22 Burst results for "Genentech"

Genentech Drug Offers Oral, at-Home Option for SMA Patients

The Bio Report

04:35 min | 2 months ago

Genentech Drug Offers Oral, at-Home Option for SMA Patients

"Levi thanks for joining us. Danny. Thank you for having me. We're GONNA talk about spinal muscular atrophy, the recent approval of Genentech's every, and which is the first oral at home therapy and what this means for patients with the condition. Let's start with spinal muscular atrophy few though what is it? Absolutely, and Danny really appreciate the opportunity to talk to you about this spinal muscular atrophy. The use S. M. A. for Short it's a neuro muscular disease is actually quite severe and progressive. In fact, it's the leading genetic causes of infant mortality and so ESA affects approximately one in ten thousand babies. So this disease is caused by a mutation in a gene called S. M. in one, it means survival motor neuron one. So it's a mouthful, but that mutation causes a deficiency of the protein the. Protein, and this is a problem because that protein is required for the proper function of nerves that control our muscles there for our movement. So without proper s him in protein function, those nerve cells, they don't they don't work well, and eventually they can become lost over time and that leads to progressive muscle weakness and as you might imagine in the fall, time. That that weakness will affect someone's ability to move their limbs to eat the breathe on the round and depending on the severity. Some people may eventually require constant caregiver support for daily activities even simple as getting dressed, brushing their teeth going to the bathroom, etc. So overall people with FEMA, they lose their ability to perform critical muscle movements and that that can often impact their ability to participate independently. And Activities of daily living and may become debilitating. We've seen new treatments. Merge for patients with us. What's the prognosis for Well. So certainly as I mentioned earlier. May remains a severe progressive disease. It can be fatal in fact, and yes, there have been recent advances but despite those advancements, the majority of people in the US with FEMA. So let's say sixty percent or so still aren't treated at all and so therefore they're they're has remained a need for continued innovation for new therapies. And and so. As I mentioned throughout their lives, you still have this progressive ability potentially to lose. Critical movements and So that's why we're excited about Israel as wristy, which we think it's first of a kind mechanism. It's at home delivery is oral dosing. All those things represented important advancements, an treatment options. For patients with? And how does wristy work? So as I mentioned everybody, it's the first at home treatment for Esa May to be FDA approved. It's actually approved for for adults as well as children who are two months of age or older, and the way that it works. The technical term is it's called a splicing modifier. So I'd describe the the SEM in protein. and. I mentioned that the primary problem for patients with SA is a mutation in gene called SM IN ONE It turns out that so they've lost. The a function, but there's a there's a second gene called sm into that can make a related former the protein but but most of that pro team, it's not it doesn't come together properly. So it can't it can't rescue a can't serve the purpose of estimating one. But what frizzy does is it causes a specific form of the SIM in to function to be expressed with actually can rescue can substitute for estimate. So you now have what we what we call a functional rescue. You have a different variation of estimate protein that can do the job that the men one protein was opposed to do, and so if you do that, if you can increase the level of that of version of in two in nerve cells and other cells in the body,

Spinal Muscular Atrophy Muscle Weakness Fema Danny S. M. Levi Genentech ESA United States S. M. A. FDA Israel SA
"genentech" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:12 min | 4 months ago

"genentech" Discussed on KQED Radio

"More about Genentech patient support programs at Genentech dash access dot com on KQ weedy the time now is a thirty live from NPR news I'm Lakshmi saying the U. S. Supreme Court has extended a lifeline to the Obama era deferred action for childhood arrivals program that has allowed about six hundred fifty thousand immigrants brought to the U. S. as children to stay and work here legally the five to four decision shields dreamers as their call from deportation for now after determining the administration's decision to rescind daca was quote arbitrary and capricious and here's John Burnett reports conservative Chief Justice John Roberts sided with the court's four liberals Chief Justice John Roberts joined the court's four liberals in and writing this opinion and what's remarkable is that back in November of last year when the Supreme Court heard oral arguments justice Roberts he cited his understanding that the trump administration would not deport daca recipients and suggested that it was mainly just up a program to grant work authorizations but then in January of this year Matt all bands head of immigration and customs enforcement announced that his agency plan to deport all the daca recipients whose renewals had expired and so he left no question they did this was not going to be a kind and gentle ramp down of the program NPR's John Burnett president trump reportedly is blasting the supreme court's decision apparently referencing the court's position on daca as well as workplace protections for LGBTQ employees the Dow is down a point this is NPR news live from KQED news I'm Brian what an effort to block governor Gavin Newsom's changes to California's November election has been put on hold by a state appeals court judge KQED's guy Marsha Roddy has more an executive order signed by new some earlier this month requires changes to California's November election in the face of the corona virus pandemic like mailing all active registered voters the ballot and allowing counties to consolidate polling places two Republican legislators sued saying Newsom overstepped his authority and last week a Sutter county judge agreed and blocked the changes but Wednesday court of appeal judge in Sacramento reversed that ruling keeping Newsom's election plans in place for now bill to codify the governor's executive order are moving through the legislature with bipartisan support I'm gonna Mars Roddy KQED news San Francisco supervisors are considering legislation to increase penalties for people who make nine one one calls for non emergency situations that are based on race the move comes after several recent incidents where police were called to respond to reports of people of color doing clearly non criminal activities such as drawing with chalk in dancing supervisor Siobhan Walton and his staff are working with the city attorney's office to amend the police code report card is being launched wasn't recalled in June we use every tool in that correct for black people people of color who just won a layer it's already illegal in California to make a false police report but there are no penalties specifically based on discriminatory intent I'm Brian what KQED news support this morning comes from Oakland International Airport the heart of the bay area and the soul of the East Bay ready to fly the East Bay way once again support for KQ weedy comes from San Francisco Opera streaming Strauss's Solomon conducted by Nicola Lewis RT this weekend starting Saturday at ten AM through Sunday eleven fifty nine PM at SF opera dot com I had on morning edition NPR's Steve Inskeep speaks with senator Dick Durbin about the supreme court's docket decision that's coming up and this afternoon this week on political breakdown will analyze all the historic action at the U. S. Supreme Court plus we'll check in on how California is dealing with the corona virus pandemic.

