so that's from. General Electric from Pratt and Whitney. There's the PW eight hundred. Series, which is also a an engine for regional jets and business jets, which is produced by pregnant Canada and it actually has the common core with the geared turbofan engine, except it doesn't have the big high bypass fan, and it doesn't have the gear, but the core of the. Pragmatism you. Eight hundred series engines the same as the geared turbofan. In from Rolls Royce. We have the F. One thirty, which is the military designation for the commercial. be are seven hundred series, which is another business jet. Engine so these are smaller diameter than the high bypass turbofans you see on seventy three seven's a three thousand family series in all of the others smaller diameter, but it turns out not a whole lot different from those t.f thirty-three engines. Their stuffed into the into the beef twos will as our insider into the engine world in our ringer. Where do we put our money on the bet I'll. Pick. Pick a winner now, so so the air. Force will have a relatively complicated or complex system for evaluating the proposals. Will take into account. A number of different factors in in this case. Some of those factors will include things like fuel burn because. A more efficient engine requires less aerial refueling. That's a that's a good thing. It'll include things like maintenance costs. What are the you know? The life cycle maintenance costs a variety of different other aspects to it I don't know if engine maintenance proposals or plans, or are going to be associated with these, or or not, or if it's you know, the maintenance is going to continue as it has with t.f thirty-three terms of WHO's doing it I don't know, but it'll be A. Interesting process, this is actually the sort of the second phase of this This proposal process the the the three of them in the first phase. If you WANNA, call it. That created digital prototypes. This is very interesting I. I don't know if this has been done to this degree in the past, but the since the first round submission from the three engine makers was a digital prototype submission, but the final proposals is comes up really fast July. Twenty second is the deadline for the air force the government to receive the final proposals.

Whitney Pw General Electric Boeing Max Flank Emmy C. Seventeen Pratt Brad GE Canada
GE selling century-old lighting unit to Savant Systems

WBZ Afternoon News

00:32 sec | 2 years ago

GE selling century-old lighting unit to Savant Systems

"Hall General Electric no longer in the light ball business CBS's Jim Priscilla tells us the Boston based company has been selling off underperforming parts of its empire for years we heard now General Electric has decided to get out of the lighting business after nearly a hundred thirty years the company is selling its Cleveland Ohio based lighting unit to smart home company savant systems G. E. was formed on April fifteenth eighteen ninety two Jim chrysalis

Hall General Electric CBS Jim Priscilla Ohio G. E. Jim Chrysalis Boston Cleveland
GE Aviation to cut workforce by up to 13,000 jobs, or 25%

Rush Limbaugh

00:14 sec | 2 years ago

GE Aviation to cut workforce by up to 13,000 jobs, or 25%

"General Electric is cutting approximately thirteen thousand jobs in its jet engine business because of lost business G. E. said in a memo to its staff that it plans to cut twenty five percent of its global aviation workforce in coming

General Electric G. E.
Boston-based GE results show scale of impact from global aviation crisis

WBZ Midday News

00:16 sec | 2 years ago

Boston-based GE results show scale of impact from global aviation crisis

"The world's largest maker of jet engines a Boston based General Electric cannot hide from the sharp downturn in commercial air travel during the corona virus pandemic sales in G. E. aviation the company's crown jewel fell thirteen percent and orders were down fourteen percent

Boston General Electric G. E. Aviation
"general electric" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"general electric" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"My credit union good morning as Hey Megan an hour to go before the market opens invoice stock futures have been all over the place right now they are lower Dow futures down one sixty nine the nasdaq indicator down almost fifty and the S. and P. futures are twenty points lower Ford Motor Company speeding up plans to produce ventilators with General Electric the carmaker has picked a simple design of the medical devices and hopes to make about fifty thousand units the next one Hundred Days well barely Wells Fargo has the ability to land about three hundred eighty four billion dollars to customers trying to weather the corona virus pandemic with the bank can't because it's in the regulatory dog house sources say the fed is reluctant to ease in order that capped the bank's assets because the company has yet to address concerns that prompted the sanctions in the first place Dow futures down one hundred and sixty seven points live with the Bloomberg business report I read Korea news radio twelve hundred W. O. A. I thank you ed for more on the corona virus go to the I heart radio app tap on the podcast app for the latest news and information time now for that look at traffic and weather together W. O. A. I. traffic center good morning be ready to tap on your brakes on the east side on I. ten east or westbound between sixteen oh four in foster road construction projects here adding multiple lanes another project on two eighty one on the north side affecting both the north and south bound side.

Ford Motor Company General Electric Wells Fargo fed Bloomberg Korea W. O. A.
Ford, GE plan to produce 50,000 ventilators in 100 days

Steve Trevelise

00:37 sec | 2 years ago

Ford, GE plan to produce 50,000 ventilators in 100 days

"At Monday's White House briefing on the corona virus pandemic president trump announced several pharmaceutical companies are donating doses of drugs believed to help treat cove in nineteen he also announced that manufacturers will begin making ventilators to meet the increased demand for just announced just a little while ago that they will produce along with General Electric healthcare fifty thousand ventilators and they're gonna be doing it in less than one Hundred Days the number of confirmed cases has continued to spike across the country there were over a hundred and fifty nine thousand cases nationwide as of this

