35 Burst results for "General Counsel"

Trump Appointee, Michael Pack, Leaves Trail Of Shattered Careers At VOA

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:47 min | Last month

Trump Appointee, Michael Pack, Leaves Trail Of Shattered Careers At VOA

"Money wherever you listen to podcasts. There's been so much controversy. At the voice of america and its parent agency that it's easy to forget the human toll executives fired reporters investigated reputations shattered all part of an ideological civil war begun by former president trump's appointee to the agency. Npr's david folkenflik reports the us agency for global media overseas the voice of america and other federally funded international broadcasters. Last monday just two days before he resigned. Michael pack defended his record on fox news. I've been head of the agency for about seven months. And my only goal has been to get it to fulfil its legally mandated mission. Its charter which is present objective balanced comprehensive news. Tell america's story to the world others who worked under pack till npr a different story. It was actually one of the most surreal times of my career and federal government. That's dan handling a senior advisor to the ceo. When pack took office handling joined the trump white house team during the transition in two thousand sixteen and stayed throughout hanlin says he figured his loyalty to the administration would never be in doubt he was wrong. Pack decided almost immediately that hamlin and need weren't to be trusted and he banished them to the far corners of the agency. Headquarters found a foosball table. And since they weren't talking to us we would come in or nine o'clock and stamp out five o'clock and we play football day and we just sit there in common. About how absurd. This whole thing was hamlin's says it was a sign of worse to come. I don't think he had a plan other than to just blow the place up. Voice of america's top officials resigned. Pack fired the presidents of all the other networks back also suspended six top agency executives and paid private law firms millions of dollars to investigate them and the also refused to extend visas for any foreign employees implying they could be spies. Here's former general. Counsel david clergyman. He was among the executives suspended because he believed that we were disloyal to him. It perceived a us as being part of this cabal and it was. It was very troubling clicker. Men says pack embraced trump's fight against the media and against the professionalism of government employees one point even quoted leviticus to me some provisions at talked about bearing false witness clemson resigned in december after months in limbo. You have to stand up to bad actors like my colleagues. And i have done. And we've paid the price for pack pursuit investigations of journalists for perceived anti-trump bias on fox pack renewed allegations against a video segment on view as early language. Service was essentially a repackaged biden. ned It was not targeted as the deserves supposed to be to pakistan but really the michigan an appeal to michigan muslims to flip the state for biden via way. Staffers say packs. Charges are ridiculous. Very few people in the us consumer even know of its coverage social media. Promotions of valley are blocked here. Plus they're only about fifteen thousand michigander. We've speak urge do multimedia journalists benazir samah had her contract terminated diva fired because they thought it was you know against it was like biased towards trump view. Cut loose three colleagues to some odd came to the us from pakistan on a fulbright journalism fellowship. She went to work for the urge. You service in two thousand nineteen. She's now one of many who lost their jobs under pack. Who are seeking to get them back. It has threatened to turn my entire

David Folkenflik Us Agency For Global Media Ove Michael Pack Hanlin Hamlin Donald Trump United States David Clergyman NPR Fox News White House DAN Biden Football Clemson Michigan Benazir Samah NED Pakistan
Joe Biden marks start of presidency with flurry of executive orders

All In with Chris Hayes

01:09 min | Last month

Joe Biden marks start of presidency with flurry of executive orders

"President biden has been in office for a little over thirty hours. He's already moving quickly. To erase the stain of his twice impeach predecessor yesterday biden ousted three trump appointees michael pack seal. The us agency for global media came under fire for pushing it. Really a corrupt pro-trump agenda with an organization that's supposed to be an actual reporting entity kathleen cranach or the director of the consumer financial protection bureau. Who critics say was more interested in protecting businesses and consumers and peter robb general counsel for the national labor relations. Board were union leaders. Say he actively worked against labor interest. Biden's also taking action overturn some of his predecessors most harmful policies he moved to suspend deportations for certain immigrants for one hundred days preserve the daca program protecting undocumented immigrants who came to the us as children president signed an executive order recommitting. The us the paris climate agreement cancelled the construction permit the keystone xl pipeline. Biden's top priorities fixing the responsible corona virus. He's already signed. At least ten executive orders directives to accelerate federal action including rejoining the world. Health organization require masks worn on all federal property

President Biden Michael Pack Us Agency For Global Media Kathleen Cranach Consumer Financial Protection Peter Robb National Labor Relations Biden United States Paris
Facebook Pursued A 'Buy or Bury' Strategy with Its Monopoly Power

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:17 min | 2 months ago

Facebook Pursued A 'Buy or Bury' Strategy with Its Monopoly Power

"For years. The media joan facebook has had a policy of bio berry when it came to its competitors. Either bring them on board or kill them off. It's what led facebook to getting hold of instagram and whatsapp but now lawsuit brought by the us. Federal regulators are more than forty five state. Prosecutors has accused facebook of behaving illegally to stifle the competition. I'm joined now by josh. Kohl's research with the university of oxford internet institute to tell us more josh. Welcome you're just explains is what the lawsuit involves then. Yes this is is claiming brought by. Us attorneys general and federal agencies in the us against facebook Full amongst other things is Is that the way in which it acquired. What's up an instagram in the decade. I'm ready it's toughest full doing site so there is a statute in the us against to Anti competitive practices and against fundamental set of against monopolies in certain context. And this case will return on. What was facebook's medidation intention for acquiring these companies and has been the net result full consumers and uses a facebook in these other platforms as a result of these acquisitions. Just explain to us. I mean how this has become the how the rules have changed a little bit because facebook will say this is why the big business is always works and in twenty two hundred twenty fourteen. The regulator waved through the takeovers of instagram and whatsapp. But now things are different. That's right yeah. Facebook general counsel responded to the news by saying that this is an attempt to revisionist history on the pot of the government because it supposedly kind of waves through these in in the last decades under the obama administration. Now it goes that was More cases the state nelson demeaning at the time to to stop the Acquisitions from happening. Rather than truly approving them But nonetheless it does raise the question. What's changed. I think as in contrast to the perhaps the rules changing actually i think the situation on the ground is what has changed. And what has become clear to. Policymakers wraps later than Than some of the rest of us all these abuses really can see us. Data use a choice and competition have emerged from facebook's Moose in the space. I think that's really what change in the wider context say. Is the broad tech clash against big tech. You know we still need The us government announced plans to go to google in october For a slightly smaller. A range of issues really. I maybe less as existential. The google that what to be pressed but nonetheless part of a much wider a an assigned. I think that the tide is starting to turn against big tech. The big tech companies are saying this is going to stifle innovation it. Is that true or is it going to be the absolute opposite. I think he's gonna the absolute opposite right out of my mouth. I mean if you look at what. Instagram and whatsapp were able to do prior to being quiet was really to shake up. perspective markets in various ways in a very different Vibe if you'd like to to the social media landscape By the on quite positive centric social networking strategy which causes blown-up sleep fruits. Since it's been acquired by facebook what's up on the other hand has before it was acquired was was very big on encryption and privacy for the that not serving uses things like that and i think the fact that the co founders of these companies have since the politics facebook Having been acquired a very very large paycheck out of it is a sign that they might be suggestions in the duration of these products are taken both the house passing a bit from the original visions and finally. This is a case where we will hear the private emails on the likes of mark zuckerberg. How will it change people's perception of facebook. Once we works out what actually happens underneath the lid. When i think it made it may change a bit. I mean certainly Zach's emails have been the basis for fa drummer and the positive cases the social Which which Dramatizes early moves in setting up facebook said. I think there's already an image about sandwiches that he's certainly competitive guy and wants to eliminate rivals and i suspect his his usual move fast and break things. Philosophy will extend to festive trade practices as these muslim edge from From the tros that might be unveiled. So tech tech companies taking a beating but it may not be just.

Facebook University Of Oxford Internet Josh Instagram United States Obama Administration Kohl Google Nelson Us Government Mark Zuckerberg Zach
Zuckerberg's Deals Are Central to Antitrust Cases

Techmeme Ride Home

04:23 min | 2 months ago

Zuckerberg's Deals Are Central to Antitrust Cases

"Well it did happen. The ftc in coalition with forty six state attorneys general plus guam and the district of columbia have sued facebook instagram and whatsapp. Acquisitions were used to stifle competition in the marketplace. I'm going to point out that. The ftc suit and the state's suit are two different cases. These are not combined which i think could be important because number one facebook argue that. The ftc is being disingenuous. It signed off on these acquisitions years ago so they can be like no take backseat on this whereas the states never signed off on anything so they can claim harm more directly and second the ftc's lawsuit at least to my reading is more you know. Throw everything and the kitchen sink in. Their people are reading everything they want to. Intuit consumers have seen their privacy harmed. Advertisers have choice limited. The marketplace has been distorted. Whereas i think the state's case is more directly about the marketplace being distorted conversely though the ftc's suit explicitly seeks to unwind the instagram and whatsapp acquisitions to make those spun out as independent companies whereas the states cases in my opinion more vague. About what they're looking for in terms of dress. But i'm not a lawyer so feel free to correct those takes but quoting the verge for nearly a decade facebook has used its dominates and monopoly power to crush smaller rivals and snuff out. Competition new york state attorney general letitia. James said in a press conference today. James is leading the group of attorneys general quote. Facebook used vast amounts of money to acquire potential rivals before they could threaten the company's dominance and quote the federal trade commission brought a separate lawsuit against facebook on similar grounds announced at the same time as the state's lawsuit. The ftc case goes further than the state case explicitly calling on the court unwind the acquisitions of instagram and whatsapp spinning off both into independent companies quote. Our aim is to rollback facebook's anticompetitive conduct and restore competition so that innovation and free competition can thrive said ian connor director of the ftc's bureau of competition in a statement. The ftc case also echoes the state attorney. General's claim about anticompetitive use of platform power particularly facebook's practice of quote cutting off access to blunt perceived competitive threats and quote the ftc case sites facebook's decision to block vines friend finding feature after the twitter acquisition as a particularly flagrant instance of this behavior and quote facebook of course had a response to the lawsuit saying they are revisionist history and that this whole case is unprecedented. Jennifer newstead facebook's general counsel wrote quote the federal trade commission and state attorneys general today attack to acquisitions that we made instagram in two thousand twelve. And what's happened. Two thousand fourteen. These transactions were intended to provide better products for the people who use them and they unquestionably did both of these acquisitions were reviewed by relevant antitrust regulators at the time the ftc conducted an in-depth second request of the instagram transaction in two thousand twelve before voting unanimously to clear it. The european commission reviewed the what's app transaction in two thousand fourteen and found no risk of harm to competition in any potential market regulators. Correctly allow these deals to move forward because they did not threaten competition now many years later with seemingly no regard for settled law or the consequences to innovation and investment. The agency is saying it. Got it wrong and wants a do over in addition to being revisionist history. This is simply not how the antitrust laws are supposed to work. No american antitrust enforcer has ever brought a case like this before and for good reason. The ftc states stood by for years while facebook invested billions of dollars and millions of hours to make instagram and whatsapp into the apps that users enjoy today and notably to ftc voted against the action that the ftc has taken today now. The agency has announced that no sale will ever be final no matter the resulting harm to consumers or the chilling effect on innovation when we acquired instagram and whatsapp. We believe these companies would be a great benefit to our facebook users and that we could help transform them into something even better and we did this lawsuit. Risks sowing doubt and uncertainty about the us government's own merger review process and weather acquiring businesses can actually rely on the outcomes of the legal process and quote.

FTC Facebook Whatsapp Instagram Attorney General Letitia Ian Connor Bureau Of Competition District Of Columbia Intuit Jennifer Newstead James New York Twitter European Commission Us Government
Loneliness and Litigation: A Lawyer's Case Study

The Psych Central Show

04:23 min | 2 months ago

Loneliness and Litigation: A Lawyer's Case Study

"Doctor. Freiberg welcome to the show. Thank you so very much dr freiberg. We are here to discuss loneliness. And i promise. We're going to get to that. But i'd be remiss if i didn't ask your thoughts on the differences between being a social psychologist and a lawyer. What's that like well. It proved interesting for me. I became a social psychologist. I and i was professor for a decade at boston university. And then i had a chance to go across the river and go to harvard law school so i wasn't gonna turn that down. I became a lawyer and then it pretty quickly became clear that criss crossing the to expertise gave me of field of work. It was unlike anybody else. No one else in in boston. Had both degrees and they're pretty quickly became what was sort of called around towns. The site lawyer. Boston's psych lawyer so institutions and agencies anything to do with psychiatry or psychology or clinical. Social work asked me to be their general counsel and it was in the context of being general counsel that i heard about so many clinical cases and that became the material for my research. You define loneliness differently from others. Can you tell us about that. Indeed what i thought. I discovered over thirty five years of being council to a great percentage of boston. Psychiatrists psychologists and clinical social workers was that they kept reporting more and more loneliness sure. Their clients had other issues as well but the clients kept talking about being enormously disconnected from others not having anybody to live with anybody in their life nobody to call more and more as the years went by loneliness became ever more present. I started just think about this topic and the more i researched it. It struck me that loneliness is not an emotion like anger or happiness. It's a sensation like hunger or thirst so just since our body tells us up were hungry thirsty it also says. I feel really lonely and disconnected. After hearing that definition it makes a little more sense this next statement because you consider chronic loneliness a public health crisis of the first order. They surgeon general of the united states. Vivek murthy the nineteenth surgeon general about a decade ago said we are actually experienced an epidemic of loneliness about thirty five percent of the american population in two thousand ten reported feeling chronically lonely and what i mean by that we all feel lonely from time to time. How could we not. But that's not like being chronically. Lonely just like being sad it's not like being clinically depressed. As a huge difference. Chronic loneliness is in the land in the last fifty years evermore so and it correlates with much worse health in much shorter life span. So it's serious. It sounds very serious but one of the things that i keep thinking about is people are enmeshed around other people may have social media so even when you're at home you're around other people. We work in offices. Now i know cove it has changed that a little bit but i just. I'm trying to think of the last time that i was truly alone. And i can't come up with it even as i sit here interviewing you. My phone will ding. I'm never not surrounded by people. I guess my question is how can people still feel so lonely. Given how connected our world is. But that's the key question because there are two pathways to loan one. Pathway is being alone being isolated being disconnected but a different pathway is being surrounded by people as you described but not benefiting from those relationships not feeling nourished not feeling nurtured not feeling sues. People are objectively lonely. 'cause they're all divorced off from anybody they don't have anybody in their lives but just as many people become chronically lonely surrounded by others