Genentech NPR
"genentech" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:42 min | 5 months ago

"genentech" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Have a check in with a story core when recorder who is a few years older now check back with him right now they were going to check on the roadways Joe McConnell says there's another problem on AT this time in Fremont this would just reported a couple of minutes ago southeast eighty between Fremont Boulevard south in mission a new crash that might be black in the middle lane just when traffic was starting to recover from the earlier crash we had at mil Paetus at Dixon landing and there is still some slow traffic behind that but it's just kind of pockets of heavy traffic heading south from mission behind this new one also on the peninsula there might have been two crashes on one on one north bound in Burlingame the first one it ends it was in the right lane that apparently is clear there's another one in the left lane closed at a potential Avenue in the back at this almost a third Joe McConnell for KQED all right thanks Joe support for KQ weedy comes from Genentech who understands that many are facing challenges during these difficult times affording prescribe to Genentech medicines should not be one of them learn more about Genentech patient support programs at Genentech dash access dot com turning your vehicle the KQ weedy and re read your pollution with an environmentally responsible solution eighty six percent of a car can be recycled and reused donating helps remove your car responsibly and professionally KQ weedy dot org slash cars how can the aids epidemic in for my response to cope in nineteen hi my roof Plato on the next science Friday Dr Anthony found T. reflects on the comparisons mysterious nature the more we learn about it the more we realize how little we know I mean it's just striking going back to the future.

Joe McConnell Fremont mil Paetus Dixon landing Burlingame KQED Dr Anthony Genentech
White People Talking About Whiteness

10% Happier with Dan Harris

05:52 min | 5 months ago

White People Talking About Whiteness

"Guys many, if not most white people don't think of themselves as racialist race, we might tell ourselves is a reality for people who have different skin colors than ours Black People Hispanic people, Asian people, Indigenous People, etc, but of course white is a race. Quick important side note here. Race is not a biological thing. It is socially constructed. Sadly the white people who seem to have most clearly grasped that white is race or white nationalists. But now it is time for the rest of US white people to actually see whiteness and to talk to each other about it. This many people in the racial justice world would argue. Is the key first step toward white people engaging fully in creating a more equitable society. My guest today is Eleanor Hancock. She's the executive director of group called White, awake which employs and I'm quoting here educational resources and spiritual practices. To engage white people and I'm quoting here again in the creation of just and sustainable society an quote. Eleanor was recommended to me by seven Selassie, who's one of the court teachers on the ten percent happier APP, and was on the show last week, and really powerful episode which I recommend you check out. In this episode Eleanor, and I talk about why this work is so important. Why so many white people resist it? The barriers white people face when they actually do begin the work. The role of meditation, and the problematic aspects of white woke kness in the discussions here we go eleanor Hancock. Nice to meet you virtually. Thanks again for doing this absolutely. So I'd be curious to hear how you came to this work. How and why you can't? I would star with just a little bit about my background and the different stages in my life that have led up to it. I grew up in West Texas. kind of a mid sized city very conservative environments. I'm solid GENENTECH's so I, didn't I was we had an integrated public school system? But that said there's I think a lot of kind of just default segregation that happens socially so I developed awareness of the differences that folks of color the differences of their experiences in the united. States in particular verses, my experience as a white person that began to happen for me in graduate school. It was a variety of different circumstances that led to that. One of them like. Having a roommate that was reading the autobiography of Asada Shukor, and just realizing I, knew about I knew about Amnesty International and that there could be folks who are imprisoned for political reasons, but I it was shocking to me to realize that was something that happened here in the United States, and then the other thing is very influential to me to jump in I. Hate interrupting my guest, but it might be worth explaining a little bit of a Sasha core in that back story just oh! So she's. Part of the Black Panthers and during this entire time period where the FBI. was, targeting civilians through their coin tell pro program and a lot of just extreme aggression on many different levels, including the outright murder of Fred Hampton while he was sleeping in his bed at night, and it was a really it was a political assassination, and during that time period they were able to capture Asada and create these charges against her that kept her in prison for a long time and. She escaped to Cuba. All of that history I would really encourage people to read about that. You can look up quantel pro and the FBI and understand. The destruction that occurred to a lot of the movements that brought a so much during the sixties, the fifties, sixties and seventies the ways that they were destroyed. And part of what happens when you infiltrate and destroy a movement from within is. All only harm it. Externally you create so much paranoia and violence within that then people also began to destroy one another in different ways, so in terms of my own. You know just how I came to this work I try not to Belabor the story too much, but I was in a series of classes and graduate school with a Chicano professor who was teaching performance our, and this was in the late nineties and I really. Learned a lot about what at the time we would have simply called identity politics through art. So. Yeah, being part of those performance art classes for the entire time. I was in graduate school, was really an eye opener that was also during this apetit Easter rebellion, and so we were all just starting to get online, and that was part of it was incredible about that time period. APETIT ZAPPA of southern Mexico, who are indigenous people who had risen up against their own governments specifically in response to Nafta the North American. Free Trade Agreement. And there are a lot of aspects of my world view that developed during that time period, and then as I lived in my life. You know I have a biracial daughter. Her father's African American during the time that we were married I had the privilege of spending a lot of time with his family and developing strong relationships with them, and experiencing myself as the minority I think that that's a unique experience that not every a lot of people don't have that opportunity to be inside of somebody else's space racially speaking and have to understand their norms and their experience and adapt to that. I think that's a really valuable experience.

Eleanor Hancock White United States Apetit Zappa Asada Shukor Genentech Black Panthers FBI Quantel Executive Director West Texas. Selassie Mexico Fred Hampton Cuba Amnesty International Professor Murder
"genentech" Discussed on WWL

