21 Burst results for "Gatica"

The Impact of Artificial Intelligence on Life Sciences

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

21:30 min | 8 months ago

The Impact of Artificial Intelligence on Life Sciences

"Live. Let's kick it off as Glenn with Meta data. You're on the and business podcast. So Glenn Are we're GonNa talk a bit about the future. And we're in this wild time in your industry with the corona virus, but I wanted ground us in the now. When when you look even in the space for twenty years you look at where data are starting to transform processes in life sciences. How do you like to frame it? What's the state of affairs today? So I think if you. If you look at what happens in life sciences outside of data, we just look. People, the big trend that we're seeing is it's good trend. That's the world I. WanNa live in as a patient. Therapies are getting more. Effective therapies are getting safer, and it's because they're being designed very different. Way used to be that you try to create a therapy that worked for as many people as you possibly could, and you would maybe high fiving in the hallways. If you right for Outta ten patients, you know this. This was the world of the blockbuster drugs, and it was about as imprecise as possible like a patient has a blood pressure over this. Give him this drug. Patients got cholesterol over that. Give them this other drug, and now as you start to get into these more effective therapies because they're more precise. Actually start to create an interesting data problem, and that is you start to have smaller and smaller denominators. If I'm starting to in well, this drug isn't district people who have a blood pressure over this. They also need to have this gene. They also need to have or not have this pre existing condition. ETC, acceptance every time I come up with more criteria. The pool of patients who are going to bed. And remember. We're making things that people take. They put in their bodies, and we've to make sure that they're safe. Not just effective, and there's a good way regulatory bodies who are protecting that safety and efficacy. So now as these patient pools, who will benefit therapies get smaller. We also have smaller smaller pool of people who we can use from a research perspective would be volunteering. Stoke the specificity, which is great means that we have a scarcity of patients that we've got to deal with a new way and I think that's been driving at least I have a very kind of drug development centric view of the world. About a drug discovery. Can I find a new molecule I really focus on the will what do I? Do if I think I've got something that's going to cure this kind of cancer. Think about making more evidence, but with fewer people line. Smaller denominators I think that's a big piece of what's driving the data landscape in life sciences. The other thing that I'll tell you which is kind of interesting, is that the life sciences industry has not been really good about data, standardization and a guy. He was a big influence in the way I think about data medi data chief data officer starting from about five years ago, his name's David, Lee and He came out of the insurance industry. Any any taught me that data standardization. Doesn't sound sexy, but until you do that, you can't benchmark until you do that. You create a predictive model and the life. Sciences Industry hasn't been great about data standardization because everybody was doing stuff for this one drug in this one area, and so I see people outside of Medi data as well, but certainly the kind of stuff that we do is we try to use AI to climb that data value curve. How do we a figure out how to standardize data in different ways data from different sources about different things? Let me just give you one quick tangent example. I got asked very kindly to speak at a conference about Ab-. Stroke and I do not know anything about cardiology like I did cancer research before we started medi data I'm comfortable talking about oncology, so I figured I better. Get ahead of it if they're asked me to. Present and I got up on stage and I said listen I. Don't know anything about stroke. But if I was speaking to a bunch of oncologists, and they were trying to build a predictive model around cancer diagnosis, and they were only looking at cancer research. They're not going to be very successful because everybody already has cancer in those research studies, but if you were to be able to go and look at large-scale cardiology studies, stroke studies studies about hard tax. If I were to go, pull data from studies research about diabetes. Then I'm going to know what those patients looked like before their cancer diagnosis, and then I can start to use. Use that to build that model so when you put that Lens on things, you realize I need to standardize data across a lot of different kinds of patients and a lot of different kinds of research patients who are in research. I have to stack the deck. I don't mean that in a various way create to create the biggest possible denominator to create the most evidence generating. Data set that I can, and even just generating that data set requires ai tool sometimes, and then once you got that data set. I think probably inherently obviously you. You've got more traditional statistical tools and methods with frankly work great and a lot of the shared also can start to apply things like machine learning neural that works and look for look for signal that you might have missed or enhanced signal. That wasn't there traditionally so I. I do think that's happening I. Feel Pretty Good. There's a lot more we. We can do, but we're. We've started as an industry getting that right. Yeah, until there's couple of things to poke into here I. Like the landscape paint I'm going to dive into a couple of things. You mentioned one of which was around standardization, so yeah, I mean what a tough problem! I think everybody. We've interviewed in healthcare. You guys are in Pharma. If I was ever GONNA be selling a product, probably said the six time on the podcast never be selling artificial intelligence solutions to hospitals like a break one. One of the Pharma companies, but in healthcare, broadly whether they be life, sciences, or or diagnostics, or whatever the case may be just data, being goofy, and like in silos and locked up and not uniform sort of this big ubiquitous issue is this when you talk about the standardization, clearly from what I understand of our look into companies like the MERCS and the bears of the world. They're beginning to try to do this with their own big corpus's of historical information, whatever being able to streamline things so that it's. It's findable, maybe not machine readable yet. They don't necessarily know where that's going to add value just yet in most cases, but but at least make it more uniform. Is this something that the industry is GonNa have to get to the same page from kind of a regulatory or kind of soft law level, or is this just per company? We're GONNA have to come up with data governance policies within our firm and just be really steady about those across silos. Like how do you see this rolling out? Yeah, so? Well I. DO think that individual companies are working on that, but I also think that there's industry organizations. There's commercial entities. My own included who are trying to do that beyond the walls of an individual company and I think we're GONNA have to I. Don't think the data that one company has is going to be sufficient. Across all the use cases that we'd not just a good idea commercially, but we have a medical ethical obligation to create the best care possible when data sets and I do think that the data quality is a really important thing to think about if if it's a a regulatory