Hundred Days White House President Trump General Electric
"general electric" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"general electric" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"If you just saw just came over the wires at four just announced just a little while ago that they will produce along with General Electric healthcare fifty thousand ventilators and they're gonna be doing it in less than one Hundred Days and top of that we have other companies that are doing ventilators including General Motors but we have nine other companies doing ventilators as we outpace what we need we're going to be sending up to Italy we're going to be sending them to France we're gonna be sending them to Spain where they have tremendous problems and to other countries as we as we can but the fact that we're doing so many so quickly is a tribute to our great companies more than fourteen thousand National Guard members have been activated I can help supplement state and local efforts to distribute personal protective equipment where we're sending a lot we have plane loads coming in we have fifty one loads from various locations all around the world then the their landing we had our first big cargo plane land this morning and we're getting it from all over the world and we're also sending things that we don't need to other parts I just spoke to the prime minister of Italy and we have additional capacity we have additional product that we don't need we're going to be sending approximately a hundred million dollars worth of of things of surgical and medical and hospital things to Italy and just sepi was very very happy I will tell you that they have a very hard time joining us this afternoon or CEOs of the great American companies that are fulfilling their patriotic duty by producing or donating medical equipment to help meet our most urgent needs what they're doing is incredible enjoy great companies Darious dom check of Honeywell you know that and Darius has been somebody that I've dealt with in the past and he's a great leader of a great company Debra Waller of jockey international a friend of mine Mike Lindell of MyPillow boy do you sell those pillows it's unbelievable what you do David Taylor Procter and gamble and Greg Hayes of United technologies corporation and I just want to tell all of you that America is very grateful do you and what you've done an amazing job you've done and we thank you very much I'd like you to come up and say a couple words if you might about you companies might come on up to one of those places come on up you have to say what you're doing because it's been really incredible that Mike okay well my pillows on a U. S. vertically integrated company which has been forced to adjust to the changing business environment as a result of a pandemic my bill is uniquely positioned as a U. S. company the function doesn't manufacture logistics management distributor and direct to consumer given our current business lines we are experiencing a fax of this pandemic firsthand but my pills down with your stab was an internal task force which is monitoring the future needs of companies across the country as a result of this pandemic and given our position we began to research and develop new protocols to address the current and future needs of U. S. businesses across multiple sectors how companies are going to prepare themselves when they once again opened up and changes to the current operations in order just to future threats and pandemics my bill is designated some of its call centre to help US companies navigate the many issues that resulted from this pandemic we've done it we've dedicated seventy five percent of my manufacturing to produce cotton face balanced up to trial in three days I was up to ten thousand a day by Friday I want to be up.

General Electric
"general electric" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

05:33 min | 2 years ago

"general electric" Discussed on WJR 760

"Seven Joe this is Kim with a question about it General Electric refrigerator good morning Kim thanks for calling and joining us this morning how may we help you I've got a side by side General Electric refrigerator are you just moved in there and then mobile home and I moved in about a year and a half ago to work just fine is it doesn't have the water hook up for the it is too quick for the water and ice cubes yes Sir hook up good it's not hooked up okay what's anyway what should not doing it could it could heating could cooling day before yesterday completely yeah or are you still cold in the freezer now the freezer starred in the process the refrigerators start menu lukewarm hi now now I got electricity too with the lights come on and when I opened either door I can hear the pain and go off so which I think is what it's supposed to do right now I want you to check something for me okay there's a fan motor underneath the refrigerator it's in the back underneath the refrigerator and to get it to that fan motor you have to pull the refrigerator out away from the wall so you don't have to be able to go to the back remove the cardboard cover that's on the bottom at the back end is nothing but a couple of screws or clips that hold it in place and when you remove that make sure you you put it back when you're done it's there for a reason okay now the fan motors what I want you to go to should I unplug your refrigerator before I do this yeah it doesn't it doesn't hurt anything to leave it plugged in okay but you want you will want to make sure that it's plugged in when you get back there so that right with the fan motors running or not right now I had a guy of neighbors not friend of mine a friend of mine not long ago who said to me I got to buy a new refrigerator said Weiss because the guy came out told me I got a bad compressor I said really well let me go take a look at the live right behind me so I went over to his house I went downstairs I went to his refrigerator and I took a simple little at lighter a cigarette lighter and I would put it in front of the refrigerator and you could see the air moving so and what in this case I couldn't see the air moving so I know the fan motor was not running but that simple little test so I pulled the refrigerator out I went to the back and took the cardboard cover off and I pulled this big rapper from the grocery store you know those in on the wrist wrist recipe or the receipt you get I pulled one of those things out of the fan blade on the fan motor and that's all that was wrong with it so lake Taylor that fan motors very prone to fail is nothing but two three screws that hold it in place in the little bracket couple wires that go to it and that's all there is to replacing it is not hard to do it's not all that expensive but I need to go there before you go anywhere else all right so whatever got thrown up on top of the researchers are blue back to the back that might be all there is right it happens all the time interesting thank you Kim okay thank you if it's not if this is not blocked by the fans and the fans not blocked by any any year for paper or anything then what do I do well now if you're compressors running and you can always tell if it's running or not it'll be hot number one to touch a very odd okay and you can also hear it when it's running but it's it's running and you're still not cooling now is the time to call for a service technician all right thanks Kim take care great thank you very much hammer how about we go to a munificent gonna talk to mark about his refrigerator good morning mark thanks for calling in how may we help you hello mark hello yes mark I'm on the line please go ahead yes I have a question actually about a chest freezer yes Sir I've got eight Gibson thirteen point five foot cubic is chest freezer it's not getting cold enough I have the temperature turned all the way up to cold and the temperature inside the freezer is about eighteen degrees how old is it yes it's old it's probably thirty years older a little older than that well listen what you're telling me is if this chest freezer is operating and you can hear the compressor operating and you don't have the door half open you should be at much colder temperatures than that which means you've got a sealed system problem with this chest freezer and in my opinion it's not worth fixing okay it's not worth fixing because.

Joe Kim General Electric
Jack Welch, legendary former GE CEO, dead at age 84

America's Morning News

00:32 sec | 2 years ago

Jack Welch, legendary former GE CEO, dead at age 84

"And Jack Welch who transformed a General Electric into a highly profitable multinational conglomerate has passed away at the age of eighty four well it's becoming one of the nation's most well known and highly regarded corporate leaders during his two decades as a G. easy chair and chief executive he personified the so called cult of C. E. O. during the late nineties out when G. E. soaring stock price made it the most valuable company in the world this is an amazing legacy and that he leaves

Jack Welch General Electric Chief Executive C. E. O. G. E.
Longtime CEO of General Electric Jack Welch dies at age 84

News, Traffic and Weather

00:38 sec | 2 years ago

Longtime CEO of General Electric Jack Welch dies at age 84

"Retired longtime General Electric chief Jack Welch passed away at the age of eighty four Jack Welch's first job G. E. the company would eventually run and remake was as a chemical engineer by the time he was forty five feet engineer his way to the top spot chairman and CEO in charge he had a simple rule for all of G. E.'s divisions if they were market leaders there are three choices fix it close it or sell it during his twenty year tenure from nineteen eighty one to two thousand one G. E.'s value jump from twelve billion dollars to over four hundred billion also part of his mantra cutting payroll G. E. shed over a hundred thousand workers in his first five years on the job Jerry Preston ABC