WWL

08:06 min | 8 months ago

"genentech" Discussed on WWL

"Take all the money I have in my Stevens put it towards that the card to get that knocked out first Genentech the windows and then work on baby step three so I'm just kind of all jumbled up and just give me some advice if the windows are standing up in the house and they're not broken out this is not an emergency it's stressed the need is something you want to it's probably a valid thing but it's not I mean the only what only reason you would panic about it is if you've been spending time with the window salesman and so I I'm thinking that we finish getting this car paid off as soon as possible builder emergency fund then save up and replace the windows now if that something is going on with the home repair that is an emergency okay the window falls out into the front yard and there is a big hole in the side of your house were used to be that's an emergency cracked and not efficient is not an emergency see the difference I do yeah so what is your household income ninety three thousand okay so you should pay off an eighteen thousand dollar van and what eight nine months hope yes yeah I well I would hope I'd get on a budget sell sure sure that the kids are hiding right I mean let's let's get after it and make it happen and so then I'm thinking this time next year you're putting windows around okay if you donate monthly if you did I don't nine month plan on the van that's a couple grand a month out of ninety thousand that's pretty doable and then you then you save you know when those are going to be I don't have another eight or nine grand so we're you know we're looking into I don't know which I'm guessing I don't know what your windows are gonna cost but something like that and you get a good bit and and you know the window replacement to business is full of characters show tread lightly and I do a lot of research and really get to know the people that you're dealing with there's some really good people in the business and there is some characters in the business show on just just be careful it is a very interesting space we endorse a lot of window replacement folks around that are great people but we really did again before I put my voice your name on one of those roses weather since late Louis tyros welcome to the Dave Ramsey show thank you Sir first I want to let you know before I ask the question our families completely debt free since two thousand two right and we're working on building what do you want to call it we have some savings then four oh one K. or forty K. and I'm disabled my husband's retired for waiting for his full security to kick in my question is when we start investing a little bit more I don't want to end up being the very type of rich persons that I despise the most because I have family that was like that and those would be so high in the air that you could build an eagle's nest our legal could build its nest in it and I just wanna make sure that I don't want to be that kind of person because I've seen those people and I can't stand the fact about them I don't want to miss that's a smart thing to be concerned about most of the time like ninety nine percent of time wealth does not make someone a jerk it exposes the fact that they already were wealth is generally wealth is generally a magnifying glass it makes you more of what you already were if you have a bit of a temper you can become an absolute raging bully if you are a compassionate kind giving person you make generosity the path of your life and we call you a philanthropist these are the kinds of that wealth makes you more of what you already are also the good parts of your relationship say with your husband or your kids get even better and the bad parts are strained even more and so if you have for instance or a relative that tries to mind your business all the time we'll wait you get a little money they don't mind your business a lot you know and so everything gets expanded you know what I'm saying and so I think and and I I you know I I know a lot of wealthy people we've made it a practice to cause people to become wealthy number one but number two to get to know them in the process and a lot of friends in the circles that I run in and the fast majority of them are wonderful people because honestly the vast majority of people are wonderful people but I know that are jerks that are poor and I know people that are rich that are poor I know people that are stuck up about being poor they got their nose up in the air in a proud to be important you I would say so yes yes the funny thing about all this is that I'm happy where I am and people aren't family tend to think for the poor families where the laws of our state boards which is how I'd like to keep it if I were you just let them think what they want to thank who gives a rip here to live in this thing for you and your husband your kids we're not we're not we're not trying to put on the dog we're not trying to show off that's that's not what we're doing is not who you are so I can't tell you you're you're fine your little sassy and your when you get some money when you get some money you're gonna be more fun a little sass here well I like that have fun with the rose open phones at triple eight eight two five five two two five you know we talk about that stuff a lot in the legacy journey class and in the cloud and in the book I did on wealth all the other books I've written about money and most of you bought those books and that's where you are you're working your way out of debt your learn how to do a budget and that kind of stuff but well this has got some philosophical and doctrinal things from a personal face perspective the strain you and make you stop and think there are people out there wandering around who are are not knowledgeable about the Bible as an example in think that being wealthy is evil or the money is evil and those are people who are biblically illiterate but they're out there and some carry a bobble around they just hadn't opened it much they think it's gonna jump through their arm by osmosis or something but you know there's a lot of judgmental people out there around the subject and it's very interesting my friend Greg Craig Groeschel who is a pastor of one of America's most successful churches today says why is it well why is wealthy only blessing the Christians apologize for make somebody think you know apologize of god blesses you with health or with a great marriage are great kids you know you had a part in all others thank you took care of your body you worked on your marriage you major kids behave but also having those things is a blessing from god and we don't apologize for that blessing but only when we work hard to get some more money we're supposed to feel bad about that we're supposed to hang our head like we've done something wrong according to some of you know not me I celebrate success I celebrate people who win I like it when you go do the things it takes to win I like it when a farmer plows his field gets the weeds out puts the seed in the ground and has a bumper crop baby hi five you do reap what you sow you're gonna get back from this life what you put into this life you're gonna get back from that job what you put into this job there once was a guy walking along a path heading towards the next town the I came upon an old man the.

Stevens Genentech
"genentech" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

02:06 min | 10 months ago

"genentech" Discussed on WRVA

"And that that makes more than if she had lived to a ripe old age that she still has an impact is very important to last and then the third thing that I'm really proud of is Morgan worked at every Genentech Karelian medical school with her Papa who is the vice dean of the medical school hi she worked with him the summer before she was killed and it really was gratifying experience for the two of them to have an adult relationship you know as a parent you can never have a relationship with your child but to see them and all that in an adult setting they really had a fantastic time that summer and that also informed Morgan's efficient to become an educator because she saw how important it was well we have a scholarship for need based on medical students at the medical school here and I love the circularity that in a direct response to our family injury we are sending healers back into the community and that is how you neutralize evil and I am you know compelled to do that at every turn families of other victims I'm sure they have have rallied around and and you they probably just come out and are so happy did did you started this system to make a difference does that happen and and what about your relationship with Hannah Graham's family had did did you did you form a bond with them you don't we have helped a lot of families everyone goes through this journey and grieves differently the Graham have chosen not to be public following the trial and and we have really respected their privacy in their approach because it is different even as a couple.

Morgan vice dean Hannah Graham Genentech Karelian
"genentech" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"genentech" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Genentech in Miami get under way in Virginia Tech won the coin toss deferred an inmate is we're coming back they kicked the opening kickoff out of bounds a rough start. so we'll see this Miami offense Greg Daniels tiki barber with you Miami orange from shoulder pads to the ankles the white helmets the orange juice Virginia Tech white tops the maroon bottoms of the orange trim Miami of the shot gun on first down first intent at their own thirty five the give play action to do or give to DJ Dallas right up the gut he's not gonna find any real room to run taken down by race shard Ashby immediately from the linebacker spot yeah Virginia Tech got to do a good job stayed gap responsible against DJ Dallas who's had a fantastic start to the season already three hundred thirty six yards or so averaging six point seven yards per carry so when he split them he goes the distance sometimes K. J. Osborne on the right side of the formation Revan Jordan the tight end on the right side tight. under center for Danny knows the offense of coordinator gonna be a pass for Williams rolling back throwing to the screen right side DJ Dallas lockers out in front of a but a good tackle by asked me for Virginia Tech in open field if he shakes free from that tackle to the far side of the field which room to run for DJ Dallas instead a modest gain it'll bring up third down yeah you can see the game plan early is to get the ball to DJ Dallas he is their game breaker so far on the off the side of the ball that was a quick story that was set up in inside screen and you're right if that tackle does get made yet block around the outside maybe picks up a few more yards their third and five four Miami twenty three percent on third down for the year DJ Dallas in the backfield no tight end for white outs well tight and deployed in the left slot Gerry Williams throwing quick in the area. did a fight with the ball and it's gonna cut down in the hands of Virginia Tech Jermaine Waller looked to be the player who pulled it down in the jump ball situation and it's Virginia Tech getting the first Arnold yeah get to turn over in the plus side of the field just inside the fifty yard line we talked about deer and woody of this Kane quarterback who had not made these type of mistakes also for this season seven touchdowns no interceptions that's his first interception of the season it puts the might of the Virginia Tech Hokies in prime position to hopefully get some scores Tomari Connor.