prescriptive method of doing it or the way regulation works today, which is demonstrate to people that you've done a responsible set of work to standardize things and prove it, but a lot of people will point a finger at regulators and say they're slowing down innovation, sometimes particularly and Pharma and I do not believe. believe that at all regulators. Job Isn't to be like Glen, you're a great guy, so you know I believe what all your data and Algorithms put out. No job is to protect the public health and say Glenn proved to me on paper that you did something that was scientifically ethically responsible to jobs. Is So so i? Think if that requirement is there? What you'll see is individual companies trying to solve this on their own, and I've seen this before in life, science space with other technology things, even just the management data used to be every company tried to do it their way. Out of their basement, and then twenty years later, this medi data do Thanh, research and again we're not the only company doing it, but you see platform providers that are doing it at a larger scale so when I see everybody trying to do it individually get excited because that means that there's actually a market demand for that. And you're creating a marketplace where the best technologies, the best rhythms, the best data sources will create something that more and more people will come onto, and that's how that's everybody clearly. I think we could extrapolate that for those of you. Listening into almost any industry right I think people say this. Even about I'm just GONNA throw some random stuff at ya like automotives. Hey, if we're GONNA make safe self driving cars. Do we want Ford my develop something about some certain snowy driving circumstance like there's GonNa. Be Some things that are going to have to be transferable so that everybody's safer on the dam road and with drugs. Maybe it's the same way. Business Opportunities Hey if we can be the ones who even through kind of soft news. Can Be. The folks that people rely on to develop a system instruct sure that's going to build a really sticky market position in clearly from a business perspective. That's that's an appeal as well part of the challenge see in life, sciences and I know you've obviously you guys have dealt with this and found ways around or whatever there's there's a way to frame it, but you know I. Look at companies like we just did a piece on Johnson and Johnson for example looking at some of their current innovations and investments today I. Frankly we. We don't see a tremendous amount, but they're involved in a consortium called Melody Out in Europe somewhere from not mistaken where Santa a bunch of other big players are from what I understand exposing a certain amount of data is being trained on in some aggregate sense in everybody's GonNa get a little bit of the benefit from it. How do we do this? Hey, we all have the same uniform stuff. Hey, we're able to kind of like mould things across companies. How do we do that without giving away the secret sauce, because of course? Clearly as a drug development firm that there's a humanitarian side, and then clearly we have to make payroll in in. That would mean that we've got to keep some of the things that are secret. So how do we uniform things and maybe cross pollinate without the risk of US losing her crowned jewels yet? So that is not an easy thing to do I'm I'm super appreciative of it. The way we've at least tried to tackle that problem is by creating like a give to get dynamic. There are definitely companies out there that sell data. And I think there's a great place for them in the world. Probably doing and we'll do some awesome stuff I. think there's there's a great place in the world for not for profit groups who say hey just throw your data. Here will create naturally yet. For sure, that's all all good, but I also think there's a place for a model where you say look if you put your data into this, what is effectively proprietary bucket, but with a third party that you trust and let that third party that make sure that everybody who's putting their data into that pool is protected in terms of not showing the specifics of your individual data points, so in your example. You know Sanofi doesn't see Johnson and Johnson's data. But you've got enough people in there that you can do things in aggregate and let people compare their own specific data to the more generalized bigger denominator that Medi date, or whoever it is or you and it's done at the standardization is done for you in a way that this transparent and you can believe in the results I think that's a really interesting commercial model, and then must exist in other industries I just not an expert. Well, it's. The way you're talking about it makes it sound like it's kind of a Nathan idea, even for you guys where it's like well. We think that there could be a space for this like it's something that could have all right. It's like an I believe you're right I, think actually it absolutely. Could I just think you Mr Glanton? Whoever your your absolute best partnership guys, you know you'd better be drinking beers or some of these people because there's a lot of trust that goes into those kind of relationships. So. There's a lot of trust that goes along in life sciences anywhere for sure yet. You're dealing with data about patients in some way. Holly anybody in medicine right has a person's life in their hands, but if if we're working on a vaccine for SARS, come to I, mean literally billions of people are going to get it like you've got billions of lives in. In your hands, so he's already. A lot of trust is important in our industry and I. do think that what will see by the way. There's posters at scientific sessions that we've done. There's clients right now are taking some of these aggregated data sets to regulators, and they're using them to demonstrate exactly what I was saying before. Their drugs are safe and effective. But with different kind of aggregated denominator, we call it a synthetic control arm, and it's not that is android senator anything synthesis out of the people it, synthesizing people who are in lots of different research studies into a cohort they can be used as. As a valid competitor to the patients who you treated with your new drought, Nisa solving that problem, you're saying of the narrowness if you have some super niche allergy medication for people with a certain kind of whatever then yeah, maybe you really need to extrapolate in that kind of uniform data, way and and kind of square that circle that you. And I actually think that not only by I know this is happening. See it happening, but this is a harbinger of things to come because. I gave. Let's take it to its most extreme, so in all US oncology, because it's happening there I and cancer, but I think it's going to happen in almost every therapeutic area, probably even like analgesics, and what the next tylenol is, but we are all so interestingly I mean at biologically individual and people talk about cancer therapy, and almost every patient really is like an end of one problem. There is nobody who has your. Your exact same tumor right in your tumor has probably different kinds of cells that have different mutations even within this one problem in your body. So when you start to think about that, we have to use these techniques to extrapolate what the best therapy is for every single person at the right time down to individual. We're going to need as an industry and I'm not just talking about now. Life Sciences although I think by scientists. Imprint part of the for sure. It's GonNa. Pay For a lot of this Oh. Yeah, sure I sure, but but these mathematical models that we used to figure out what to do for individuals there being