Dr Freiberg Freiberg Boston Harvard Law School Boston University Vivek Murthy Chronic Loneliness United States
AGs' Lawsuit Accuses Facebook Of Gobbling Up Competitive Threats

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:49 min | 2 months ago

AGs' Lawsuit Accuses Facebook Of Gobbling Up Competitive Threats

"Facebook crushes the competition. That's one of those cliches. We used to talk about. Big successful. Companies is facebook crushing the competition. Legally or illegally. That's something the courts will decide. The federal trade commission and attorneys general from across the country are suing facebook. They say the company eliminated competition by either buying other companies or making it impossible for them to succeed connecticut. Attorney general william. Tong is one of the forty eight eight involved in the suit. Thank you sir for being here. Good morning oil. Facebook has been a dominant company. Four years now. Why filing this lawsuit right now. you don't facebook has expensive and power and what is done without our and its market dominance is. It's it's engaged in a program of what we call by in berry where they either by their competitors or if they don't play ball and sell they crushed their competitors and what they've done is they've crushed any threat to their business and their market domination. They've eliminated choice for consumers and they beat third party app developers and software developers into submission. And your argument is that's illegal. That's not just being smart competitive business. No it's not just being smart when you're a business like facebook and you essentially dominate an entire field that means so much to people today particularly in a global pandemic in public health when we rely so much on technology to stay in touch with our friends. Our family to do business to sell products to advertise Social media's become central really in our lives and when you're the dominant market player You have an obligation not to abuse that power and what a facebook has done. It's it has abused. Its market power to keep competitors out of the marketplace and the leverage that market power to prejudice. Anybody who doesn't play by facebook's rules okay but how have users been hurt by what you're alleging. Facebook has done the ordinary people of connecticut. How are they getting hurt here. So they really don't have any choice. They because facebook not only is the dominant player in its own right through facebook but because they bought instagram Which targets a younger generation including my kids and whatsapp. Widely globally used social messaging And also a direct peer to peer messaging app. Because they've done that. You really have very limited options and so you don't have a choice on where you go to For social media number one or two by products for example on on facebook facebook marketplace. And if you're a small business in connecticut Or even a bigger business and you want advertisers sell products. You really have to use facebook or one of its companion products so you don't have any choice because of their facebook argues that there is competition and i will tell you the young people in my life that the teens the tweens. They don't care about facebook at all. They're all on tiktok. Is it possible that in five ten years facebook will be kind of irrelevant or at least not the behemoth is now and that this is just sort of panicking over something that companies become dominant for a few years and they tend to fade know. Our view is Unless we do something. That won't be the case because facebook has frankly so much money and so much market power and that's why they're buyer berry strategy so successful because they can go and pay outside prices for instagram and whatsapp and essentially stifled competition. That way so no. We think that Unless the court takes action and unless the forty eight states plus the ftc are successful. Facebook will continue to dominate. The space facebook's general counsel makes an interesting argument noting that facebook bought instagram in two thousand and twelve and bought whatsapp a few years later and federal regulators said that was fine and now basically. They're going back on what they said. What do you think about that argument. Well we certainly weren't part of that determination and we look forward over the next two years to more robust antitrust enforcement enforcement of our nations and our states antitrust laws and the states the forty eight of us have done our own investigation and now in concert with the federal trade commission have determined that facebook is acting illegally. Okay connecticut attorney general william tom. Thanks so much for your time today. We appreciate it. Thank you well.

Facebook Attorney General William Connecticut Federal Trade Commission Tong Berry Social Media Instagram Attorney General William Tom
US government sues Facebook for predatory conduct

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

02:23 min | 2 months ago

US government sues Facebook for predatory conduct

"For abusing. Its dominance in online search and advertising. The government's most significant attempts to betray competition since its historic case against microsoft two decades ago. James noted at a press conference that it's really critically important that we block this predatory acquisition of companies and that we restore confidence to the market. The ftc said facebook had engaged in a systematic strategy to eliminate its competition including by purchasing smaller up and coming rivals like instagram. In two thousand twelve and whatsapp. In twenty fourteen. James echoed that in her press conference saying facebook used its monopoly power to crush smaller rivals and snuff out competition. All at the expense of everyday uses the ftc. Find facebook five billion dollars in two thousand nineteen for privacy violations and instituted new oversight and restrictions on its business. the fine was the largest. The agency has ever levied on tech company or the had no visible impact on facebook's business facebook cold government's actions revisionist history that punishes successful businesses and noted that. The ftc cleared the instagram and whatsapp acquisitions years ago. The government now wants a do over sending a chilling warning to american business that no sale is ever final. Facebook general counsel jennifer newstead said in a statement that echoed the company's response to a recent congressional antitrust probe. Facebook is the world's biggest social network with two point. Seven billion uses an accompany with a market value of nearly eight hundred billion dollars who. Ceo mark zuckerberg is the world's fifth richest individual and the most public face of big tech swagger. Donald trump's high tech weapons deals with the united arab emirates fell short on wednesday in the us senate as trump's fellow republicans opposed resolutions of disapproval seeking to block the sale of drones and advanced f. Thirty five fighter jets. The senate voted fifty forty six and forty nine forty seven mostly along party lines to stop consideration of the resolutions killing them. At least until president-elect. Joe biden takes office on january. Twentieth biden is

Facebook FTC James Jennifer Newstead Instagram Microsoft Ceo Mark Zuckerberg Government Donald Trump Senate United Arab Emirates United States Joe Biden Twentieth Biden
Sarasota attorney resigns state job to protest Rebekah Jones raid

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

06:39 min | 2 months ago

Sarasota attorney resigns state job to protest Rebekah Jones raid

"Our next guest resigned his position on the florida government. Because of what you're about to see. We showed you this video last night. When rebecca johns the florida health department whistle blower. Who was fired for refusing to manipulate covid. Nineteen data joined us here to describe what it was like. When florida state police officers entered her home at eight. Thirty am on monday. Searching for computer evidence about a possible text that should not have been sent. They entered her home with guns drawn. And aiming those guns upstairs in her home at her husband and her two children ages two and eleven outside in the house relaxing. She'll all the children off all down missy. Jones come down the stairs now. Police come down. Fear is what rebecca jones said about that last night on this program. I thought i was being arrested. I had no idea what four. But i have honestly been expecting to santa's to send people after me for six months. I didn't know they search word for the house until they start healing warrant inside and tell me. Tell me husband and two children to come downstairs. Which was confusing. Because i had no idea why. And they're standing at the top of the stairs and the my husband is holding our two year old daughter in my eleven year. Old son is behind him in there pointing their guns at him at the end of that discussion last night. I reported the breaking news. That attorney ron philip. Kofsky resigned in protest from his position on judicial nominating commission after he saw that video of the police guns drawn in rebecca jones home and after he studied the search warrant that was issued by a judge who appointed by florida governor rhonda santa's in his resignation letter from the post. That governor disentis appointed him to attorney ron. Philip kofsky said i have been increasingly alarmed. By the governor's response to the covid nineteen pandemic. I believe the policy of this state toward cova is reckless and irresponsible. I have followed the events of miss jones and reviewed the search warrant that led to her home being raided. Based on. What i've seen and read i find these actions unconscionable even if the facts alleged are true i would still call her a hero. I no longer wish to serve. The current government of florida in any capacity joining us now is landfill kaczynski. The former vice chair of the twelfth circuit judicial nominating commission in florida. He's also a former general counsel to the sarasota republican party. Thank you very much for joining us tonight. Mr full custody. We really appreciate it up. Tell me how you came to your decision. Did you see the video first. And then read the search warrant and an assemble your thoughts from those two things. Yes i i saw. The video in obviously was pretty shocking. Outrage like everybody else. And then i posted something on twitter about i reaction to that in actually. A trump supporter sent me a link to the search warrant From the miami herald website said. Well you know before you say anything. You'd better read the war and see what terrible thing she's done. I did that and it just made me more matt well. I'm gonna read from the warrant because it's all about a text. They're in there with grow with guns drawn because a text was sent to florida of workers in the florida health department maybe to twelve hundred people and the text said. This was a group text and it said this. It's in the warrant. It said it's time to speak up before another seventeen thousand people are dead. You know this is wrong. You don't have to be part of this. Be a hero. Speak out before it's too late. That was the crime that was being investigated with guns drawn in rebecca johns home yet. It's outrage said not And the fact that a a search warrant was signed which was so broad which encompassed them seizing all of her electron devices with no minimization or limits. On what they could do once they receive. Those devices led me to believe that really their primary. The primary target of this warrant is not necessarily rebecca jones in the primary purpose of the war is not to make a criminal case against rebecca jones. The primary purpose of all of this is to find out the identities of the people inside the state government core talking to her. And what they're telling her. And i think that's really what they're after. Yes and she said that she has had some confidential sources in there who've been trying to give her a good information about covid and she worries now that with the seizure of electronic devices the identities of those people could well be obtained by the state. Police who's boss is the governor of the state of florida. And and i you make the point that those police officers knew exactly who this woman is that she's kind of famous in florida now. Yeah absolutely. there's there's just no. I know that. The governor's office is denying that he had any knowledge whatsoever about this investigation. Or this warrant. I mean this is a law enforcement agency. That reports directly to the governor's office it. It doesn't report to a state. Attorney's office locally. So this is. A nemesis of governor descends us and has been for six months and outspoken critic high profile. So the idea that his own law enforcement agency would execute a search warrant like this on such a high profile critic and they wouldn't clear through him. Or as general counsel i that just strains all credibility to me rod filled kofsky. Thank you very much for joining us tonight. And also thank you for taking your oath as lawyer seriously and your position as an officer of the court seriously when you see something like this say something about it the way you have. We really appreciate that. Thank you

Rebecca Jones Florida Health Department Rebecca Johns Florida Government Florida State Police Florida Ron Philip Kofsky Rhonda Santa Governor Disentis Attorney Ron Philip Kofsky Twelfth Circuit Judicial Nomin Sarasota Republican Party Miami Herald Missy Miss Jones Cova Kaczynski Jones
Interview With Chelsea Hirschhorn

Skimm'd from The Couch

04:46 min | 3 months ago

Interview With Chelsea Hirschhorn

"Hey everyone it's genial. I'm really excited today. And i have so many questions because today chelsea her short our guest on skinned from the couch. She is the founder and ceo afrita a company that makes products to make parents lives easier. I'm so excited. Because i like in my soon to be future. I will be obsessed with these products as my friends already are. It's one of the top selling parenting brands on amazon and you can find their products in over thirty thousand stores across the country chelsea. Thank you for being here. Welcomed skin from the couch. Thank you for having me a dory guys skin from the couch and take on a whole new meeting. yeah. I think everyone now is working from their couches. Okay we're gonna start out with an easy question. Skim your resume for us. Ooh okay. i worked in a candy store in high school in my town in in westchester my parents. Instill that of work ethic in both me and my siblings from a very young age but pressing fast forward too many details that far back i graduated from college went to law school where i met my husband and during law school. I was a legal intern for the new york. Mets my summer internship know the legal internship. When you're in law squad to your second year of law schools are a pretty big deal and it usually ends up. Hopefully if all goes well was an offer at the end of the summer and so my my summer internship after my second year of law school was with gotcha which was the pre eminent. Bankruptcy firm is started with them a second year of law school that was in two thousand seven and then got my offer. September two thousand eight. The world imploded. They actually asked. If i would start early. I started with them. I think it was like october. Two thousand eight. I joined the restructuring group and my first experiences. A lawyer was filing a general motors in american airlines bankruptcy and lehman brothers so spent about two years there and then my husband and i got married in about two thousand ten and he was general counsel for a brazilian private equity fund. That had just acquired burger king. They asked him and one of the other associates from the firm to go down to miami and run the restructuring. that's for burger. King is space and was founded. I left while you know shortly after we got married. Florida has what they call authorized house. Counsel's you actually don't have to take the bar if you work in house as an attorney. So it's really focused on finding an inhouse role and at the time removed. The miami marlins baseball team could had experience in baseball from law. School was opening a new ballpark so previous to that they had actually the facility from the miami dolphins the football team and they didn't have their own ballpark so they were building their own miami. I was brought on as associate in-house counsel director of non baseball revenues. So for the first time in franchise history. They were going to be trying to drive revenue that wasn't affiliated with baseball revenue. So it's sort of you know my first foray into running a peon. Al like an entrepreneurial or business unit within a large the larger confines of a much more resource organization and so i was there for four and a half years. I got pregnant with my first son a now three and we bought our first house in miami beach and my neighbor i was still working for the marlins in house. I was about probably six months pregnant at the time. My neighbor who was like the mayor of our blocks is lovely swedish woman. She invited us over for dinner and had been time about this business that she had started in her garage really and it was still in her garage. Had a few boxes of this swedish nasal spray that she sold to pediatrician's offices and baby boutiques and her kids were now teenagers and she wanted to know anyone. Miami interested in taking over the business. And i said you know about my okay my era i wasn't a parent yet. It didn't even it almost like went right over my head. Yeah i couldn't imagine what. The product was an eric as she wants you to buy the inventory for her. Then eventually you take over an hour running freda yes fast forward. What something that people can't find out about you from google earth lincoln that i really you know up until that moment i really was not a risk taker at all. I told the line. I did what was laid out for me and i i would never in a million years have predicted that i would have veered off. Course