Arnold Kane Virginia Dallas coordinator Revan Jordan Ashby Greg Daniels Tomari Connor Genentech Jermaine Waller Gerry Williams Danny K. J. Osborne DJ Dallas Virginia Tech Miami three hundred thirty six yards twenty three percent seven yards
Promising Huntington's Disease Drug Enters Large Study

All Things Considered

03:28 min | 1 year ago

Promising Huntington's Disease Drug Enters Large Study

"Scientists are about to launch a major study to find out whether a drug concilate the gene that causes the devastating illness Huntington's disease. This follows the discovery that the experimental drug reduced levels of the damaged protein that causes this mind, robbing disease as NPR science correspondent, Richard Harris reports the new study will determine whether that drug can also stop Huntington's progression. If one of your parents has Huntington's disease. There's a fifty fifty chance you will get it to Ginette Garcia lost her mother to Huntington's. She's one of ten children who get together for huge family reunions with all the usual drama of events like that. But when you throw the word Huntington's disease into that mix, it is all of a sudden, this terrifying prospect that were all faced with the disease usually strikes in middle age and can unfold over the course of ten to twenty years the symptoms of HD are like having Alzheimer's. Carrington's and LS simultaneously. When it's in its full swing. The fifty seven year old woman from San Jose headed genetic test a decade ago and found out that she was going to develop Huntington's eventually, and she's recently been seeing the first signs, including involuntary movements which she noticed when watching a video of herself I saw myself about four months ago for the first time, and I went home. Holy crap. Okay. Here we go Kor disease is emerging it. What could be a fortunate moment? She's heading off to a neurologist to see if she would qualify for a study that is generating a lot of excitement last year drug company. Roche Genentech announced that an experimental drug sharply reduced the amount of illness inducing protein, measured people's spinal fluid. They are now about to launch a trial involving more than six hundred people with early symptoms of the disease to see if they can slow or stop its progression. So it's exciting and they're filling it, and I wanna be a part of it. Dr Scott schobul who heads the research effort on this drug at Roche says it's been more than twenty five years since the Huntington g. Gene was discovered. It's taken that long to translate the additional genetic discoveries into a tractable therapeutic strategy. Scientists developed ways to silence the damage, gene. So the body makes far less of the illness inducing protein. Other researchers figured out how to deliver the drug into the brain the solution. There is to inject it into a person's spinal fluid. The drug could actually transfer quite readily to the brain, and then sink into the target brain tissue. Roche started recruiting patients for its new study in January, but it halted the trial after discovering the drug didn't need to be injected as often as they'd planned. We're going to get back up and running over the next several weeks to months Huntington's affects about thirty thousand people in the United States, and this drug is the most hopeful news yet, George your Lena, scientists at the Huntington's disease society of America says his main concern is whether the drug will penetrate deeply enough into the brain to stop the disease. If not other treatments are also in the works. He says. Some with more potential to reach deep into the brain. So lot of different approaches are being worked on in different stages of drug discovery across the world. It's really quite exciting. Ginette Garcia says she's all in on this one and not for herself as much as for her four children and six grandchildren. I have a grandson Richard that was born blind whose at risk for HD. I'm just not going to stop because I don't want him

Huntington Roche Ginette Garcia Huntington G Richard Harris Roche Genentech NPR Gene Carrington Alzheimer Involuntary Movements Dr Scott Schobul San Jose United States America George Twenty Five Years Fifty Seven Year Twenty Years
FDA issues warning after a dozen people get sick from stem cell treatments

At Home with Gary Sullivan

00:26 sec | 2 years ago

FDA issues warning after a dozen people get sick from stem cell treatments

"News Radio. The CDC reports a dozen people needed treatment after developing infections from contaminated stem cells people in Arizona, Florida and Texas received infusions or injections of stem cell products derived from umbilical cord blood earlier this year, the products were contaminated with bacteria, the stem cell products were processed by San Diego based Genentech the CDC said the products are not approved by the FDA and are not

CDC San Diego FDA Arizona Texas Florida
"genentech" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"genentech" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

"You that the motivations and the dreams in the endeavors infill ick valley today that Seoul of Silicon Valley is the same as it was in nineteen eighty eight in nineteen sixty eight and given that consistency. There is no way that Silicon Valley has lost its soul there. Probably about six thousand startups in Silicon Valley, and some of the people are here because they wanna make money, and it's always been that way. Let me remind you that at the Homebrew, computer club. Where apple got started everyone in that room wanted to sell their stuff Larry page and Sergei Brin started Google under federal contract at Stanford University. So this ideal ISM and the commercialism have always gone absolutely hand in hand. And right now there are people in Silicon Valley who are working to do things like obviate the need for the internal combustion engine. And this was the exact same situation. We had for example in the nineteen eighties huge PEOs Genentech and apple these companies changed our lives for the better and actually more or less the exact same time. The genetic is figuring out how to build insulin using recombinant DNA techniques. So that we don't have to squeeze it out of the pink reasses of pigs, which is how people used to get inside. One of the biggest IPO's the next year was Chucky cheese. And that is just the way things work in Silicon Valley. Silicon Valley has been dealing with a range of problems from the eggs essential to the frivolous forever. And sometimes the frivolous turn exit stencil. I mean Facebook was not designed to become the problem that right now a lot of people feel and there have been concerns that Silicon Valley is going to destroy the world as we know it forever in nineteen seventy five there were congressional hearings. When congress found out about the Arpanet, which was the precursor to the internet, which of course, they funded through the department of defense, but they found out about it and Senator tiny from California. I want to quote him are concerned that powerful new technologies reminiscent of those described almost fifty years ago by George Orwell, we'll destroy the constitution's delicate balance between the powers of the state and the rights of individuals, and there have been organizations like computer professionals for social responsibility. Pushing to understand and make Silicon Valley better in these people. Do not run contrary to Silicon Valley. So these people are in a central part of Silicon Valley soul. Silicon Valley has the same messy mix of idealism and commercialism opportunism and dreams that has kept it going through ups and downs for the last sixty years. Author and historian Leslie Berlin, arguing against the resolution silicone valley has lost its soul. More opening statements coming up from intelligence, squared US. We are halfway through the opening round of this intelligence squared US debate. I'm John donvan. We have four debaters to teams of two arguing it out over this resolution Silicon Valley has lost its soul. You've heard the first two opening statements and now onto the third debating four the resolution on gauche pose and fellow at the Harvard. Kennedy School, ladies and gentlemen, define gauche. When when we think about soul, at least, I think about having a moral, compass taking actions or company exhibiting exercising operations in a way that is quote, unquote, right there. These business leaders that started with a soul and then had to sell it. This industry is currently operating in a way that doesn't have that. So it is operating in Leslie's words with pure commercialism. Let me ask would an industry have a soul. If it trans all over common conceptions of human rights take apple as an example last year. The Chinese government said if you want to do business in China, then you're going to have to build a data center in China. If you want to collect information on Chinese individuals, you need to localize data center here. What that means? Of course, is that any? Company any foreign company that that localize is data center in China has to also give access to the Chinese government, which is balanced date..