born right now using these techniques stacking up all this data and figuring out how to use as a group. We're GONNA use that against individuals, so this stacking I'm just going to clarify this point will move into the next question, but I wanNA nutshell this for the audience the stacking is it sounded almost like a combination of two things one if we can have some. Unification, around the data, we can combine it in certain ways where nobody's giving away their secret sauce, but maybe we were able to get bigger cluster of people who have a specific genetic condition, or whatever, and then use that for for our clinical trials. That's one side of it. You also mentioned Kinda the synthetic sort of element. was that kind of like you know what immediately came to my mind? was you know we're we're? We're training an algorithm to read handwriting. You know we'll come up with a bunch of programmatic generated handwriting. That might be slight variations of things like using that I. Don't think that's what you. You meant there, but what? What did you mean by synthetic again? No, so you got that stack. We've got stack of every patient and I'm coming to see you I say all right well. What am I going to treat Glenn while I got to figure out because Glenn's unique. WHO's similar to Glen and so what you do? Is You build these kind of like Matrix views, patients and you start to use algorithms to compare Glenn with everybody in the stack. Yeah Okay Okay you, you pull those people out of the stack, and you then synthesize them into a group of smaller stack, but that is purpose built. To make a guess about what to do best for Glenn Don or all them. You synthesize one of these smaller stacks from the big one to use as a competitor the same way if I had a group of patients who I gave my new drug to and I'll give another group of patients a placebo sugar pill right I, compare them with like. Well, should I be giving people sugar pills if we have tons of people who are in research, who already gotten the standard of care? Can I reset the CISE? Those people into a comparative instead of exposing a whole bunch of volunteer patience to something that. Does, not effective, and that's the synthesis of the group. Yeah, it's not robots. You're not talking about programmatic degenerate I wasn't suspecting were so. It is it is quite interesting. Because the direct analogy, some of our listeners are avid readers that emerged dot com, always covering use cases in different industries. We think about how a net flicks or Amazon does recommendations you know. You're stripping, you know. In their case, it's purchase behavior. Geo Location whatever else for you. It's genetic stuff in health history, whatever and yeah, you just find in those similar clusters and being able to extrapolate a little bit. You know the movie Gatica. People haven't seen it like the ideas like your DNA decides whether or not you're going to be an astronaut or somebody who's cleaning, toilets or something, cleaning toilets, and of course, of course, that's patently ludicrous, because your genes interestingly don't change that much there. In instances where mutations and things, but actually I I can't tell you much more about your health today than I could have told you about your health the day you. You were born because it's a static data. Set Your Connecticut Right. That is a very simple view of it. There's a lot more elaborate stuff, but if you think about all the stuff that is changing about you overtime, Gina Type, and then all of your phenotype, and you start to measure that stuff and you start to think about it. It really is a problem of finding not one needle, but the right ten. Ten needles in the haystack that allow us to make the best comparison between Glen or a group of patients and patients like them, and that's another place where these artificial intelligence tools are used, so we use them to create stacks, but we also use them to select the right needles out of those haystacks to create these comparative groups Yup I. See those reasonable applications I would be you know. BE FRANK WITH YOU IF If that struck me as not possible based on precedents and other industries, but that clustering strikes me as quite possible, particularly solve that data harmonisation issue. I mean that's a Lotta. The crux of it I know we're just about to wrap up I know you have seen a lot of things change with covid nineteen. Thinking about what that means for the future of your industry. Any closing thoughts before we wrap on. What this means for now in the near future in life sciences. Yes so at the risk of making Not Look that good? Because, I'm definitely including myself in this criticism wouldn't have been nice if we had all that patient data stacked up. And I mean they're. They're few million patients around the world who are in studies on the Medi Data Platform. It's all different companies doing the research with their data, but can you imagine if we had that stack? And we were paying attention to in the hundred fifty countries that we do research knowing some of these patients, genetics, and all of their pheno types in a better way than we normally do in medicine, because we see them consistently wouldn't have been great for layer on like who seems to be coming down with cove nineteen I mean no, no, no, no doubt, no young. And I think that that that's an interesting. You put like an exclamation point on why we need to do this. It's like there's an ethical imperative, not just a commercial driver to think about data in different ways. Yeah, yeah, well. To some degree you know my thought is like what you're articulating makes a tremendous amount of sense. Given Your Business Model. It makes slightly less if I work at Bayer. However like despite the biased tilt, I do understand the value prop and I do think that it is compelling and I think it does feel like it'll have to be the future. People are not going to keep distance silos forever. I do think it make sense. Air Because, if you if pharmaceutical a pharmaceutical company B. comes out with the same effectively drug, and and they're competing for the same group of patients, and neither of them knows that you might be better off taking drug Abe before drug be or drug be is better in a certain kind of of patient than drug. As than actually, you are not serving your customer and you're. You're not generating the revenue that you could be generating, and so you should be motivated with other companies to lineup tightly. In terms of what is the best way to treat patients I actually think it's in your best interest. i. e Clayton clearly is I mean there's a little bit more potentially to lose while in your firm, it's it's almost explicitly to game but I. I think he'd do things like you see things like melody you see companies like yours have been tremendously successful. You guys were acquired recently. You know massive congratulations for that and yes I think long term it's not against their interests by any means, and hopefully I think Glenn. It'll be part of the future. I know these are things you've thought about for. People are interested. Interested in some Glenn stocks is a book coming out in August called the patient equation by Wiley. It's about precision medicine in the age of Covid nineteen and beyond Glenn. If people are interested in in stay in touch following your thoughts, we live sciences I. Know We have a lot of people that follow that space. Where should they go on the web to find you? Cou. You could find me on twitter, etc, at captain, clinical a fictitious superhero for good science. And meditated accomplish our website for anybody interested. There's all kinds of papers and men links to publications. We do academic stuff, too, so it's not all commercial awesome, all right,