Jack Welch Engineer Chairman And Ceo General Electric Jerry Preston Abc
"general electric" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

14:08 min | 2 years ago

"general electric" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"By pricing our American auto industry been so tired it's harder in the block the bad news messenger and third company to General Electric and I know you want to talk about that I was you know it's a it's fascinating amity your discussion the point you raise follow precisely the outline I have in front of me I don't need my outline he you instinctively you just know where I would love to go next so of course G. eat is exactly what I want to talk about because in the background during LBJ JFK and Nixon administration in the background is a B. grade actor who becomes of course the president Reagan and tell us if you can briefly but include all the juicy details how General Electric a fortune five hundred company one of the most trusted companies in America if not the world what in the world did they have to do with delivering president Reagan to us and I should mention before I turn the microphone over to you is that I mentioned earlier LBJ was driven by and guided by Roosevelt J. F. K. he was guided by you to a substantial degree the brain trust the best and the brightest from Marvin Nixon seem to be guided by Nixon and Reagan as we will learn was guided by Frederick Hayek Austrian economist and he was when he started amity and you'll take over now when he started he was a rock ribbed Democrat in the Franklin Delano Roosevelt mold so tell us about General Electric and president Ronald Reagan it's a wonderful story well yes and it starts not even with Reagan but with the company General Electric companies have sold their white people and GT sold like fighting he on the one hand with kind of a bunch of bad men who were quite cynical and thought a lot about marketing at this point I meet in the early sixties and wanted the whole wall and create login and good distribution and make money and work with government very cynically you know G. with the provider soldier by the Tennessee Valley Authority which is not recommended yeah on the other hand though there's the old G. E. which was very individual Thomas Edison a man alone in a lab comes up with an idea that changes the world and that man works better when he's really all alone and you get to pick anything about who's going to buy the product certainly not about the next contract he concerned about unions actually they were concerned American innovation out of its own market there was a fellow named Lambeau where it's completely forgotten but he was kind of the crew were there and I think when you give money away anywhere might want to think about the console where was making it actually at an intellectual policy her cell and walked back which is he needed to train people the merits of free market capitalism with a history she no Edison and Charlie Kaufman the original mantle innovator with a company by reminding them where growth com well that is it's like sending money on backing a capitalist history book it's what level where the executive a GP one three and ability to keep the workers more than a hundred thousand people all about half full and heat it had little pamphlet about hi yeah remarks here and about what would work he has led to pop your eyes and higher and you know pop them all about how are you home out and handed all this out and it seems like you're ready and won the thing to hold where did why hi you're aging actor who was not very popular and as you mentioned was a rocket Democrat at that time Democrats long awaited open for all the capitalist ideas and break in need of a job in the like the job but he wasn't really sure about the capitalism at first he went around on the rubber chicken circuit and gave a lectures workers that in town hall about the American capital and gradually Reagan's this actor nothing more than a PR point became the ideas that one reason why he followed the GT bought stock or bond he wait markets worked in the beauty of compounding and if you things like that and at the beginning of the book what happened and she got caught up in it so divided sold the property for executives at G. he had been polluting it legally in violation of American law with Westinghouse and other company in their industry I was in charge too much to the TV at all my gosh she even cheating the American tax payer so every bloody court case actual GP executive jail one usual anti trust union road with laughter and is this by G. easy stock when in the toilet our and Mr Goldberg department as little propaganda bell fell part with your ball where retired your rating inspired in his show G. are part of a propaganda effort was cancelled so you think it's all washed out and what's interesting is that right remember it all but even if he wasn't a G. E. anymore and he got a Michael on politics against give speeches about market and what was wrong with the socialization that and so on and hit the ideas and his performance took home so though this long shot propaganda philosophy effort by Boulware paid off sometimes you undertake a project the political or for legislation he did not pay off for ten or twenty years it doesn't pay off till after your death but it does mean being that your rations name the undertaker the court well where each investment it's great getting free market ideas paid off exponentially for those investors over quite a long period so I like that and I like the way great store business hello it was a blow job look around think about politics and he did correspond with people where where the van for governor excellent political effort and extremely successful for L. one California so that's all in the book of breaking start got down to eat dark out down but they do well later and what's fascinating is ball where who had his goal the education first of the workers then with the G. E. theater and early black and white television program in the drink I guess the fifties and early sixties wall words goal was to educate the public and the not only did the educate the public body educated a president or a soon to be president beyond his wildest dreams so I'm just reinforcing amity what you said about sometimes you plant a seed and it's the jazz station period is very lengthy but sure enough up grows a sequoia tree or redwood tree and talk about an accident the accident of ball where trying to educate workers on the merits of capitalism and ends up giving us a two term president who becomes president of course at exactly the right time we were in the economic pets when Reagan took office and not bold wears teaching but the teachings of the Austrian economist of high tech and bash your do of course was French in the eighteen fifties their teachings is what guided Reagan through the eighties add up and many if you could take a step back and we look at this arc we look at John C. in though who the damage the economy with his guns and butter policy perhaps but spending on great society thought clearly it was a failure it gave us the seventies Nixon impose wage and price controls and as you said increase spending for Medicare so Nixon damage the economy along comes Reagan and fixes everything in the glorious economic eighties why wouldn't that and now they ask you to go beyond the scope of the book why wouldn't that have ended the argument why wouldn't that show here we lived through several decades we tried one approach it failed another approach it succeeded why are we not still in the Reagan economic era what happened to the country you're an observer that cause us to now forget that comparison between the sixties and seventies and bad economic approach and the eighties and a different economic approach amnesia word word or casual PMR orange and sat we can't remember how bad that's the big thing how bad if you were one of the with one hand not employed in the seventies if you were unable to buy the house you needed a member of the seventy people fought houses would have to become ever smaller but what we thought we could never turn the thermostat up seventy eight yeah because you didn't have enough energy and we never would have what comes back you know Cheryl bowl OPM here to be in a sense of the word how may we help you the dark hi so what we don't have the background so long people for retiring now live locally in the fall market after he just to give out the listeners one measure very we tend to think of the ever rising stock market is our kind of birthright you put the money in the five twenty nine plan it will grow by act and your child will have some money for universe the Dow Jones industrial average was flat and I'm not even counting the inflation from the mid sixties all the way three eighty almost two generations the did not want to cross the outline it's a very different experience you can go back in the dividends if you want to get the better number but there was the average paid the one thousand and that nominal so well when you could be big inflation is much lower so that's what it was like and we forgot that okay the aspen brands nothing is new as in fashion social is not new social failure or commercial my thinking tell you those are not get what we need too long ago and that many Americans have been served over he they haven't seen communism or economic trouble they have a good dinner plates for the money doesn't work under a lot of those so so that the change but we do have this evidence if only we can recall it one of the things that I if you don't mind me mentioning is we yeah I work at the Calvin Coolidge foundation and what we do is try to remember the past with that just to make dinner find a Wagan like where we understood the importance of market with the importance of federalism under strain breaking news we like to praise him government did well under Reagan under college the government actually shrank and your listeners you're sophisticated services that real amateurs that nominal the government really shine in real terms so wow how did the president shrink the government and not nearly can change the world quite a mention mention of going family we ought to mention of.

