33 Burst results for "Gene Pool"

Breaking From the UK: No Baby Has Been Called ‘Gary’ Since 1993

The Gargle

00:48 sec | Last month

Breaking From the UK: No Baby Has Been Called ‘Gary’ Since 1993

"Also in breaking us. Gary despair as news breaks in the uk that no baby hasn't been named gary since nineteen ninety-three gary extinction only alleviated by the high proportion of creepy gerry's dating way younger than is appropriate. Which should keep the scatter plot of the gary. Gene pool spread over time. I am just now imagining a baby named gary. And it's the funniest thing i've ever thought of is gary is gary the full name. I guess it is right. But gary feels like one of those names where it should be the nickname. I think gary is the nickname i think people have been cold. Gareth since nineteen ninety-three. But i feel like the assertiveness of cooling your child gary visit particular package of assumptions bills like naming and baby. Bother like that

Gary Gerry UK Gareth
Rand Paul Drags Anthony Fauci Over Coronavirus Origins

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:58 min | 2 months ago

Rand Paul Drags Anthony Fauci Over Coronavirus Origins

"There was a memorable exchange between dr fao. She and senator rand paul in the united states. Senate yesterday you may have read about it. I want you to hear it. It takes six minutes. But i want you to hear here is a change as you are aware it is a crime to lie to congress. Section one zero zero one of the. Us criminal code creates a felony and a five year penalty for lying to congress on your last trip to our committee on may eleventh. You stated that the nih has not ever and does not now fund gain of function research in the wuhan institute of technology and yet gain of function. Research was done entirely in the wuhan institute by dr she and was funded by the nih. I'd like to ask anatomist consent. Insert into the record. The wuhan virology paper entitled discovery of a rich gene pool of bat. Sars related corona viruses. Please deliver a copy of the journal. Article doctrine vouching in this paper doctors. She credits the nih enlist the actual number of the graph that she was given by the nih in this paper she took to. Bat corona virus genes spike chains and combine them with the sars related backbone to create new viruses that are not found in nature. These lab created viruses with into shown to replicate in humans. These experiments combined genetic information from different corona viruses that infect animals but not humans to create novel artificial viruses able to infect human cells viruses that in nature only infect animals were manipulated in the wuhan lab to gain the function of infecting humans. This research fits the definition of the research that the nih said was subject to the pause in two thousand fourteen to two thousand seventeen a pause in funding on gain of function

NIH Dr Fao Senator Rand Paul Wuhan Institute Of Technology Wuhan Institute The Wuhan Virology Congress United States Senate Sars
San Diego man arrested for taking 2-year-old inside elephant exhibit at zoo

The Armstrong & Getty Show

01:44 min | 6 months ago

San Diego man arrested for taking 2-year-old inside elephant exhibit at zoo

"I've seen the news footage. Miami went unhinged. A father has been arrested on suspicion of child endangerment after he carried his two year old daughter into the elephant habitat at the San Diego Zoo to take a photograph of the animals. Good Lord Dad thought it would be cool to take his two year old little girl. Into the elephant habitat for a cool social media picture. Wow, the man bypassed multiple barriers and common sense and purposely and illegally trespassed into the that that's That's not the problem to me that he Broke some law. Into the habitat for Asian and African elements of Fuck. You gotta bring the gotta bring that into it. Whether they're agent elephants or not, makes no difference. Wow, I'm glad there are no white supremacist elephants. In there. There was a safe space Jack for the Asian and African elephants. The witness who provided video and you'll hear the sound again here in a little bit. Shows a man dropping the child as they flee the enclosure as a trumpeting elephant charged at them. The man picked up the toddler was able to get her out safely. Thank God I don't care if he gets trampled, of course, then the little girl's father this but Police said the 25 year old man wanted to take a photo with the American bull elephant. Ah, being held $100,000 bail. What do you do with somebody? That makes a decision like that? Well, this is a difficult moral ground for me if he had been childless, I always root for the animal in this scenario of the gorilla to tear him limb from limb the tiger to eat him the elephant to stomp him into the ground just because I don't want his genes in the gene pool. On the other hand, he has reproduced beautiful little girl dated, Jim. I don't know. You know, I want the little girl to be okay. Obviously,

San Diego Zoo Miami Jack JIM
The Mystery Of The Pennhurst Asylum

Haunted Places

04:47 min | 7 months ago

The Mystery Of The Pennhurst Asylum

"The eastern pennsylvania institution for the feeble minded and epileptic later called pinehurst asylum was originally established as a facility for the disabled opened in nineteen o eight. The property contained in array of buildings all scattered around large tracts of farmland in chester county. Thirty miles outside of philadelphia though it might sound like it was designed for care and comfort. The reality was anything. But the institute was first created to house intellectually and developmentally disabled people alongside those who suffered from epilepsy but this strategy was unwise as such patients had very different needs. What's worse is that. Many of the institutions goals were based on the nineteenth century eugenics movement proponents of the movement believed that the human gene pool should be protected and anyone deemed. Genetically inferior. Should be prevented from reproducing by forced sterilization or segregation from the rest of society. For this reason. People with certain kinds of disabilities whose families could not care for them were sent to penn hearst. Most of them came as infants or children. Girls and boys are separated into different buildings. So there wouldn't be any sexual mixing in the decades since the institution closed a slew of modern day rumors claim that penn hurst carried out forced sterilizations on its patients. But while sterilization did occur at similar institutions in the united states. There was actually no record of it at pinehurst. Rumors of the institute's horrific procedures ran rampant. The last perhaps this is because the hospital was shrouded in an era of mystery it operated almost completely independently of the outside world. It had its own power plant and produced its own. Food and supplies were brought in by a special rail. Line pen hurts was designed so that no one from the outside could get in but more importantly so that no one on the inside could ever get out. Georgie was carrying a stack of folded sheets toward the finish piles. When he noticed a girl arguing with an orderly. George stopped in his tracks. She had long shiny hair and was pointing a finger directly at him confidently shouting and screaming. He was instantly captivated and continued to watch her but eventually to more orderlies came over to give her a shot. And take away georgie side. Good things never lasted. Long at penn harris georgia's mother had left him there when he was only three. He never knew why not what he done or where she'd gone he'd been stuck in this place for twelve years and he knew it like the back of his hand. He knew that when the girl got taken away it was the last he'd see of her or so he thought The next day georgy walked into the laundry building at his heart nearly stopped there. She was if he someone else. He could've tapped on her shoulder and introduced himself but as it was he could barely manage breathing and walking at the same time. Georgie said down in front of his pile of sheets and started cursing himself for being so shy and that was when someone tapped him on the shoulder turned. The girl was standing behind him. A fitted sheet in her hand. She has georgie how to fold it. Her name was kerry. No one was happy to be. A pen harassed. But carrie was indignant about it. She said she didn't belong there. That was why she'd been fighting with the orderly. There was no way she was going to spend the day slaving over an ironing board if she wasn't getting paid the orderly at said that barbital injection might change her mind but it obviously didn't soon george bush love. He used to find laundry duty tedious. But now it was the only thing. He looked forward to because laundry. Duty meant seeing carry a few weeks. After they first met george carey was sitting on a low stone wall outside the laundry carried. Turn to him with a frown. She asked to launch. She was a burden after her parents died. Her guardianship went to her uncle.

Eastern Pennsylvania Instituti Penn Hearst Penn Hurst Chester County Georgie Epilepsy Penn Harris Philadelphia Georgy United States George Georgia Kerry Carrie George Carey George Bush
Africa's Great Green Wall to combat desertification secures $16.8 billion  in international finance Impact

Science Magazine Podcast

11:48 min | 8 months ago

Africa's Great Green Wall to combat desertification secures $16.8 billion in international finance Impact

"Now we have science writer. Rachel danske with an update on africa's great green wall project which will soon see an infusion of billions of dollars from the world bank and others this project. The great green wall is intended to serve as a bulwark against desertification of the land south of the sahara desert while at the same time supporting communities that live in this region. Okay rachel how're you doing. I'm doing well. Thanks for having me sure. This is a rape big wall. This is a big project. It's basically supposed to be this green band that spans about seven thousand kilometers across the whole hop of africa. It launched back in two thousand seven. Rachel what would you say. The progress has been since two thousand seven now to two thousand twenty one almost non-existent which is why they launched this new round of funding last month. There was an assessment that found that a fraction of the goal had been achieved so far and the goal is for twenty thirty so they realized that time was running out right throughout this piece. You make this really important distinction between planting a tree and growing a tree. Why is that so important to think about when you know thinking about restoring lands or planting trees to help prevent desertification. The first time. I heard it. I just thought well. That's a really good way to put it. And then when racer after another would phrase it that way that we don't plant trees we grow them because that's been one of the missing pieces in restoration. Efforts globally not even specific to the great green wall but just in restoration landscape and forest restoration. Generally there has been this focus on planting trees but little focus really on looking at what gets planted in the first place in paying attention to the species diversity in the planting material and making sure that it's the right tree for the right place. There's also last follow plus maintenance of the tree then there needs to be talked to someone in west africa who was saying that. He's traveled to so many countries throughout the continental. Seen so many trees planted. But where the forests. Yeah that's a really interesting way of thinking about it. Basically tree planting mania that's been happening has come from all these different projects foundations quotas. That are saying oh. It costs a dollar to put a tree in the ground and we're going to offset our carbon. We're going to green the world but no one's looking after these trees and making sure that they live beyond that for sheer gas so now that we know that. That's not a good way to go about this. There's actually a lot of research. That's found some of the best practices for restoration projects. What are some of the recommendations have come out from research. In the past ten years when paper published last year talked about ten golden rules for reforestation. And they think those summed up a lot of the recommendations really well in addition to just protecting existing forests which probably sounds obvious. But there's a lot of research on the new. I don't have the same benefits that existing ones do and it's hard to replace that beyond that involving local communities has been just incredibly important component that researchers are saying was not really part of the focus before because the restoration ecologists are focused on the physical research and they aren't trained to think about how people play into the picture and it's just so important to the survival of the trees because it's people who are planting trees and it's people who are maintaining the trees and if you don't have community by an investment in rye these trees there and interested keeping them there. The trees aren't going to last and the trees only have their benefits when they last going back to trees here for a minute you mentioned keeping old us in place for protecting them. What else is being looked at. So that's when using a diversity of species so that there can start to be restored. Biodiversity rather than just monoculture of trees. They're starting to be focused now. Also on the quality of the seeds. And what you're actually planting. And how do we build. The systems and infrastructure for collecting and improving. Seeds is going to be the most resilient seed for that species but then it's also about the genetic diversity because there can be inbreeding with plants. If you're not collecting from wide enough geographic area than you can start to sort of limit. The gene pool and that can be problematic. You talk about this example in ethiopia of a seat initiative a network that is supposed to improve the quality of seats. Can you talk about how that would work. And how it would involve the community. The provision of adequate trees deep portfolio or pets. Bo is a project in ethiopia that they're calling it a functional trees seed system. It's a multi-pronged effort. They're trying to develop standards for seed collection and sharing that. There's high quality seed that will ensure that the trees that are planted can be their most resilient they're developing maps for how to source those seeds they're trying to strengthen the research system the infrastructure and the the research system to improve seed quality and they're linking all of that to the people who will use the seeds seeds there's technical training for farmers and the local language and there are diagrams of how to store different types of seeds. They're really trying to get that knowledge to the community to farmers and local nurseries to scale up the capacity of local decentralized infrastructure. Is there another model project that people might be looking at to expand as the money comes in. Are there other areas. That are doing good things. Yeah there was one of their project that i came across the one billion trees for africa project. And it's led by this man from cameroon tabby jota. He talked about how he grew up in this thriving economy system and he went off to university and when he came back the lands that he new as a forest with no longer for us. He started planting marina cheese and cola nut trees and mingo trees and all these different trees that would restore some of the soil health that he thought had been lost but also produce food and income generating opportunities for people so that they would be invested in keeping the trees there. He called his approach. The contagion approach. Because it's just sort of caught on. He got a bunch of men and women in this one community to be involved in the tree planting the neighboring communities saw what was happening and he was very clear that it's not like a drastic change where their community sedley rich where they weren't before but the small benefits were noticeable and so the neighboring community wanted to do something similar. And so it's just been a word of mouth approach so as he developed this very grassroots success he's gotten funding from more international sources than use it to do the work on the ground in these different communities mostly in west africa. And he's starting to do more and more with the great great wall which seems very exciting so there are a couple of different findings that we talked about that suggests the way forward for this type of restoration project involving the community diversity of. They're planting making sure that they're not just putting stuff in the ground but they're actually supporting plant growth and the communities around it but another thing that comes up a lot in your story is now we kind of what should happen. Researchers have come to a lot of conclusions that are very useful. But then there's the practice what's actually happening on the ground and maybe even what will happen on the ground. What are some of the biggest impediments to implementing the results of this research. One interesting comment. That i heard was that the implementing partners people with the money don't have scientist on their teams. They don't realize how complicated it is to plant a tree into get it right and to make sure that grows the lack of knowledge in the right places and the lack of communication between the people with the money and the people with the knowledge and also the community who is going to be involved. Those conversations aren't being had something else that a here is the expectations that donors have. They want fast results. And that's not. How trees in general work. But it's especially not how effective restoration works because all of these things need to happen and they take time getting communities involved. There's a lot of upfront investment. That needs to happen. In developing all of this infrastructure and research systems with a lot faster to just go and say just plant a bunch of eucalyptus trees. Because that's what they have the seeds and planting materials for. There's a disconnect between the speed that donors want to see results and the reality of what needs to happen. I've seen that you've written about this project for years now. What do you think you're going to see if you check back in two years. I hope to see that things. Like the pats project and this other effort the one billion trees for africa a hope that they have scaled and and that they inspire or serve as models for other projects. I don't know where. I'm placing bets. It feels like there is enough of a resounding message coming from the research community about the importance of this and the importance for the effective ecosystem function restoration and the community development but also for the climate benefits and if the global fenders governments who want to plant trees for the climate benefits if they are serious than they will start listening to these researchers. This is like thousands of miles. Four thousand miles. That's like the us plus another third right east west a huge huge area to cover an across countries. And all these different people's. How is this. possible. Rachel i mean this is a global scale. This is a huge project. it's huge. It's huge and that's probably why it sounded like the great idea when they announced it. And why didn't go anywhere for ten years but it's the partner agencies that i've spoken with involved in this project. The great queen wall are really clear that it's an environmental program but it's also the social alliance when that's meant to economic development but also really impart some resilience. See into these communities. Who are the most vulnerable to the effects of climate change. That's why they're really ramping. Up this funding now because they see the value for the planet from a climate change perspective but also for the millions of people across this gigantic area. Pinks rachel thanks for having me. Sure rachel Danske is a science writer based in denver. You can find a link to story on the episode page for the podcasts. At science mag dot org slash podcast.