Silicon Valley ick valley apple Leslie Berlin Seoul China George Orwell Facebook Genentech Chucky cheese Chinese government US John donvan Harvard Google Stanford University Sergei Brin California
"genentech" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

The Jordan Harbinger Show

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"genentech" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

"They're all right. That's enough, housekeeping. What is the first thing out of the mailbag here? Hi Jordan. Jason Genentech. Team. I started using the level one reengagement techniques and they are working splendidly. I sent out an Email to a professional acquaintance, two weeks ago to see how they were doing an ended up getting invited to a party that will be full of professional contacts and networking opportunities. My question is, if by using the reengagement script once a quarter or so it grows stale, have you ever had someone noticed that you're using the same lines, three or four times a year when texting or emailing. Thanks for all the great work. You guys do love the show and looking forward to level two signed curious correspondent. So congrats on the success of this is actually a really good question. I think it's really telling that you just started using level one and you're already seeing the benefits of getting invited to high level events. That's the whole point of level one reengaging in filtering in these opportunities. So that's great. As to your question, I've actually never been called out on using the same reengagement scripts line or lines every quarter or so. I think one people don't really notice to. They don't really care. And if they do notice, they probably. Care less about me using some of the same language than they do about actually hearing from me in the first place and further since the script always changes based on what you learned in level one about customizing the script and using people's names and talking about where you met them in the last time you spoke, which is actually easier than it sounds. It's not really the same thing. It's not cut and pasting the same text over and over. So it's really unlikely somebody would ever notice or call it out. It's kind of like saying, hey, didn't you say, how's it going? Last time you sent me a text guide I did in. That's normal thing to do. If someone does notice or call you out, it doesn't really matter. You're the one who's actually doing the work of keeping in touch. So if you get in touch with somebody four times in a year and you're the one that starts the conversation and they never do the fact that you're using some similar languaging. It's kind of like, well, you're the one that actually put in the work. So it would be pretty tacky of someone who was themselves too lazy to keep up the communication to question the methods that you're using in doing so. And I. Get why you wrote this in think newbies to level one worry about this when they shouldn't. This is one of those non issues that sort of never crops up people. They worry about it anyway because they either aren't customizing the script like they're supposed to be according to the instructions in level one or because they're using systems to keep in touch with people, and they're like on this is cheating. Somehow. It's not cheating. This is how really good relationship builders work. They don't just randomly think of people all the time. I mean, yes, we do, but we don't do it perfectly. I don't keep in touch with eleven hundred people because I'm randomly thinking of them. There are systems that remind me and then I customize each message. It's really, really easy. It certainly easier than trying to remember, but congrats on your success so far and for those of you who have been punting or kicking the can down the.

Jason Genentech Jordan two weeks
"genentech" Discussed on Novel Targets

Novel Targets

04:03 min | 2 years ago

"genentech" Discussed on Novel Targets

"The drugs by ADC, you may need to make sure combination doesn't have any negative effect on an K cells. My name is Deepak Sampath principal scientist at Genentech. And currently. I'm also the translational research leader for Veneta clocks in K cells. Does the need to have an effect on them narrative eighty no we actually have data for that. So last time we spoke we were talking about the post we had e OTC in two thousand thirteen where we had very nice gotta suggesting that Annetta clocks can be combined with open a Tuesday, ma'am. And so as, you know, naked antibodies function through MK cells and so- ex vivo we don't see any detrimental effects on an K self-survival, and that's large private think because they're probably either dependent other profile proteins such as MC L one, for example. But most importantly clinical data, which we know that we're combining well with say. Twos. A mad and clocks, and so there's clearly activity we can combine with toxin and we're seeing activity, so if we were actually impacting case cells, we wouldn't be seeing this clinical affect with drugs that are clear dependent upon in K sells for NY dependence. Your talk city, or sell you dependence. I talk city. So to me, the clinical data, always Trump's pretty clinical. I n k cells are fine in terms of treating within a class. I think they're still remained functional or else. We wouldn't be seeing that that we do. Let's continue our journey into an cell biology and hear about a potential novel target. Hi, I'm Nick Huntington from the world allies a hole institute in Melvin and lab is dedicated to the research on natural killer, cell development and their role in cancer. Immunotherapy we published a high impact paper on the discovery of an intracellular checkpoint cold SIS, and this is the sign of kind juice S H two containing protein, which means that as the site of kind fifteen binds to the case, sells it activates them. But then as a consequence desist protein accumulates to turn this activation off it goes to the surface to the receptor and degrades the receptor degrades the kinds inhibits signaling and then K sell stopped responding. We found that if we generically deleted this this protein, the incase sales became exquisitely sensitive twelve fifteen and so to the T cells, in fact, both CD IT cells, officiant, facetious and. In case, sufficient assists, where extremely sensitive twelve fifteen and had superior proliferation and functional qualities in vitro in response to our fifteen now translating this into Chuma model, we found that sedation in a mouse, actually, rented them largely resistant to any metastatic black six, which is a mouse train Chuma cells that were totally resistant to metastasis at doses of tumors, which caused a lot of metastases enormous to try and think of the best treatment setting for assists, inhibitor, we developed a model of spontaneous breast cancer, and the model of where we inject breast cancer cell line into the memory fat and really remarkably in the knockout mice. We'll sister fission lies when we removed the primary Chuma. There was no metastases found in the lung now in contrast for the control mice had many metastases in the lung. So we think as a treatment regime, maybe when you detect primer you remove that treat that with the first line of thera. And then the patient on this inhibitor to increase the activity to prevent metastases or increase the control of metastases in the periphery all where metastases might already exists. But they're so small in number that you can't detect them traditional medical detection systems now in K cells don't last so long as T-cells does that mean that you potentially would have to keep giving this type of therapy for a long period of time over it be just give it and get this affect natural killer cells do not have a extended half life. They persist in patients when they're transferred to patients and also when we transfer them to mice that have no in cases, they can survive, but they don't proliferate and expand and and reconstitute the incase L..