Afrita Baseball Chelsea Westchester Marlins Mets Amazon Miami Lehman Brothers American Airlines General Motors Burger King Miami Dolphins Burger New York King Florida Football Miami Beach
Interview With Chelsea Hirschhorn

Skimm'd from The Couch

04:15 min | 3 months ago

Interview With Chelsea Hirschhorn

"Hey everyone it's genial. I'm really excited today. And i have so many questions because today chelsea her short our guest on skinned from the couch. She is the founder and ceo afrita a company that makes products to make parents lives easier. I'm so excited. Because i like in my soon to be future. I will be obsessed with these products as my friends already are. It's one of the top selling parenting brands on amazon and you can find their products in over thirty thousand stores across the country chelsea. Thank you for being here. Welcomed skin from the couch. Thank you for having me a dory guys skin from the couch and take on a whole new meeting. yeah. I think everyone now is working from their couches. Okay we're gonna start out with an easy question. Skim your resume for us. Ooh okay. i worked in a candy store in high school in my town in in westchester my parents. Instill that of work ethic in both me and my siblings from a very young age but pressing fast forward too many details that far back i graduated from college went to law school where i met my husband and during law school. I was a legal intern for the new york. Mets my summer internship know the legal internship. When you're in law squad to your second year of law schools are a pretty big deal and it usually ends up. Hopefully if all goes well was an offer at the end of the summer and so my my summer internship after my second year of law school was with gotcha which was the pre eminent. Bankruptcy firm is started with them a second year of law school that was in two thousand seven and then got my offer. September two thousand eight. The world imploded. They actually asked. If i would start early. I started with them. I think it was like october. Two thousand eight. I joined the restructuring group and my first experiences. A lawyer was filing a general motors in american airlines bankruptcy and lehman brothers so spent about two years there and then my husband and i got married in about two thousand ten and he was general counsel for a brazilian private equity fund. That had just acquired burger king. They asked him and one of the other associates from the firm to go down to miami and run the restructuring. that's for burger. King is space and was founded. I left while you know shortly after we got married. Florida has what they call authorized house. Counsel's you actually don't have to take the bar if you work in house as an attorney. So it's really focused on finding an inhouse role and at the time removed. The miami marlins baseball team could had experience in baseball from law. School was opening a new ballpark so previous to that they had actually the facility from the miami dolphins the football team and they didn't have their own ballpark so they were building their own miami. I was brought on as associate in-house counsel director of non baseball revenues. So for the first time in franchise history. They were going to be trying to drive revenue that wasn't affiliated with baseball revenue. So it's sort of you know my first foray into running a peon. Al like an entrepreneurial or business unit within a large the larger confines of a much more resource organization and so i was there for four and a half years. I got pregnant with my first son a now three and we bought our first house in miami beach and my neighbor i was still working for the marlins in house. I was about probably six months pregnant at the time. My neighbor who was like the mayor of our blocks is lovely swedish woman. She invited us over for dinner and had been time about this business that she had started in her garage really and it was still in her garage. Had a few boxes of this swedish nasal spray that she sold to pediatrician's offices and baby boutiques and her kids were now teenagers and she wanted to know anyone. Miami interested in taking over the business. And i said you know about my okay my era i wasn't a parent yet. It didn't even it almost like went right over my head. Yeah i couldn't imagine what. The product was an eric as she wants you to buy the inventory for her.

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The Latest: Pennsylvania judge sides with Trump campaign

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 3 months ago

The Latest: Pennsylvania judge sides with Trump campaign

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting a Pennsylvania judge sides with the trump campaign on a limited number of mail in or absentee ballots the trump campaign has secured a favorable ruling in Pennsylvania Commonwealth court judge Mary Hannah Levitt has ordered Pennsylvania counties not to count to mail in or absentee ballots for which the voter didn't submit valid identification within six days of the November third election trump campaign general counsel Matt Morgan calls the order win but the court order affects a subset of about ten thousand ballots that arrived within three days of polls closing as allowed by the state Supreme Court as of Thursday night Democrat Joe Biden leads trump by approximately fifty five thousand votes in Pennsylvania I might cross yep

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Trump campaign files new election lawsuit in Pennsylvania

Mark Levin

00:34 sec | 3 months ago

Trump campaign files new election lawsuit in Pennsylvania

"Files Another lawsuit in Pennsylvania During a news conference general counsel to the Trump campaign, Matthew Morgan explains the violations included in the lawsuit. The Donald J. Trump for president into representative voters filed suit against the secretary of state in select counties. Alleging two things number one, a violation of equal access based on a lack of meaningful observation and transparency, particularly in Democrat controlled counties, and, secondly, a violation of the equal protection. Based on disparate treatment between Republican voters and Democrat voters.

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California GOP won't remove unofficial ballot drop boxes

Pat Walsh

00:35 sec | 4 months ago

California GOP won't remove unofficial ballot drop boxes

"State Republican Party leader CVI will not comply with an order from the seats. Chief elections. Official Secretary of State Alex Padilla. Attorney General Javier Becerra say the unofficial ballot drop boxes are illegal and have ordered Republicans to remove them by today. Republican Party leaders say we have put the boxes in Orange of Fresno and Los Angeles County's on Wednesday they would not reveal where else they have put these boxes or how many ballots they have collected from them. The party's general counsel, says the box is comply with California's ballot harvesting wall, which allows people to collect ballots from voters and return them to county election officers to be counted.

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Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