Glenn Cancer Glen Johnson Diabetes Europe Bayer United States Twitter Sars AI Covid Pharma Glenn Don
"gatica" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:38 min | 8 months ago

"gatica" Discussed on KCBS All News

"The Money Watch Report. Companies looking to make money from autonomous vehicles have mainly focused on making deliveries to homes or providing ride hailing services. But Bloomberg senior writer Kyle Stocks as a startup called Gatica concentrates on moving groceries from point to point in the so called Middle Mile from a large Operation Santo, a smaller distribution center or a store where customers to pick up at the curb before products or put on board here. Mons. Make sure the vehicles can navigate the static roots will drive route for 4 to 6 weeks, and they mapped the road tricky spot, and then from there, they can make choices. They could make sure these vehicles always drive in the slow lane that they only take right Turns. WalMart has signed on as one of Gatica first customers, Gatica says It's profitable now, even though it still puts a safety driver in every vehicle. Some points. A person will come out and the economic flew improved. Jeff Dillinger Bloomberg business for KCBS, Hi, It's Gil Gross. Let's talk about an opportunity. Have you ever wondered how the banks make all their money? Have you ever wanted to be on that side of the deal? We'll Pacific private money. Their clients are doing just that. For over a decade, clients of Pacific private money have been earning returns of 7% and higher secured by California real estate, a conservative values. In these uncertain times. It's important to learn consistent returns on your savings and retirement accounts and let's face it. Many of us are not on track to achieve the level retirement income we desire. Strategies like Pacific Private Money's mortgage backed investments might be just the thing you need to boost the incoming your retirement accounts remember earning.

Pacific Private Money Gatica Jeff Dillinger Bloomberg Bloomberg Gil Gross WalMart Operation Santo Kyle Stocks writer California
"gatica" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:22 min | 9 months ago

"gatica" Discussed on 710 WOR

"There is a surprising lack of transparency on the part of companies collecting your information yeah that what is the name of the company axiom axiom yeah yeah yeah they're scary dude yeah I I've been you we're making this video and the way it works is usually been will ban will write an outline for what he's going to present in the blog I will shoot it then as I'm editing I end up doing a lot of research and oh my god been I've just been scaring their website and have nothing against you axing arms you're listening your employees it's just the murky world well it's pervasive like the the amount of information that axiom has is is impressive media and the way they talk about it sometimes they're offline data that they have used for online purposes yeah I don't know it's fastening of your website so we we've talked a little bit about because the the science fiction elements and how we see some science fact generating but we knew know that this is a very old story we've seen things like Isaac Asimov's foundation series which deal with the fictional at this point fictional science of psychohistory predicting the future on a large scale events we've dealt with Gatica where personal information medical information is used to cash and I'm trying not to spoil things I know it's tough yeah but I mean what's the limit with spoilers like at what point it kind of stinks he I guess you just have to put an alert at the very beginning of something that may I have a spoiler in it and just say don't listen this if you have not seen these movies read these books or listen to these songs wow really okay all right so that's that's pretty complicated but we've also seen it in of course minority report we have mentioned but the the controversy surrounding this which is expressed our culture is and another one would be the dark knight yes yeah we're Lucious fox okay yeah L. as in the cell phone system monitoring system it's.

Isaac Asimov Gatica Lucious fox
Hey Baby Whats Your Predisposition For A Variety Of Possible Genetic Disorders?

You Did What Now?

08:16 min | 1 year ago

Hey Baby Whats Your Predisposition For A Variety Of Possible Genetic Disorders?