Rachel Danske Africa West Africa Sahara Desert Ethiopia Marina Cheese Rachel BO Cameroon Cola East West United States Pinks Rachel Denver
Israel's incredible Covid vaccine rollout story

Jonny Gould's Jewish State

06:50 min | 8 months ago

Israel's incredible Covid vaccine rollout story

"Collier who is obviously very prominent pro. Israel researcher and journalist. He tried to navigate through some of the reasons why israel has been so successful so fast and he says it's never going to be a single cause about why israel has responded so incredibly he says of course. Israel was an enormous high price on life. No soldier is left behind. And then he talks about the coup pat holum system and that is not one central player in the vaccination like the over here but several like cl- elite mcabe may hit it. This is the sort of multiple. Nhs scenario that we have in israel and it means that several brains in each community organized separately to deal with her impatience obviously science and technology great economic driver for the economy and the id system. There's no real bother about anonymity. It's not a big thing in israel. People know pretty much. Everyone is in many of the systems are integrated and of course a militarized system to handle mass events community like kibbutzim and small towns cities on the west bank as well. Everyone knows must've been the the half keyboards how farm communities which are becoming sort of districts and towns of of major cities and they respond well to hostile acts. This is a. This is kind of a security issue where the threat isn't from from bombs or rockets. It's a threat from house which is a similar threat. Yes i mean. There's much more to say on that as well. I mean you'll right in the the emergency response in israel is sadly perhaps very well refined become very well. Refunding has had to become very refined over the years. And we see that mentality driving. Israel's attempts to quash the virus and to get the vaccination writes all the way through one anecdote which struck me was that in one vaccination center recently. They run out of time so the vaccines enter had to close and they still had those of the vaccine left which had to be used that evening or so. Nurses went out into the streets and grabbed a piece of delivery guy and gave him a shot. I mean that sort of can do spirit has been viable. But i think there are other elements like practical elements as well the contributed towards success so for example early planning israel paid reportedly over the odds by some degree to gets these first vaccines in. Benjamin netanyahu himself developed a personal relationship with the bosses pfizer and promised to give pfizer israeli data about the vaccine use in response to getting these these first doses and of course there's always in a position to give them that data because it's got one of the best digitalized health system in the world which allows for that data to be harvested and then to be used in further research but there are other innovations well so for instance israeli scientists found a way of getting more doses out of each vial vaccine than had initially been intended therefore stretching it further and in addition when the vaccines arrived on these huge pallets in bangor in airport rather than take them out like that. The israeli logistics experts decided to find a way of abortion them in small books style. Size insulated boxes they could remain at seventy but be taken out by most bikes or whatever and post out into small centers throughout the country in the community so the people didn't have to travel too far sickly during lockdown things like that all of these small but vital innovations have contributed towards this message. Success all the way from the initial negotiations and securing those vaccines all the way down to the grassroots rollouts and everything in between it's been just a magnificent display of guinness with with the nostril national spirit. I was indeed a very privileged to speak to around leads. The head of research it collegiate. Who runs through the extraordinary artificial intelligence and data which israel has what they've mapped millions and millions of people in the israeli gene pool and of israel's gene pool extends to two hundred nations around the world it's an extraordinary level of data which they can then feed to monsieur buller adviser which is which is an incredible gift to be able to give enrich. We are very fortunate to be standing on. The shoulders of giants are people at the nineties. In israel where smart enough to create an electronic medical records and make them ubiquitous over the system so since mid ninety s collegiate we have had electronic medical records in all of physicians offices on so in every hospital ward and so does abundance of data of massive amounts being collected in harnessed for the use of our patients. This puts israel ahead of the curve in terms of planning and alleviating major medical problems which afflict the whole world. I think that is proving to be true. Because we put into practice into scale concepts that in other places are considered the theoretical and so we have at khalid been practicing predictive modeling in practice for over a decade now so tens and hundreds of thousands of people receiving care based on personalization and predictive models in massive scales for a decade. So i i do think that the availability of data the availability of the will to change and transform the system as well as the innovative spirit of the local eco-system within the health sector and from the outside all communist together to create a very interesting setting for innovation in practice. And this is four million people. Isn't it so you can help kill the world with all the different afflictions the different health issues that you see amongst those millions of people and they have arrived into israel from all four corners of the world so in a sense every population around the world can benefit from the data. You find the differences between people. We are now moving into an innovation driven strategy where we will try more. And more to take the insights that we've gained and take them out to the world in various ways in creating spinoffs and startups within khalid and also by allowing startups organizations from around the world to test. Drive their new ideas. Collegiate so we can actually prove whether or not they making a difference.

Israel Pat Holum Pfizer Collier West Bank Benjamin Netanyahu Monsieur Buller Bangor Giants Khalid Collegiate
The Population Control Movement

Behind the Bastards

04:35 min | 9 months ago

The Population Control Movement

"The negro project was very popular with black community leaders at the time and it would be unfair to frame it as an act of genocide. Sanger wrote repeatedly of the importance of bringing in black doctor stating at one point. I do not believe that this project should be directed a run by white medical men which is good. If you're going to do a healthcare project like focused on the black community like that. That shows like she. She was like she was capable of understanding what was necessary in order to actually reach people in nineteen thirty nine now so that i guess yeah. Yeah in one thousand nine hundred nine. She argued in a letter. That black ministers needed to be heavily involved in the project in order to gain the trust of their communities. We do not want to go out that we want to exterminate the negro population in the minister is the man who could straighten out that idea if it ever occurs to any of their more rebellious members again sue problematic language there but also there's no evidence she was actually going for genocide because she was again doing the same thing with white people. She was a birth control across the board advocate right. She wanted everyone to have more access to contraceptives. There are people on the right. Like denise souza who will spread wildly untrue claims about sanger like that. She called black people human weeds in a minister civilization. And there is no evidence of this sanger's own legacy contains enough problematic facts without making up lies. She was a eugenicist and she wrote in nineteen twenty-three that birth control does not mean contraception indiscriminately practiced. It means the release in cultivation of the better elements in our society and the gradual suppression elimination and eventual extinction of defective stocks. Those human weeds who threaten the blooming of the finest flowers of american civilization. So she did call people human weeds. But she wasn't referring to black people. She was referring more to mentally challenged people more to people with like who are prone to diseases. And that's bad that's really bad. But she was not like a four exterminating everything but white people. She was four exterminating people. She considered unhealthy or at least exterminating them from the gene pool. Which is again bad. But let's be accurate about the kind of bad it is. You know we don't need to make it anymore. Yeah criminal. I don't say because it's not flowery. It's already bad. Didn't wanna make better by wiping out black people. She wanted to make black people and white people better by wiping out folks who had what she considered to be like bad qualities through selective breeding and. That's really terrible for herself. What does back. Yeah these are yes. Yes thanks at up. Yeah that is bad but like it's not the kind of bad luck again because they tried to. I like the progressives always been trying to wipe out black like. That's not what she was doing. We don't need to add information. She was just a she was a. Here's plenty that's bad about her. Yeah let's let's be intellectually honest when we can dennis someone. She also stated during another speech. I believe now immediately. There should be national sterilization for certain this genetic types of our population who are being encouraged to breed and would die out where the government not feeding them. You know that's bad but again it's the kind of like part of why they like to try to frame her. Badness is something different is because if you're accurate about it you can find a fuck load of republicans who say the. The poor should starve right. Like the people who can't work on their own by jordan peterson. Talking about like how terrifying it is that. Some people aren't intelligent enough to be in the military and like say like because. What do we do with those people like. That's a really. Like what margaret sanger was. Saying back then is still common today. Apple dress it up a little bit more. I mean kind of relate to the copay things like that's fine. They're already they're already probably die. So it's the run productive. Yeah they're in productive there on the government dole. Exactly yeah she just. She was bad she just was not the kind of bad people. Like desouza liked painter. As and in fact a lot of progressive black leaders at the time like margaret sanger. And what she was trying to do in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine letter to dr. cj gamble of proctor and gamble fame. She urged him to get over his resistance to hiring a fulltime negro physician. Ask quote the colored. Negroes can get closer to their own members and more or less lay their cards on the table which means they're ignorant superstitions in doubt again. She's also she's number one saying that black people are ignorant and superstitious which is bad but also saying that like no you get educated black people to talk to them about birth control so again. She's a problematic person but not painters

Sanger Denise Souza Jordan Peterson Margaret Sanger Dennis Desouza Cj Gamble Apple
Go for Tree Diversity in Your Yard

Your Gardening Questions

03:35 min | 10 months ago

Go for Tree Diversity in Your Yard

"I have some spruce trees. I have ten of planet along the back of my property. They're absolutely beautiful. They're dying one at a time. So i guess one of the lessons is that when you go to plant a screen or you want a wind break something like that. You want some plant diversity. Yes always is is a key mark. I'm going to jump backwards to compromise conversations. We've had about your sweet gums lining tree edge. That is street after street after street in your community. That's wonderful when it's in full color in all going will aid sets and or disease or what have you or a particularly harsh winter that can cause significant diseases we gums the lack of diversity can be extremely expensive in many ways visually and financially now to avoid that then based on your question i try in designed to always think of that. Very factor Well any given blue spruce or any three of them is plenty in my opinion now and order then to enjoy them. Put them in a prominent spot. Put them where they can be seen and enjoyed by you and neighbors but then next to them not close not not going to cause a problem later on but i would definitely add in some pine Where the Well we'll we'll just say the australian scotch pines can have their little problems. Now you would come in with other kinds of pine and i'm not going to elaborate. There are many other pine trees that can work. Then we come to this plant. That i've mentioned this call came a separate and this will give us now Diversity in their gene pool. It'll give us diversity in their appearance and so on so. I would strongly recommend against a hedge. Well for the most part would go against a hedge of any one given thing I i know one place that i drive by frequently where they used all white pines and other white pines are still in very good shape. But i've been driving by for twenty years and those beautiful young white pines have all started to get high. Hid is if you will as all plants grow. The growth energy goes to the tips of the branches. And and to the top. Well the fella planet all of those white pines to screen his property now has no screening whatsoever. There all naked to about nine feet. All you see is tree trunks. Now that still as a diversion to the i but no disease organisms. They're just simply too many of one thing that a whole does the same thing they'll they'll live on for probably in the next thirty years. They may break up in a windstorm a little bit. They're right now. there's no problem with white pines. however his problem as was initially perceived is ongoing now. Because there's not much you can plant below them and so so anyhow mark diversity is the key there where if you use a blue spruce or if you use whatever then go to other things in a different corner oriented in that line or even to the extent of changing character use the evergreens that are needed to block the given circumstances. You don't wanna see anytime the year and then add in some deciduous trees be things like flooring crabs or or what have you. Hawthorne's and japanese. Red maples and so on to give you the change of pace in character. Color times of year in the whole ball of wax. So try to avoid monocultures is what it's called.

