3 Burst results for "Gena Davis Institute"

"geena davis institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:22 min | 1 year ago

"geena davis institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Rated films only twenty eight percent of the speaking characters were female and an even smaller percent when you look across all readings this gave credence to what's known as the back they'll test which was inspired by a comic strip drawn by the graphic novelist Allison backed out it is a gauge of whether a movie includes at least two women talking to each other about something other than a man the study Davis commissioned also found a disproportionately high share of weight characters in movies and TV shows so an overwhelming representation of weight maleness which perhaps not coincidentally could also describe the personnel in many Hollywood studios at the time my plan was I'll go back to them in a private way not bust anybody publicly and see if that has any impact so that's what I did and what happened what happened was all these people who see the problem what so ever and literally hot that things were fifty fifty were horrified and I think because people who make kids entertainment do it because they love kids they were completely nonplussed that they hadn't realize this but maybe just maybe there was good reason why so many characters in films and TV were male maybe it had to do with economic theory or at least what passed for N. economic theory it went like this the way to make money in Hollywood was to make movies geared toward a male audience that's something that Hollywood has sort of lived by and made every decision about that in a way that men just don't wanna watch women's we must take make everything about men and we'll stick one in or something who's pretty or hot in the nineties I think the belief was that you know teen males and twenty something males are the ones that will show up and knocked on doors on a Friday night at a movie theater that Sean Bailey he is president of production at Walt Disney Studios and that was the way you could get a huge opening weekend and that's what a lot of places played primarily to and and by the way it's not altogether untrue either but just how true is it or was it at least back in the nineties and even if very true back then how much is it changed in if it hasn't changed much why not one reason of course could be discrimination let's first talk about what economists mean when they talk about discrimination discrimination is typically defined as differences in observable outcomes such as wages or such as performance evaluations that cannot be attributed directly to underlying differences in performance that's easily Boren she's an economist at the university of Pennsylvania so for example if you're looking at gender discrimination a condom as we define discrimination is occurring as a male and a female generated similar performance but they were treated differently in terms of how they were paid are and how they are evaluated based on differences that are not tribute old to any performance difference there are however different flavors or sources of discrimination the first would be a preference very tasty source which would say that the discrimination occurred because the evaluator who's determining the way into the performance evaluation and has some sort of preference or dislike for the group that they're discriminating against Gina Davis does not think that's what causes gender disparity in Hollywood believe is based on how the studios responded to the gender data she showed them this is a few years ago but we did a survey of top executives to see what they thought about what they learned and something like ninety percent said it was definitely have an impact on them and they thought it was very important to show gender parity okay so let's accept these for the sake of argument the Hollywood doesn't exercise taste based discrimination against female characters a second source would be a believe based source and this would be when there's no preference or dislike for a particular group but because the underlying quality is not perfectly observable the evaluator is going to form a belief about performance that's based not only on any signal of performance from that individual but also from some underlying belief about whether different groups have different average performance differences believe base is also known as the **** discrimination and historically it when a condom is used the words the **** discrimination they're offering to believe based differences that are actually based on correct beliefs this gets to what Gina Davis said earlier regarding Hollywood's belief about male movie goers then you know what that meant just don't wanna what women and was this belief based difference based on a correct belief it is true that a decade ago films led by man made a lot more money on average than films led by women that's Caroline Heldman a political scientist at Occidental College in the research director at the Geena Davis institute so in terms of box office revenues what we found is that in the past decade the gap in terms of films led by men and films led by women has closed and in fact we studied the twenty fifteen sixteen and seventeen and found that in all those years movie starring a female character made more at the box office indeed the three top grossing domestic film of two thousand seventeen were Star Wars the last date I which had male and female leads a live action remake of beauty and the beast interestingly with Emma Watson playing bell and Wonder Woman starring the Israeli actress gal Gadot and yet males continue to be cast much more often in leading roles they're also paid a lot more one analysis found that even after controlling for an actor's past performance including awards female stars were paid fifty six percent less than male stars or about two point two million dollars less per film Caroline held and again you know Hollywood is leaving money on the table if they continue to cast men at.