"Hey everyone thinks listening on your host Stephanie Educator in Science Aficionado Afficionado and I'm like Oh programmer tech guy. I'm still not an algorithm here on still not a computer driven eight or host. That's the goal that I will successfully generate an and I can do this for me. We are real life. non-genetically modified humans so anyways Michael I think we've talked about this before. But you are happily married. Is that correct. How many years weird nine and a few nine years in a couple of months? That's wonderful how. How did you and your lovely wife meet each other? We actually met in high school. We went to high school together. Kept in touch through college and stuff. Yeah so yeah my husband and my husband and I we also met in high school. So it's it's probably been awhile since you've been on the dating scene. Is that accurate pretty much. Never so yeah it's been probably since nineteen ninety-six since I was last dating anyone but and I'm very thankful for that by the way. Hey Hey don't have to. He don't have to participate in the the psychosis that is dating world speaking of Algorithms. I think Tinder and all those those Al those Dating sites are all generated on some very interesting algorithms. I'm sure yeah well do you know anyone who's You know maybe met their significant other through dating out such as like Tinder e harmony. Maybe one or two friends of Matt that way. Yeah Yeah My. My brother-in-law met his wife on E. Harmony. And they're very happy together so But what if we took that a step further So that you could actually just use your DNA to find a match. How would that work? Yeah so there are some researchers at Harvard medical the school who are creating a new dating APP that matches people based on their DNA. No they did. What now right? So so the goal is to create a system it screens out matches. That would result in a child with an inherited disease. Okay sure I guess us. Why can't we just care the focus on carrying that disease rather than he'll be crisper them in in in utero? Whoops you guys are not that compatible genetically Taylor just flip switches here and make sure your baby doesn't get this so that better than just like rolling out people? Well I guess this is just too tight us in the meantime until all the genetic diseases diseases have been wiped out. But yeah the reason why I definitely wanted to do this articles because I feel like it exemplifies that scene in Gatica which we did a whole episode so on she kisses a boy and then she goes to the booth and she submits the DNA so that the The booth Heller can run quick check and secret dealer Jackass. Yeah how how perfect. This guy is. What is Gatica rating so? This is true life now apparently or will be soon. It's a it's a it's a start. Start up called digit eight which is kind of a play on words. I think I'm I'm too old to really know a lot of Internet slang and but D- A it is the slang for date that's like pre stomas license plate territory there. Yeah so that's kind of what they're what they're basing it on is if they can you know everyone's sending their DNA in to have it tested for ancestry the street or for food intolerances. So why not. You're looking for a made out there. Why don't you send your DNA and this company? Digit eight can run aunt and then they can give you some based on your DNA. Some potential viable mates out there that you can try dating going into the first date knowing doing that. If you did choose to marry and have children with this person that your children would likely not be born with any of this seven thousand inherited diseases that that people are susceptible to. Yeah okay. Sure I guess that's good I I just seems like so far down the line and you just like you're not going to be there that's gutless. That's how many other people i. I wonder how many suggested to have does even example. How many I guess it depends on your own genetics? Like new car. You're carrying something and mashed with somebody. That's also carrying that. Recessive has a trade. But like I it's going to block out so many potential matches that you could be happy with well. It says it claims that you you would still be compatible with probably ninety five percent of other people out there and so that's I guess my my confusion about this is it claims aims to that. It's just going to tell you who you're compatible with instead of telling you who you're not compatible with but if you are compatible with ninety five percent of the people that are you know in this world then is it just GonNa give you a list of here are five million people that you're genetically compatible with Good Luck Doc. I'm sure it's going to be built on top of one of the existing algorithms for dating and matching wherever. This could be like talk switch like this. This feels awfully a lot down the road to eugenic yet. eugenics okay so yeah. That's the major concern that everyone is screaming about right now is is this a form of or will it lead to a form of EUGENICS. I can't see how wouldn't so so I so I wanted to look up. What exactly is the definition of eugenics and? Let's see if it applies here. So here's what I could find. eugenics is the science of improving a human population by controlled breeding to increase the occurrence of desirable heritable characteristics. I mean it's not controlled breeding it sort of the opposite. It serve exclusionary. But it's you're you're luminated possibilities right. So that's that's the fine distinction. Is that the the Professor who is Who is behind? This says that this is voluntary. You know this is just an option for you to find a mate. Nobody is going to force Chris you to participate in this dating APP in order to find a mate so it's not controlled breeding necessarily accept by you. You were your desire to find a mate that you're not going to have trouble with this terry aspect of it does display an I wonder so. I hope at least that they're going to match you whether or not you're GINA is on file or is submitting your DNA to the stadium app sort of the requirement of using it. Yes you would have to submit limit your DNA and they would run all of the test and say and they would you know give you probably some sort of print out that said you. You have a recessive disposition. POSITION JEANS TO X Y and Z diseases so for example tastes ax is a disease that your babies can inherit. It's recessive so both partners partner's needs to carry this gene in order to pass it on to their offspring rights so if you're genetically A He plus cer- Gatica or whatever term. We want to use your probably. Finally you'll match with everybody because all your recessive genes are not going to everybody. Else's recessive. Dreams are not going to trigger yours. Yeah I mean most of US probably have recessive genes for for something and as long as we. Don't you know find a partner. That is the other point one percent of the population that has this then. Our children are going to be for the most part pretty healthy but it's that rare occurrence when you know it's a perfect storm of this person has heterogenous for this gene and the other person is Hetero. I guess and there's a if they'd get together. There's a twenty five percent chance that the child is going and get both forms of the recessive gene.

Partner Gatica Programmer Tinder Michael E. Harmony United States Harvard Utero Matt Taylor Heller Gina Professor Chris
"gatica" Discussed on This Is Only A Test

This Is Only A Test

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"gatica" Discussed on This Is Only A Test

"And in addition, I love the, the rear entry suit the Russians were the first to have the backpack, open Nasr's, turn that is taken that with that with that Ryan capsule and with VA suits for surface exploration, where there's no airlock required. Anymore because the becomes the I love efficiencies, like well that and the, you know, we spent a countless amounts of money making airtight, zippers which, you know, it's great to have the Russians. The circle suit has this amazing like biological corridor that you sort of comes out and you crawl into it, and then you just tied up and put a bread clip on it, caved. The jack. So it's this like the Soviet space designers. So as Donna, Shing, because it is often better design. Right. Because it's designed is someone who teaches design, I think about design as a response to a set of limitations. Right. And because they had so many more, they had did everything we did. But with way, more limitations in terms of what they everything from the absence of solid state electronics to airtight, zippers. And so the design solutions that they needed it was only creativity that made up for that gap. Wow. Awesome. Well, thank you so much for being on the show when it's such a pleasure. Yeah. No, really. Really great to hang out with you all. And it's awesome. Thanks. That was a really awesome conversation, actually, I could have just made it an hour long episode really. Because there's so much to dive into both a history and wear space, suits are going and really love the we got some unconventional answers. I think each of us in our heart of arts as fiction fans have our favorite visual space suits. But like nNcholas gave some very interesting answer is picking up the Gatica suit and giving the history of that, that was so cool on talking about how we relate needs Spacey's for all different body types, and that really needs to be true in both science fiction and reality for me. You know, I was thinking about where do I want species to go, and I just really wanna keep pushing bio mimicry, because I think there's so much to learn from all of the biology here on earth and ways in which we can apply it into outer space. Even though all of this biology is here underneath the atmosphere. I think there's things that we can learn about how to adapt to different environments that we can learn from biology here on earth science fiction fans, who are very open minded about. That, yes, we wanna see domes and things are familiar, but Nolte in the fabrication techniques are there now. So that if we see something like what we saw on the sunshine. Right. That's completely out there. That's okay in a reads as science fiction, and it reads something futuristic, people should definitely check out Nicholas's book. It's just simply called a spacesuit. And of course, we'll have more episodes of off road in the future other movies and topics. You can also listen to off world as a podcast if you go to tested dot com slash off world like this video subscribe and Ireland. I we'll see next time..