scientist Genentech Deepak Sampath Veneta Trump Nick Huntington principal Melvin
"genentech" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"genentech" Discussed on Venture Stories

"One is a motion hall. Obviously, another is is very sim-. That is also in the clinical trial space trying to take the replace animals from animal testing and replace them with with machine on berry investigation models. Because as we know it to a user trying to help here to a cost to win six billion dollars to bring a drug to market, it takes dozen years. Incredibly high failure rates. So versus is trying to hell Adnan RDM d. which is sort of like a flat iron for for rare diseases. I think what's interesting in the three examples I mentioned is what we look for in investment is is really strong, founder market fit. And part of that is in addition to the usual skills of a of an entrepreneur, it's it's surreal, domain expertise in Rachel, you're experience prior to motion hall like ITO in the world of, you know, it's not like you were doing the work. You experience the the pain hand made us sort of uniquely situated to to to build this product in end you empathize with the customers and Joe Zeo VERA. Sam is a veteran also, Nomex. So has sort of unique understanding of both the NFL should say, sort of grew up in the former world hurt her dad was at a believe started. Either worked at Genentech started her his own biotech company, and she yourself intern Genentech sushi understood. You know enough about farmer to be dangerous of also really understood the technology from multiple perspectives, and then RDM de the CEO himself had a rare disease or NF to reform of cancer, which enabled him to emphasize his customer in in a in a sort of differentiated way, also build out a community in a way that in a trusted way. And then his partner Nancy worked at that was hem corporate have at twenty three in may so understood the pharma side to that's one thing in terms of what we're looking for invest investing. I think the drug discovery is very sexy space as mentioned. There's enormous opportunity there. We're interested in clinical trials is a really interesting space originally talked about in terms of improvement workflows end it's it's maybe not as as sexy, but it's enormous. I think that's where most of the. -tunities Akwa comment on that, Eric and in Rachel. Thank you so I do. I wanna maybe introduce a a a little bit of of should have been been doing this for twenty five more years. And one introduce a little bit of Stoorikhel perspective. I think it's important when we look at in business models and we look at, you know, and we look at investment opportunity..

Genentech Rachel Adnan RDM Joe Zeo VERA Sam NFL founder cancer ITO CEO intern partner Nancy six billion dollars Eric
Fda, Japan and Us discussed on Joel Riley

Joel Riley

01:15 min | 2 years ago

Fda, Japan and Us discussed on Joel Riley

"With with good reliability information like from consumer reports and basically you drive the wheels off of it most buyers will have to finance though so go with the shortest term loan you can daria albinger abc news the fda is speeding up the review process for a single dose flu pill it's made by san franciscobased genentech the drug company says it works by stopping flu viruses from reproducing but does so earlier in the process than drugs like tamiflu it's already approved in japan and could potentially be approved in the us by the end of the year healthcare experts are warning about the dangers behind painkiller prescriptions president of florida's healthcare leadership council mary greeley says these prescriptions are fueling the opioid crisis were calling for research into finding good alternative therapies to treat pain and better manage pain florida has reported a significant increase in fatal opioid overdoses in recent years in two thousand sixteen more than four thousand people died because of opioids which was a forty six percent increase from the year before experts say many people develop the addictions after being prescribed potent painkillers health update kristen marks nbc news radio rod stewart is.

FDA Japan United States President Trump Florida Mary Greeley Rod Stewart Painkillers NBC Forty Six Percent
"genentech" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"genentech" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"The nasdaq urban outfitters at network appliance genentech's five below jen texas auto parts five below i believe is a retailer this is not the media type growth but this is what's working at sea maybe a different story ats why gapped up in february at around twenty five and while the market was getting trash just just sat between twenty six and twenty nine broke out on tuesday pretty darn good numbers i'm just going to throw you out another fafather few names that are trading at highs lululemon remember that one could reaction to earnings two three weeks ago edging up recent ipo's dropbox db x they lose money let me just tell you that here's another recent ipo i q i y symbol i q new high loses a lot of money be careful and on the nasdaq i'll just give it a few more simtek osama tc zuma's z z shoes and apparel and on the new york again oils down a little actually oil prices a back up now but a oil stocks summer up somewhere down mixed but at the highs you got conaco phillips national oilwell that's lovie hess ats valero energy via zillow holly frontier hfc a bunch of couple refiners there but that's it then you got a few other names you ready herbalife h l f very big short in that auto home atm again that is a name that broke out on monday or tuesday of this week and held up pretty well my only issue with that is sales down abercrombie and fitch.

genentech zuma new york zillow lovie hess fitch two three weeks
"genentech" Discussed on CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"genentech" Discussed on CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

"I think that's the toughest tossup eight nine or i took for tech but like whatever you know who who knows i took virginia tech as well and so congressional alabama we are in agreement there which means the tide are gonna win they have fifteen losses let's let's not forget about that listening for junior tech which has by the way win over virginia is almost a little bit underrated there that game is in pittsburgh i will be there if the snow allows me it's coming down pretty couldn't connecticut i'm supposed to fly out tomorrow villanova genentech alabama all those games are going to be in pittsburgh i've got villanova purdue and i think that there's a good possibility in this region gp that we could have seeds fit but as i said like florida texas tech west virginia which toss state all these teams are possibilities i have wichita state beating villanova never mind do i yes i do okay i just brought up my bracket 'cause i wavered this was the savior and wichita state villanova whereby to that i was like what do i want to do what do i do i switched it over so i just lie i've which state in hilly date they're the oldest team experience wise in the field and villanova's had this weird street going every tournament they've been in since two thousand nine which has been every single tournament except one year they either end their season in the last weekend or the first weekend at the tournament they never go out and this week sixteen early date i feel like that's going to change this year i'll take the shockers to beat villanova that game would be in boston if that were the case and the final four pick looted too early.