twenty eight percent two million dollars fifty six percent ninety percent
"geena davis institute" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

21:49 min | 1 year ago

"geena davis institute" Discussed on Freakonomics

"We've been talking today about Disney princesses them how the main female actors and a lot of traditional kids movies were prized mostly for their beauty but they weren't really protagonists things happen to them but they didn't have much agency we've also been talking about how in the earlier days of kids TV there weren't many female characters at all here's what the actor Gene Davis by the way she prefers actor too actress here's what she told us about the beloved educational series with a cast of puppet characters it had nineteen male characters before added one female character for the past fifteen years the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in media has been updating its numbers on gender representation in Kids taint it's kind of like Super Bowl Sunday when I get the date and I opened it up because then I get to see whether or not we've made significant strides that again is Caroline Heldman the instant shoots director of research and I'll tell you the last couple of years the story has been so positive it's small but it's been in the right direction we have a brand new research study that were profoundly psyched about 'cause we just re looked at TV shows made for little kids so we were talking eleven and under and for the first time female characters accounted for fifty five point three percent of screen time and fifty percent point of speaking time and the percentage of female lead characters has gone up to forty six point eight percent which is is pretty much parity and we're like over the moon about that what was that number maybe ten or twenty years ago the race who was two or three to one male to female lead characters and so I'm pretty sure that this is the only sector of gross gender inequality in the entire business in front of and behind the camera that has changed dramatically medically a lot of folks don't know that Hollywood actually in its very early years the silent years was more gender equitable than it is today but as soon as it became big business it became a male dominated sector about twenty percent of the key decision making roles in film are held by women and in television that number hovers around thirty percent key decision making roles meaning executive jobs as well as producers directors cinematographers and so on it's especially the case for women of Color and while there have been small gains in recent years we have seen very little traction for the last couple of decades that we have studied the yes and what's your not evidence necessarily but what's your reckoning as to how much that is a supply issue and how much it's a demand issue right so I definitely think that the interest and in many cases to supply is there for example only four percent of films are directed by women and people have said exactly what you said that well they're not as interested at a but fifty eight percent of film scores are now women they want to be directors they graduate with the same abilities there is one major studio that has substantially changed the status quo yes yes they just announced that forty percent of their director is coming up are women and that's like ten times better than anybody else is doing so that's that's really incredibly also make more movies starring a female character than not which studio might that be I'll give you a hint we heard from someone there earlier talking about why I so many films have male leads you know teen males and twenty something males or the ones that will show up and knock down your doors on a Friday night and who is at my name is uh Sean Bailey and my title is president of production at Walt Disney Studios The Walt Disney Company is so massive it's split into a few different story coz Disney animation and Pixar animation oversee the animated features there's also marvel in Twentieth Century Fox which Disney Baugh earlier this year as head of Disney Studios Shawn Bayley overseas the live action divisions in recent years this has included live action remakes of Disney's own classics many of those had been animated in terms of what we call the broaden definition of Disney fairy tale and we sort of thought well largely for a family audience and then we started the to realize wait a second there's a hugely underserved portion of the audience here that that is not only family but but clearly women are more than half of the population so and everybody sort of caught up in you know making movies for the teen and twentysomething male we may have a tremendous opportunity here when Bailey joined Disney in two thousand ten he inherited a live action remake of Allison Wonderland Tim Burton directed it starred in half away Mia Varsha Cova Johnny Depp and Helena Bonham Carter it was a huge hit grossing a billion dollars worldwide and we really spend some time thinking about it and there was a quote from Walt that I won't get precisely right but I'll paraphrase it here which is someone said to him you make these animated movies for children Ed and so I think what the break through was families and just for kids we're trying to make movies for everybody and once we do that the female audience in particular is huge and these can become you know really really significant films from a global box office perspective and I think there's by the way not just the commercial returns but they're great stories to tell that we don't think any of our competitors are really focused on currently stories like Malefic for instance based on the Godmother from sleeping beauty and as he noted earlier live action remakes of old princess movies including beauty and the beast that's the one with bell and if you've forgotten and then somehow he becomes a handsome prince. If you've seen the two thousand seventeen remake with Emma Watson you probably noticed some tweaks we did recognize overprotective and why he didn't want her to leave we really worked on the idea that why doesn't bell just leave so we worked sold our conscience couldn't allow her to leave him to die which gave them a little time to bond and we also thought it was really important to have her which along with the other high grossing films female leads you might think would naturally lead to even more starring roles for more women in more films but that's not quite the case why not Sean Bailey from Disney has a theory one thing we've seen that I think is interesting and relevant sort of disavow them of that vision and so we started trying in our screen place to more specifically call out gender ethnicity doing and how you can get involved in your community at neighborhood of good dot com.