Hawthorne
Too Much Of A Good Thing: The Cautionary Tale of Biotech Crops

Short Wave

09:03 min | 10 months ago

Too Much Of A Good Thing: The Cautionary Tale of Biotech Crops

"Dan let's start with a little bt crops one. oh one all right. Walk us through how they work. So these genetically modified plants got their superpowers from a bacteria. Let's let julie describe it a little bit for bt in particular They express genes that. Come from a type of bacterium It's really a very common. Bacteria that's found in soils it's called bacillus thuringiensis as the scientific name now. This kind of bacteria is actually poisonous and the larval stage of some major insect pests like corn route worm. Cotton bollworm Which farmers worry about a lot. So what the scientists did was they took some of the genes from bacteria and inserted them into these corn and cotton plants which then made the plants poisonous to the insects just like the bacteria were so now. The plants can actually protect themselves by killing off past that. Try to eat them. Exactly which is a big deal for farmers. Here is david current. He's an entomologist at texas am university. He gives farmers advice on the best way to handle their insect problems. A lot of them are cotton farmers and for them. The effect was dramatic. U we'd have cases before the introduction of bt where You know farmers were having to treat you know it could be ten times. You know for these pests. The ring ten times in a season they could yeah some areas and one bt was introduced. Well our our insecticide sprays just plummeted. And you know in there were guys who wouldn't have to treat it all and that's a big deal for not just the farmers but for the environment right. Dan like those pesticides. Don't just kill the insects year. For right yeah absolutely. Regular insecticides can kill off a whole range of species and mess up the whole ecosystem. Bt crops produced specific proteins that only kill particular insects so those crops are basically harmless to pollinators like bees and beneficial insects. That prey on past help. Keep them under control. It's not toxic to people or birds and for farmers like jonathan evans and north carolina. It meant he didn't have to work so hard is always better for the plant to protect itself. Then i have to go out and try to to spray for the worms. Did it really change farming. Have -solutely i mean you can tend a lot more acres. Were the whole equipment. Got it so jonathan. The farmer loves these crops. Julie who likes insects is happy. When did things start to go sour. Dan well i guess for jonathan it was you know one day in two thousand sixteen when he went out to cotton field and saul some cotton bollworm happily chowing down on his cotton plants and he knew what that meant. Those insects had evolved. He was looking at a new strain of bollworm that the bt protein wouldn't kill and this has been happening more and more often the country right david kerns that insect specialist at texas a and m. says some farmers are pretty disappointed and angry. There's words i can't use but they wanted to know what the heck they're doing paying for a technology and they're still having a spray. Okay dan so let's talk about. Why some of those insects have become resistant to bt crops. Yeah let's get into the science mattie evolution and here we go okay so there's a part of this. It's really simple. You have a gazillion different individual. Let's say cotton bollworm out there. There's genetic variation among them and just by chance. You may very well have a few that have some genetic mutation that makes them a little less vulnerable to the fbi t. Now they're rare normally right no problem share except if you plant these bt crops everywhere you kill off all the other insects and you have. What biologists call selection pressure right those rare individuals. That aren't killed by the gmo will be the only ones that survive and they will find each other and you know what happens next. Mattie they do that birds and the bees and the bugs thing they do they they they mate and offspring and suddenly you have a lot of insects with that. Same genetic trait a new strain of resistant. Insects emerged its evolution. Right in front of your eyes. That is what has happened over and over now. It's complicated because the biotech companies actually deployed a whole series of slightly different bt jeans and we've seen insects evolve resistance. I two one gene and then the next one sometimes it took maybe five years other times. It took a lot longer fifteen even twenty years. And it's patchy in some places the bt crops are still working and other places they aren't okay but the end. This idea of selection pressure has been around for a long time right so clearly. Scientists saw this coming. Oh absolutely did. In fact i was around. I was reporting on this back when there. Were these arguments going on back when the crops were new and university. Scientists were predicting that this would happen. If the genes were overused. They were pushing this idea of refuge to keep it from happening. They said farmers should be required to plant some of their land with non bt crops Just so all those pests. You know those with and without the resistance. Gene could thrive there elway. So in that way the rare insects with genetic resistance to bt wouldn't completely take over because some of those that were sensitive would still be around to be in the gene pool exactly exactly and the companies actually agreed to this in principle but there were these big arguments about how big the refuge had to be. There were some scientists who said at least for some of these bt crops. Farmers should not be allowed to plant those crops on more than half of their land. But the company said that'll never work. Farmers won't go for bt crops at all if there's such strict rules and the companies one and sure enough now there's resistance to bt so scientists like julie are back once again this argument pushing for tighter government rules. We are at an important point where we've seen some examples of what can happen and definitely do need to make some changes. What kind of changes are we talking about here. Dan because it feels pretty late in the game. Right it is. It is but there's one thing that people are focused on there's at least one bt. Gene is still working the bugs of not resistant to it yet so it still is effective against a lot of insects. And it's sort of carrying a lot of the weight right now. It's kind of the last bt. Still standing and scientists are worried. It'll soon break. You know under that weight of overuse especially in the south is used in both corn and cotton to fight off insects so that the environmental protection agency scientific advisers have told the agency it should only allow that gene to be used in one of those crops cotton or corn and it should be caught because controlling the bollworm in cotton is just much much more important economically in corn. It's a minor pest got and cotonou can wipe out your crop. And if you don't let it be used in corn than all those cornfields are that refuge. I see see but the company that owns this gene. Syngenta says no. That's not necessary. And it's not fair and the and the epa is actually backed away from idea. Okay i mean so what happens now dan. Well there are a lot of scientists including julie peterson who say if current farming practices. Don't change. it's possible that all of the bt genes that are currently on the market will stop working reliably within ten years and then farmers will have to find new ways to fight the insects. Maybe they'll be spraying more. Insecticides again or more and this is what julie wants maybe they go back to some more old-fashioned pest control methods you know crop rotations change what crops you plant from year to year. Yeah i mean. Indigenous communities around the world have used that technique for thousands of years some organic farmers due to right the the trick is going to be using those techniques and still producing the kind of big harvest that a lot of farmers and a lot of consumers now depend on. Okay dan charles. Thank you so much for bringing us

BT David Current Jonathan Evans David Kerns DAN Jonathan Julie Texas Saul Mattie North Carolina FBI Elway Gene Julie Peterson
"gene pool" Discussed on D4WH - A Doctor Who podcast

D4WH - A Doctor Who podcast

04:47 min | 1 year ago

"gene pool" Discussed on D4WH - A Doctor Who podcast

"And that gives codeine. codeine. Oh, what do you know how everyone who gets tested for covered or took all of a sudden has covered? Well, no because the people I know got tested didn't know exactly that doesn't make any sense. They can infect last week is very exciting. Yeah. Most people who get the tests don't end with, with, Oh my God, why are people so stupid? We we like just breeding stupider and stupider and stupider people. It's like idiocracy you seen Idiocracy Thursday. We're fucking A Thousand Years time. Everyone's is going to be a fucking idiot. Yeah, and the the average guy who's like don't put Gatorade on your plants. Yeah. It's going to be you want to put toilet water on there. Gatorade on the that's the thing is like we're so stupid in hundred hundred years time that everyone thinks but it's got electrolytes. That's what players. Yeah, so it's all about how how the the joke is the lower end of the gene pool has lots of kids in the higher end of the gene pool. So don't don't think we'll have any children we we might only have one and then we kind died died out or they die out. don't don't know which end of the gene pool I am but they die out and the lower end of the gene pool just keeps going. Yeah. So the president is a whirl wrestler World Federation wrestling champion Dairy Cruise. Yeah. Yeah it is wrong, which is kind what what they got now. Oh Pete one says for doctor doctor to close the bridge, but this will mean that all of sudden sudden will be stuck on Earth the doctor tries convince convince people to save the other Earth Jackie Jackie it contains they pop back and form a plan with assignment to infiltrate the sphere room. was was kind of disappointed when Pink goes is not my Jackie. My Jack Jack Jack It's not my chapter. I I'm on board with what Pete's thing really because he hasn't really don't don't really know the doctor. He's like what encounter him once or twice and then suddenly he's trying to being shipped with this woman. That is not grown up with. Well, that's true. And he's particular version of Jackie got turned into Cyberman. Cyberman. Yeah, so it's extremely triggering. Yeah. Also, I think it probably doesn't help that the first mention of the parallel world. He meets is his daughter From Another Dimension. If you hadn't met the the Jackie first, he'd be like, oh right. I'm kind of on board, but he's like, oh if I want that Jackie, I also have to get daughter I passed she is high maintenance. Yeah, I guess it's like the moral question of if you lost somebody that was close to you like your wife or your husband or whatever and I had the opportunity to go into a different parallel universe and reconcile with that version. Would you do that that would be hard because I would always know that they weren't maybe I would get over it and think I you know this place. Sort like like my version but it would always be there not quite my version it always be difference as you'd be like. Oh, honey. you you want to see see the new Batman movie Batman? What's that turn off but didn't have any Dimension or not some getting out of this is like look, it's raining again. Yeah, let's watch Doctor Who was still doing get me back to the other dimension pack in my Dimension. He's real. Let's go back to your dimension. It's just like Dave passes away in this Dimension and then you go into a parallel universes. It's like, oh, yeah, honey. I'm I like feedback. Okay with you. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. I'm out of here. That's like the only thing that's different though. He's really nice. It's ever that Bonnie fake thing. The Genesis sucks ready and Rosie needs to touch it. But before she does she tells Daleks Daleks about how she destroyed the emperor of the dialects with the time for Tex. I like that. She's quite Brave now, you know from where she started job. Well, she knows that they need him. Yeah. Yeah. Anyway, I like that. She's sort of sticks up for herself. She sticks it up the dialects are they kind of just bumped her and she would have fallen Fallen. Yeah, that's just it you know why that didn't happen. I don't know why when they first come through they don't go touch it just touch it and then we can kill you. Yeah, that's true. They could have just Janome made a trip or something or yeah, but then when they do ask her there like you will touch it. She's like no way no way. No, I will never ever touch it. What if we kill Mickey? All right. Well, I'll touch with their wage was me in that situation. It's like, oh we'll kill Mickey if you don't touch his like fine kill me gather. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, I've tried to leave him that many times and he keeps coming back. All right, we will use Mickey instead of the Genesis Ark is Time Lord technology and can only be open through touch something that dialogue can never do well and it's going to be a time traveler time going to be time time traveler the doctor turns up to make sure that they're okay. Not worried about the the dead. Dr. Rajesh on the floor somewhere. Maybe they cleaned

Jackie Pete one Gatorade codeine president World Federation Cyberman Pink
The earliest human footprints in Arabia