General Electric
"general electric" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

05:02 min | 3 years ago

"general electric" Discussed on KTOK

"We can't forget, what happened in Charlottesville. Even more important. We have to remember who we are. This is America after Mr. Biden's announcement Mr. Trump wrote on Twitter welcome to the race. Sleepy. Joe? Mr. Biden is not scheduled by the way to hold his first public campaign event until Monday in Pittsburgh. Meanwhile, his democratic rivals had a head start on fundraising for several months and in recent weeks, mister Biden has faced allegations from seven women that he inappropriately touched them or made close contacts. Mr. Biden enjoys a seventy two percent approval rating among registered Democrats. According to a recent poll by Monmouth university nonetheless number of challenges face, Mr. Biden and his campaign while seeking his party's nomination. Alex Bolton senior reporter at the hill is here to examine some of them, Alex. What are the questions faces? I mean the biggest question facing right off the bat whether he's going to support calls for impeachment, and that's something that Elizabeth Warren in prominently coke for House, Democrats, do and it's something that other Democrats will have a behind Biden go that way. It it's something that scene is perhaps pandering to the base, and that's one of the challenges that by face throughout this race. I mean, he comes in as a centrist, which would help them in a general election holy poll room, having lead over Trump in the general election. But that's because he has more of a moderate. Is that going to be enough for him to win the the democratic primary, which is which secures? The General Electric and test is going to be key support, impeaching Trump something that democratic leaders washing. Notably Nancy Pelosi things would be a bad idea. Backfire on the Democrats like it did Republicans in nineteen ninety eight how about a running mate. So this is something that bite advisers earlier last month when they suggested that maybe he could pick Stacey Abrams who came within two points of winning the Georgia. Gubernatorial race in twenty teen. Potential Senate candidate for president African American women in your outperformed expectations reliable reliably Republican state. A one of the challenges by faces is is. He's a white, man. He's a part of the establishment. And as that in step with where the democratic base is looking they want like the first one president in twenty sixteen. They were disappointed many Democrats who want the candidate or their nominee to be a groundbreaking in terms of making feeling whether it's the Greenwich ceiling for women or whether it's breaking the color barrier that you know, traditionally has the White House. So the question is Ken Biden as a white man win. And I think that's why he. Abrahams. As ready made with Alex Bolton senior staff writer at the hill. He's written a piece about the decisions facing Joe Biden in a twenty twenty primary finish up with handling allegations of inappropriate conduct with women. Something that. Will Biden in recent weeks, and he addressed it with a statement saying that he will be mindful and going, and he'll be respectful of women who allege invaded personal space, and they will take the complaints. Seriously. He put out the video, you know, he wasn't an apology. But it said that he would think about it and perhaps do things differently going forward. But then of course, he you cut that interesting by on stage, they labor he made a joke where he put his own around going today. I commissioned. Kid, and it was seen as respectful, and so I think the consensus of the democratic guess we spoke to put this issue behind him. The video statement of policy had not settled him. So for him to joke only few days later about you know, having permission to. Or one of his when people who don't stage with him that was just the demonstrated. I think maybe a glibness not that was not appropriate that he thinks that he's put us behind continue to try to minimize these allegations. In fact, the consensus advice week democrat dredges will worked on presidential campaigns with that Biden f get more serious really tackled as he he'd attack is going to show that he will change the way he acts at public events, and to really show that he's respectful and takes me to move very seriously that this is not something he has gotten beyond it will rise again. And again is the prediction, Alex, Alex, Bolton's senior reporter.

mister Biden Joe Biden Alex Bolton Biden Abrahams Mr. Trump president reporter Twitter Charlottesville Nancy Pelosi Monmouth university America Elizabeth Warren Senate Stacey Abrams White House Republicans Pittsburgh Greenwich
"general electric" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