Disney Sean Bailey Emma Watson fifty eight percent billion dollars thirty percent twenty percent eight percent fifteen years fifty percent forty percent three percent four percent twenty years
"geena davis institute" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

04:59 min | 1 year ago

"geena davis institute" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"It was interesting because it kind of felt like wow wow I got that out of the way you know pretty early and <hes> it kind of felt really good like well I just I checked off something so yeah now. It seems like in the dock this changes everything that you know Thelma and Louise represented some sort of pivot point right in in terms of the industry you know having you know putting some confidence and faith eighth and female leads having a female driven movie right with with specifically <hes> female themes right because you you know throughout the dock and and this this mission you have with if <hes> the Geena Davis Institute on Gender and media like that that whole part of it the research at your crew crew put in to that that the whole idea that you in primarily I think the the two areas of like in the name of the children to some degree yes but also in the name of the you know grownup women who WanNa work right that you the evidence had to be presented exactly you on this level of like you know how women are depicted depicted in descriptions right in script what are women saying. Would women say that right. <hes> you know their just their screen time in general you know and then you'll behind the camera on the writing directing level all the way down the line yeah that that you know that you had to amass evidence exactly I've of institutional sexism right it wasn't enough just to you to spend a day anybody watching movies or television right but because of this <hes> a kind of institutionalized and cultural sort of habit yet of framing women like this. No one was really like other than women. Have some women were were kind of pushing back on it right right well what happened is I mean I knew what everybody knew that fewer female directors writers and female fewer female stars lead characters and all that stuff but I like like you were saying I just that's kind of the way it is or something was my my thinking and then <hes> and then when my daughter was a toddler iced I started watching kids things with our showing preschool shows like that and I immediately noticed that there seems to be far more male characters than female characters in what's made for the littlest kids <hes> teletubbies gender-balanced <hes> I don't know if it can tell but <hes> but but other than that seemed to be a big problem but but apropos of what you're saying <hes> I decided I I'm just going to bring it up in when I have meetings with whoever exit producer and and every single person said no no no that's not true anymore. That's been fixed right and I asked dozens and dozens of people this question every person said that's not true anymore <hes> and <hes> and sometimes they would name the movie with one female character as proof right gender inequality was fixed right and so that's when I realized I want to get the data <hes> because how I can't be wrong and what I've seen I don't think and so so that's what I did and of course it proves to be absolutely true and it's fascinating data and sort of work that went into doing it and <hes> but like and also the doc goes into the fact that that wasn't the way it always was right that I in. I think that's a kind of a profound piece that in the silent era there like were literally hundreds of women working in film and directing film in Production side of film starring you starring course and you go well. Mary Pickford was you know had her own united artists was part of it was Griffith Chaplain Fairbanks in her. Maybe one another one I don't I don't remember who is involved but but the primary reason changed was when the studios were sort of became kind of property of banks and the corporate structure <hes> was less you know kind of wild west e and more organized along corporate hierarchical lines which were Yo- intrinsically male right right so the the distrust of women or the condescension was brought in from another another business almost right yep like it's almost like there was this island error that could have been <hes> forest as an artistic you know kind of <hes> independent world of of.

Mary Pickford Geena Davis Institute on Gende Thelma Griffith Chaplain Fairbanks producer Louise