alabama virginia pittsburgh florida villanova boston connecticut wichita one year
"genentech" Discussed on Channel 955

Channel 955

03:26 min | 2 years ago

"genentech" Discussed on Channel 955

"A week with a comfort what victory didn't king leka cuba chris smith is tipped with the cars forget to get paul has from the you as is great trump the can though his thumb did you the for cutting cramming a signal that the run rewards in the front the would you know it's a brand you said you with king you laugh through hansie but the feelings is that a king frankie king cap and set up such that genentech at top deck echoed with let me out a physical theory was that random since took the back going to bed too vote get back quickly clash pathetic what is that the they didn't think mop the has me look what it took the lead and the mop the someone clinton has done for you great thing com the the the tell what until noon you gene gene this way break jason now not dean brown paul millsap not now a put my life back and abroad now with modest isn't a geek queen mancini from me admittedly not promptly did it the blaming the late review so what could come back a brain new you see me through its own even realize what to believe me you puppet up a ticket to the middle got i think i got the king of tainted kim thing like grief window thing of them nobody has no one to buck the tone owned on my responsibilities only three two thousand like metabolism brain you're putting lic to think thing one of the gut printed upon a modern with only to cut them raising the super duper gave them as though that is great great thing was gone the them one of the show to the iheartradio music awards to hang out with ed sheeran camila cabello dj collett in more rain your trip tomorrow morning with us go to the iheartradio music awards to hang out with ed sheeran camila cabello dj in more rain your trip tomorrow morning with us at nine ten channel nine five five.

chris smith paul clinton jason paul millsap queen mancini dj collett dean brown kim
"genentech" Discussed on Super Station 101

Super Station 101

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"genentech" Discussed on Super Station 101

"Of changing laws around the world alabama has been my home for fifty years i want to glenn ours grammar school john carroll highschool sanford yoon varsity for college and birmingham school of law for law school i'm alexander should know one of alabama zone i have relied on three basic principles in protecting the rights of the injured god family and the law these beliefs have catapulted our firm to be one of the largest in alabama i'm alexander should nar let me be your turn this look at traffic is brought to you by genentech in the national strokeassociation we've already got delays downtown this morning from where you've got construction that as the four left lane of 2015 nine southbound shut down on the ramp to sixty five southbound drabick is already slow from telepiu is the street also 65 cell phone is beginning slowdown now it's 16th street and you've got delays because the exit ramp being closed at 17th street also coming up from the south side expect delays on 280 already this morning between bear creek indentified valley and also 165 and between the shelby county airport exit and the highway thirty one alabaster exit and then again and pelham north of the tank farms exit and just glues we're dealing with an accident in the clearing stages now thankfully sixty nine southbound south of three fifty nine at skyline boulevard and then also you've got longterm work on old montgomery highway at mcfarland boulevard and then in huntsville you got roadwork as well on memorial parkway between gulf road and camera if you can't be sure it's a stroke how can you be sure it's not call nine one one right away because when it comes to stroke it's okay to overreact get informed at overreact to stroke dot com that's overreact the number two stroke dot com.

alabama genentech huntsville glenn birmingham school of law bear creek indentified valley shelby county fifty years
"genentech" Discussed on Manager Tools

Manager Tools

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"genentech" Discussed on Manager Tools

"Access to things i talk to managers were directors all the time they say oh no i can't i catcher mike kelder with people it's to confidential what are you talking about are you kidding me i went to your website this ceos calendar is public in an effort at transparency the board is going to reach down and ask free her calendar at some point there's too much no you can't know what's going on so what that means is now i hate to say this hr but you're like you're like a priest it where oh they're special robes and and we you know we can't go there hr when they come to training they could set sit in the back of the room an audit they don't actually have to go through training because why would they need to go to the training i mean they're not a manager they're just helping managers they don't need to know what managers need to do in order to be effective but managers need to know how the performance of eu system works on the forget i was at genentech a couple of years ago and i saw one of the coolest things i've mentioned this before genentech had called us and to do some training and they ask for a little bit of time before the training even though i was still going aid to 330 they said you know we like a few minutes it's always bad it's like oh this is going to be bad and they took like 45 minutes which i don't have those view indoor public conferences you know it's chockablock it's dead full the entire time it's a race to get done by three thirty or five whenever were finishing depending upon that the agenda but i sat in the back of the room and watch hr be totally open about the confrontation system how buckets worked how people were allotted buckets what happened in how they get how they determined the bans they're doing and manager for just sucking it up now this was normal gin and tonic because it's a very well managing hr organizations really good there but these managers recently desperate for even though they expected to get it ninety percent of the companies in the world all of these systems which technically are associated with.

mike kelder genentech ninety percent 45 minutes
"genentech" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"genentech" Discussed on WRVA

"Basically all the hidden taxes you go to a baseball game you're being tax for that you go to a football game in tax for that i mean this hardly an instance where these greet you does greedy illness loiseau said by the left they're always say that uh the greedy rich people just want their own money unlike okay they earned the money most people i know the most people i know that have anything in life got it the old fashioned way they went out hard and worked for it that's how they got it not illgotten gains the aren't drug dealers these these are in criminals either people that but worked extraordinarily hard to make this happen for them found for their families you know the people that are greedy though people empower pollock titians because they want more your money so they can basically go out there and by votes with your money by giving gifts and grants they wanna redistribute and building constituencies with their money and they're the ones that are so greedy they don't give a flying rip that means you won't get to take a family vacation or buy a new car or upgrade your house or get our first home they just don't care they are the greedy selfish ones in this equation politicians they disgusts me w b it'll be builders is a full service home improvement company serving the greater richman area specializing in windows citing roofing gutter protection screen porches decks and more for testimonials and more information visit us on the web at the letters b and w builders dot com or visit our eight thousand square foot showroom located at eighty six oon staples mill road enrichment inexperience our first class customer service in person w climber safely 630 reject if you can't be sure it's a stroke how can you be sure it's not the call nine one one right away because when it comes to stroke it's okay to overreact after all the signs of stroke aren't always obvious in seconds count some know what to look for learn the 10 strokes symptoms it can make all the difference for a loved one get informed at overreact to stroke dot com that's overreact the number two stroke dot com a shared mission sponsored by genentech and the national strokeassociation.