Scientific Sense

59:58 min | 4 months ago

Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods, leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be Color a wide variety of domains red new discoveries are made. and New Technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new ideas affect society. And help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation. V seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense. Dot. com. And displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics, guests at other ideas. Please send up to info at scientific sense. Dot Com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen. Dot Info. My guests today's facade John. WHO's professor of Law and society at Griffith University in Brisbane Australia. He's also adjunct professor of law at Queensland University of Technology and Research Associated University College Under Center for Blockchain Technologies, he who suggests on the Bloomberg professional globalization of law and the technology in law. But come John. Hello. Thank you. Sure. Yeah. So I want to start with one of your recent people, professions and expertise hog machine learning, and blockchain redesigning the landscape of professional knowledge and organization. In invite you say machine learning has entered the world of the professions. The different impacts automation will have huge impacts on the nature of work and society. Engineering architecture and medicine or early and enthusiastic adopters. Other professions especially law at late you say at in some cases with leptons adopters. could you talk about you know sort of the landscape all? Of Law, profession and. They today in terms of opting these technologies. Certainly Louis interesting because it's a very old profession is. Often considered one of the. Original traditional professions along with medicine and the church. And in a sense law has used different kinds of technology might say I mean does it? Based around writing. And then the printing press and So on yet that. It's always being based on a craft. A skill which the individual person is that enables them to do, whatever is quote if you like and. said, there's never been a lot of room for any kind of automation. Certainly, the has been space for using. A people who are not fully qualified as low as about as paralegals, people like that, who will do a lot of repetitive work document checking and things like that and so on. But what will get into now is the situation where automation through machine learning. There's other kinds of artificial intelligence. is able to start constructing documents example contracts. Check dollop a documents for particular clauses and things like that mature they're up to date and this incense is. Replacing now, the kind of work that noise will do. So I think in some ways more more of of the profession of law is gonNA be subject to automation, but distinction I would many because I think it's quite important here is that A lot of what lawyers do. Is actually quite. Active that that that that the drafting contracts overtime or or they're reviewing documents to some sort or another or they're getting through particular. Negotiation. And so you know a lot of it is the same, but they build up the expertise through doing these same kinds of were over and over again and What we're now finding is that instead of having young lawyers coming in and doing what you might call the grunt work of checking documents and going through discovery applications where he goes through the size boxes of evidence to decide. which are the appropriate documents you want the emails, the invoices order, this sort of stuff that is the kind of work which is lending itself to automation. And, and so that his taking away a lot of the work which is used for trading purposes with young lawyers and is just doing it much quicker. will quickly I mean More efficiently in many ways and probably expensive much much expensive a Lotta. This work is being outsourced to you know legal process outsourcing India or Philippines South Africa places like that. So yeah, that's that's right and so in some ways, the group of lawyers who do the work which requires the skill, the judgment. Is Reducing in some ways. That pool is getting smaller. Yeah Yeah it's it's interesting. The the distinction that you make between automation. And in my job and let's call it decision making right which is you know a lot of work in the business side of this. So for example. in the nineties in large pharmaceutical company So you think about you know rnd. People might think it has really complex selection of programs that design of them, portfolio management, risk management, all those decisions. Genuine companies be say well, senior managers with lots of experience and intuition make those decisions really well right and so that's statement would automatically implied that machines can really do much there. But what we find in the mid nineties says that is systematic analysis of data make those decisions. Don't better. Actually, I've Tom to humans humans. Always seem to make decisions. These are typically bonding the decision. So if you go back and look at it, alternative experiment has not been wrong. So we have no date to say it was a good decision at typically. So human scaffold, fifty percents of making good decisions So do you know just throwing a coin or letting monkey make those decisions so? Yup We found that even complex decision making that humans hold. you know close to their you know kind of domain I'm not necessarily. So we have machines That could do that much better than I. Don't know there's an analog of that in in law I I. Think The may be actually I mean Two three years ago the royal. Society in England decided to arrange a working party on machine learning. One of the things that they put together a a roundtable on machine learning professions resolved to talk about that night and I talked about the history of professions in technology and. and. I think one of the peculiar things that came out to in relation to law is that law. Has always been a sort of on its own. If you think about medicine, for example, medicines always had the teacher hospital institution that sort of straddles the academic quilt and the practice walls and brings those people together and as a result. INCORPORATES loss of, scientific, work. Engineering work as well computing work and things like that. And that's been the first teaching hospital king into existence in in the French revolution in Seventeen eighty-nine. A long history of that. If you look at law, there was nothing equivalent to that whatsoever and there is in fact, actually a big gap between what academy does on what the practitioners in your do so that As a result as before law has come to this a quite late but what we are. Finding I think is that Certainly the management consultancy finding is that because of the nature of a lot of what goes on in legal office a remarkable amount of it can be automated. So what we are getting now is companies setting themselves up to do this automated work. So. We have companies which do nothing but contract our instruction formation sort of company. The typical lawyer would would say to a client Do you WANNA contract classes. Yes I want this for this. And loyal galway draft contract back with it, and then in the con- comes back against as I need another contract, you go through the same process. which is good for the lawyer but not necessarily good kind. What we're finding now is the company's not can think of a few of them that will, in fact, go into the company's show order contracts. Let's see the entire. Corpus of contracts you've got there and they will analyze them. And basically say, all right. We can create a new contract in automated way fairly easily it may need some modification according to special circumstances but on the whole, it's fairly standard and and they can do that INNOVA systematic world meaning the contracts are reviewed that checked. If they're going to expire marketing, you want an unable just the system will cope with that if you're. Yeah. So yeah. No No. No so I was just going to say yes. So that the distinction you make, you know in terms education sort of systematic graduate level education that because as you say, it is low in one sense of soft proficient. You say in called professions like made it to text reengineering this team has a strong concern ensuring that expertise applied in the public interest when as low little bit different from from bad and economics in some sense sort of in the same same vein we have now made economics at really odd. of mathematics you know north of analytics there. Whether they are actually useful from policy making perspective is left to debate but at least it has been an attempt to make this make economic video hard. So so I don't know A. Fascination has been in in law I very much that will happen in law. Oh there things are beginning to happen I mean let me just boob. At. One example I learned in that workshop that I mentioned the Royal Society held. With somebody from the engineering profession talking about. The difference in skills between people who above forty I'm below forty he said. If he he was about Forty Years Austin design an aeroplane, takeout pen and paper Pencil, and paper and. I don't know anyone under forty could do that would know how to do that go onto a computer program undecided there. So you can see that the incorporation of technology into the academy through to the actual. Occupation. Than phones and things is is already a standard and they're in law. It isn't law. As you said, it's still very much a soft skill although I will argue that there is a difference between the way nor is viewed in different parts of the world. So in the United States A law is I think more tilted towards the sciences. So low in economics is one of the big things in the. US. So you got a lot of people working in the of lower economics who might go onto antitrust work no competition work and things like that which across a lot of economics, mathematics and Statistics and so on. In, say a Europe Australia and so on. Law is more allied towards the humanities. And the classics. So it doesn't have that kind of scientific underpinning in that way. So anything that's going to change in these parts if you like is going to be something that's going to be imported from outside. And is going to have a very dramatic impact when whether it does An and I think that's yet to happen. I don't think there's been sort of Cambrian explosion. If you like in in law, the will be one I'm sure but but law has an advantage over engineering economics or the other areas you might. That's With the nature of the rule of law and absent justice is since law as a a way of ordering society is absolutely crucial to everything else. Then, Law and lawyers will say will look you know we have a special status here is different amid leave engineer. We certainly want to make sure bridges stay up. We don't want down but we can design different kinds of bridges. We can design different kinds of legal bills, but they're also the fundamental rules If you want to you know if you're an engineering company and you want to build a bridge in a different country, you're going to have to do it on the basis of the legal rules, which will be just vise by the lawyers according to the country's there in so on. So in in that was what? I might put in a special category if you live. Yea. Yea. Let me let me push NBA John. So. The. The conference that you mentioned you know the Internet is under forty and engineers at. So so one could argue you know from an engineering perspective could argue e- It sexually dangerous. To not use machines to build aircraft the goes you know all the technology that cap today actually help us make the trap lot safer. granted. If you sit down with a blank sheet of paper and Pencil, you might get the principal right. But, but the technology has advanced so much that you really have to use. Technology to do so in some sense, engineering is pushed back. that. I argue this myself then they were naive engineering school. I had a V exposed at my daughter bent to school. She used the same physics book. Twenty, five. meter. I argue that that is sort of backward because data speed no need for an engineer to really learn Newtonian physics anymore because it is prescriptive, it's deterministic can make machines, learn it very quickly and so why spend all? Right. So so then you know if you think about the the law field. I wonder if there is a senior argument that is to say Dan and tape really good lawyer casts lot of intuitions dot expedients to crap something Contract or a discourse, but then maybe the machine scan actually do it even better We haven't really tested that hypothesis yet. Right be almost have this idea that humans are always dominant. Or machines but that the not be true as technology lancers. So what do you think about that in the in the? It's a very important point actually because the. American bosses. being modifying its ethical rules recently to say that lawyers have a duty and obligation to keep up to date with technology. So we already know the technology is now a an important part and I have to say when when I say the word technology, I mean this at all kinds of levels from what you can do with Microsoft word for example, it strays plug ins all the way up to artificial intelligence IBM, Watson, or something like that So that if if lawyers become. A. Uses of technology whether this small firms or big firms or what have you a under the Aba now they they actually have an obligation to make sure that they are up to date. They can't just say we didn't know what we were doing. So I think in that respect, there is a there was a move. The other move that is taking place is actually the push from from the clients. Now, this you have to look into ways one is with corporate clients. The corporation seen US lawyers have to use noise if you'd like want their work done. PHILOS- money on Chiba they wanted to more efficiently They don't want the best piece of work every time they want something that works and they want officiant. UTA A and so on. So it was interesting I think a few years ago. The General Counsel Cisco. Actually made a speech. Saying that he expected his. Lawyers Law firms who worked for the company to be reducing their fees year on year. Now, that's the opposite of what lawyers normally do, which is to raise them year on year. So say that that's one push which is. Very profound push now, coming from the client himselves who are using the beginning to use their procurement departments in in the companies and things like that to help purchase legal services the other aspects which is just as important in this is if you look at the role of lawyers and individuals. So if you is what access to to legal services, it's expensive lawyers are not cheap they charge our money We don't know how to judge the quality of their work and so on. because. There was a credence which we just know that So. On this is where technology can begin to step in and provide services which are. Efficient and often quite. what very well for the individual saying that this. Technology can be seen to be improving access to justice a Lotta people. Yeah. Yeah yes. I want to come back to this. John. I think this is a very important point. So bent on put has a lot of uncertainty. Uncertainty maybe not not the right term, but it's called deterministic. It shows beatty ability and so the determination of quality it's not as easy as hard media India nearing or. Right business economics legal all sorts of well foreign that category and the application of technology sort of a different different meaning there but I want to touch on one of the things that you say in the paper, and that is you mentioned this before and that's about training training the next generation. So you savior regulating bodies professions are involved in the collection and reproduction of knowledge intended to be used by the entire body professionals, and so there was an expectation here that you know seeing it professionals. Is Providing the wisdom that knowledge mission to train the next generation now in a technology driven. regime. discuss vacations right. Our expert is going to be a computer engineer in the future. And so so how does that work from from cleaning and knowledge Asian will I think this is This is a crucial issue in it's one which the profession hasn't. Really. Got To grips with yet I think because you think of technology in terms of Predictive analytics a document review and things like this most law schools are not preparing students for this they may be a a a a causal to on some aspect of technology, but it's not something which lawyers themselves are learning. So I think what is going to happen is we're going to find a blending of skills occurring. So law firms will be sense having to bring in a range of technologists who perhaps have. A scales a straddle, both sides of the lines, the lawyers like this too I think I think we're going to find an avangard Who will begin to develop skills that allow them to talk to both sides of the line, the tech people and? Below people if you likes and there will be people who will acquire develop these skills as well but that's that's still some way down the line I didn't think we're anywhere near there yet, and part of the reason for that I think is that you know law is still a very highly regulated profession and and the regulators themselves are in the same situation they are unsure about what is going to happen and they also feel they have an obligation to. Not only ensure that. Customers clients and consumers are protected but in some ways, the profession is protected to if you like so. You know it's it's a it's a fine balancing. There I. Think. It's a fight balancing act and you'd say if the changing changing things. So going back, you know you care as an individual eighteen status of expert. Some form of encapsulation of knowledge and analysis occurs enabling professional experts, derived diagnoses, decisions, and conclusion wrapped late. and you make some distinctions. Type of learning that. Human? Beings. That the distinction between doing drive and become a gift and laster Yes yes. Yes I think that's important. So the the the the principle behind this is that Individuals can acquire a lot of knowledge in in various areas. So as I say learning how to drive a car, you learn how to change gear you though with the speeds. Braking different rates, conditions, and things like that. So. If you WANNA take that further and become a formula one drive or something like that. Then you have to undergo a very different kind of training and that kind of thing becomes a lot more collective rather than individual because you start to you're you're going to be in a group that is gonna be doing a particular kind of our driving. If you like everybody in the group has to understand what each other is doing that group, you can't have people going right a racetrack at two hundred miles an hour or thinking individually feel like they have to have a collective consciousness. About. How to drive in that situation? That's nothing like how? You and I might drive. I'm not saying we bad drivers just saying spreading very different. So I think professional work is not. That different from this in a way. So once you you can go through school and you can do your law degree and you can learn your low. We can learn you engineering's this applies to or professions really. But in order to become a professional in order to become somebody who can operate function within that. Group if you like you then have yourself have to develop collective consciousness and and one way of thinking about it is that we we can kind of tacit knowledge. This assorted knowledge you learn on the job from people, which is not always articulated in a precise formulate kind way but it's something you pick up from the way. Somebody does something you just recognize aw that that's how they've done that might not be. Written down anywhere or anything like that. But you know that's different from now exiting differently from the way that wise doing I think X.'s doing it better I and you and you just, and you can absorb that. That's what I mean by this kind of tacit knowledge and that comes about from the professional context. As how the professional context develops becomes absolutely crucial to how you introduce new ways of doing things new my daddy's new skills new outlooks if you like and I. Think this is where we're on the cost of of this beginning to develop I mean we we know it's got to be done quite how it's going to be done. is yet to be. So. So let me make a statement John and I want I want your reaction to it so eat in hard sciences eight years against again medicine. Expertise has about a consistent happy of remorse. Whereas enor- economics and business in general, let's say expertise is not about the ability to apply rules but to deal with. and at and if that is true, it has lot of implications rate. It has implications as to how we might divide work. Between. And machine in the future. And the skills that universities need to impart on on on new graduates are also quite different. So I always argued in the business. engineering contexts that universities having changed the dog they get mentioned before they're using the same. Using the same. Out Thirty four years without asking the question are those skills relevant, anymore or more importantly watch. Really relevant for a human being in the future rate. do you agree with that that expertise assert more about dealing exceptions apply? Putting it actually. I. I can see the logic behind what you. Saying I think what distinguishes? A good professional whether it's a good engineer good architect or good lawyer or doctor is is somebody who has a certain? This may sound strange but it's the. Imagination. Creativity. about. Kind of flare that allows them to function on the nausea they they've got and developed over the years and the experience. Gathered from Nova pitching what they'd be doing over the years and so on, and it allows them to see around things in ways which they perhaps would. I can give you an example if you like a law. So I'm in in Germany and some other countries. For example, there's a particular way of bundling together mortgage securities I I won't go to detail about this, but this statute that enables you do it. And then you can sell these securities and get money. In certain countries, the UK, the US, and so on. This, NICI. So in a sense to put this kind of a a deal together it. Couldn't be done if you live. So a bank came to