Science Magazine Podcast

07:54 min | 1 year ago

The earliest human footprints in Arabia

"Now, we have contributing correspondent and gibbons. She wrote this week about the likely earliest human footprints on the Arabian Peninsula high an hi Sarah how old or how early are these footprints but that's a good question. They threw a whole package of dating methods at them and came up with in the Ballpark of twenty, one, thousand, two, hundred, and ten, thousand years old. Now the dates are not absolute. There's some questions about them, but that's a pretty good ballpark. How does this age compare to previous hints or clues that humans modern humans early modern humans were on the Arabian Peninsula. Here's the. We know that early hominids members of human family have been migrating out of Africa for two million years because we find fossils of our ancestors in the public of Georgia we find them in. Asia. We find them in Eurasia place, but we don't know how they got out and the most logical route is they had to walk through Rabia because they couldn't fly. They couldn't paddleboats a at that point the one landmass in the way between Africa where humans arose originally, our ancestors arose and Eurasia is through Arabia. So we know they had to go through there, but there's a huge gap there are. No tools older than three hundred to five, hundred, thousand years, and what is there is not definitive. The only fossil have a member of the human family from Arabia is a finger bone that is about eighty eight, thousand years old. So the mystery is, where's the evidence of members of the human family marching through Arabia, and then the second part of that is modern humans specifically, our ancestors Homo sapiens arose probably in Africa, because we see fossils in the ballpark of one, hundred, eight, thousand, three, hundred, thousand years of Proto early Homo, sapiens arising and Africa, and then we find more of these sort. Of Early Homo Sapiens in Greece dating possibly back to as early as two hundred and ten thousand. So we know that they got out right now we're just trying to find evidence. Is there something that going on in the Arabian Peninsula that either people didn't want to hang out there for very long or that erased a lot of evidence. Reagan. Peninsula, has covered with desert's it's very dry today the food desert where they found these fossils is parched arid but there were periods in the past where the planet was cooler and wetter, and during those times hundred, twenty, five, thousand years ago it was. One of them, it was green radio was covered with tens of thousands of lakes. They were grasslands between them. If you think about these early human ancestors, it's not a separate continent or a separate place for them to go to its Afro Arabia, right? Yeah. So it's an extension of Africa if the client is good and they're following large game, how were they able to find these footprints? This is a very large area and it's a few remnants of human passing through. Yes. So this team will have by Michael, Leah and it's an international team of Saudi Arabians in a number of people on. Has Been doing a search of scouring the deserts of. Arabia. For the last decade, they start with satellite imagery which helps them see parched ancient lake beds which have sort of characteristic white halio souls often these ancient sediments that stand out in the satellites and then go down to ground truth what they see on the satellites, an airplane shots they go in on foot in jeeps, and in this case they saw this ancient. Lake better rolling out as white sediment. It had just been recently exposed by Rosen and they found the footprints of the animals which was amazing and as I looked closer to one hundreds of footprints, it was four hundred mostly animals but they did identify a small number. It was seven that seemed to be human footprints. So they knew right away they were very excited about that that this was something that was important how Can you tell that they're human footprints and not some other upright walking relative? There's not a whole science of studying human footprints ever since the first ones are found in la totally in Tanzania and Kenya there've been a number of footprints that have been studied people use three D morphometric dimensional analysis with computational imaging or can really look at the depth and they could model how much weight would have been needed to make. That footprint, the length of the foot, the stride between the steps, and then they've done studies living people in their footprints in Africa to sort of test out those ideas and Lo, and behold when they do that to these footprints, they seem to come up with somebody kind of humor that was taller and maybe a little lighter weight more like a modern human of Homo sapiens and say an Andrew Tall so based on that. They say, Oh, these probably were made by Homo sapiens although we cannot rule out that nanotubes might have been there to is there anything else can tell about these people by looking at these marks I think if they get more, they can start to tell about their social structure footprint studies in Africa. I've got quite complicated where you could see the direction that they're going in the payson different members of social groups you can. To see what they are the packs of humans look like you know, what size are they how many are in these groups? What are they doing a lot of the way in this case, they're not spending a lotta time. They're just sort of walking through. This is a bantering group. What is really really cool. Though is that footprint site these are a snapshot of a single moment in time a single day most of the. Time when you have an archaeological site in a layer soil that you get the fossils of the tools and the dates, all that took place. This fan is usually hundreds of thousands, tens of thousands of years. So if you find an animal bone near a prominent human early Human Boehner tool, you don't necessarily know fear there at the same time as parch with footprints like these these were lay down in the same day maybe. A couple of days and they dried out and then got caught up in preserved. So we know they were all there at the same time. So you get this really cool day in the life look at the and of the animals they were with, which is really cool in this case and lots of animals. Yes. Almost four hundred footprints of animals including very interesting. A wild asses which I don't think we're carrying burdens but. That's kind of neat and they were elephants and the thing that's interesting about the elephants as their popular disappeared for the Middle East, just in Africa. Thanks for three hundred years ago and here they are in hundred twenty, thousand in Arabia and the camps they also Campbell's it's kind of interesting that such large animals with Aaron. It begs the question were these humans following them where they attracted them. Going back to the, we talked about it being about one, hundred, twenty, thousand years old. There's some question about the date but if that were cracked, is there anything particularly Gordon about this time human history about what we know about migrations that we could link these prince two? Yes. So what is really interesting is that genetic evidence says that everybody outside of Africa. Came from migrations that happened in the last fifty to eighty thousand years. So this state predates that we happen to know that early Homo Sapiens were in the Middle East pretty quickly after this or at the same time they're fossils in caves. At school and cough so that our early sort of product Homo sapiens. So we know humans are at sorta suggests that because we don't have DNA that dates back this early these were failed migrations. These were members of the human family that went out they weren't shelled migrations for them they lived, but they did not contribute to the gene pool of letting people today that's one hypothesis but it also shows that there's more complex story of groups of humans migrating out of Africa constantly whenever the weather excitement is right that it's three to nothing that they can get water follow animals to meet and trek. Africa. They can cross the desert. It looks like humans were doing that whenever they could and so how do they contribute tour ancestry today a really interesting question and how many different kinds of hominids out there. Thank you so much an thank you. Sir,

Africa Arabian Peninsula Arabia Middle East Afro Arabia Gibbons Asia Cough Rabia Sarah Eurasia Saudi Arabians Reagan Georgia Tanzania
International Panel Warns Us to Tap the Brakes on Gene Editing, but That Wont Stop Us

The BreakPoint Podcast

04:33 min | 1 year ago

International Panel Warns Us to Tap the Brakes on Gene Editing, but That Wont Stop Us

"Disasters are mostly by definition unavoidable, but we can often take basic steps to mitigate the damage such as not building in flood zones are on top of major faultlines mitigating manmade disasters. Hand is almost entirely avoidable, but quite often we don't because we're victims of our own ideologies and collective pride. For example, last week a panel of genetics experts issued a direct and stark warning against editing genes of human embryos that are destined for implantation. The panel, which consists of experts from ten different countries was jointly convened by the US National Academy of Medicine the US National Academy of Sciences and the UK Royal Society. The present state of gene editing said, the panel's report is simply too risky for both individual embryos and the human race as a whole while technologies such as Christopher are fairly precise and targeting and editing certain genes. They wrote recent ventures have demonstrated that fairly precise isn't. Good enough for instance, when researchers at the Francis Crick Institute in London US crisper recently to edit eighteen human embryos in order to study the role of a particular gene in the early stages of human development about a half of those embryos contain what they called quote major unintended at it. Now, that phrase is a euphemism for harmful mutations and genetic damage, the kind that could lead. To birth defects and even life threatening medical problems like cancer and not to mention could permanently enter the gene pool to other studies were also cited in the same report and one researchers attempted to correct gene mutation that causes blindness in the other the attempt was to prevent certain heart defects. However, researchers found that in both experiments, a significant percentage of the treated embryos suffered chromosomal damage one. Genetics expert described these failures this way if human embryo editing for reproductive purposes, germline editing were spaceflight. This new data would be the equivalent of having the rocket exploded at the launch pad before takeoff. Still once again, this new report focus only on the technical failures of gene editing. Once again, any discussion or even any acknowledgement of the many ethical questions inherent to this very idea of. Gene editing were completely avoided. So now and what's become far too typical of the scientific culture of our age in which philosophy ethics are completely divorced from technology and science research proceeds with an ethical framework of utilitarianism built on a philosophy of scientism or to put it more. Simply gene editing will continue because you know scientists are only real hope to solve problems and if we can do. Something we should, and so even though this panel admits that it could be years before the technical difficulties of gene editing are ironed out experiments will continue and should continue though quote initially limited to serious genetic disorders that are caused by DNA variants and a single gene and should be used quote on when the alternatives for having a biologically related child that is unaffected by the genetic. Disorder are poor. Look Scientific. hubris is indeed a very tough train to stop certainly an international panel of experts admitting that gene editing dangerous and unnecessary but we should proceed anyway as long as it's with caution that's not going to stop any eager scientists around the world, much less the governments and corporations who are funding them. Now, the sincere desire to eradicate dangerous diseases including genetic diseases understandable. It's even noble. The longing to heal is just a reflection of God's image in US ethically sound and medically safe treatment should always be pursued but we should never proceed without a full awareness of the human temptation to become like God is genesis three puts it determining good and evil after all couples are already genetically screening donor sperm to create designer babies and governments like China have. Already. Demonstrated their willingness to experiment on entire ethnic groups we are a world and too often h church that proceeds with the most invasive and inhumane technologies without adequate or in some cases any serious ethical reflection now, there is still time to prevent the potential manmade catastrophe of gene editing time itself however won't be enough unless we have the will to say,

United States Us National Academy Of Medicin Us National Academy Of Science Francis Crick Institute Hand Cancer Christopher London China Uk Royal Society
Kristen Michaela AKA KittyPlays: What Is eSports

The Playbook

07:47 min | 1 year ago

Kristen Michaela AKA KittyPlays: What Is eSports

"The heck is sports so has a great question and I can go many different ways any way you want. This initial as the industry is evolving. I think it is finding some splitting up. that's happening but east. Sports is competitive. Gaming online covers a huge wash of games. There's none in specific that really have succeeded over others even think fortnight's made a really big step into things but even then they don't call themselves e sport repetitive fortnight. Because they really want to separate themselves from things that are happening but It transcends all ages everyone can access it. The Mobile Games especially really popping up Across the world and leagues are forming. Now how many people you think play in that realm millions and millions and millions. I'm sure we could ask more than any other sport now. More than any other sport. Well the interesting thing about sports is you're you're grouping a huge group of people you know there's some people that like to play mobile games or some people like to play. Pc Games but then when within each realm there's so many games within it we have millions of players on fortnight you have millions of players on Doda on counterstrike on clash of clans Especially classifies really popular in China. Actually but my favorite thing. I've one son who's nine huge fortnight kid and You know the EA staff of course but mostly for night and then. I HAVE TEENAGE DAUGHTERS. Which are on the mobile side playing all types of different things but I love the fact that out walk by in the skin that my son is playing is a girl skin. Yeah and I ask can make did why. Why did you choose that one? And he's like because it's the coolest skin I there there. Is this connective? That's occurring? Because you know whether you are athletic. Tall skinny fat strong week. Blue eyed brown eyed white skin. Blacks game all young Europe or South. America make yourself to be whatever you want yourself to be in that world but your skill set is determinative upon. You'll a lifetime of achievement. I mean literally you could start when you're seventy and be the best in the world or you could start when you're seven and be the best in the world. Well it's different skills right so it's not just relative to your gene pool if you have this strategy mentally you know and you can do the High Meta Game. We call it so just understanding the game in a way that other players don't you might Come out on top above players. That have really fast reaction times but still don't understand the deep strategy and that's interesting about each sports is like you don't need to be six foot five Like an super naturally strong to have an advantage. Anyone has access to this. Whether like you said you're young or you're old And so it's an opportunity for people to get together to build community and then compete against each other which is so natural for human beings. Yeah and you said something that was really needed that everybody was worried about. A specially with gaming was community. Originally the idea of sitting there and playing a game by yourself. What was the tragic part about playing video games or gaming it all right because we weren't outside he weren't in community. We weren't learning how to interact. And you I love the fact that Mike his F- friends around the world that they've never met the communicate all the time effectively. They share inspiration. They stare disappointment and excitement winning and losing all these different emotional things that we have to learn about. But I actually believe that it's building a community building one is that it's not separating what we're doing How do you feel about that? Because you're in that generation where you know. It's not as if when you were a little kid. You could be a streamer all the time. You were probably out playing outside and Canada's skiing's Gaetan whatever you do. And then you've transitioned into. I'm sure a lot of your time is spent with a headset in. A chair added a cherry definitely. I mean I talked to parents all the time now. Actually my anyone that my dad works with these always forwarding them to me for questions because they get worried about their Daughter's son when they're saying that they don't want to go to soccer practice or basketball practice anymore because they want to focus on competitive fortnight. And I understand like when you have the known and it's an unknown world and you know there's always issues of privacy coming up and safety but I love the way that twitch and gaming and enjoying content brings people together There's so many kids. Now who are learning such strong communication skills leadership skills Like map awareness deep strategy. Like there's analytic young into the tenth degree easy And I think all the skills that you earn in gaming and when you work together with another person towards an objective whether it's scoring a goal on the soccer field or capturing the flag in a video game As a way that you bond and you learn about the person and I credit a lot of my leadership skills and communication skills to all the time I spent rating in world of warcraft. And my my mom would come into my room and be like Kristen. Like go outside. Your friends invited to the party. And I'd be leading a raid group through world of warcraft and running a guilds at like fourteen mom one day. I'm going to get paid to play Video Games. And you mentioned this at the time that was game testing or game developing which was still really really small industries. And now you can use any skills that you have and join the gaming industry whether it's investing in org and running or eggs or being a manager of players coach psychologists like there's a pro player anything the one thing you know coming from my background in sports agent tree in sports marketing side of things. I don't think anyone's really leading the way of branding someone so you have an extraordinarily following. You really good at what you do. And you're only gonNA get better rate. It's not like you know it might be great great to be six foot five and have all the athletic ability in the world but that only lasts so long. You're not getting better at thirty eight now or forty eight or fifty eight so the gaming skills and knowledge are GonNa be exponentially superior to what they are today and people like you will be the ones leading it not just playing but coaching in developing all types of things. But I don't think we have a grasp on how to monetize or brand. Kitty PLAYS FOR EXAMPLE. Right the other sports if someone had a following like you had or like. Ninja Ninja can say. He made five million in the year. He fifty million right. I think he probably will. This area is learning how to brand himself more and well. I mean that develops solutions. Were opening to it now to write. Evidently Yeah and well we do see a lot of As everyone's learning about sports individually also companies are learning about East sports so traditionally they would go for huge advise in media but that does not have the same level of engagement that influencers content creators pro players and brands online. Have so you see a lot of these companies. Now that they're starting to understand more about gaming start taking one hundred million dollar advise and putting it on real creators who have real engagement in real communities that will buy their products so that's the whole education area as well