windows genentech football mill
"genentech" Discussed on Novel Targets

Novel Targets

04:19 min | 3 years ago

"genentech" Discussed on Novel Targets

"Hi, I'm Daniel Chan vice president global head of cancer immunotherapy at Genentech and Roche year ago poke test we heard, but you're writing in new paper, we have a pay patrol the immune set point what's the idea behind that? The idea behind the set point is to try come to grips with the fact that people exhibit highly variable resp-. To immunotherapy in particular. And one of the main reasons for it is that people have highly variable immune set points. In other words, some people are more likely to respond to certain stimuli and others, and we try to understand what are the various factors that contribute to the likelihood or lack thereof of response. One of the nice things about the cancer. And set point is that it does build upon the cancer immunity cycle that is still the foundation, but we're the cancer immunity cycle. Tries to simplify all of cancer immune biology, the cancer set point builds upon it and book ends it and takes it to its extreme complexity, and it's important to recognize that complexity because what it does is it creates a framework to now start to fit in all of the developing data in this field and give us a way to start to look at it all together in a way that we can understand it hoick research has joined to use this in practice too. Of his concept. We have all of these different multifactorial factors influence people's immune system and everybody has an individual immune set point. I think it gets used in two ways one is in the first instance to better understand the mechanisms of immune response. So if for example, you can understand the individual genetic variations that either predispose someone to respond or not then you can look at what the affected or what the variable genes are and understand where they fit into an overall mechanistic sense think longer term, what would hope is that you can get a idea in amalgamated set point view that you can kind of use diagnostic in some senses probably years off. But nevertheless, you add up all of the various things that would contribute to somebody's likelihood of responding to a particular therapy and know enough about what they are. So that you could tailor or modify your therapies accordingly. It's interesting it does allow. How this if we think about it from the clinical standpoint to take any individual patient and understand the complete intricacies of their cancer immune interaction, and so in many ways, this is a hyper personalized approach that one can take now in the clinic it may or may not lead to hyper personalized therapy. But it does at the minimum allow us to understand clinical data in a, hyper personalized fashion, any given patient understanding all of the different factors that may influence, whether they develop an active anti-cancer immune response or don't develop when at all environmental factors like but microbiome sunlight how we possibly going to capture a west someone fits on. This dial is to a are what the hiawatha low in. Well, if you're living in the north Finland in the middle of the winter than sunlight, probably isn't going to be too much of a factor, assuming that sunlight effects are acute. As opposed to chronic but more seriously. I mean, the microbiome is I think something is attracting a great deal of potential over the last several months because there is more and more objective evidence to say that the particular 'Bacterial communities that live in your gut actually do play a large role in one's ability to respond to different types of immunotherapy or even exhibit the adverse events associated with some of these therapies once you know, that you can then either avoid or include particular types of therapies, or possibly even take an action to alter the microbial communities that are found in particular patient, so that individual response better or with a lower adverse event incidents. So there are a lot of factors obviously that can influence whether or not you have an affective anti cancer immune response, we don't yet know how important each one of those factors is, but this type of data does give us a sense of the kind of things that we may want to collect..

Daniel Chan Genentech vice president Roche north Finland global head
"genentech" Discussed on Novel Targets

Novel Targets

04:02 min | 4 years ago

"genentech" Discussed on Novel Targets

"Scientists on researches name is Michael winger. I work at genetic in south San Francisco in clinical development due to German accent. You totally did. Yes. I worked nine years out of Basel, and I'm originally German trained in Germany, and I did a brief spell in the United States, but not enough to get rid of my germ, Nixon trading US, scientist or hematologist both. I'm a hematologist oncologist MD PHD in Matilde. I'm told everybody has to be smart at Genentech. It helps having a few smart people around you because if that happens, I get a lot of good ideas from them, and that can help them developing though, said here's what do you do? I'm overseeing the development of three drugs. One is called platoon Fedotova, which is an antibody drug country. Antibody drug conjugates are really cool molecules we can develop pre clinically super of medicines. But they just happen to be a little bit too toxic to be given to patients so the country itself. This problem by attaching a tiny amount of the toxin to the antibody by means of Lincoln drug and that contact the body plus Lincou, plus the toxin Senan jetted to the patient and travels to the cancer cell, the antibody ducks to sell the whole complex gets internalized and only then the toxin gets released, and then the talks starts killing the cell, but only the cancer cell, and that gets rid of a lot of the toxicity we would need to fear otherwise. So this is like a small bump, but goes to. Specific target amendments to reach target releases its payload and kills cancer. That's absolutely, correct. And yes, they could be called smart bombs still chemotherapy. So it's not necessarily something that is very different from conventional chemotherapy other than it's delivered just to the cancer cell. So tell me about him. What does that target pilot? Does that deliver them Fedotova in targets an antigen called CD seventy nine b which is part of the receptor, and that is also essential for this molecule to work because the only want to kill licnen B cells and CD seven nine beats only expressed on b cells. So that's important because otherwise we would have that same problem that we have was the stem chemotherapy that a lot of the good cells in the body would be affected Pulitzer is this antibody against CD ninety than linka cold VC and toxin called M E, which is essentially a about a thousand times more potent version of alkaloid, Kristen or Vinson and. Inserted in patients with lung cancers. It's able to pretty effectively on its own destroy blood Kansas, but we have learned in the development. That's probably best used in combination. And that's the data was showing at this meeting. We have three posters in one or a presentation and in all of these we show data together with either retire or twos a map or with the Mustang or chop chemotherapy. So tell me about the strategy behind targeting some of these aggressive lymphomas, we're not just targeting aggressive lymph Olmos well to targeting indolent lymphomas data and both of these here at the meeting specifically on film, which is the most common of the indolent lymphomas and diffuse large film, which is the most common of the aggressive lymph illness. The strategy is relatively simple in that. We think the single agent activity of these molecules is impressive, but probably not enough to really make a huge difference for patients, and that's what we really are here for two to make a difference for patients. So what? We think right now is we want to replace part of a standard chemotherapy in the chop regimen. That's when Kristen and want to replace it with politics of adult in increasing the efficacy, but not necessarily having any additional safety issues, which is a tall order to do. But the initial data was showing here the poster by every Tilly on thirty three patients with DB L treated frontline with a regimen called R chop minus Kristen's referred to. This is our CHP are chip plus politics methadone open show, an eighty five percent overall response..

Kristen Fedotova United States Michael winger San Francisco Genentech Basel Pulitzer methadone Lincou Tilly Senan Matilde scientist Kansas Olmos Nixon Germany Vinson