one of the large English law firms and said, look we wanted we want to replicate this in in the UK, want to set a market this we're not the statues off there. What can you do and what was interesting was that the law firm then went back to first principles lawyers who were looking at this went back I suppose they looked at some vape basic areas of law matter your trust. And contract from what have you? I'm from that they constructed elite supplement that looked very much like the one in Germany, but without stat sheet and they tested it and it worked. Out To be credibly successful. So much so that the German government started German legal profession started to complain because they said. You can only do this by statute and these we find a way of doing it three. I suppose using law and there it is an they were vowed shops by but that was a particular example if you like of of what you were talking about, they took the exceptions they went back to first principles and said you know or How would we get? This is where we gotta get to, and this is a way right at the beginning what are the steps we need to take and and? And that's what a good loyal will do if you. Right right? Yeah. So that's very important point. So you in your paper dawn as the DREYFUSS and rice note that the proficient performer immersed in the world of skillful activities sees what needs to be done. But decides how to do it. So as we move into a and other technologies, I think it's important point it is. Right from Dad benefactor culture we have been using humans as you mentioned before in lots of with meted activities big not designed for humans I would I would contend enjoy doing things over and over again, and if you had thought of doing that, yeah, because they have to do it for living right and so so we should be moving to word It would where anything that is with pita on delegated to the machine at automation in the bottom of that and Appealed autonation you can have intelligent automation you can have you know reinforcement learning those types of things you have some aspects of intelligence into the into the two. And deploy humans Don't Miss. They're really good at in some case. I'm. So you know we've been studying the green for ages be our no close. It feels to understand mother. Heck it does You know it's not neat learning it. Oh, BBC of. thirty years ago as see that person again, you could see you could you could have a feeling. Then you've seen that before and and what the brain has done actually not only as he that pattern but also age that matter intuitively for thirty years and say, yes, that face I, guess before. and. So there are some superpowers the brain has reaped have been applying the all all. So for a technology might allow. Look I. Think Technology will allow us to incredibly complex things without having to think about too much I. Mean if you look at the way a port functions, for example, any major port these days they've got millions of containers and ships going through them all the time. So there's a lot of paper going through the you those charter parties, bills of lading guarantees. So the lot of legal work that's being done it, it's all quite standard stuff. I mean everybody. KNOWS, what needs to be done and so on. Now, some people are beginning to think while the best way to handle a port if you like I for everybody should know is to put everything that's going on in the poor into a blockchain so that you can see the whole supply chain. You see when something comes in, you can determine when the goods are being offloaded. When they're being shipped, you can stop making the payments as a result of the. Operation of the smart contracts if you like, and the whole thing would be just one quite seamless. In some ways without that much human intervention really just need oversight Some bits of coordination so on. But at the moment is still a a lot of humans are vote in that shipping people, law people, all sorts of things which is. I think insane. That's a waste of resources. We know that there are people who have all kinds of problems that require that creative flair she like as so why waste money on the routine stuff when you could develop skills to the the real need if you like in that way? Yeah Yeah. So I, want that some that bit that John Blockchain, for example, as you mentioned. So so one reason especially in the professions like law and business humans have an advantage justice dimension of trust. and you know at least our generation we don't really. At eighty level, right. So so having that. Human human touch is still extremely important for us. Now, technologies like Blockchain, for example, actually allows that trust to be tensely decoupled, right? Yeah, and I think I think you're right. Look I. Think I mean one of the reasons we make contracts is because We, don't trust each other. So we we devised these documents with all the conditions in them. Something goes wrong. This is what will happen things like that and so on. What are the interesting things? You know people really rely on contracts are met you. You draw up a contract. And the to business people stick him in the drawer I never look at again less something really really fundamental goes wrong but they know sumit doesn't that never look at that again. So you say value of the contract, what did it actually do if you look at some of the Asian countries say like Taiwan or parts of China, you have a assistant coach Guanxi, which is where people developed effective relationships by knowing each other over a period of time around business that allows them to develop trust it. So You know there are different ways of of handling trust, but we we seem to spend a lot of time on trying to minimize something You know which we don't really do a lot of if you like. So I think one of the advantages of of blockchain is that it just it removes a lot of this from from the equation if there's certain things you know that can happen. as a result off if this thing that systems. Lead happened And you know. As, long as you've got oversight and you can see what's going on than. You don't need to be too concerned about it. It will just do what it needs to do in that way and So. Again. That's still very much in the early stages, but we are seeing situations where supply chains A shipping goods from one country to another can actually be done under smart contracts through a blockchain. Technology if you live. That that is now happening I associate goodful dealing with things like gum counterfeiting if you're. Producing. Particular high-quality could site move our phones or particular pharmaceutical products and so on you know it's one way of guaranteeing the quality of the product is you couldn't I say look you can examine the whole supply chain or the data is there. And you know his Eq- code look at it and you get the whole thing going all the way back The. Again, issues around that if you're dealing with the digital. Is Much easier once you start dealing with physical products then you have. A question of how do you get that first initial digitization of the physical if you'd like to goes on so though some people I know here in Australia who? Run A company called Beef Ledger, which is trying to export beef straight beef to China using the blockchain supply chain, which will. Guarantee the security, and the quality of the goods to the Chinese consumer APP because having problems with this before. But I will tell you now do doing something like that does require that the people you are dealing with. You're going to set this up with You have to have a trusting relationship with you before you can set up a technology that will do away with the So we're still in that. That's really early days. I think another a lot of time way to go right Yeah, but the technology works it. Clean potential one could argue contracts exist because they probably known performance if you have a technology that drives that probably the of non-performance zero, then you can actually get rid of for contract. Yeah limit. It is. Not. Goes back to that earlier point I made that. Most most contracts are fairly standard. You know a routine things they're there to. Record a series of transactions payments that have gone on between people without the to do much. If you like you know once you you're you're doing the business, the contract just kind of records that in perpetuity. So the small contract just takes that into a different area and an an actually does the whole implementation and execution without people to be involved in that too much and there's something goes wrong. But if it if it all goes right then back it is done you need to you don't you think about it Right. Yeah. Hasn't been jumping to another are forthcoming people globalization law at. A time of crisis in the? Global Lawyer and so in the say Nikolai Condom Nieve a Russian economists in the nineteen thirties believed the worst economy operates long sixty year cycles Then he called K. Braves. And you safeguarding coronavirus analysis, the fifth psycho young's from nineteen eighty to twenty thirty. It's you save twenty, nineteen forthcoming John You might have. I think so I think say because I, tell you off the what's happening this year I thought my good I couldn't My God. I was just. Owners because you know a contract device these waves up into into what he calls four seasons spring summer or winter at, and we're in the winter off this fifth cycle if you like this is. All the bad stuff happens and he's news war. Famine Disease I think wait a minute that sounds Yes yes. That's exactly right. A. But one of the interesting things about contractors was that you know he he a because he's A. Solid economists are installing a dip executed. By the way you know he he got fed up ninety that was the end of Nikolai unfortunately but he. He said instead of know if you like the ownership of the means of production are being the determinate for changeover from system system, he said it's it's technology and and that the technology will drive you out of the downswing of the last cycle into the upswing of the new cycle, and and the way that works is the win. You're in this kind of winter period because of the kind of economic. Gloom pervades if you like people tend to hold back in subsurface vestment in terms of technological innovation of what have you and so a lot of energy resources, resources, money capital if you like builds up to a second point when people say we're GONNA go for this is this is it? And that's when if you like technology comes to the fall on, really drives it forward. So from that perspective, what he's saying is that you know come right about twenty thirty. If. Things are going slowly now regarding technology they're going to speed up. In. This period and that's when it will. You know really also take take off and people have looked back over our preceding cycles and they've you know it works if you like not just their. Fantasy theory there are also the people who do Cleo dynamics in history these the quantitative historians and they've done a similar kind of analysis of historical periods and said, yeah, you know there are all these citrical. Processes that take place even revolutions occur and big upset occurs and what have you and and. One of their Perspectives which I find quite interesting is that they say one of the reasons for revolutions come about is caused a lease beginning to compete with each other and and an an I look at say trump in in America and I look at the Democrats and I I I would say Modine, India I look she in China and different groups of elites who are engaged really profound struggle for the future of their countries if you live. Out which again is leading to this kind of potential eruption of activity and a new ways of doing things. Yeah. It makes a lot of intuitive sense gone. So one way to think about this also. There are a lot of excesses. So innovating go good their excesses in the system people to believe that invincible they changed assumptions about. because they don't see any. and. Financial markets to right. So these cycles and real real mass that uniquely talking about you can see the. Happening in the financial markets more clearly. But what he's saying is that he happens mortgage and you ask in this paper in two thousand, nineteen for in many ways go. Crystallization off the settling ketone economic forces lost throat ear Kublai doomed as populous. Separates nationalism and lead clients and I think they have that we have probably the answer to that. But you see I think. One of the points I was trying to make an in in this paper walls that Global Law. If you like is is, is the a kind of synthesis off chaos? How do we bring some kind of order to chaos now once you start seeing the undermining? Of his global institutions, you see trump was withdrawn from the W. H. O.. He's he's are criticized NATO he he won't have the do with the International, Criminal Court and so we've got this kind of real life tension now between a an international legal order that's being built up since the Second World War both Ekit economic and legal order is Global And so we can't just a radical globalization I mean even even with covert, we can't eradicate mobilize ation we've got to. Handle covert the Kobe pandemic on a global basis. Otherwise, we'll. We're lost it retreats to a national. Approach is not gonNA. Work? We'll be defeated in that race is going to be global. Might. Be One of my questions in in paper was will who are the people who are going to be doing this? Kind of bringing the the order to chaos if you like and that made argument that it's got to be the global lawyer. And this is a person who not only understand their national legal system but also able to communicate with lawyers and officials. From around the world if you like. To be able to develop a kind of common. Language common discourse that enables them to stop putting these things together are, and it's not just a simple massa of saying mathematically, it works this way or not. It requires the kind of pulling together of people, but it requires that sort of common understanding which. Comes out of what I was saying about this idea of testing knowledge you know as you got this kind of professional consciousness you know how people ought to behave and how they will interact with you, and then that enables you to be out of bizarre to predict how you can do things and so on and so on. That basis I think we can operate kind of global order. It had a a below the institutional level if you're not kind of private. As opposed to the public according and that will put three. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah you know I the limit John I don't know if you think this way I limit one could as. Want to stay need for. Countries what does the need for legal system differentials? We set this up with the premise that it's easier to manage small chunks. one could also argue with Edmund Affect. -nology that you don't need to segment this debate that we have done. which might make these types of issues you know. See where you're coming from and I'm going to say yes or no? Yes, I think the home range of of questions that can be handled by the technology the ones we got pay I don't chain, etc. I don't I didn't see any issues there but there are a lot of decisions that needs to be made a book in terms of putting things together and resolve disputes that can only function at a human level because it's not. These are not decisions that are simple binary decisions. If you'd like, it's yes or no it's it's often a lot more nuance than complex about I mean, one of the resources in the World Kiva Zero System, the world amendment which is being fought over if you like is water, a water is probably one of the most valuable resources anywhere and it's you often find that rivers and things like that sort of flow between countries, they form borders. And and you are you know people if you look at the Nile, ESL start stopping in Sudan throwaway down to the Mediterranean. So he goes to countries all three countries, east European and then into Egypt's and so unwell well, who has the right to put it dime at a particular place and things like that all of that has to be cooled in act. You see a not going to be done at a human level that that's what caused the skills in negotiation judgment interpretation understanding if you like of the other people, no machine can do that I got. Yes before we conclude, I want to touch on one other thing So in the paper, you say as technology and culture intersect more and more. Ethical conundrums will intensify these raising questions about the rights and obligations of robots. And go beyond as moves. Three laws of robotics in two issues of rights of all moon. Algorithm, stem serves. So this is this is an area that be Kevin babies even even really form some notions allowed rights of all modes at rights of a are. Sai, gets more sophisticated. Yes. Yes. I do. I, mean I think this is one of the issues we already know some of the problems with algorithms and and you know can we can be are they transplanted from you see what's going on the ethical issues around the construction and implementation of algorithms and things like that. But I I I think looking into the future we all going to rely on things like robots. And various kinds of machines so much more so that if you look at a country like Japan, which is a a an aging population such that it doesn't have sufficient younger people to look after the people who need looking often. So machines, I'll be part of that, and that means people will stop forming real relationships with machines and and so that's when I would say. Okay. So let's think about how we View a potential rights of machine that we give. We give rise to humans. Yes. We know that we give rights to animals. Now we've also given rights to viz in forest in some countries as well as so machines I think our. Next logical step you know do we do we treat them with respect Let me give you one. Very classic example yet the production of. Robots for sex if you like is a major industry at the moment, some manufacturers say they want to program them say that people can act out rape fantasies will do we want that I? Mean you know should we be at first of all? You know? We should be having people behave in this particular kind of way, but even an uncertain if you do it against another human being, you'll be punished for it and you say we'll a machine is a piece of property you should be you should be doing that but I'm getting to think that maybe a machines should be treated with dignity say that we are treat ourselves with. Dixie. This a kind of reflexive situation here what we? Do to machines we do to each other, and they may again due to US depending on how they evolve and and move forward in that way is a very contentious issue. A lot of people would reject that right out of hand I agree I think we've got to stop thinking about stop dining forward because I. think we're going to at some point again. I. Don't know when. But at some point we will be having to deal with that. It's a it's a very important point. Joan. So if I understand you correctly, you know that the rights to animals the rights to inanimate. INANIMATE things like Lubers The recent those exist is because of its effects on humans and can see video a clear link in the future we would see a very clear link between a algorithms and robots ended affects on human. So this is not me You know each not fantasy in the sense that yeah, robots should have rights, but rather it's a more conceptual question. Any fraud did not have rights each going to cabin negative I I think that's absolutely true. I mean just to highlight that if you like this firm called Boston Dynamics that produces. Robots and they produced these videos of these. Now, these robots are resistant being pushed over and things like that, and it was quite interesting because a lot of people say all you can't treat them in this way. This is awful and so what I mean that that's the answer for more fighting to to the extreme extent. But it I think you know on the basis what you're saying, you know how we Oakland. Hold human beings accountable to each other in an increasingly complex world machines have become part of that. We can't just have them all sitting on the edge as though they're not part of who we are, what we are and how we do things. Right. So. Incursion Johnny fuel sort of look forward five years. At. The intersection of law and technology. But you think people see sort of the biggest. I. Think you'll see it two wins. On the you know for the individual The individual, you're going to see a lot of them just interacting. With artificial Tennessee, say lost questions about what my rights for this how do I deal with a tendency agreement? How do I complain against a producer company or something like that or that's going to be automated? is fairly straightforward to do and and it will only need A. Minimal. Amount of human inside of. An intervention if you like. At the other end at the. In I think we're GONNA see more and more technology coming in because as those basic functions that are. Being, carried out by junior people or or paralegals or things like that are the ones which are going to be increasing, automating creasing. I'm. We will replace the humans and just let machines do that because there's no point in wasting human resources on that whether that means we need fuel or more lawyers That's an open question I think it will that we need different kinds of lawyers We will need Roy Moore to logically aware much more sophisticated. They don't it's be programmers or odors or anything like that, but they need to have a quite a a a a strong understanding and gross what's going on in technology in that way if you like so. Yeah. We can definitely see an. Yeah, so I, think you mentioned the so from a structure perspective in all forum DC law firm sprucing to word. It a group of equity partners. Around it by machine so to speak well, I. Think. I was in that paper or another one I. I'm S-. Forecast. Law. Firms. Being. Distributed decentralized we'll tournaments organizations running on a blockchain with with the various people. into setting when they will no I. Think the law firm is still a very strong and powerful is Shutian, that's not gonNA disappear straight away. But certainly the numbers of partners who control things will shrink. They'll that will get smarter as proportion and yes, they will be surrounded by machines and they surrounded by people who are servicing those machines. Your excellent. Yeah. Thanks for doing this weekend. John really enjoyed the conversation. Thank you very much. It's been great fun and very