06:23 min | 3 years ago

"general electric" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Fountain square, and now we're going to eliminate about one hundred positions at the vice president level and up to save some one hundred million dollars is the problem is that the way I look at it as ban if you can't make money now when the economy's good what's going to happen when things start to sour little bit. How we look in as mardi would say not good and what happens though, too. I don't know how many of those jobs are Cincinnati-based the VP level. Once a lot of these positions. I know have moved to New York. But what does that do the local economy here when you have people making wellness six figures who are now unemployed Nathan backtrack from simply money gives some perspective this morning and Nathan this is not exclusive courts of the retail industry. But we care a lot because it's Macy's, and that's a Cincinnati company. Yeah. You betcha. And anytime that a local story about people losing their jobs comes across the news wires. Just what you think? What is you know? What would it be like if I walked into work tomorrow, if you walked into work tomorrow and the boss said, well, we decided that we need to restructure and make sure that the shareholders are getting the the scene stock rise. So you you're here then you start thinking. Wow. The bills to I have an emergency fund. How long would last worldwide go? So these are these news headlines, always become my opinion, very personal because you kind of go, gee, am I just one slipped from off a banana peel from financial disaster? And that's kind of what comes out here. And then of course, what some of the comments are just priceless. Like listen to this. The the CEO said, oh, we're going to get rid of the vice presidents because we have found out. Oh, ready for this. Big windup. Here's the pitch. Loney? Sales associates seem to be more important than vice president. We always say their sales the people who sell stuff right seemed to be more important than the people who put your man, the paper about the people who sell stuff, right? The people have produced stuff at the bottom are more important, the people who just say simply acknowledge one another kiss each others butts. Oh, yeah. So then they found in a few places when they added a couple of associates are buckle your seatbelts. I'm making this stuff up, right? Sales went up. Customer services king hits it. It's just not believe. What were these guys thinking the sad part about this story? And maybe the dangerous part for Macy's is that this seems to be like the swallows these birds at once a year come to Capistrano, and then disappear again, it seems that the end of every year Macy's wakes up and goes, let's see sales. No. Who therapist let's reorganize? And so this is only the sixth year in a row that at the end of the year along with earnings announcements, we get a reorganization for Macy's death and back Rackham simply money this morning on seven hundred wwl w and acute hearing centers dot com hotline and Nathan the impact here that I don't know gonna these hundred jobs are based in Cincinnati, but they want to save one hundred million dollars. Now, basic math will tell you that saw one hundred jobs at a million each one hundred million dollars. But but clearly, it's not just VP's. It's a whole bunch of support staff to was well 'cause I don't think all the VP's are pulling down a mill each they probably got assistance, and assistance to assistance, and that's really what hurts to is. Because he may be able to survive you got a little golden parachute or something like that and your vice president. But if you're the I dunno a special assistant to the vice president or the assistant to the assistant vice president now, you got some real problems there. And this is what what? I wonder how the impact it's going to be felt locally is a number of these jobs are going to be local. Well, we'll have some you got to remember Macy's has got some perations and a few other places Atlanta, and certainly lots of people left at New York from the days when Macy's was Macy's before Federated Department Stores bought them a long time ago, go far enough back, and you've got Lazarus from Cincinnati which started the whole deal and Shintos which some of you might remember from a little ways back if you're of the day. Yes. It certainly going to have an impact. I don't think that it's going to be as as big here in Cincinnati as we might think good, which is it's good. And it's bad. I mean, we're still a very, vibrant and growing town here. You know, we just reported yesterday. They have the money to to businesses secure is one of the other on escapes me blue eyes. They're bringing in a hundred two hundred thirty jobs between the two of them for the average job out there. Going to be seventy thousand dollars at the high tech firm and blue ashes going to be one hundred and nine thousand dollars. I think what it brings up. Sometimes is you know, when you maybe maybe worked at General Electric or General Motors in a plant, and you sit there with your son and your daughter, you go, you know, I hope you'll go to work plant your kids. Look at you, go. Yeah. I hope you'll go to work in the plant programming. Computers, writing the code right and figuring out all the technology to get the computers running on time and admit robots worry, and that's how where the jobs will be moving forward. So it's it's sad to see these jobs. This appearing this in Cincinnati was the front and center for what Macy's strategy is. And that is they're going to get rid of stores that aren't destination stores the way I translate that look at the top fifty centers where you got a lot of wealthy people who or or solid upper middle to upper middle class people who will buy what's at Macy's. And they're gonna and on top of that they're going to focus on the things that are good. Which is a makeup and find and jewelry fine menswear. This would be a good for you. If you ever go. Now, I'm fine with it. I'm I'm I'm good where my tracksuit, my jeans, my t shirts shorts. I like that. That's my. So the challenge the challenge though, is that the average family in America has got less than thousand dollars to handle an from these people. I I would hope would have the money to handle the emergency. You're you're absolutely spot on the support staff. That's where it's where it's going. And you would Macy says their earnings are going to be flat this year. It's like, okay. So I guess Amazon it's like going showing up the Olympics. And you're going to run in place Williams on takes off down the down the track. You know, like, oh, really? Yeah..

Macy vice president Cincinnati VP Nathan New York assistant vice president mardi Loney America Capistrano CEO Williams Amazon Olympics General Electric special assistant Federated Department Stores
"general electric" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"general electric" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"In the best actress category vehicle. Olivia Colman was the shocking winner. She beat out the pre-oscar favorite. Glenn Close other awards went pretty much as expected. Rummy Malakwen best actor bohemian rhapsody in the supporting categories winners were Mahershala Ali and Regina king other winners. Last night, included, Spike, Lee, his first competitive Oscar win and lady Gaga. She won best original song for shallow from stars. For how many times you get rejected. How many times you stand up and our brave and you keep on going. Thank you, Rhode Island's Peter fairly and Peabody's. Brian curry scored for green book last night at the Oscars. But there were some more new Englanders picking up praise and statuettes Springfield native Ruth Carter an Oscar one for costume designs on the movie. Black Panther New Hampshire. Native Matt Renner won the Academy Award for best documentary feature keto eight let's check Wall Street now Tracy jonky is at Bloomberg on this Monday. I'd tracey. Hi there. Ben General Electric is having its best day in a decade. The stock is surging eleven percent after GE agreed to sell its bio. Pharma business for more than twenty one billion dollars. The trade war with China will not escalate at the end of the week with doubled tariffs on two hundred billion dollars in Chinese made goods. President Trump has extended the Friday deadline to give negotiators more time and Wall Street's responding with the Dow game has one hundred fifty nine points. Nasdaq up sixty one up fifteen I'm Tracy jonky. Bloomberg business on WBZ. Boston's NewsRadio good women soon. Be part of the selective service process..