Spacey Ryan Nasr Nicholas Ireland Nolte Donna Shing nNcholas Gatica
"gatica" Discussed on Flash Forward

Flash Forward

04:58 min | 2 years ago

"gatica" Discussed on Flash Forward

"She likes technology. She likes science, and she's interested in ways that we can make the lives of disabled, folks better. And she's not saying that living with disability doesn't include suffering. But she does point out that one of the hardest. Parts of her disability is not the physical part. It's the way that she's treated able is often inflicts far more suffering than any disability on its own what Alice and other disability advocates wont is for geneticists and scientists to think long and hard about what they're actually saying when they say things like we want to eliminate disability and for them to invite actually disabled people into those discussions instead of Suming that they know what people want and need because right now scientists aren't talking to activists and advocates. Silos that did a place that is dove. Dove get a district that. It will actually. Looses disabilities. Diseases. People. Three. Of course, there are class and race issues at play here too. Do what? Afford it. Ninety. Do have have done. If we're talking about. This future of building better. Healthier stronger people. I think that literally. Did it is with this is trying to kill us trying to treat and superior. Human body, Twitter, creepy, and there's another key thing here that I think often gets overlooked, which is that it's not actually possible to eliminate disability or suffering even people who can afford, this technology are never going to be able to actually succeed at only having babies with the precise bodies and minds that they want. Here's the thing about genetics. It's really complicated. There is no one, gene. Or even a few genes that determine things like intelligence or physical, fitness whenever people talk about the future of human, gene editing. They tend to reference the movie Gatica as an example of a world where human embryo, genetic editing is pervasive. In fact, you heard a clip from Gatica in the intro to this episode. Here's another clip. Many others in my situation and moved around a lot the next few years getting work where I could. I must have cleaned half the toilets in the state. I belong to a new underclass. No longer determined by social status of the color of your skin. Atika gentlemen. Now, we now have discrimination down to a science. From the front. Spotted face on that uh when you hear people talking about or referencing this movie, they stopped there and talk about a world where some people are actually better than others. Thanks to engineering, but the point of this movie is that those who are not generically engineered might indeed be just as capable and smart as their superhuman counterparts. The main character in Gatica is not genetically engineered an invalid as they say in the movie, but he proves that he is just as smart and strong as his brother, the valid, and if we ever did wind up in a world where there were unscrupulous and unscientific companies telling people that they could genetically engineer their kids to be smarter, which seems plausible considering all the pseudoscience on the market. Now, this is the world we would be in one where in fact, there is for example, no intelligence difference between the two groups. But people think there is the same way that today. Some people think there is a difference in intelligence between men and women or white people and not white people when that's not true at all. Of course. This is the world that Alice already lives in. So I'm ready. Presence where? Are you ready? Different body Vides and did a trio. Eight people type of body. Over. Easily matching. Evasion. Energy count this wider..

Gatica Alice Dove Twitter Vides engineer
Can science fiction help us grapple with gene editing?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:56 min | 2 years ago

Can science fiction help us grapple with gene editing?