Blockchain John Gill Eappen Eappen Queensland University Of Techn Blockchain Technologies Australia Griffith University India United States German Government Innova Bloomberg Inflammation Royal Society Brisbane John Blockchain Chiba
Make schools safe now: Chicago Teachers Union president says

WBBM Afternoon News Update

00:55 sec | 5 months ago

Make schools safe now: Chicago Teachers Union president says

"After an arbitrator to determine that public school buildings were not covert safe gives Rob Hart with story. The arbitrator's ruling that came down Friday said the district violated the union contract by making some staff members come into school buildings to work. Instead of working remotely. The union's general counsel, Robert Bloch, said during a morning news conference that face masks and social distancing are not enough to stop the spread of an airborne virus. They must accept that it's just not safe currently. To be in a CPS building. They must allow their employees to work remotely, and they must not attempt to reopen their schools until they're safe. The district said in a statement that the arbitrator did not specify the ways in which school buildings or unsafe the union says the majority of school buildings were built before 1950 with outdated ventilation systems. The two sides now have to find a way to implement the ruling. Rob Hart NewsRadio 105.9 FM, Now the latest on the Corona virus in Illinois,

Rob Hart Robert Bloch CPS General Counsel Illinois
Interview with Shyamala Prayaga

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

06:46 min | 5 months ago

Interview with Shyamala Prayaga

"Hello and welcome to the today podcast. I'm your host, Kathleen Mulch and I'm your host Ronald smells our our guest. Today is Shammala Pro Yoga who is the autonomous digital assistant vision lead at Ford High Shinola. Thank you so much for joining us today on today. Thank you so much. It's my pleasure. Yes. Welcome Chamois, and thanks for joining us. We'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners and tell them a little bit about your background and your current role at Ford. So. Yeah. I'M GONNA and I'm the frontal known job. You know your aren't complete. So basically, I lead the wishing funded autonomous official assistance the now Newton values cases in what technologies do we need, what kind of experience we need to design, and then bringing it onto the order to find the expedience exempted. So I've been with old saw announced deals. Now on food I will voice box technologies, which is now at all students. On, board with Amazon and that is weird. Mijo. Needed on I will with little up signs once size companies as well. So I've been in the expedience design roller far on mostly two decades now today's about me. Yeah. Well, that's great. Well, you know we do spend a lot of time talking about all these different applications of AI. We call the seven patterns of Ai and we were really excited to have you present. And participate in a panel at our data for a conference which was held live September fourteenth through eighteen, twenty, twenty virtually of course, because everything is virtual but we had you WANNA panel and it was fantastic new shed some really great insights about a especially as it relates to voice assistance and voice and autonomous systems for data, and for those who are listening if you weren't able to attend the event have no worries because. You can still go on and you can access all the content at Data Ai C., O. N. F. DOT COM including chamois panel. So maybe as a preview to encourage those to listen to the whole panel. Chamois, why don't you tell us a little bit about your insights that you have gleaned about using I and the data challenges and some of the other challenges especially in the context of Autonomous Invoice assistance? Yeah. So so basically Voice as. You donate anyone using voices June board noticed agile. The superficial level of poison system is really good. You know when you ask the the assistant to do something, it would answer right. But Dan if you look, there's lot of technologies a lot of different kinds of things going in the background, which kind of makes the assistant waters doing fudd exam. You said play music, veteran recognizing usage music, and understanding the Indian that you meant you want to listen to music who processing eight and then playing the music for you, and then you know natives funding backfield wrist on of these things, acknowledges, and of course, throughout this fish cutting your wise to understand. It to renege does not of data required to understand the national and then of course, you not buying your accounting guide. So there's none of the Dow which needs to be captured throughout when you're designing. Now, I also spoke about like how these voice assistance are limited to. Happy. Use Case is solo voice assistance will officially if you are you know on American with perfect English. But if you know the moment you start having some sort of accident, you know they not as much our diamond, not even the ignites if you how strong accident. So that's another problem. So of course, this dude that challenge they've been handed down from uh specific segment, not the other. Thing especially in the autonomous eighty taints they if you on an automated states is not of background nice but you cannot control. So in those kinds of scenarios, of course, in all the assistance failed ignites, but the users said. So some of the automotive companies they would say instrument the use of Leixoes the window like make sure that business background noise. But then those are not the solutions to simplify the experience of making us Seinfield behalf not of. Their time beyond making improvements everyday. But I still feel like there's more data which is required make expedience use of the US, and that is where you know we spoke about takes and how Imboden is because as we start collecting on all these data than we are getting in, do the tribal seeded as trying to be on those kinds of face? Yeah. You know that's great. I enjoyed that panel so much on the panel we also discussed humanizing privacy Can. You share with our listeners, what this means and Wyatt? So important yeah. Glad you asked him that question also writing a book about this topic, which will come in twenty twenty, one call humanizing privacy so like I mentioned. It takes his on about principle integrity fairness and responsibility dry, and then you know into would be as will. But if you look at these assistance, the biggest challenges you know are great. But then the moment that comes to do is not of issues. For example, you know like it has been so many news at Alex saw Google has been regard late listening to other things. Other reasons they were not supposed to not for pressing for the other reason. So they will those kind of leaks which has happened and even if. You know like when you first buy your device on renewables `integrated. Donate, adopt your device. You would have Johnson conditions and everything in place but then who reads the domes and conditions to know Lakewood did I actually, what do you are starting on what they are using to fulfill specifically quiz no-one really does and that is where the biggest thing is although the companies are trying to cover legally they are covering in a way which is not used as human center and I believe in Ruin ising rival. See because I feel like privacy is the stepping stone towards trust if used those feel lake, this company has the right kind of takes the ad being responsible being the being honest. The Indy Vega behalf dignity than of course, in all people will want to use it in how we do that. So I believe that it's not just the responsibility of legal or you know alike general counsel to design some Johnson conditions concerns on these the. But I believe that business something where you know that it has to be more things we need to be humanizing the entire thing privacy as fake.

Johnson Ford High Shinola Kathleen Mulch Mijo Ronald Ford United States Amazon Official Lakewood General Counsel DAN Seinfield Fudd Wyatt Google Imboden Alex
Interview with Shyamala Prayaga

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

06:46 min | 5 months ago

Interview with Shyamala Prayaga

"Hello and welcome to the today podcast. I'm your host, Kathleen Mulch and I'm your host Ronald smells our our guest. Today is Shammala Pro Yoga who is the autonomous digital assistant vision lead at Ford High Shinola. Thank you so much for joining us today on today. Thank you so much. It's my pleasure. Yes. Welcome Chamois, and thanks for joining us. We'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners and tell them a little bit about your background and your current role at Ford. So. Yeah. I'M GONNA and I'm the frontal known job. You know your aren't complete. So basically, I lead the wishing funded autonomous official assistance the now Newton values cases in what technologies do we need, what kind of experience we need to design, and then bringing it onto the order to find the expedience exempted. So I've been with old saw announced deals. Now on food I will voice box technologies, which is now at all students. On, board with Amazon and that is weird. Mijo. Needed on I will with little up signs once size companies as well. So I've been in the expedience design roller far on mostly two decades now today's about me. Yeah. Well, that's great. Well, you know we do spend a lot of time talking about all these different applications of AI. We call the seven patterns of Ai and we were really excited to have you present. And participate in a panel at our data for a conference which was held live September fourteenth through eighteen, twenty, twenty virtually of course, because everything is virtual but we had you WANNA panel and it was fantastic new shed some really great insights about a especially as it relates to voice assistance and voice and autonomous systems for data, and for those who are listening if you weren't able to attend the event have no worries because. You can still go on and you can access all the content at Data Ai C., O. N. F. DOT COM including chamois panel. So maybe as a preview to encourage those to listen to the whole panel. Chamois, why don't you tell us a little bit about your insights that you have gleaned about using I and the data challenges and some of the other challenges especially in the context of Autonomous Invoice assistance? Yeah. So so basically Voice as. You donate anyone using voices June board noticed agile. The superficial level of poison system is really good. You know when you ask the the assistant to do something, it would answer right. But Dan if you look, there's lot of technologies a lot of different kinds of things going in the background, which kind of makes the assistant waters doing fudd exam. You said play music, veteran recognizing usage music, and understanding the Indian that you meant you want to listen to music who processing eight and then playing the music for you, and then you know natives funding backfield wrist on of these things, acknowledges, and of course, throughout this fish cutting your wise to understand. It to renege does not of data required to understand the national and then of course, you not buying your accounting guide. So there's none of the Dow which needs to be captured throughout when you're designing. Now, I also spoke about like how these voice assistance are limited to. Happy. Use Case is solo voice assistance will officially if you are you know on American with perfect English. But if you know the moment you start having some sort of accident, you know they not as much our diamond, not even the ignites if you how strong accident. So that's another problem. So of course, this dude that challenge they've been handed down from uh specific segment, not the other. Thing especially in the autonomous eighty taints they if you on an automated states is not of background nice but you cannot control. So in those kinds of scenarios, of course, in all the assistance failed ignites, but the users said. So some of the automotive companies they would say instrument the use of Leixoes the window like make sure that business background noise. But then those are not the solutions to simplify the experience of making us Seinfield behalf not of. Their time beyond making improvements everyday. But I still feel like there's more data which is required make expedience use of the US, and that is where you know we spoke about takes and how Imboden is because as we start collecting on all these data than we are getting in, do the tribal seeded as trying to be on those kinds of face? Yeah. You know that's great. I enjoyed that panel so much on the panel we also discussed humanizing privacy Can. You share with our listeners, what this means and Wyatt? So important yeah. Glad you asked him that question also writing a book about this topic, which will come in twenty twenty, one call humanizing privacy so like I mentioned. It takes his on about principle integrity fairness and responsibility dry, and then you know into would be as will. But if you look at these assistance, the biggest challenges you know are great. But then the moment that comes to do is not of issues. For example, you know like it has been so many news at Alex saw Google has been regard late listening to other things. Other reasons they were not supposed to not for pressing for the other reason. So they will those kind of leaks which has happened and even if. You know like when you first buy your device on renewables `integrated. Donate, adopt your device. You would have Johnson conditions and everything in place but then who reads the domes and conditions to know Lakewood did I actually, what do you are starting on what they are using to fulfill specifically quiz no-one really does and that is where the biggest thing is although the companies are trying to cover legally they are covering in a way which is not used as human center and I believe in Ruin ising rival. See because I feel like privacy is the stepping stone towards trust if used those feel lake, this company has the right kind of takes the ad being responsible being the being honest. The Indy Vega behalf dignity than of course, in all people will want to use it in how we do that. So I believe that it's not just the responsibility of legal or you know alike general counsel to design some Johnson conditions concerns on these the. But I believe that business something where you know that it has to be more things we need to be humanizing the entire thing privacy as fake.

Johnson Ford High Shinola Kathleen Mulch Mijo Ronald Ford United States Amazon Official Lakewood General Counsel DAN Seinfield Fudd Wyatt Google Imboden Alex
Steve Bannon's arrest has tertiary ties to video games

Gaming Ride Home

05:35 min | 6 months ago

Steve Bannon's arrest has tertiary ties to video games

"Former thirty eight studios CEO curt. Schilling was involved in the build a wall pack. The thing that just led to former Donald Trump advisor, steve bannon getting arrested. This is just a weird tangentially related to video games news story that is just so strange and it also kind of goes to show that if curt schilling is involved in a company, that's probably a good reason to not invest any money. So for the. Non Video game side of the story former President Donald Trump advisor Steve Bannon was arrested this morning for issues related to a crowdfunding campaign. He was involved with that was raising money to build a wall between Mexico and the United States of America. The campaign raised over twenty, five million dollars, but apparently, the money was being used for personal gain Audrey Strauss the acting us attorney for the southern district of New York said. The. Defendants defrauded hundreds of thousands of donors capitalizing on their interest and funding a border wall to raise millions of dollars under the false pretense that all of the money would be spent on construction while repeatedly assuring donors that Brian Cole fade the founder and public face of the We build the wall would not be paid a cent. The defendants secretly schemed to pass hundreds of thousands of dollars to coalfields, which he used to fund his lavish lifestyle. That quote comes from NPR story. Linked in the show notes. So that's the main part of it but the tangentially related video games side of it comes from Edward Isaac Dove Air From the Atlantic on twitter who wrote Crisco Bosch is the General Counsel of the build the wall pack that Steve Bannon was just arrested for being involved in as chairman. The advisory board includes Eric Prince Former Colorado Congressman Tom Tancredo Sheriff David Clarke and former pitcher curt schilling curt schilling is predominantly known for being a pitcher in the MLB. I will always know him as the CEO of thirty eight studios, the developer that created kingdoms of Amour with investment funds from the State of Rhode Island, which he neglected to return when required, which ultimately doomed the developer and the kingdoms of Ahmir franchise though then might be making comeback soon, there's a, there's a remake rerelease on the way. It's really gross that money was being raised to build a wall which as near as I can tell is thankfully nowhere near fruition and it's totally unsurprising that it is all collapsing under the weight of its founders deciding to just try and keep the money for themselves. Rock steady responds to recent sexual harassment issues with kind of a weird public statement. The publication. The Guardian recently released a story about sexual harassment issues at develop a rock steady games and how the company had not taken proper action when women within the studio went directly to its leadership wants the article was published rock steady apparently began to take action internally and called a studio meeting but the developer also released kind of strange statement on twitter. Here's the statement in full working on. Our response to the recent news, we received the following unsolicited letter eight out of ten people that sign of the original two, thousand, eighteen letter or still rock steady. The following unedited letter below is from seven of those people. Please note that all involved do not wish to have their identity disclosed publicly under any circumstances. This statement is sent in representation of the current women at rock steady studios who were. Working at the studio in two thousand eighteen who signed a letter regarding issues being faced by female employees. The statement has in no way been asked for or influenced by management or anyone else. This is solely the voices of those involved who are still currently employed by rock steady. We all feel the need to respond to this and to reflect what actually happened at the time and how this has been. Handled since recently, an article was posted in the Guardian regarding this letter, which was sent to the studio heads and HR in two thousand eighteen in addition to multiple other accusations. In this article, we feel that the anonymous source or sources attempted to speak on behalf of all women at rock steady, and we do not feel that this article is a fair representation of us the events at the time or. Since the letter was received when the letter was received by the studio immediate action was taken, which resulted in a series of meetings with the women of the studio to allow us a safe space to talk about any issues we were facing figuring out strategies to resolve these issues and what the studio could do going forward continued efforts have been made to ensure that we have a voice within our. Working, within the studio ranging from involvement, specifically with how our characters are represented to workshops to help build self-confidence within male dominated industries. Throughout all of this, a firm promise has been made that there always an open forum for us to speak out net issues would be addressed with seriousness none of the current female employees at the studio who are involved with the letter were contacted about this letter being released. To the media until we were informed by the studio at the time of working through the original letter with the studio, we were assured that this would be kept as a private matter. As this was what we had collectively requested we feel that our privacy and witches have been disregarded and a private matter has been made public. This has left us feeling that we have been violated by the source or. Sources as it was kept private for personal reasons, twelve involve not to industry secrecy. We would like to conclude this statement reaffirming the importance of any minority within the games industry to speak up and four studios to take seriously as rock steady did at the time and continues to do any allegations being brought forward to work towards creating safe environments for us to work in so that we can make games.

Curt Schilling Steve Bannon Donald Trump Developer CEO Harassment Advisor Twitter Brian Cole NPR Edward Isaac Audrey Strauss MLB Mexico New York Rhode Island Crisco Bosch America Tom Tancredo Founder
"general counsel" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"general counsel" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"Reuter is general counsel vice president and director of the practice groups of the federalist society for law and public policy he served in two federal government agency offices of the inspector general as counsel to the inspector general and deputy inspector general responsible for policing the use of federal funds granted and contracted through those agencies as such he helped conduct and oversee criminal investigations across the country he is the principal author of the non fiction book the hidden **** the untold story of America's deal with the devil gene Reuter welcome to coast to coast AM how are you I'm great thank you Richard crap me on so good to be with you it's very timely book in January we commemorated the seventy fifth anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz it's hard to imagine that there are people out there who do not know this horrible dark evil chapter in in history but unfortunately there are so tell us about the arch which how many how many died there and and tell us a little bit about the general Hans cobblers involvement in Auschwitz course sure well first of all I I'd say that the Huns calmer who is the hidden **** the principal subject of our book made the Holocaust possible he made outfits possible and I hope many of your listeners have heard of the Holocaust and heard about Schmidts there are always a lot of details people don't know about the Holocaust in the concentration camps they actually began in Germany in the early nineteen thirties with the rise of the **** party to a first incarcerate political opponents this is back in an era when a group called the free court battle the communists in the communists captured were put into makeshift prisons there were about a hundred and seventy or so in Berlin alone the most notorious and the first one at this point in time was Dachau and this was going on just as are subject Hans calmer first to join in on the party and the Schutzstaffel and these were converted hospitals hotels apartments even restaurants and that's the way concentration camps got started not initially as killing camps not initially as slave labor camps but when the Holocaust geared up it was definitely Hans counselor that the **** party turned to sort of perfect the concentration camp system and the killing the massive killing of of the Jewish race and to answer your question most directly the the best estimates I think are that one point one million people died at Auschwitz and millions more died at other camps and other places throughout the world through the Holocaust and the so called there was a civil engineer and an SS commander so what what what his exact involvements have been in in designing the slave labor camps will will I mean we see overseeing their design did he in fact design them how did he for example make them more efficient if I can use that cold and ghastly term yeah well you've you've hit on on something there it's like what language to use to describe his his facility for doing these things because he was very good at what he did and you know it's important not to sound like you're heaping praise on somebody who who perfected the killing of human beings but you're right he was an architect and engineer by training he did his undergraduate degree and and Germany earned a PhD in engineering in nineteen thirty and before and and in the early years of the war even he was involved in the increasingly complicated but really but nine civil engineering projects think about roadways and buildings and.