Soccer China Canada Europe America Gaetan Mike Kristen Kitty
Inside Christmas Card, Girl Finds Plea From Chinese Prison Laborers

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Inside Christmas Card, Girl Finds Plea From Chinese Prison Laborers

"And the British grocery chain Tesco has suspended its supply of Christmas cards from a Chinese factory over allegations of forced labor the Sunday times reports on a six year old girl from south London who made this discovery in a note in her Tesco cards it read we are foreign prisoners in Shanhai gene pool prison China forced to work against our will please help us to notify human rights organization of Tesco says the supplier will be dropped if these

Tesco South London China Shanhai Six Year
"gene pool" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"gene pool" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Washington post has a a clone of a woman named Jennifer Rubin she also appears on CNN and she looks like puppet or something and she she she's supposed to be the Republican writing on the op ed page at the at the the editorial page of The Washington Post doctor evil post and she's got a day story over the weekend time to call out and remove pollutants propagandists not again she's the Republican writing opinion pieces at the Washington post and they were putting propaganda she says are all the Republicans everywhere that's issues the Republican at the she she says that and then she starts with a falsehood because she's not bright at all and and she doesn't even bother to cover the news that she writes about her understand the stories that she writes about which is perfectly typical in Washington actually Republicans are not merely violating their oaths of office for failing to support impeachment of a president who arguably has committed more serious high crimes and misdemeanors and acts of bribery that all its predecessors combined what she really falls for it hook line and sinker doesn't check none of them sacrifice national security to obtain a political advantage first of all it's happened all the time it happened with Obama and it didn't happen here but never mind that and trump has been disloyal to the United States it's completely in patently absurd lay false not only giving Russia a leg up in its war against Ukraine I'm sorry Barack Obama sent the blankets and trump sent them lethal weapons how stupid are you Jennifer honestly really I mean what do you like and Chuck Todd gene pool or something and also in broadcasting as propaganda brought a breast prop again see they broadcasting is propaganda as you know Ukraine we got a problem over there too that's what he says so this is not you can't look at the many art times reports Fiona hill are respected Russia scholar of which there are tens of thousands in the city and former senior White House official she was not a senior White House official.

Washington post Jennifer Rubin CNN Washington president bribery United States Russia Ukraine Barack Obama Fiona hill official Chuck Todd White House
"gene pool" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

07:16 min | 2 years ago

"gene pool" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"A gene pool to slice it zeroed in on Kentucky legends doubles to roam the southern slope defected tenderness say nerd stop with the selfie video and watch the game the legend straight radio eight forty welcome back in the U. K. healthcare marks to show coach stoops so we get him loose for early tonight to get back over to a practice for their normal Tuesday routine of field work and the family evening and we have a Terry Wilson devante Robinson with us both coming back from injuries as if you got a question for these guys you can send it in all of our platforms you can call us you can tweet U. K. sports network you can post in the Kentucky football Facebook page or you can text stoops and your question the seven one eight five five developed a let's talk a little bit about just how this season has gone and and from your perspective what you're seeing the guys do defensively we'll talk about that that your side of the ball there were so many question marks coming into the year with Josh gone all the guys in the secondary gone and and yet the defense has well this is a time to not allow anybody to even get to thirty points in an entire season is a pretty impressive accomplishment yeah I think they stepped up big questionnaire by was worry about Josh and like all the secondary being gone but you know we just put our head down we grinded like all all season there's guys stepped up usually a Calvin Taylor Quinn TJ all the whole secondary young guys gain new experience and you know they they're doing their thing cal is been a interesting story mean I remember when he first came into use is this big guy you wonder if he's you know going to be able to you know fill out and and develop into a player and now as I would assume he's got a great shot to be playing in the league next year yeah he has great shot thing he's awesome player was a like play we go like Josh last year I was great you know okay but you know we we did our part cover the guys when he's going to get the set so Terry talks will bit about what Lynn is doing having to in the middle of the season go back to bring his high school days learning how to play the quarterback position and all the things you you have to learn because not just snap it in him just taking off running he's headed to read so you got to decide whether to give it to the back or keep it at that yeah you know and then the first time I've ever met land you know up a put up his high school highlights because I've heard all the hype and you know he's definitely you definitely don't his job out there but you know they're doing similar similar things we did in high school don't just read in the N. and knowing the run game and does make sure we're getting those like some quick passes out you know get in a receivers hands so they can go make plays you know try to get sort side and some so you know everything's really similar you know but he's just doing a good job out there you know just try to put everything together I know you would love to be out there would've loved to seen what could have transpired this season if you stay healthy but look into next season and coming back was talk to coach stoops about this that maybe you guys is an offense are learning a few things that you can add to your package when you're back at the helm yeah no doubt and I I heard that you know and some some of those run games schemes to to the game you know it is going to is going to be powerful and then just back in the passing game on top of it you know it Affleck will be untouchable so I'm really excited about it you know I just can't wait to get back out there and get on the field view of my team in and and just go have fun it dissipate being back fully recovered by next season Thalia no doubt about it when if you were to go through an entry before no but what I I've have broken my collarbone but not like this yeah no Sir it or anything the Monday with a you know this my first major too so what's that light can be used to being out there and I have to sit and watch and go through rehab and can't be out of the practice field it's after last kind of hard but you know I talk to my parents think they can be up and spirits and just pray for me an error by support me so you know it's it's hard estimate is more a mental thing than anything but you know you just put your head down you've got to grind to get back out there and be with your brothers I feel like you know just being around you know my guys and everything seeing them every day that's what that's what makes me happy and you know I just I just like to be around and just watching the game from the you know from the sideline everything and I just want to be you know that leader that I was trying to be on the field you know this is the time back to work on it and you know just in just encourage everybody and and just up lift them you know at all times you know I I'm not plan anything but you know I can I can definitely be he notes your leader on the team guys fall but behind by eleven early last week and it didn't seem to panic at all have to take some of that comes from the all the success that you guys had the year before a year no doubt about that you know we've we've learned you know no ever don't ever quit enough and hard game if everything's not going away you know we we stay stay to the plants they to the game plan and on just go out there you know and try to execute every play and you know it turned out that we did give up and we just kept plant the divine to a the two of you I would assume we're gonna be counted on to to really provide leadership roles these are for the team next season you eager to embrace that yes I'm I'm really eager because you know they're still like our second are still young I talked to them all the time they ask me questions and I answer from like to the best of my ability and I'm just really excited to get back out there with them and just ball out with them because I miss being out yeah you know our quarterback room is is always know tight in you know I I feel like it's my job to to help them and it's their job to help me you know we learned a lot in that room and coaching so does a great job on teaching us and you know in charge he he makes the game you know you try to make the game slowdown force you know by you know watching so much filament this understand what we need to do so I feel like you know just just being in the quarterback room it's it's a great vibe in there and you know you just want to help each other get better anything you're picking up on now that you're in this position that you're in I guess you try to find some way to to make a positive out of a of a negative situation were it helps you as a quarterback when you come back to the field no doubt on that's been smarter you know just learning the game more on me and just picking up on things that you know that I was learning before the injury and just making sure that you know I'm staying Chris so when you know summer comes or when the fall camp comes whenever you know when I'm back on the field I'm ready to go no I'm not behind or anything and just stand on top of the place Terry Wilson vontade Robinson and best of luck on your rehab guys the CD back after next season yes Sir thank you we take a break and we'll continue with you K. healthcare marks to show when we come right back this is the UK exports at work when you're out recruiting an email or text doesn't always cut.

Kentucky U. K.
Jockey Club of America Ponders Restrictions to Widen Gene Pool

In The Gate

09:03 min | 2 years ago

Jockey Club of America Ponders Restrictions to Widen Gene Pool

"The Jockey Club is concerned about the gene mm pool becoming too concentrated now. Let's be clear the one hundred forty mating limit is not a rule at least not yet. The Jockey Club is considering it nonetheless the ideas drawing quite a bit of reaction across the industry our hope here on this show and the reason we've been a little late in getting a new show up for you is that we wanted to find an impartial you get informed observer to weigh in on the issue and finally we found such a person. Frank Mitchell is a renowned bloodstock expert writing for a number of publications including the Pollack report as well as bio data track international and we are pleased to welcome come back here to win the gate Frank Mitchell. Let's break this down in a couple of different ways first of all in terms of the actual horses themselves and their performances says what are the benefits of diversity as opposed to concentrating the evolution of the breed with a few high performing stallions well how for the purposes of the breed the tendency historically is for the best athletes to be the overall but there's always a significant minority of very good good excellent stallions who are not the top of the tree on the race course you only have to look at forces like Mr Prospector the winter sudden Florida and more recently congrats and went to study in Florida and became leading freshman sire and then the absolute touchstone of the modern horse didn't have an extensive rates record withstanding. I couldn't find a home it said today he almost didn't find one begin win but his his trainer and owner believe in so much that they convinced that Hancock to go ahead and put into studying the rest is history and those horses are still out there and you know they're very small minority dancing type that doesn't let us take is going to be a very small minority of the good stallions but the general effect capping the books is going to help more stallions that are on the margins get a realistic shot at is it best for the breed to have diversity or is it best to concentrate the breed with a few high-performing performing stallions well that is kind of a two edged sword. Most people say we need to have more diversity and that is a good thing for the stability and the genetic viability of the break because if you get too narrow a bottleneck genetically you can create problems for yourself but the horses that are superior sites are always a very small minority of the stallions at Sta uh-huh and they just they congregate and they tend to go one way and then the other in terms of their population and the lines in the northern dancer lie has taken over almost the whole world it hasn't done to nearly such an extent here in the states thanks to the work of bold ruler true is son such as secretary and the mayor line and Seattle slew and AP the Andy through the male line as well as some kind of out liar male line so that we see here in Kentucky too much less extent than a breeding population stay in Australia which is just like top to bottom standing and Danehill generation after generation if you go through some of those pedigrees you'll see three and four crosses sometimes of northern dancer within four generation and it's it's like Whoa so the genetic viability is crewed by having greater variety but the the actual bottom line four months seems to follow certain lines so that the more of certain stallions alliens that you get into a pedigree the better the results so it's a conflict that breeders inbreeding path to have to deal with it head to deal with ever since the breed started and really take online back in the seventeen hundred. I want to go back to something you said earlier. You were talking about the quality of the offspring and you were talking about the hancocks now. Obviously a lot of people have weighed in on this issue one of them in the thoroughbred. Daily News was Arthur Hancock of stone farm one of the leading figures in this industry in America for several decades that cades. He said that his father the legendary Bull Hancock had said to him that over breeding stallion compromises the quality polity of the offspring. What are your thoughts on that. Well certainly minimizes your options for getting the the best you're deluding the product and the more you dilute it the less excellence you can expect but that's it. Everybody wants to bowl ruin and you know bull. Hancock believed what he said because you I didn't think bold ruler breeding any supersized books I mean he's a very fertile stallions very good. We'll beat out. Everything was great with him getting up pretty large bucket. Nobody bread a large book up until the nineties now in that regard. You're talking about the quality of the horses right and because there's also the money issue too. You know we all know that sometimes less can be more if you have something really valuable like I don't know especially issued coin series and only a few are made. They'll each be more valuable so what is more at play here the money issue or the quality issue. I think it's a quality issue that the Jockey Club is addressing and also the Jockey Club's goal is to invent and benefit thorburn breed and race in America and that's one of their slogan but that's one of their reasons for being and to do that they try to encourage thoroughbred racing and breeding to command the interest of the public as well as its confidence and favorable opinion and I think that favorable opinion it should not be underestimated in this day of course wide social media and Television Radio Internet. Everything what do you mean. One of the issues of the the mega books is the popular field that you'll see on blogs and host response lines and things of that is that the breeders leaders in quotation marks are just reading anything to the the best horses and as a result you get a lot of not so good who would sons and daughters of these best stallions that ended up not having home when they don't succeed on the race track and then is going into and I think that one of the small things in the big picture that the Jockey Club is looking at is people's perception perception of racing and breeding and how the over-breeding over-breeding of a horse themes to be almost to financially driven and perhaps causing problems in terms of unproductive progeny that have to be found a home for some fashion. WHOA