Olivia Colman Tracy jonky Bloomberg Oscar Lee lady Gaga Mahershala Ali Ruth Carter Matt Renner Brian curry New Hampshire Peabody GE President Trump Regina king Glenn Ben General Electric Boston Springfield Rhode Island
"general electric" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

11:44 min | 3 years ago

"general electric" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"General Electric has altered the terms of a deal to unload its locomotive business GE shares. They're up now by four point two percent. And after earnings last night Starbucks up by three point two percent. Recapping US equities higher SNP up twenty one a gain of eight tenths of one percent. I'm Charlie Pellett. And that is a Bloomberg business flash much appreciated. Charlie pellett. You are listening to Bloomberg BusinessWeek Carol Massar along with Jason Kelly right here. Here on Bloomberg radio. I am very proud to announce today that we have reached a deal to end the shutdown and reopen the federal government. And that was President Trump speaking just moments ago in the rose garden down at the White House in the nation's capital much-anticipated, and after thirty five days, it appears the shutdown is over it's been a busy day in Washington owing to that and some other headlines. So let's get a sense of what it all means. Craig Gordon, executive editor and Washington bureau chief joins us, the hardest working man in Hollywood. I know Craig. So what do we take away from what we just heard from the president? What you sorry. There was a complete and utter capitulation by the president on his demand for wall funding. You may remember that he said he would not sign a Bill that did not include five point seven billion dollars to build a wall. Then yesterday, they said, well at least a down payment, but like our big now payment and then today, he accepted exactly zero dollars. That is huge. What happened? Why did he all of a sudden why did he capitulate? I think what happened is LaGuardia Airport. Gotcha down today. And it's all fun and games until someone can't land their airplane. It's hard not to take note of the timing of the Roger stone indictment on the same day when talk about that minute. But you know, Trump is a master of distraction, and certainly a lot of us in the newsroom horror writing stories about Roger stone, and how his close ties to candidate Trump and President Trump, suddenly we're now having about the end of the shutdown. So we'll we'll be back to stone before long here. But. He did have just a lot of pressure piling up on Trump. I think also you saw yesterday after they took those votes in the Senate that both failed McConnell and Schumer got together. And I think there was a little bit of a growing drumbeat. Among even some Republicans senators and say, look, Mr President, if you're not going to open this up we will. So obviously better for him to look like he's in control of the situation. But it is it is pretty hard overstate. How much he gave up on the wall? Well, and we were tight Carol. Now, we're talking as we were listening to and and it does feel on the other side like a pretty clean win for speaker Nancy Pelosi here. Yeah. I mean, I, you know, it's interesting because there were a lot of questions about whether Pelosi was sort of the right leader for the new democratic majority. You've got a kind of a younger and more diverse majority in the house now boy, I think she's she's earn her pay. She's really she's kind of getting it done for them right now. I mean, look she stood in with resin, the United States, and she pretty much got everything she wanted so far and he's gotten almost nothing that he wanted so far, and that's kind of a win by any measure. So Craig I gotta ask you, you know, one of the things that I think has been played many times. And maybe not surprisingly is that is seemingly seminal meeting in the Oval Office. Among the president the vice president Senator Schumer speaker Pelosi or then house minority leader Pelosi where Trump said I will own this. I will shut down the government. How much has that come to haunt him in a way, especially in terms of public perception of who's to blame for what's happened over the past thirty five dollars? Yeah. I mean, I think it was sort of determinative if you go back and watch that take my favorite part of that tape is is look at Chuck Schumer, the Senate top Senate democrat he can barely contain his laughter because he knows he's got them. He's got him in. That moment. And look there's been a lot of polls out about who's to blame for the shutdown there, not a single one that I've seen that says Democrats have the blame or the majority blame blame Trump and the Republicans, and that's that has given Pelosi and shimmer just enormous ability to maneuver, they know that they have the public against Trump on this kind of felt like they were on the side of the angels. I thought that when Pelosi said he couldn't deliver the state of the union that might have been a misstep on her part because he is the president, and he wants to give speeches should give a speech. But that's isn't even seem to have changed the change of dynamic. And here we are just a few days later where Trump is capitulating. So they have had public opinion on their side. And I do think the LaGuardia thing was was a pretty several moment. But just the whole drumbeat people not getting paid food banks. We've been through the airport and watching those TSA people when you know, they're not getting paid and they're still doing their job. I think for a lot of Americans that was that was unpleasant. And they decided that Trump was the one that bore the blame. But to quote, one of our former colleagues Hans Nichols. Who tweeted a ceasefire not? The truth. I mean, this ain't over. No. But then I agree with that. I would say a couple of things about that. It seems like it'd be really hard to shut down the government again having just come through it. I know that this is a three week deal. And theoretically on February fifteenth the money runs out just like it ran out before. And you could you could happen again. Boy, I think at that point you might have a lot a lot of lawmakers on the Republican side again saying like, look, Mr President, we can do this hard way. I don't think they want to kind of go through this again. And Secondly it again. I've said it about five times, there's no way there's no way to look at this except that Trump caved. I mean, Nancy Pelosi is Chuck Schumer knows the Democratic Party knows that. And so the idea that he comes back three weeks later playing a stronger hand and having a better chance to get the wall. There's no version of politics that I am familiar with where that's true. So Craig is the pressure. So let's let's talk about you reference Roger stone today 'cause you're right. We came bang out of the gate this morning. I'm reading in you know, and this was the big story. And I thought this was going to be the big story in addition to the shutdown, but really the big story out of Washington. So Roger stone longtime Republican strategists sometime confident of the president charged with obstructing special counsel Robert Muller's investigation of Russia Russian interference in the two thousand sixteen elections. So is that investigation getting to the president? Yeah. I mean, you know, we don't know where this is all going to lead. I think of it a little bit like concentric circles with Donald Trump in the middle and Muller has been moving through those Manafort, I that was kind of low hanging fruit. He had some some filing violations, etc. That was kind of an easy one. Once they rated Cohen that was one circle closer to Trump. They got other records from from Satele room and all that stuff. Now, you've got stone who is a confidante of Trump for many many years meeting in a couple of New Yorkers go back a long way, probably thirty years in New York City, New York state politics. So they know each other. Well, again, mother is alleging that stone lied and some of his testimony. So that's usually fairly easy to prove. It's interesting in the indictment. It doesn't really get to the substance of too much into the self-censor. Stone is not charge related to the substance of the Muller allegation that he was the go-between between WikiLeaks on the Russian hat Democratic National Committee emails and the Trump campaign in there. It's talked about it's sort of that's the role. The Muller believes are alleges that stone play he's charged with any of that. So that's most of us just perjury and such. But again, you now have a very direct link between WikiLeaks Russia. Stone and people in the Trump campaign. There's a very tantalizing part of that Diana where it talks about stone has directed by senior Trump campaign officials to sort of reach out to WikiLeaks and see what they had on the Democratic National Committee emails or any kind of dirt on Hillary. We don't know who did the reaching out. But there again, there's another person who's likely target of future Muller action. So with every step he's building this very methodical case, it does feel like we're getting closer to Donald Trump. Right. And well, it seems like a long time ago at least to me. I mean this earlier this was the week that earlier we heard a little bit of back and forth round. Michael Cohen, the president's former lawyer as it relates to his plan. Testimony on Capitol Hill in front of the house being postponed by him this voluntary testimony. But now is do I have it, right? That he has been subpoenaed to testify behind closed doors in front of the Senate. Yeah. Following the bouncing ball. I'm pretty sure that's right. It's again, it's like we can do is easy way. The hardware come in. He'd said I'll tell my story anytime anyplace downtown started tweeting some rather threatening things about members of his family. And he decided, you know, maybe not, but they can't subpoena him Democrats have subpoena power. They they could bring him in to talk, and again, probably nobody on earth, except Donald Trump himself knows more about Donald Trump's business dealings than Michael Cohen, Roger stone. Again, we can presume was we know was in close contact with Trump off and on during the campaign a afford again was right in the middle of the campaign along with his associate Rick gates. So Robert Muller knows a lot of things right now. And as I say, I want to use the cliche of tip of the iceberg because it's hard to know, exactly. Where in the iceberg. We are ready to the Muller investigation. But I think, you know, again, even in the stone diamond there's nothing specifically laying out point by point the the alleged ties between stone WikiLeaks and the Trump campaign and all that. But it's all. There. It's all like right there in there, and you can only presume the Muller has a lot more to say on that that puts people like stone and others from the campaign much more directly in in the middle of that. And now, you have a situation where you have essentially a US presidential campaign seeking information from a foreign government that's supposed to do that. And so I it seems like is heading in that direction. So if that's ultimately where we end up Craig I mean, what could potentially happen to does. That mean, you have charges against a sitting president illegally. This is kind of a new world for us know if that indeed is how it plays out. How would it play out? Yeah. I mean, I it's it's a little hard to tell. I do think we're we're kind of back to the old like what did the president now on when we now know it from the days of Watergate, and that and that we don't know. I mean, just to be fair to all involved here. We certainly have a lot of people who we know talk to Donald Trump for Roger stone people like that. And Michael Cohen in pretty close proximity to some some bad and likely illegal things, we don't know yet, if they told Trump if Trump new Trump directed them, we just we simply don't know. And again, I think we will know before the end of this. But that's going to ultimately be the question. I mean, you really blend of blunt about it how much trouble Donald gets trouble down. Trump gets in is how much he knew and how much he directed. If any if anything, and we just don't know yet. Well, last quick question does the president delivers state of the union speech on January twenty ninth. I don't think it'll be on the twenty ninth. 'cause that'd be a pretty quick turnaround. Just almost logistically, but we actually were watching the watching the rose garden event that just happened to see if he would sort of say, oh, by the way, I'm gonna give my speech. So stay tuned. More to come on that right? You are the best. And I know it's been busy for you guys in your team. But I always get us up to speed. Thank you. Thank you. Craig Jordan, Washington bureau chief at Bloomberg news from our ninety nine one studio in the nation's capital. So as you have been hearing, it appears there is an agreement to reopen the government based on what the president United States just said moments ago in the rose garden, you heard some of the context just there from executive editor and DC bureau chief Craig Gordon more to come on that more to come on the market reaction. This is work..