"The. If we're talking about, gene editing. You had to know we were gonna talk about Gatica from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Molly would. News broke this week about a Chinese scientists who says he edited the genes of two twin girls while they were still in the womb. The goal was to make the girls immune to HIV, but editing human genes at that level is ethically. Controversial and illegal in many countries. It raises questions about creating genetic traits that can be passed on and about a future where people choose the genetic traits. They want in their children, not surprisingly, it's topic. Well, covered in science fiction. I belong to a new underclass. No longer determined by social status for the color of your skin. Gatica gentlemen. Now, we now have discrimination down to a science. That's from the nineteen Ninety-seven movie Gatica about a future where your genes determine whether you'll succeed in life or be considered invalid. Amy Webb is a professor of strategic foresight at the NYU stern school of business and the founder of the future today institute, she told me there are plenty of benefits to gene editing technology, but Gatica social commentary was all to present the parts of that movie that I think were so spot on it wasn't necessarily the technology itself. But the application of that technology throughout society, I think it's entirely plausible that we could be heading into a situation in which due to certain circumstances and the distribution of wealth and the distribution of health care. It's plausible that we could have engineered humans who succeed in life. You know, I'm not talking about huge changes. I'm talking about small things like eradicating certain diseases for certain groups of people in everybody else's kinda just left to deal with Darwinism on its own. So when you see news like we saw this week with at least one Chinese scientists saying that he was doing gene editing on babies before they're born. Do you think to yourself? Okay. The future has arrived. And now these storylines are gonna come to pass to. Yeah. We'll the problem is that that future arrived a couple years ago. So what we heard about the news? This week was not the first instance of a Chinese scientists using crisper to edit the genome so already like twenty fifteen there were we heard about that was that was the first time that we heard about other experiments happening. We did it ourselves in the United States in two thousand seventeen it's just that. Some of the circumstances were different. But this is not our first foray. So what we're really talking about is what happens when we alter or edit, our, gene pool, and whatever the result of that is heritable. On the one hand it's possible to weed out certain genetic disorders on the other hand. It's theoretically possible to create babies with six fingers on each hand. So that in that scene Gattaca where there's a piano player with twelve fingers playing an extraordinarily complicated piece. You know, playing playing a piece that was built for somebody with twelve fingers. You know, it's the aerobically possible that we could be moving into a future in which we are bestowing upon certain people genetic capabilities biological capabilities that other people don't get. You know, that's the real sticky problem with germline editing. It's what becomes heritable, and what are the consequences of that both good and bad? And with that points to is maybe not a Huxley in future, necessarily, or even what we saw Gatica where you know, based on your DNA you were assigned to a worker class or to an elite thinking class, but it's it is possible that we could be moving toward a sort of new economic class of humans. If you were family had enough money and the resources to edit you before you were born. You know, you're going to have certain advantages, and we may find that society discriminates against people who weren't engineered that that does look like a real possibility. Even if we don't have people with six or seven fingers on each hand to play extra hard concertos, right? I mean, these technologies always starts out as we want to prevent disease. But it feels like at some point some version of designer gene editing is inevitable that people are going to want it. Right. So the problem is we tend to use the word designer next two, gene editing a little too often. And I think that makes a lot of people think of almost like an all cart list of genetic traits that you get to choose from. I wanna baby that has curly blonde hair and green eyes and his six and a half taller, whatever. There are some real benefits that that we can be moving toward. As as humans once we are able to add it certain traits, right on the other hand, what are the consequences of that? And I think. We can quickly wander into all kinds of weird scifi scenarios. I think in practical terms. The consequences. We would be dealing with immediately have to do with economic and social status consequences. Amy Webb is the founder of the future today institute, and some of you have been asking what happened to related links. They are not gone. I'm just sick. So I'm conserving, my voice and my energy. But hopefully, you enjoy this extra long interview and hopefully with an sleep broke Kotei and zinc related links. We'll be back tomorrow. I'm elliot. Marketplace sack. This is a PM. Listeners like you who give to marketplace do more than just keep us on the air. You help us grow and get better. It's a way to directly support independent reporting and journalism you trust and to make it possible for us to tell the stories of modern life through our digital economy. And when you give today the impact of your gift will be doubled. Thanks to our friends at Candida donate now at marketplace dot org to make your donation. Go twice as far and thank you.

Gatica Amy Webb Founder HIV Molly Nyu Stern School Of Business United States Gattaca Candida Huxley Kotei Professor One Hand
"gatica" Discussed on Filmhaus

Filmhaus

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"gatica" Discussed on Filmhaus

"So when people say things like we'll just turn your brain off that prime means check Facebook until things explode. I think what people mean by that is oftentimes I'll be I'll be criticizing a film like I dunno edge of tomorrow, and I'll be going into like the time travel mechanics and pointing. How the rules that it set up for the film are ones that they don't follow. And I think that a lot of people see something like that. And they go like well. Yeah. But it's a dumb action movie. So you're not, you know, like, the what the film is trying to market itself as he shouldn't be mentioning those things you're supposed to not think about it sort of thing. But it's like, I can't not think about it. And to me in my opinion. Like, if you're a fan of something like if you're the biggest fan of edge of tomorrow, you should be thinking about the mechanics of the universe. Everything that I'm a huge fan of I want to understand it to like the fullest degree. You know, even if it's something that I find in a movie that I love that. You know, it makes it make less sense. Like, why weren't there any security cameras in Gatica that you know, kind of ruins the blood damage. I'm sorry. It actually that's one of my favorite movies. I can still think it's a great movie. I love it. I'm gonna continue watching it. It's a great experience. Like, it a lot in filmmaking dramatically, and you know, there's the story is very poignant. But you know, I just I feel like there's no part of a movie that shouldn't be talked about. It's it's another conversation for someone to take small issues with the movie and then act like it ruins the whole thing. And a lot of people think that I do that. But. I would say that most of the time if I'm going on about like kind of nitpicky things for like a relatively well received movie. That's that's popular. It's not usually the nitpicky things that that prevent me from loving the movie like there's some plot. Holes are not weighed evenly. There's some things that like completely ruin the movie there's some that don't. But most of the time it's usually because I don't feel the movie achieved as much in what it set out to do. So like something like mission impossible fallout. I'm like, yeah. I really loved the action scenes, but the action scenes were half of the movie, not you know, I loved half of the movie in sure rest of it. You know, the the stereotypical cheesy dialogue scenes, and you know, I you can just watch my review if you want. But I mean, I can't I can't praise the full movie when half of it was something that that connected with me. Well, I guess the takeaway, and I've done this. I've I've learned to do this just with most of cultures that I will never begrudge someone for having an opinion, and because someone watches anything certain way, our opinions don't need a lineup in order for me to like something. It's the same way. Where just because it's sort of like, a buyer's remorse or the other can't remember it is a buyer's justification sorta. Like, I went on bought a PS four. And it's the number one selling console or I wince on Finnity war. And it's the number one movie. Therefore, I am right. And I I don't know what that phenomenon is. But I that's probably been going on human history for ever. Oh, some way where you know, you wanna be on some sort of team or some side. But it's a weird thing too people get very invested in the world's that they are watching our viewing. And if you don't like it they somehow feel personally attacked. Yeah. Now. Exactly. Yeah. This isn't that seems to be a constant uphill battle that you're dealing. I know you had a you had a big backlash with like the Black Panther review. You did where you got a certain opinion about something people said, well, how dare you and? Yeah, that's that seems like a constant fight that you're having probably every quarter. I think you you think depends. What's in theaters? You know, sometimes I see a movie that's like doing so. Well, that I know I'm probably not gonna like, and I.