Jockey Club Arthur Hancock America Frank Mitchell Florida Mr Prospector Seattle Secretary Pollack Kentucky Thorburn Australia Andy Four Months
Drinking bleach will not cure cancer or autism, FDA warns

Todd Schnitt

01:34 min | 2 years ago

Drinking bleach will not cure cancer or autism, FDA warns

"You get ready to drink your delicious glass of belief and apparently you consume on the regular at least enough so that the FDA has to issue an actual statement Pacific Klay acting commissioner Ned Sharpless and a press release was issued and EDS to remind consumers the drinking bleach will not cure cancer or autism which by the way is wrong if you drink enough bleach it will install it will in fact stop the cancer but you'd be dead so there's you know it's got side effects you probably have to mention those are specifically what the dudes talking about is variety of products but things like miracle mineral solution and the mass and quarter of chlorine dioxide protocol and just other other things there's that word that are being pushed out there as alternatives which essentially have the chemical composition of bleach you're drinking bleach and that is what they hope to address because enough of you were drinking bleach then it became a concern now I'm gonna go out on a limb here and I hope you don't know your drinking bleach because if they told you that was bleach you knew it was bleach and yes still consume the bleach then keep drinking because the gene pool needs scrubbed that being said if it's you know scam artist in snake oil salesmen out there I should add that so I I guess what they're hoping to

FDA Pacific Klay Ned Sharpless EDS Cancer Acting Commissioner
"gene pool" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

03:32 min | 2 years ago

"gene pool" Discussed on KGO 810

"They say they're getting, it's not very regulated the sperm banks. So at all, no, they could get away with it up until now. Because now people are finding information about their DNA. What a shock one woman discovered the identity of the man who sperm she was given. She learned at the medical history was far from pristine, a grandmother, had died of brain cancer at the age of sixty a grandfather had suffered with Alzheimer's. Another grandmother had died of heart disease. I felt they tainted, the gene pool for my kids. This woman says of the spur bag. I didn't choose someone who has a history of brain cancer in the family. I would never have chosen this donor. And that's reversible. And there's also it's the harm is done Ryan from a legal perspective. It's very tough to pursue a case because you can't show damages yet. Wow. I didn't think about that part. Yeah, it's very difficult. I mean you almost have nowhere to run as a plaintiff. So it's really, I think a fascinating world. And i'm. And here's the other part of it. Yes, one mom, this one mom says she felt violated because they put something in her body. And she just felt physically violated. No, she said it wasn't like a rape per se. But it's like a some kind of it's in that space right now. And the only way that a lot of these mothers. No is I say, mother's generically parents is that their kids and line, this case of this one mothers, her daughter's twenty one years old. She took one of those DNA tests that we're talking about yesterday. And she matched to a half sibling who knew the donor, number the anonymous man, and it was not the donor that her mother had chosen at the clinic decades earlier. Wow. I've been given the wrong donor. And there's no way I would have found out unless my daughter took a DNA test says this woman. You don't know what you inherited you could stack the deck against your own child unwittingly. And that's the thing. I mean, maybe it won't matter. In other words in this one instance, that you're involved in it might not, but it might make all the difference, certainly these companies have to it would seem beheld a some kind of standard. Well, they tried. There was a case out of Ohio, in the mid west back in twenty fourteen in the judge threw it out saying that it's not a wrongful birth because they can't the child has no health problems yet. That's my point. Yeah. Can't show damages yet. Four one five eight hundred eighty eight ten. If you have any thoughts on this, you're welcome to weigh in this morning for one five, eight hundred eighty eight ten but to me, it was fascinating because it's a whole world and these are desperate, parents often desperate to have a kid, and I do everything they can to make sure that, that, that, that child is going to have a great life. And then as it turns out, Yikes this happens when we come back our pets property, we'll get into that as well. Mark thompson. K G O a temp. Want to make a super baby. Daddy. She..

brain cancer Alzheimer heart disease rape Mark thompson Ohio Ryan twenty one years
"gene pool" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"gene pool" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"And like look at how Chinese technology and medicine is. So I'm I'm wondering if the problem here is that this guy was sort of a lone wolf that was trying to be a little too promotional because if he if he wasn't and there was real legitimate breakthroughs. I don't feel like China would be throwing him under the bus like this. Yeah. I I'm not sure disappeared from sight. Things that we we aren't considering one is that the current research indicates that the use of the crisper technology is actually incredibly damaging to the genes themselves nornandy, you using Krista to target specific genes. But what's coming out is the evidence is at Crispus, actually damaging and Todd, gene structures. Right. So you may actually be causing more genetic defects than you're actually fixing. And so this is the reverse side of of a breakthrough. The the reality star said in that they might have some downsides. The children's not being identified by the Chinese government. They said the Chinese government says we are going to monitor them because there's some concern about their long-term remember ones, Dolly, the sheep was the first cloned animal, these clone sheep died very quickly because it turned out. Not only were they cloning sheep. They were cloning their biological clock. So the senescence was actually the same time. I think it. Yeah. I think the challenge with the Crispus stuff is there actually attacking the line. So what that means? If those children have genetic defects they'll carry through into the children of those those those babies, and so they replicate down through the years, and we don't want to situation. Babs with uncontrolled use of Krista that is actually damaging to the Joan line, then gets fit into the gene pool that that is theoretically the end of the world type scenario so science wants to be careful about this. On the other hand, if any country's gonna do it, you'd think it'd be the first would be the Chinese. I guess that was your point. Jason, right. Is that you know. There's there's there's so many issues it's not even the side effects. Not even let's say, you could do it affected without side effects. Then that raises a whole slew of other problems will only be available to those who can afford it will become. Yeah, we'll billionaires become a new species because they can afford their to have children that are smarter faster better. More more good looking than everybody else. It's amazing. How much, you know, science fiction, of course, is dealt with the has been dealing with issues for so long. Right. Like, I remember in deep space nine in Star Trek these space nine where the remember the doctor it came out like about halfway through the series that he was genetically manipulated. He was kind of an underperformer and he had this genetic manipulation and tournament to kind of like this brainiac. And then of course, you know, Jurassic Park. It was like, you know, the the whole you're so busy trying to figure out if you could that you didn't stop to think if you should. Which of course, that was all about, you know, Mendocino manipulation in dialyzers. I mean, if you could do it. I mean, if these kids were successfully crisper edited to be resistant to diseases, that's a good thing. Right. Oh, I mean, the potential of this is amazing. I know I don't I don't think anybody would argue with the fact that being able to, you know, get rid of diseases be able to protect against diseases be able to do all kinds of things that that are in a mind blowing really the potentials fantastic. But but to fat moving too fast and something like this is fraught with of risk and so much air if there's any speed with which you can move because we because we just don't have mechanisms to think about this or to I'm talking about the the the legitimate issues that you raise Greg of whether it works whether causes problems with the ethical issues in just modifying genes, we don't have any mechanism for this. It's only you're out whether which build a wall forgetting, I mean, this seems so beyond our capabilities and our under. Like we have tournaments 'cause on the road and the risk of you know, coincidental death or accidental death exists..

Chinese government Krista China Todd Jurassic Park Greg Jason Joan Mendocino dialyzers
"gene pool" Discussed on The Tai Lopez Show

The Tai Lopez Show

05:04 min | 3 years ago

"gene pool" Discussed on The Tai Lopez Show

"Public drive for him? Zach and listeners try the five dollar for the first month trial month and. We're gonna we're gonna maybe we should test the C which are ratio before. And after on Tinder, although I'm good for that. Stalking to Dr David bus one of my mentors in here. We talked a lot about in, you know, humans have adapted to have certain emotions one of those rage. One of those as revenge. One of those is anger. Right. Bogus. What they evolved for a reason and people who use them did better or else, they would've been drowned out of the DNA pool the, gene pool. And so there's a reason to say to people look. Knock it off. There's a reason even sometimes they have rage. You know, there was a guy who worked for me who told the story about his longtime girlfriend. He's like I knocked her out. And it was in a room was like twenty able there and we all turn like what like if? That's true. I would you tell the story publicly in it sounded horrible his like the I choked her out and it sounded like domestic abuse. But then he said I was like what are you talking about? I it was overheard him talking to one. He said, oh, yeah. My daughter from another marriage had told me she was like three years old had said, you know, the girlfriend your girlfriend. She means. She's mean to me, she hurts me when you're not around and the dad this man said he didn't believe his daughter. He was like what? No, she doesn't. You're just making it up any said he walked around the corner. One time and saw his fiancee pull. His daughter out of the car, so hard yanking her that she that the daughter was like being dragged on concrete in hitting her head in serious chance of brain damage that he said he just got in such a rage. Basically knocked this woman out that he was dated. I'm not justifying violence. What I'm saying is. They humans respond, and when you respond appropriately. It's just an it's fair, even though sometimes it may be hard again about probably not the way you wanna do it. You know, but to there when I grew up. There was a certain train of thought the best thing to do is always turn the other cheek which you know, is a religious thing in in. I'm respecting people's religions, but in my life experience, it's an imbalanced approach to what you need to do in you need to learn because the reason I'm recording. This is a lot of you. Listen to me because you wanna become more successful. And I'm telling you that the path of success is a path fraught with landmines and trial and tribulations and people betraying you and people talking about you, and you won't experience this if you're not successful. I remember. When I wasn't that successful in. I would here like rappers or music talking about my haters, and I remember they get haters. I don't have any haters, and I didn't have aiders. Why didn't I have aiders easy? I wasn't doing big things. And so you may not have yet. But I'm preparing you. For the day that it will make them for some of us than you think. And you need to take a balanced approach flip. The coin flip the coin if it's heads respond if it's tails, let it go so K, it's actually wise to have some injustice, just take green Barrett. Because arrose you're going to have people lead you down a path where you're spending all your energy trying to convince idiots in as Allen, nationwide mentors. Dole these die. Don't try to teach a big to fly. You can't do. It bothers the pig. But like I said I took that too much of an extreme in the past my life, and I remember this being much much too nice into forgiving into passive. I actually think you know, not to get too full awful. But I think one of the reasons that to family. Manages do better is because usually people marry somewhat complementary scape. Meaning a quiet person Mary's allowed person or either usually complementary said a skills to a happy marriage. And so one person's nicer one person represents the tail flip. And one person represents the head flip which is the angry. Parents you know, in my family like my stepdad's. He was a big, dude. He was six foot who was he six foot seven two hundred and eighty pounds..