President Trump president Roger stone Trump Robert Muller Craig US Nancy Pelosi Mr President Chuck Schumer Bloomberg Senate Michael Cohen Craig Gordon Carol Massar Starbucks Charlie Pellett Washington bureau chief General Electric
"general electric" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

03:50 min | 3 years ago

"general electric" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"You can get it filled at a a WalMart, Costco. But what's available to you? You complain about the cost people around the world that would pay anything anything. For drugs that improve their lives. For insulin. For betablockers. You name it. The vast majority of the world doesn't have access to these things. Some people argue over. As I say that some people argue, let's see over vaccines. I'm not one of them, by the way, but some do. Well, the vast majority of the people of the world don't have access to vaccines. There's nothing to argue over nothing. We have a partial government shutdown where a percentage of the twenty five percent of the government wasn't funded a shutdown. I look at this. I say to myself. Are they not familiar with the depression? Are they not familiar with the depression? But the Federal Reserve did to the dollar. Which drove a recession into a depression government? Did that? And I hear people complaining. I don't know anybody who hasn't been unemployed or any small businessman who hasn't had a period of time or woman where they don't have the sales that they need to cover some costs. Parents went through that. I went through many decades ago. And nobody ever said. But you know, what a couple of months if he come back a couple of weeks, we come back. We'll make it all up to you. You'll get all your money back. Nobody gave me my money back. I went through my pension. I went through all of our savings at a borrow money because I was going to get through it with the family come hell or high water. And I'm certainly not alone. This is the experience of most Americans. We're supposed to hate successful. People. You see because that's the only way socialism slash Marxism slash progressivism. Works. You have to destroy successful people because they're an example that the society works. These men that I've named are not billionaires because they stole from somebody. They're billionaires because they made a difference to you and your life a huge difference. How about the money men as we like to call them? The Andrew Mellon's of the world. Andrew Mellon to the world. Their finances. But for Andrew Mellon. You wouldn't have electricity in your home? You wear. General Electric used to be called Edison electric Thomas, Edison, invented a form of electricity production, tesla invented another form. Tesla's form was better. You're using it today. You've heard of Westinghouse. Westinghouse was another big businessmen. And he owned Tesla's patents. Well, melon. Who didn't produce anything was an investor? Well, he secured those patents in his own way from Westinghouse. He really didn't want to give them up. And.