Reuter general counsel vice president and director
"general counsel" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

06:10 min | 1 year ago

"general counsel" Discussed on KTRH

"Ruth Ginsburg the reason the left lobsters because she's a left wing politician former general counsel for the American criminal liberties union I am pretty much a left wing hack on the Supreme Court who has been idolized and celebrated by of course law schools the media and the usual Kabyle however the business insider they've an article titled justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg hits back at trump's call to stop impeachment quote the president is not a lawyer why she hang back in anything George Washington was on a lawyer either so what the president of the United States today wrote a historical letter a comprehensive letter for the record for all of history and all of time to Nancy Pelosi laying out in exquisite detail what a disgrace this entire we're a row jobless and I'm gonna begin reading it to him you will have to go to the break at some point a retail after the break as well I don't believe I can finish it before hand but it's worth reading he writes dear madam speaker I write to express my course I lose it immediately lose administrators how to her right to express my strongest a most powerful protest against the partisan impeachment crusade being pursued by the Democrats in the house of representatives this impeachment represents an unprecedented and unconstitutional abuse of power by Democrat lawmakers unequal to nearly two and a half centuries of American legislative history the articles of impeachment introduced by the house Judiciary Committee are not recognizable under any standard of constitutional theory interpretation and jurisprudence thanks Lou no crimes no misdemeanors and offenses whatsoever your cheap in the importance of the very ugly word impeachment the articles of impeachment introduced by the house at that site and reading of my iPhone by proceeding with your invalid impeachment you are violating your oaths of office your breaking your allegiance to the constitution and your declaring open war on American democracy you dare to invoke the founding fathers in pursuit of this election nullification scheme yet your spiteful actions display unfettered contempt for America's founding and your egregious conduct threatens to destroy that which are found his pledge their very lives to build even worse worse than offending the founding fathers your offending Americans of faith by continually saying I pray for the president when you know this statement is not true unless it is meant in a negative sense it is a terrible thing you are doing but you will have to live with it not I your first claim abuse of power is a completely disingenuous meritless and baseless invention of your imagination you know that I had a totally innocent conversation with the president of Ukraine I then add a second conversation that is been misquoted mis characterizing fraudulently misrepresented fortunately there was a transcript of the conversation taken and you know from the transcript which was immediately made available that the paragraph in question was perfect I said the president so let's get quote I would like you to do us a favor though because our country's been through a lot in Ukraine knows a lot about it unquote I said do us a favor not me and our country not a campaign I then mention the Attorney General the United States every time I talk with a foreign leader I put America's interests America's interests first just as I did with president Zelinsky you are turning a policy disagreement between two branches of government into an impeachable offense it is no more legitimate than the executive branch charging members of Congress with crimes for the lawful exercise of legislative power you know full well that vice president Biden used his office and one billion dollars of US aid to to it coerced Ukraine into firing the prosecutor who's digging into that company paying his son millions of dollars you know this because Biden bragged about it on a video Biden openly stated quote I said I'm telling you you're not getting the billion dollars I looked at them and I said I'm leaving in six hours if the prosecutors not fired you're not getting the money well son of a **** he got fired even Joe by the minute just days ago in an interview with NPR that it look bad now you're trying to impeach me by falsely accusing me of doing what Joe Biden is admitted he actually did president someone's his repeatedly cut declared that I did nothing wrong and that there was no pressure he further emphasized it was a good phone call I don't feel pressure and I explicitly stressed that nobody pushed me the cranium farm minister stated very clearly I've never seen a direct link between investigations and security assistance he also said there was no pressure senator Ron Johnson of Wisconsin a supporter of Ukraine who met privately the president's whiskey is set at no time during this meeting was there any mention buys a Lynskey or any Ukrainian that they were feeling pressure to do anything in return for the military a many meetings have been held between representatives Ukraine and I got a country never once did.

general counsel
"general counsel" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"general counsel" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"In with the general counsel of the American luxury retailer Barney's has filed for bankruptcy the chain says it'll shut down several stores but keep flagship open in major cities including Los Angeles and San Francisco a Russian military depot in Siberia has exploded a dozen people were hurt and one was unaccounted for after the fire triggered explosions in the ammo storage facility and a former Ohio University men's basketball player was once pregnant there were drug test you took would tell you anyway DJ Cooper's accused of trying to pass the test by giving a sample of his girlfriend's urine instead of his own it showed she was with child the test was done like last year's though Cooper could join Bosnia's national team the international basketball federation has suspended Cooper for fraud it's a crash on the ninety one will look at would be can't find this guy next here's a tender little tale fresh from the trail about a cowboy fell in love with a cow girl named Dale it was love at first sight that's what they said sweet something sure went to their heads they walked and talked and shot the breeze held hands and kissed under the trees then the cow girl whispered let's get some food so they rode on to a place that looked good founder Roy Rogers restaurant just around the band cabaret said wasn't Royce some kind of legend Calabro said works for me how about you cow boy smiled I like it too folks of Roy said they're happy dues yell sit right down here Buckaroos before too long they were feeling at home cowboys said not better than where the buffalo roam three piece combo is a tasty surprised new chicken tenders soft drinks and fries each big tender was specially chosen the chicken was hand breaded fresh never frozen when they had their fill they said their goodbyes cowboys said we'll be back there's lots more to try folks at Royce said see.

Dale Buckaroos Roy Rogers founder basketball Ohio University Royce cowboys Calabro general counsel fraud international basketball feder Bosnia DJ Cooper Siberia San Francisco Los Angeles Barney
"general counsel" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"general counsel" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"His answers won't be good enough. And maybe there will be a concern. And maybe he's not the same guy. He was although I dealt with him professionally when. In the Senate, and he was the general counsel of Verizon inbound him to be, you know, you know, a decent. Good lawyer to deal with people change. I have no reason to think he has changed once upon a time Rudy Giuliani also was sort of above poured and had certain qualities, and that's changed a lot. So why don't have reason to believe that's happened to Bill bar, but we'll see. And I think the Senate confirmation hearing can't be glossing over these issues. One final point on what this means for the Russian vestige action. I can't believe Donald Trump would have agreed to nominate someone without an assurance that that person would not recuse himself from the Russian investigation. That's the reason he was so mad at Jeff Sessions every day that he was in office on the other hand there has been some reporting that Bill bar interviewed to be one of Donald Trump's defense lawyers. Now, I don't know how far that interview went on. How much information was exchanged? I don't know if it's even true, I think that would raise legitimate question as to whether or not that would compromise him. If you heard attorney client privilege information even in connection with a job interview. View that's significant and would bear on the question. So I don't know enough about that to say, but obviously that's something that has to be explored. But I I can't believe the Bill bar was asked to do this job unless Donald Trump felt very strongly that he wasn't going to recuse himself, and maybe he will have to alternately there too. And God bless Murphy. Does and good luck to him. But I think we'll have to wait and see. And I think the hearings are going to be very very very important..

Donald Trump Bill bar general counsel Senate Rudy Giuliani Verizon Murphy attorney
"general counsel" Discussed on Pod Save the World

Pod Save the World

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"general counsel" Discussed on Pod Save the World

"How hold so i see this from very complicated perk so i i see your argument but then i imagine some host of fox and friends being named cit director and you have this compliance senate pushing them through in like i don't know i wonder if we wouldn't benefit from someone that at least is professional i don't know i think i would vote against her because of the legacy of torture and because of what an enormous stain it was on our history but at the very least i see it as being really complicated torture and then and then destroying of the evidence and the tapes as well time i hear everything you're saying and you're saying okay well can we make an argument that somehow she might have evolved that like that okay there was one moment in time where you might have done something that you do you have regret over i don't know have you involved in any way will the record doesn't suggest that whatsoever you know three or four years later you're actively trying to hunt down the tapes and destroy them you send the cable saying to people in thailand destroy all those ninety two tapes you got over there of all the evidence she's lobbying the cia general counsel john rizzo to can we please destroy these things and then years later when the senate is producing a torture report she amongst many cia staffer lobbying the white house lobbying dennis mcdonough directly and saying please for the love of god do not let our names be known we cannot be outed in this manner i see all that conduct as you learned nothing you were not held accountable you've just been essentially rewarded i would argue it's even worse than that to argue it's worse because institution the cia is refusing to declassify information to this day at this moment about her record about where she worked.

fox director senate john rizzo cia white house thailand general counsel dennis mcdonough four years
"general counsel" Discussed on Super Station 101

Super Station 101

03:14 min | 3 years ago

"general counsel" Discussed on Super Station 101

"Sexual health education the law mandates the schools teach about gender gender expression gender identity and the harm of negative gender stereotypes you know the best education they could do is take that part from kindergarten cop where too little kid explains the differences between boys and girls mmhmm and to go bow health the best policy is abstinence well isn't it interesting that the very first thing on his this list is comprehensive sexual health education one we enter the h i v crisis into the argument here yeah yeah are now the hpv crisis right apparently there's there's going on or the mental health crisis associated with half of this john i shouldn't have said junk according to the law students can be excused from the comprehensive sexual health education portion of the law but it's what kids are not exempt from that is what has parents concern the school district general counsel said the exemption does not apply to instructions materials or programming this is their words i'm not making it up programming that discusses gender gender identity gender expression and sexual orientation so are they getting teachers from knoxville sex week that come down i guess rupaul going to read to the children of jack and jill uhhuh yeah now what's really isn't about this listen to this this this paragraph in full these school districts general counsel said that expression an exemption does not apply to instructions materials or programming that discusses gender gender identity gender expression sexual orientation discrimination harassment bullying intimidation relationships or family and does not discuss the program does not discuss member this is a sexual health curriculum the program does not discuss human reproductive organs and their functions i kind of thought that's what it was about that's why it's called sex education is to cover is to educate kids people things on the reproductive aspect of it from happens from one particular website the courts have held that parents do not have the constitutional rights to override the determination of the state legislature or the school district asked you what information their children will be provided in the public school classroom the memorandum reads now again this is happening in california orange county to be specific but this is an underscoring of the progressive ideology of the approach towards sexual education in school districts where they have taught sex education over the years you have seen lower incidences of teen pregnancies promiscuity.

general counsel harassment orange county school district jill uhhuh california
"general counsel" Discussed on Innovation Rising, Presented by Healthbox

Innovation Rising, Presented by Healthbox

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"general counsel" Discussed on Innovation Rising, Presented by Healthbox

"Yes so interestingly at this mall company and it will tell you a little bit about tommy's management style that i so i'm general counsel lido business development efforts that i also lead all of finance and hr teams which is a lot of fun and it kind of allowed me to have my fingers in multiple different parts of the business but the way i think about my job more generally is that my responsibility is to make sure that we we have the right company level strategy but the areas that i'm looking after and making sure we attract develop and retain world call talent i mean it it's pretty simple that's what i focus on every day a really those two areas it's great so i want to dive into the technology side of the business because i think that sort of you along with the diet portion your key differentiator what makes you a breakout company in the digital health space but can you give us a high level overview of how verte works from both a diet in coaching perspective yeah absolutely so one thing i'll mention some of your listeners maybe with health coaches we have heine trained health catches but they also partner with physicians and we are provider in a licensed to practice medicine in all fifty states across the us in terms of how the of what from the diet and then you traditional perspective all explain into an resistance really briefly the idea is is that when you eat cova hydrates and suga they metabolize in your bloodstream is glucose over time the beta cells in the pancreas produce insulin to pull that glucose out of the bloodstream and then as you eat more and more call hydrogen and more and more shogo the beethoven the pancreas have to produce more and more incident to keep up over time they produce enough and we produce insulin outside the body exhorting us insulin and then inject.

tommy partner general counsel heine cova
"general counsel" Discussed on Innovation Rising, Presented by Healthbox

Innovation Rising, Presented by Healthbox

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"general counsel" Discussed on Innovation Rising, Presented by Healthbox

"Unmanned there's not much that you can go in that realm right to sony started reading all the basic science you still reading a little basic science and stumbled across indian volwick and so on when i said to them oh my god you'd go this research which is incredible much figure out how we can scale this and take this two million wow and sammy also cofounder of truly up so it's not like he had other things on his plate at the same time that he was training prior man's that right having an exit like that i'm sure we'll give you some level of flexibility to put you what all crew in total gold his building a very valuable but i'm not sure as personally fulfilling a an online real estate marketplace does that his passion for the problem come through in how the business operates in sort of the culture that there are incredible into it didn't talk accounting wonderful to be around and if you all came about the juxtaposition of those two experiences truly which you very proud of oviously at an incredible category defining company then where would doing great things for many many people and helping them improve their lives and reverse the course of disease just managing it i think that comes across in almost everything that we do as a company and that definitely comes from the dedication that saami stephen jeff have towards this goal of reversing diabetes one hundred million people by twenty twenty five that's great we'll definitely dig into a little bit of those results in how the model works in a moment but can you tell me a bit more about as general counsel in headed development what are some of your big responsibilities.