Zach Stalking Dr David Mary Dole Allen six foot eighty pounds five dollar three years
"gene pool" Discussed on The Tai Lopez Show

The Tai Lopez Show

05:04 min | 3 years ago

"gene pool" Discussed on The Tai Lopez Show

"Public drive for him? Zach and listeners try the five dollar for the first month trial month and. We're gonna we're gonna maybe we should test the C which are ratio before. And after on Tinder, although I'm good for that. Stalking to Dr David bus one of my mentors in here. We talked a lot about in, you know, humans have adapted to have certain emotions one of those rage. One of those as revenge. One of those is anger. Right. Bogus. What they evolved for a reason and people who use them did better or else, they would've been drowned out of the DNA pool the, gene pool. And so there's a reason to say to people look. Knock it off. There's a reason even sometimes they have rage. You know, there was a guy who worked for me who told the story about his longtime girlfriend. He's like I knocked her out. And it was in a room was like twenty able there and we all turn like what like if? That's true. I would you tell the story publicly in it sounded horrible his like the I choked her out and it sounded like domestic abuse. But then he said I was like what are you talking about? I it was overheard him talking to one. He said, oh, yeah. My daughter from another marriage had told me she was like three years old had said, you know, the girlfriend your girlfriend. She means. She's mean to me, she hurts me when you're not around and the dad this man said he didn't believe his daughter. He was like what? No, she doesn't. You're just making it up any said he walked around the corner. One time and saw his fiancee pull. His daughter out of the car, so hard yanking her that she that the daughter was like being dragged on concrete in hitting her head in serious chance of brain damage that he said he just got in such a rage. Basically knocked this woman out that he was dated. I'm not justifying violence. What I'm saying is. They humans respond, and when you respond appropriately. It's just an it's fair, even though sometimes it may be hard again about probably not the way you wanna do it. You know, but to there when I grew up. There was a certain train of thought the best thing to do is always turn the other cheek which you know, is a religious thing in in. I'm respecting people's religions, but in my life experience, it's an imbalanced approach to what you need to do in you need to learn because the reason I'm recording. This is a lot of you. Listen to me because you wanna become more successful. And I'm telling you that the path of success is a path fraught with landmines and trial and tribulations and people betraying you and people talking about you, and you won't experience this if you're not successful. I remember. When I wasn't that successful in. I would here like rappers or music talking about my haters, and I remember they get haters. I don't have any haters, and I didn't have aiders. Why didn't I have aiders easy? I wasn't doing big things. And so you may not have yet. But I'm preparing you. For the day that it will make them for some of us than you think. And you need to take a balanced approach flip. The coin flip the coin if it's heads respond if it's tails, let it go so K, it's actually wise to have some injustice, just take green Barrett. Because arrose you're going to have people lead you down a path where you're spending all your energy trying to convince idiots in as Allen, nationwide mentors. Dole these die. Don't try to teach a big to fly. You can't do. It bothers the pig. But like I said I took that too much of an extreme in the past my life, and I remember this being much much too nice into forgiving into passive. I actually think you know, not to get too full awful. But I think one of the reasons that to family. Manages do better is because usually people marry somewhat complementary scape. Meaning a quiet person Mary's allowed person or either usually complementary said a skills to a happy marriage. And so one person's nicer one person represents the tail flip. And one person represents the head flip which is the angry. Parents you know, in my family like my stepdad's. He was a big, dude. He was six foot who was he six foot seven two hundred and eighty pounds..

Zach Stalking Dr David Mary Dole Allen six foot eighty pounds five dollar three years
"gene pool" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

02:41 min | 3 years ago

"gene pool" Discussed on The Science Show

"Which had we leave back then we might have looked at and thought they kind of like the weisensee they were different species a stable hybrid. Species which has been created, of course, after fourteen thousand years ago, subsequent migrations into Europe diluted that Neanderthal, gene pool. And we have the people of today the Europeans today who clearly modern humans, but with residual of Neanderthal. Jane, did you say forty thousand years ago, fourteen fourteen years only fourteen thousand years ago? So the hybrids held Europe for twenty thousand years between sounding yes and gang further east the Denisovans who have found so might be on the euro's just a couple of bits of bone. Apparently, I've got a bit of Denison lucky somewhere. None of those in Europe. No, not as far as we know. So it's it's really is in the end of stronghold. And then these hybrids almost instant they created takeover, and they create this extraordinary culture the likes of which the world hadn't seen before. So, you know, thirty eight thousand years ago in round figures, they created the first evidence of domestication is in Europe about thirty seven thirty six thousand years ago. When the dog is domesticated. So those people thinking differently those hybrids that doing things differently, and then the caveat almost instantly. We get sure acheive we get these beautiful images created the earliest musical instruments in the world seemed to be made by these hybrids, bone flutes, and so forth. And of course, dramatic carvings like the lion of whole fills this human lion hybrid. Who knows what it was used for? But how magical that these hybrid beings created another hybrid Meech to tell a story now when you look at the ways in which some more than scientists have done their work. You've got a mixture of on the one hand people sifting through tiny tiny bits of almost Sand Lake material looking for some tiny glint of tooth and on the other. There's a deposit in Germany, which seemed to be almost like a treasure trove of big fossils. It's all on route all off it is what Europe's like that it has a number of fossil localities that preserve in exquisite detail. Animals from the long ago past so missile in Germany is one of those where we find organisms preserved with their last meal still observable in his stomach their fetuses still in place, some organisms you can still see a bit of Colorado. And then you go to Monte Boker in Italy, and they preserved in all its splendor, the organisms that inhabited the world silliest coral reef, and some of the fish. You can see the color pens on steel. It's just beautiful, but to fill in the gaps between these special moments, we have to join the likes of Gerry Hooker from the British Museum who spend entire life saving tons and.

Europe Monte Boker Germany Gerry Hooker Denison Jane Meech Sand Lake Denisovans British Museum Colorado Italy fourteen thousand years thirty seven thirty six thousa thirty eight thousand years fourteen fourteen years twenty thousand years forty thousand years one hand
Can science fiction help us grapple with gene editing?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:56 min | 3 years ago

Can science fiction help us grapple with gene editing?

"The. If we're talking about, gene editing. You had to know we were gonna talk about Gatica from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Molly would. News broke this week about a Chinese scientists who says he edited the genes of two twin girls while they were still in the womb. The goal was to make the girls immune to HIV, but editing human genes at that level is ethically. Controversial and illegal in many countries. It raises questions about creating genetic traits that can be passed on and about a future where people choose the genetic traits. They want in their children, not surprisingly, it's topic. Well, covered in science fiction. I belong to a new underclass. No longer determined by social status for the color of your skin. Gatica gentlemen. Now, we now have discrimination down to a science. That's from the nineteen Ninety-seven movie Gatica about a future where your genes determine whether you'll succeed in life or be considered invalid. Amy Webb is a professor of strategic foresight at the NYU stern school of business and the founder of the future today institute, she told me there are plenty of benefits to gene editing technology, but Gatica social commentary was all to present the parts of that movie that I think were so spot on it wasn't necessarily the technology itself. But the application of that technology throughout society, I think it's entirely plausible that we could be heading into a situation in which due to certain circumstances and the distribution of wealth and the distribution of health care. It's plausible that we could have engineered humans who succeed in life. You know, I'm not talking about huge changes. I'm talking about small things like eradicating certain diseases for certain groups of people in everybody else's kinda just left to deal with Darwinism on its own. So when you see news like we saw this week with at least one Chinese scientists saying that he was doing gene editing on babies before they're born. Do you think to yourself? Okay. The future has arrived. And now these storylines are gonna come to pass to. Yeah. We'll the problem is that that future arrived a couple years ago. So what we heard about the news? This week was not the first instance of a Chinese scientists using crisper to edit the genome so already like twenty fifteen there were we heard about that was that was the first time that we heard about other experiments happening. We did it ourselves in the United States in two thousand seventeen it's just that. Some of the circumstances were different. But this is not our first foray. So what we're really talking about is what happens when we alter or edit, our, gene pool, and whatever the result of that is heritable. On the one hand it's possible to weed out certain genetic disorders on the other hand. It's theoretically possible to create babies with six fingers on each hand. So that in that scene Gattaca where there's a piano player with twelve fingers playing an extraordinarily complicated piece. You know, playing playing a piece that was built for somebody with twelve fingers. You know, it's the aerobically possible that we could be moving into a future in which we are bestowing upon certain people genetic capabilities biological capabilities that other people don't get. You know, that's the real sticky problem with germline editing. It's what becomes heritable, and what are the consequences of that both good and bad? And with that points to is maybe not a Huxley in future, necessarily, or even what we saw Gatica where you know, based on your DNA you were assigned to a worker class or to an elite thinking class, but it's it is possible that we could be moving toward a sort of new economic class of humans. If you were family had enough money and the resources to edit you before you were born. You know, you're going to have certain advantages, and we may find that society discriminates against people who weren't engineered that that does look like a real possibility. Even if we don't have people with six or seven fingers on each hand to play extra hard concertos, right? I mean, these technologies always starts out as we want to prevent disease. But it feels like at some point some version of designer gene editing is inevitable that people are going to want it. Right. So the problem is we tend to use the word designer next two, gene editing a little too often. And I think that makes a lot of people think of almost like an all cart list of genetic traits that you get to choose from. I wanna baby that has curly blonde hair and green eyes and his six and a half taller, whatever. There are some real benefits that that we can be moving toward. As as humans once we are able to add it certain traits, right on the other hand, what are the consequences of that? And I think. We can quickly wander into all kinds of weird scifi scenarios. I think in practical terms. The consequences. We would be dealing with immediately have to do with economic and social status consequences. Amy Webb is the founder of the future today institute, and some of you have been asking what happened to related links. They are not gone. I'm just sick. So I'm conserving, my voice and my energy. But hopefully, you enjoy this extra long interview and hopefully with an sleep broke Kotei and zinc related links. We'll be back tomorrow. I'm elliot. Marketplace sack. This is a PM. Listeners like you who give to marketplace do more than just keep us on the air. You help us grow and get better. It's a way to directly support independent reporting and journalism you trust and to make it possible for us to tell the stories of modern life through our digital economy. And when you give today the impact of your gift will be doubled. Thanks to our friends at Candida donate now at marketplace dot org to make your donation. Go twice as far and thank you.

Gatica Amy Webb Founder HIV Molly Nyu Stern School Of Business United States Gattaca Candida Huxley Kotei Professor One Hand
"gene pool" Discussed on Undiscovered

Undiscovered

03:22 min | 3 years ago

"gene pool" Discussed on Undiscovered

"So ideally, they'll get somewhere that's closer to actual patient demographics. And if they get a more diverse, gene pool, they stand a better chance of discovering new cancer genes, they might even figure out if there are some genes that play a part in why African Americans do get those more aggressive, breast cancer types. But researchers who do this kind of work have to be so careful because if there's one thing we've learned that we are so quick to harp on differences, especially racial differences. Even when those differences do not exist. So I asked about this. How do you do this work? How do you? Get more diverse patients in medical research without inadvertently ushering them. So I think the biggest we can say that you do this is you have to have people who represent the groups that you're talking about be really in charge of leading it or at least be like advising on it. Because then you run you don't run into some of the dumb stuff like I hope that more of this happens. I hope that there's more of a focus on having diverse representation in clinical trials and clinical research are people going to mess up. Absolutely. That's just like a given. This work that Sean wants to see happening this reckoning with medicines past and present it's happening more and more and not just around conference tables at fancy research institutes like a few months ago, New York City finally took down that statue of Marion SIMS gynecologist that had stood in central park for eighty four years. It took more than a decade of work by local activists to make this happen. They protested and petition until finally the city relented, so April parks department workers strap SIMS into a bright blue harness and then carefully lifted him off his pedestal. Nearby. People chanted. So now, there's just the granite pedestal. The city is said it's gonna leave it there. They've talked about adding plaques with some extra historical context about what seems did. And who he did it to including the only three names that we know for the women he experimented on an Arca. Betsy and Lucy. They've also talked about commissioning a new artwork something that honors women of color in science. But for now, the granite pedestal stands bear, the statue has gone hopefully, making way for something better to take its place. Undiscovered is reported and produced by me, Ella, fetter and me any Munaf we had production help this week from Alexa, limb story consulting from Linda Villarosa and fact checking help from Robin Palmer, our senior editor is Christopher Intel..