Andrew Mellon Westinghouse Edison tesla depression WalMart Federal Reserve Costco General Electric twenty five percent
"general electric" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:03 min | 3 years ago

"general electric" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Howard hill of the music, man. But I also think of a play that is considered the American classic death of a salesman. Do you feel that you spent much of your career trying to rehabilitate the image of sales and the people who sell order, I don't really feel. I've done that in terms of consciously, obviously, a very positive and and passionate seller person, actually. And so always. I felt that that's telling us is valuable and selling his really everything in life. So I suppose I have been my actions tried to rehabilitate because so many people regard showing us something that's either too much or too little and so forth and so on so. The focus on my life. My life has been out as you well know has been focusing on customers and making people feel great when they're working within our family business, or when they're shopping with us first step in your process is making the connection you tell the story about the man who only like blue suits. Tell us that this was really my first major sale when I started working with my mom and dad back in the late sixties show him came in. And he was very senior person with General Electric, unsure you even know him, and I won't mention his name. But he he he only wore blue suits. And my dad took me off as he came in. He said you can you can help this wonderful as a friend of ours. And I sold them very quickly. He wanted to suit. So I sold them a very quick pusued. Basic navy blue suit blue pinstripe suit, which are two parcels of blue uniform in corporate America. And then as I was getting to know him, and I got he began to respect me. And he realized that I was Mitchell to start out. He said what else might use suggest that? I said, you know, let me show you something that I have. Hey, hey. More. Sleepy suit on it. It was in Harris tweed suit, sorta Tweety looking suit had actually was more worried about all the blue. Anyway, I said why don't you try it on? So he he's all okay. I'll try thinking he would couldn't even do that. But he took his jacket off put this other jacket on. And he said, you know this. This is really interesting. I. Sounds like you like it. And he turned to his wife who will. Of course, he was always needed her approval. And she said, you know, I love it. And he said. Reminds me when I was a young kid. And this was what we were when I went to boarding school. And I said, well, then maybe you can work sometime Twenty-one a little informal look. Okay. Great. I'll take it. And all of a sudden, I realize it was really fun had. I realized that I could make suggestions that what he wanted. I tried to talk time but warmer than we have now. But I, but it was my first really important sale. None of course, I put on furnishings shirts ties and all the rest of us and so forth that matched the entire once. He got into buying mood. He even with me as a young he enjoyed it. And from then on it cemented, our relationship that lasted many many years after you don't prejudge customers by Lucks. But you do write about tells teach your sales people who look for. What are the details can be nonverbal, obviously. I mean when you're when you're McQueen customers and connecting with customers, you you don't necessarily look what they're wearing. That's a that's a misnomer. But you can see, you know, listening is most important watching and listening to you, you you get their details are their names, we try to introduce ourselves. Jack, Mitchell, you say more through eleven and so forth, and you begin to get their names as is John or Jack. You can see that. Are they wearing a of a wedding ring copied? They're married, and maybe there's something that they could buy for their wife or their spouse. And you begin to listen about all those particular things. And then you listen, of course, you watch their nonverbal there do they crown they smiled and mean you and I always kid we know about our smiles smiling. It's fine. All of a sudden, you're looking at your watch. It says to me that you're in a hurry. You have a cough date or something, and you have to hurry out of the store software things like that that you can pick up non verbally. And then of course, you when you start looking you start people started asking questions, and that's the most important part. You begin to listening is the most important skill. I believe and selling and you listen not only with your ears. You listen with your eyes. And those tells pop up all the time. We'll continue this conversation with Jack Mitchell, the chairman of Mitchell's clothing stores one of the most successful small businesses in the nation in just a moment. This is a closer look with Arthur Levitt,.

Jack Mitchell Howard hill salesman cough General Electric Arthur Levitt Harris tweed America chairman John
"general electric" Discussed on MarketFoolery

MarketFoolery

03:29 min | 3 years ago

"general electric" Discussed on MarketFoolery

"And it just seems that the like you said the board wasn't behind that. And at some point this fall. It's just the when the last straw, hit the camel's back in the board just didn't seem to be a line with where that the way that Flannery was either taking the business or talking about taking the business, and they thought that was just a little bit too much for the General Electric, and they they went towards a cope who's pretty new to the General Electric business. I'm glad to use the phrase the G family in reference to John Flannery because that is something to be noted about Larry cult. This is a guy coming from outside the company it's not to say that either good or bad. But it is notable. And yeah, I think it's going to be very. Posting to see what does. And, you know, Jan in General Electric for years and years has talked about their management discipline going all the way back to Jack Welsh. And as just grooming these great managers, and I think we've seen over the last ten years. That's that. Maybe not really the best way to characterize that. When you think about the long-term, just maybe the business just so dramatic and so big that it's hard to turn especially with the disaster. The financial business turned out to be but Larry called comes from Danaher where they have their Danaher business system, and that has just an operating philosophy that has worked well for din her when it comes to industrial acquiring businesses turning them into profit machines reallocating that capital, which is if that's the way the General Electric is going to go in focusing on their core businesses that might be the way that gets General Electric outta this steep rabbit hole than it's in right now. If lyrical is not on the hot seat. Let's say it's a little warmer. The average does are there other CEO's that you look at. And you think I'm keeping my on them because they're I think they're poised for a great year. Yeah. There's a lot, You you know, know. the likes of a Larry cope gets an and Elon Musk, and the we love talking about those in the media thing are struggling. But there are there are definitely CEO's out there that are doing so where so well just from day to day continue to grow that business, married. Dylan Ulta is one of those ones as proven to be an exceptional CEO of that retailer of cosmetics and the way that they add to their stores, renovate stores, tactically will shift their real estate how they have pushed the online business to be a bigger driver how they have used their membership rewards now to be able to drive so much more value on a on a per member basis and make use of footprint Ida big box retailer that is fairly large in the face of the likes of Amazon and other retailers that are continuing. To hunt at Ulta they have been able to continue to grow and grow pretty nicely. And it's it's it's exceptionally profitable for retailer, and the us that capital, very, well and have very high returns in the capital's, everydollar, they're investing back in the business continues ago, more and more valuable. So I think Mary dealer Dylan. She does get get some respect. But she's not a household name. She should be well, particularly when you consider that for a stretch of time that she has been in the corner office, you mentioned the salon business. I mean Ulta was doing very well in that..

General Electric Dylan Ulta CEO John Flannery Danaher Larry cult Larry cope Jack Welsh Larry Elon Musk Amazon Dylan ten years