stephen jeff general counsel sony twenty twenty
"general counsel" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"general counsel" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"News also confirming the james aid baker will be moved out of his position as general counsel to the fbi but that's okay i'll affording a resident everett aaron jameson under arrest after allegedly saying he wanted to attack san francisco's pierre thirty nine on christmas day according to the fbi jameson jumped on their radar after a tip revealed he was allegedly liking a lot of pro isis proterror post on social media an undercover agent posing as a senior isis leader then started talking to jameson and he away actually described wanted used explosives to funnel large number of people into one place where he can attack it pier thirty nine launches will car in los angeles james zoom's a 26yearold former marine who converted to islam two years ago now facing up to twenty years in jail if convicted police in abepura florina just minutes ago that a shooting did not take place at the abepura mall police securing the scene after earlier reports of shots may have been fired senior russian diplomat saying the us move providing ukraine with lethal weapons will only fuel the conflict in the eastern part of that country a sale by the us of antitank missiles to ukraine would be a significant escalation in us support for ukrainian government forces who since two thousand fourteen on ukrainian territory have been battling russianbacked fighters separatist fighters oxer steve harragan a tropical storm leasing flash floods and landslides in the southern philippines leaving at least one hundred twenty people dead another one hundred sixty missing those landslides and flooding triggered by a tropical storm afflicting most of the deaths in three hardhit provinces fox news.

baker general counsel fbi everett aaron jameson san francisco pierre social media los angeles abepura florina us ukraine philippines james christmas abepura steve harragan twenty years two years
"general counsel" Discussed on AM730

AM730

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"general counsel" Discussed on AM730

"The fbi removed its general counsel the top lawyer was reassigned yup it it's getting their friends they are they are digging into what happened at the bureau and they're they're not gonna stop at the house intel committee because something was wotton in the bureau during 2018 and you have to understand that there is a whole lot of reckoning coming up moreover the former acting director now number two andrew mccabe was up in front of the intel committee in a seven hour interview wednesday fbi deputy director andrew mccabe repeatedly declined to answer whether the bureau had been able to verify the substantive allegations in the christopher steal boissier or even identify a substantive allegation had been corroborated according to sources familiar with the questioning the dossier pu portion of the unity began with mckay being asked if he thought the dossier met the standard of credibility the fbi required to open an investigation mccabe said he believed that he said i more than one occasion the fbi had worked hard to verify the dossier telling lawmakers that the fbi at one point said investigators to london as part of the effort mccabe was asked to point to anything a dossier that he knew to be true and mccabe no the dossier said accurately that the unpaid low level trump foreign policy advisor carter page visited moscow july 2016 the caves questioners were not impressed pages moscow trip was reported the press at the time it happened at the dossier of course had all these salacious tough nothing of which was verified in on more than one occasion when asked about it mccague gave you answers such these are not price quote i can't answer that or i don't know how the answer is i don't know how to answer that indeed that was mccague's answer when he was asked for the most important piece of information the dossier that the fbi had been able to verify he said something like i can't answer that after the questioning established the mccabe was not a be able to would not verify any substantive allegations he was asked if he stood by its veracity in a cage said he did it is remarkable i think i think that's one of the.

general counsel house intel committee acting director deputy director mckay fbi mccabe mccague wotton andrew mccabe christopher london foreign policy advisor carter moscow seven hour
"general counsel" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:46 min | 3 years ago

"general counsel" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Of the breach and its discovery it's not right that is correct this one and mr kelly and reports directly to you the ceo correct correct so um we were told that mr kelly was informed by the chief security officer the week of july 30th which has been talking about that a cybersecurity insent you mentioned that had occurred is that correct he was notified is my understanding of the 31st of july the suspicious activity in a particular environment called a web portal that was a dispute environment we were told that mr kelly this is our staff harm was informed at the same time that the incident might have compromised personal personally identify identifiable information is that correct the only knowledge i have is he was notified on the 31st at was suspicious activity in the consumer dispute portal with what we were told that mr kelly than wrote a short memo to you regarding the incident is there correct correct congresswoman it in his email it said some suspicious activity at around that that that same time um act three akwa facts executives sold over one million dollars akwa fact stock that's on august first in august second and it's reported that mr kelly was ultimately responsible for approving those sales is it true that mr cowley or one of his direct reports would would have been required to sign off on the stock sales yes mr kelly whose or general counsel owns the clearance process and he will hi i have a lot of questions so the answer is yes he he had to say was supposed to sign off yes did anyone thought these the executives have knowledge the cybersecurity incident had occurred the best my knowledge congresswoman no when were they informed that the incident had occurred i don't know exactly the date that they weren't forbidding were not best my knowledge they had no knowledge at the time the cleared their trades the general class' do now for sure that they didn't now the best of my knowledge they did not know and mr kelly who we were told knew of the breach and that it contain personal information and yet still approve the stock sale is he's still chief legal officer for akwa facts congress on i would come back to that again he did not know who is a breach when he approved it could have.

mr kelly ceo officer mr cowley chief legal officer general counsel one million dollars
"general counsel" Discussed on Techdirt

Techdirt

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"general counsel" Discussed on Techdirt

"Well i mean we it it's difficult for us to control what what other people are going to thank her desire do on so i don't think we ever ground our decision and in that swift calculus also the incentive structure being the way that it is for trolls and how little they have to invest to take folks on it it it it's it's difficult to figure out how to to push that instead of structure completely the different ensuring either direction but to thinks we didn't know is that you know again that if we were only looking at the shortterm decisions that that wasn't gonna solve our problem and further if we were on we we saw the general impact on on the industry and as i expressed before you know to some extent we we sort of look at a lot of firms who could suit very early on who may not be able to have to settle because otherwise they may not survive if they had a you know a two year case hanging over their heads as they were just trying to do funding rounds and things like that on and so roof for the health of industry and the health of the internet we thought this was also a good serve corporate citizen thing to do so that the those who that the motivations that really drove um the the the approach and the response that that we've had in this case cool i it's yeah i mean i'm just sort of fascinated in general by unlike the different ways the different companies are are responding to it and i know like you know on the flip side of that companies i'm at least some companies that i've spoken to that have decided to just settle because it's cheaper than suddenly find themselves magically hit up by by more patten trolls are the same patent troll whose discovered a new patent they might uh you know the they might infringe upon or at least the claim that they infringe upon and so it becomes a sort of feeding frenzy where you know it's like if you respond to spam you suddenly get a lot more spam so i know at least uncommitted found that if they given to patten trolls this and we find themselves targeted by more petrels.

patten two year
"general counsel" Discussed on Techdirt

Techdirt

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"general counsel" Discussed on Techdirt

"So it it it strikes me as a bit on of irony has the right word here whatever that that a problem that's really created by the cost and delay recruits to some extent by the costs and delay of the federal court system that the courts would be considering um a decision which they would say yes were the the only way to get a decision here's to go to federal court in you have to have a jury trial and and go through all those steps to to get a fair hearing here it it it strikes me as a um you know rather than serve going in in in straightening out some of the the problems with with federal litigation and in streamlining it so people really can use the court system to effectively in a defender litigate their rights that the answer here is going to sort of god let the problem continues to persist but then also say that it is the only recourse for a lot of problems so it's now that's the oil states decision i'm or case from below that's up on appeal and and we expect a truck that in and and be involved in america's briefer whatever to to make clear you know the point of view that companies like ours have with regard to that uh uh option yeah yeah i think that's going to be and it's going to be an important case i mean i know probably basically be you may be a year or so until there's actually decision on that but definitely an important one to to follow it just going back to to sort of your situation and what you're facing now how much it and if you can say how much of sort of your decision and thinking about this who's was similar to what your new egg has said very clearly which is they knew that sort of being publicly aggressive against patten trolls that have gone after them would would scare off other patten trolls from from suing them how much did did that sort of factor into your thinking.

america patten
"general counsel" Discussed on Techdirt

Techdirt

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"general counsel" Discussed on Techdirt

"And so you know figuring out how you stop that problem would would be useful i know that's not your response but now but i mean you you raise a number of good points there because i think you could say that listen when you're in this place where were you what what what they're attempting to patent is software or is something you up process putting for example even if it's not technical on you know that that it's just a trickier thing to do that and so there should be standards you know with a at the penetrate markovski careful with with that but you you raised a number of excellent points in in in your discussion there because it's exactly right that when you work in ah a large organization a lot of times your success or failure in the moment whether not you get a bonus or promotion is is your production in your production is probably the number of patten decisions you push through so there's always going incentive to just sort of say yeah this this looks good on a kick it a bit but then on move afford rather than doing the hard work of of of figuring all that out to you you of that dynamic but that also y you know suit through their challenges here but it's not like we have stood still or we need to stand still i mean you look at the ipr process that was just near developed i think it was 2011 or twenty twelve maman and for folks who don't know that's an administrative process at the patent and trademark office that allows them to go back and and and look at the patent and say you know we really shouldn't have issued this in the first place are we shouldn't have issued it you know this broadly or things like that in and that with the with the impossible dynamic maybe not impossible but quite tricky dynamic coming in especially with regards things like software patents.

maman
"general counsel" Discussed on Techdirt

Techdirt

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"general counsel" Discussed on Techdirt

"What seem at the moment logical decisions down a road in a direction that you don't want to go and so we thought very hard not so much about what's the next step we wanna take where do we want to be as a company as we continue to grow and then what's the best way for us to get to that state of affairs um we also head you know an understanding from from our peers in the industry in all of that this is a serious concern for a lot of folks and because of the scope that our company has you know our mantra the it to build a better internet at cloud flare really means it is not only our health that will determine our own ultimate success but really the the health of the entire environment of folks at our online because if there's not us for the healthy innovative tekin an internet industry then argue that that causes limitations for us as well yeah um and how much how much of the decision in terms of how to react was was driven by the nature of of blackbird technologies self and sort of the way that the dave acted you know i think as we looked at every step in this process we were sort of further convinced and um it became clear that that this was the right path i mean if you look at just the underlying claim itself its base a patent that really doesn't have much to do with what our technology is um an and so that the merits of the underlying case were strong to begin with our our our arguments were sure and then know when you looked at the nature of what blackbird was was doing in the way that they were trying to sort of you know port gas on on on this problem i'm that sort of further made us think about um with we would respond to this that that really almost every sort of feature of this that we saw certain encouraged us to try to do more to address the situation is best we could.

dave blackbird technologies
"general counsel" Discussed on Techdirt

Techdirt

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"general counsel" Discussed on Techdirt

"Hello and welcome to the podcast i'm mike massmond quickly with all the critical of the modern my voice of the apply to fight the white too tight deadline comes to the proper the pick of the of the of the uh first of all thanks again for all the feedback ratings in whatever on the podcasts lately we really appreciate it and again if you're not actually subscribe to the podcast are just listening to it on the ticker website or because someone sent you an episode please think about subscribing via whatever podcasting up your happen to use it gets you the podcast first each week and make sure that you don't miss any episodes now onto today's topic patents and patten trolling are obviously a fairly common topic untucked shirt itself and directly on this podcast and one of the things that we've discussed repeatedly is looking at ways to deal with patten trolls that don't necessarily involve convincing congress to pass muchneeded patten reform now that's obviously very important to but unfortunately congress keeps dragging its feet in the past we've discussed various efforts lake defensive patten aggregating patten pledges and agreements and even patten insurance now all these are interesting but there's another thing that some companies can do as well and that's to hit back hard on patten trolls when they get hit with a trolling lawsuit or a threat this strategy was one that was loudly endorsed by online electronics retailer new egg in the past and they promised to never settle with patten trolls and to fight them as long as they can go they went through a bunch of lawsuits and the strategy seems to have paid off new egg has pointed out that patten trolls no longer go after new egg for some reason or another mainly because they know the general strategy of trying to extract an easy payment is not going to work and may backfire impressively.

mike massmond congress patten electronics retailer
"general counsel" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

WSJ Tech News Briefing

01:52 min | 4 years ago

"general counsel" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

"What's the best adjective were responsible organization i mean they don't they didn't really have a real hr organization for instance that that was capable of dealing with a real sexual harassment problems that's something if you're a tenperson company and you've got a hashtag foued around a table maybe you can do it but when your view of a big company you really need real processes in place to protect your employees as one v told me uh you know move fast and break things sure um but don't move fast in break your own people right it's great to be a startup and move quickly which uber does very well but you just gotta go back in back fill that the necessary processes to to mature as an organization and there's so much a play and had sent the light on how culture and values impact a company in all sorts of ways but in particular on recruiting talent which is key how his guber seen this struggle through right now they don't have a cfo they don't have a coo they don't have a general counsel they don't have a head of engineering they don't have a head of marketing lau and recruiting for those rolls has got to be very difficult when you know there's all this uncertainty at the top it's an overused word but the ceo takes a leave of absence for instance hand you know who my working for uh there is also the problem of your hiring a coo i mean sometimes coo needs to know that they can work in a real partnership with the ceo because you're going to be operating the business you in the case of travis kalanick is it's got to be tough to think that a guy like that is going to work very smoothly in tandem with another person particularly somebody who you know the kind of the calibre person they're trying to hire would probably want a lot of autonomy and a lot of power in second a work in concert with travis that would probably may be be pretty difficult if it doesn't these roles how of an impact could this have on business you know in this case business seems to be going well it's not so much a business issues it's that's forced him out but it could become one to the extent.

cfo coo general counsel ceo harassment head of engineering head of marketing travis kalanick