New York City Marion SIMS Ella Alexa Linda Villarosa Betsy senior editor Robin Palmer Christopher Intel Sean Lucy eighty four years
"gene pool" Discussed on Undiscovered

Undiscovered

03:29 min | 3 years ago

"gene pool" Discussed on Undiscovered

"Gene pool for a few hundred thousand mice on one island, he's betting he can do it with a ton of engineered mice and the regular old laws of inheritance. Like what? Mendel discovered. You've got a gene, you have a fifty percent chance of passing that gene to your offspring, but this doesn't work on the mainland because there you don't have a few hundred thousand mice. You have billions of mice. And if you want that anti lime gene to spread regular old inheritance, it's not gonna cut it. So Kevin another's, they're working on another more powerful technology. It's called gene drive. It's genetic hack a mouse with gene drive. I wouldn't just have a fifty percent chance of passing lime resistance genes down to their offspring. They'd have a nearly hundred percent chance every mouse's lime resistant generation after generation after generation. After this is rig after because gene drive doesn't stop. You release one mouse with gene drive. You have potentially just changed the genetics of every mouse on the planet. And I want to be super clear about this. Kevin is not planning to use any version of gene drive on the vineyard. He's going with classic old inheritance, but looking to the future, Kevin is working on a version of gene drive that would not spread indefinitely. Think of it like gene drive light, right? So the idea is a works over a certain number of generations. The is spreading it's spreading spreading and at stumps. But still you might think, you know if scientists are working on this technology that might potentially change the genetics of every mouse on the planet. You know you as a citizen of the planet might wanna vote, and that's the thing you thought informed consent was hard on one little island, try a planet. <music>. The evening after the meeting Kevin, and I caught the ferry back to the mainland part way through the ride, actually pulled his foot up onto the very seat started rolling up the bottom of his jeans and looking very intently at his angle, and it took me a second to to figure out what was going on. He was doing tick check earlier that day journalist making video about Kevin, had him out in the woods shooting some b, roll out of the woods, and of course edge of the woods is no prime mouse habitat and therefore ticks. But I was just curious. I ran my hands through a lot of the grass and sure enough came. It could be years before we know if the vineyard ultimately says, yes, meanwhile, the ticks are still out there. This will be the first tick check of many. If Kevin really wants them gone. Undiscovered is reported and produced by knee any Munaf and me Ella fetter and we definitely have some thank yous to say because this is the last episode of our first season it is. We've been coming to you every week since may. But now we have to actually go find some more stories to bring you for season two. So this is not goodbye just goodbye for now. And of course, the biggest thank yous go out to you for listening. Thank you. We didn't know if that would happen. If you've got thoughts about what you wanna hear more of in the second season. Let us know. We've got a survey set up at undiscovered podcast dot org slash survey. Our trusty editor is Christopher entirely. Thank you so much season. One would not have happened without you. Thanks Daniel, Dana Christian, Scott up actor and Beethoven. We

Kevin another Mendel editor Christopher Munaf Daniel Ella fetter Beethoven Dana Christian Scott fifty percent hundred percent
"gene pool" Discussed on Science in Action

Science in Action

04:17 min | 3 years ago

"gene pool" Discussed on Science in Action

"Dealing with a limited gene pool and even if the technology is successful in offspring are produced those offspring are going to have to be bred to each other there's probably going to be a significant inbreeding along the way i mean we spoke to thomas about this particular route of artificial insemination producing these embrose putting them into host mothers and it'll be born hopefully one of these within three years they're only the two potential mothers at the moment factor notching but there are purchases can be tried to make sort of offficial exits that right yeah that's kinda the second strategy there's really two strategies the scientists are employing here one is to produce the hybrid embryos with the northern white rhinos sperm and the southern white rhino eggs but the other strategy is to try to produce gambits from stem cells and so if they can use their cell lines they will have more individuals to choose from and more genetic diversity but visible more experimentation to be done for that kind of route that is a much harder route to go yeah i mean that progress with that has primarily been made in the mouse and it's taken a lot of labs a lot of money and a lot of scientists working on it to get to where they are today with the aim from what you say it has to be not just to produce individuals but actually to produce a viable population of northern white rhino i mean is it pointless otherwise it's interesting from a scientific perspective to show that you can do this kind of thing but is it just scientific experiment or is it really going to have a conservation impact i think the odds are against it in really making a significant conservation impact and the reason i say that with about thirty years of exp perience in this field even artificial insemination which is actually a pretty straightforward procedure even that has failed to play a significant role in very many endangered species breeding programs it does work in a number of species it has worked but it just hasn't been incorporated as a useful tool for managing these endangered populations in most cases the southern white rhino was critically endangered it has bounced back just through conventional conservation measures so does that note give you some hope that this way of clawing back to a viable population of northern white rhino it's possible this other might rhino did drop to pretty low numbers but they still existed in wild habitats and they were still breeding naturally and there are two things that have really driven the northern white rhino subspecies to basically extinction and one was all the civil unrest in the poaching that occurred in its northern territory up in africa and the other is the fact that the bandaged breeding program failed so we did have northern white rhinos in breeding programs and that was not successful so we have to start questioning why that didn't work because here we're about to try it again i mean obviously like us you'll be looking and waiting to see how how this plays out but in your own work i mean are you working with rhino at all and do you think that may be lessons out of this maybe not direct for the work you do oh yeah they're certainly there certainly is and you know with with the work i with the somatropine rhino right now that is a critically endangered species and we've seen the numbers dropped significantly in recent years so we're dealing with a population of fewer than one hundred rhinos of that species and there is no other subspecies that we could readily use as a surrogate for this particular species traditionally you'll also acting samples off semen experts on yeah so in the smart and right now we are also banking cement from these rhinos we haven't yet collected l o sites but i think dr hildebrandt has and you know we're we're trying to kind of go down that same path of let's save what we can while we have a viable population still but the strategy mostly for us to protect the environment to make sure i have some weather they can thrive that was really the hope but with a smart and ryan we've pursued two approaches we do have a managed breeding program for the species and a lot of our work here in cincinnati went to solving the.

thirty years three years
"gene pool" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"gene pool" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"The state says sort it out yourselves historically there were attacks on humans mainly old people and children if a child is tech tomorrow then everything will change gene pool and his neighbors began gathering dna evidence last year to prove that a wolf was behind the attacks instead his results showed that there were in fact many wolves involved ten so far movin two hundred sheep were killed in ever home last year and even right at the start at the summer almost half that number have been killed so far this year the wolves have begun attacking in broad daylight and moving onto large animals the deputy head of the departmental administration law valid says they have concrete dna results for just one wolf and that evidence is often too unreliable to use contravene katie tree keep our your full example when you have a sheep that's been killed and then picked over by vultures or other creatures we can't be left with just bones and we can't say from the bones whether it might have been a wolf or something else so those cases are registered as undetermined one local mayor has said children under ten years old should not walk outside alone for fear of attack but today activists say the wolf poses little threat to people here and should be allowed to return on jewish you more adobo apiece could teach us manuel ultimate is a local activist who says he's been threatened for trying to protect the wolves they're returning to ever home from other parts of france he says because sheep here unless protected see realistically the boom boom in tabas pull the petit's leaving sweets on a low table and telling children not to touch them if you don't protect the flocks with dogs or shepherds for example you're heading for failure in territories like this with a the or dispersed over large areas for grazing there'll be an explosion of attacks in over the next few years and it'll be a catastrophe ever home size and terrain make it difficult to protect with traditional dogs and fences so frontiers national government is now looking at new measures to contain the problem but any solution is likely to divide ever homes farmers and residents from its environmental activists in the age old row of conservation who needs protecting from whom barra baraboo by lucy williamson in france and that's all from us for now but there will be.

deputy head france lucy williamson ten years
"gene pool" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"gene pool" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Even refined down further and the most successful among us are the people who yes like all of us have that possibility have that tendency but haven't even more well what happens in in a civilized society is not a winnowing a so much of the gene pool by people dying off but there's an economic winnowing and what's happening today is that companies and employees and all of us who work in have to exist in the workforce are becoming more successful if we are good at elastic thinking if we're good at adapting if our minds can deal with change we can if we can learn and absorbed new ideas and those who don't fall down on the economic ladder if you're just joining us i'm talking this hour to leonard milana now he's the author of elastic and we're talking about how flexible thinking works in a time of change you can join us at eight hundred four two three eight two five five that's eight hundred four to three talk is this something you can train yourself to do or are we talking about people who deep in their neurological profile deepen their dna lurks a tendency that might be more pronounced than in others while there are individual differences in our abilities for elastic thinking and in our our our desire and enjoyment to to take on new challenges but yes we can also adjust that we can change that we can change the way we think there's a lot of it depends on our mindset and on on the external conditions on the physical environment and there are ways to work on the way you think in order to think more or less likely.

leonard milana
"gene pool" Discussed on The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"gene pool" Discussed on The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

"Yeah i mean cardiac car gal but what i'm saying is there's a concrete correlation you have to get something if the take care of it you have to maintain it you have to be responsible with the registered the car guy all the car guys i know fucking rocksolid dudes like super there's not irresponsible car guys there's spags who like cars but i'm saying like the car guys they're all the same dude i go to these events and do these things are all the best so our hit us our guy so how do we how do we crawl out of as a country thing things we have to acknowledge the problem we have to aknowledge simple ways out you know take care of community care your family but not read your kids have a relationship with kids the msa which means spend for six hours a day of your kids at least somebody somebody from primer june four gene pool it's pretty i don't i don't get why it's such a i don't get why was such a hassle for our family and i don't get what the hassle is like i the other day my son had a basketball game and i went to the basketball game and was enjoyable was an hour long he made a few shots cheered a little and then the following day was old man's league night at the gym like eight o'clock the dads were all get together and play and sunny wanna come.

basketball six hours
"gene pool" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

02:01 min | 4 years ago

"gene pool" Discussed on Freakonomics

"Yes so gone tourism the economic applications spacer pretty questionable okay let's say space travel is not the productivity gamechanger were looking for about another hot technology fusion energy the winner smith's are kind kinda cool on this one too because we've been working on it for over fifty years and we still haven't managed to make it something that we can use to for example power a toaster okay but here's an idea their bullish on biotechnologies bio printing for instance so the idea here is that you harvest cells from an individual who has an oregon that's failing you grow up those cells in large numbers and then you put them through a three d printer that builds you a new oregon layer by layer also synthetic biology be exciting thing is you can create organisms that make conflicts molecules that we like such as medicines or fuels and precision medicine so the idea with precision medicine is that if we know enough about you in particular we can figure out the best treatment for exactly the disease that you have and the best treatment for you in particular we could also using the crisper gene editing tool address entire diseases in the gene pool we looked at this possibility in an earlier episode called evolution accelerated and then there's the idea that brain computer interfaces could jack up our cognitive abilities which might have a lot of positive externalities and so this free robust evidence at a view improve people's iqs they tend to become not just more productive but annual happier more social of less likely to commit crimes that sort of thing so that seems like a good benefit so at the moment these devices are being used for things like trying to give amputees the ability to move their arms again or to move their fingers again but it's possible that at some point many of us will have devices on our brain that help us still a little bit more efficient the ominous thing there's is and this is already happening with pharmaceuticals is once one person is using everybody else in the industry is going.

smith oregon synthetic biology fifty years
"gene pool" Discussed on Invested: The Rule #1 Podcast

Invested: The Rule #1 Podcast

02:16 min | 4 years ago

"gene pool" Discussed on Invested: The Rule #1 Podcast

"Yup so we all were human we all have this potentialities to make bad decisions under pressure and it turns out that actually the more pressure the more bad decisions were capable of making because of what danny gatuma call thinking faster system one thinking where this is lovely book by the way we've talked about before daily dedicated was thinking fastest slow where he's basically saying is slow think he'd is rational you take your time like what seventeen times thirty four and you gotta work through it whereas fasting heat is oh allied in the bush ron atlanta and it's the fast thinking that evolved that we we evolved to do because if you didn't run you got eaten reproduce so that gene disappeared out of the gene pool which would allow you to think rationally carefully and slowly while being attacked by a liar that didn't work so we end up developing biased sees based on sharp experiences based on what we're taught when we're little and so on that help us respond quickly to things like don't walking probe that truck stop right there so we develop this biased and it affects our thinking in really strange ways that nobody quite realized that we all have this stuff going on and that's where racism or lease excuse me any some water stephane so i'll just admire having some water debt daniel qena man is a behavioral economist only spoken about him at length on the podcast and it is it's a i mean it sounds like it sort of is information that matters only to other people but this genuinely has helped me understand value investing better because so much of what we're doing is about looking into the management looking into the executives out at a company and trying to predict are these the kind of people who are gonna make good decisions over the next five to ten years i mean that's hard to predict about best friends and spouses much less total strangers who harder like you know somebody you're never gonna meet in your life.

ron atlanta gene stephane danny gatuma ten years
"gene pool" Discussed on Undiscovered

Undiscovered

01:36 min | 4 years ago

"gene pool" Discussed on Undiscovered

"That scientists when people say 'no will stop that will be worthwhile in and of itself for cabin just showing that consent actually means something that if you say no scientists will respect that that's a win but imagine if the vineyard votes yes say kevin's mice get released on the island and say they work say they get rid of lime there will likely be some form of movement on the mainland to say wait a minute we want that to uh there were about four thousand cases of lime in massachusetts in 2015 five thousand in new jersey nine thousand in slovenia must as the people who go to the doctor lime is spreading and here's the bad news kevin's solution for martha's vineyard it's not gonna work for new jersey or pennsylvania kevin's proposing to change the gene pool for a few hundred thousand mice on one island is betting he can do it with a ton of engineered mice and the regular old laws of inheritance like what mendel discovered you've got a gene you have a fifty percent chance of passing that gene to your offspring that this doesn't work on the mainland because there you don't have a few hundred thousand mice you have billions of mice and if you want that anti lime gene to spread regular old inheritance it's not going to cut it so kevin another's they're working on another more powerful technology skuld gene drive it's a genetic hack a mouse with gene dr wouldn't just have a fifty percent chance of passing lime resistance genes down to their offspring.

kevin massachusetts slovenia martha pennsylvania mendel fifty percent