Facebook Gatica
"gatica" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"gatica" Discussed on TechStuff

"Not necessarily creepy but not necessarily welcome either. But imagine that you're walking through a store and just as you're passing in front of a certain store item. Let's say it's cookie, crisp cereal, and you start hearing a voice whispering to you. Hey that cookie crisp looks pretty good might seem really weird the slow disembodied voice. And as soon as you get past a certain point, you can't hear it anymore. You just have this experience as you're going through the store you keep hearing these targeted sounds in very narrow spots. And as soon as you're out of those spots. He can't hear it. That's pretty creepy. Right. Well, how does it work? Well, according to the company the secret is in the size of the sound waves. Compared to the size of the sound source, the company states that if you have a sound source that is much larger than the comparable size of the sound waves. It's producing you get more direction -ality out of your sound. So you can focus it more like a beam. So if you were to create loudspeakers that are much much much larger than the sound waves they're producing and sound waves can measure from a few inches up to several feet in size. You could direct though sound waves in a beam more like a directional beam rather than having them propagate outward in all equal directions. But that would not work very well for something like targeted advertising because you would have to have these enormous speakers perched behind the areas, and that would be very distracting. So this company has gone with an approach that has these devices producing ultrasonic beams of sound ultrasonic sound ways are very very tiny. There. Also normally imperceptible at least directly they are imperceptible to us. We cannot here in this frequency. They do have a very strong directionality as result of the way, they are generated. So according to the company as the tra- sonic beam travels through the air, the inherent properties of the air caused the ultrasound to change shape in predictable way, this gives rise to frequency components in the audible band, which can be accurately predicted and therefore precisely controlled by generating the correct all tra- sonic signal. We can create within the air itself any sound desired. So in other words, it's the interaction of these ultra sonic frequencies with the air itself that causes the tra- sonic frequencies to change, and then you produce these audible frequencies, and because this is all very controllable in a predictable environment, you can produce. Whatever sounds you want. This is based off. Work of an inventor named Woody Norris. He demonstrated this technology at a Ted talk in the early two thousands rather than generating the audible sound on the face of the speaker as a traditional speaker would where the speakers moving a diaphragm in and out in pushing around the ultra sonic amid creates a column of the air itself to act like a speaker, which is pretty nifty. I'm sorry. I meant spooky number nine DNA hacking so back in two thousand three scientists finished mapping out the human genome. But that was obviously just the beginning. That's just a a long list of base pairs. Next came the work to examine the genome closely and determine which base pairs in the more than three billion pairs that make up human genome are responsible for different stuff like our? Possibility of developing a disease, for example, because if you could determine that and if you could determine a way of changing that part of the DNA so that it's eliminated. Maybe you could make someone not develop that disease, you could potentially wipe out certain diseases and beyond that what about hacking the human genome. So that we can create designer human beings you in beings who have traits. The we considered to be superior now that's the stuff of lots of science fiction and horror cautionary tales stuff like Gatica saying. Yeah. But who gets to decide what is superior, and what happens to people who aren't able to take advantage of that technology, and what the people who do take advantage of that technology..

Woody Norris Gatica Ted
"gatica" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"gatica" Discussed on Filmspotting

"That was the other bit of confusion is people said, okay, if you're leaving out, I performed and all those link later films, then I gotta come up with a top five characters or link later scenes that don't include those. It was just for the poll. Okay. Well, I'm I'm board now. I understand now. Yes, I think we are doing scenes. Yes, slash moments. We're going to drill down and we're allowed to do linkletter films and we're allowed to talk about first reform are now. There's a reason why I was hesitant to do this list. I'm not going to spoil it here though. Spoils really the wrong word. But actually it comes up in my conversation with Ethan Hawke my love for those link later films, in particular, some of the scenes he's been in just kind of makes us redundant terrace. Tori. I me so I'm going to try to find a way around that. Okay, we'll see if I pull it off with next week stop five, which is indeed Ethan, Hawke scenes slash moments slash moments, and we're looking at his entire filmography. Yes, even movies from twenty eighteen now even richer link later directed movie. So it was going to explain all this to Keith you or me. I'm gonna let you do it 'cause I'm apparently not doing a good job of setting this up. We will also note that we may have aired in overlooking hawks, performance in Gatica as one of the choices. It's by far the biggest other option. There are more write in votes for Gatica than what hamlet got or urge an extra Troy Dyer actually getting fewer votes than Gatica. But that's because way before we get to David lean, I've got some Ethan Hawke homework to do having seen yet is on the list. I love Gatica really good. You'll enjoy it into nickel, right? That's actor behind that film. You can vote now in that pull if you're not to confused film spotting dot net, if you leave a comment and we hope you. Do please let us know where you're listening from. We will share the results of that poll on next week show. You can't wait. A state of confusion is exactly where we should be from asker theater. The part of the show where we perform a scene and you get a chance at winning of film spotting t-shirt a couple of weeks back at them, and I'm massacred this scene. Thank you. A fine. Don't. It's nice here. I'm sorry, sir. Thank you. What the hell? No, you won't. You fed up trying to take a plea show. Last year would not roasting, how black and White House..

Ethan Hawke Gatica Tori asker theater Keith Troy Dyer White House David
Patriots Release WR Jordan Matthews After Significant Hamstring Injury, sign 1-year deal with Erick Decker

Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

04:39 min | 2 years ago

Patriots Release WR Jordan Matthews After Significant Hamstring Injury, sign 1-year deal with Erick Decker

"What does he go play outside in a different sport now? Oh, yeah. Yeah. I mean six. Nine, whatever you gonna play when he gets blasted over the middle, is he gonna come back to the bra, took you seem stitching. His nose play with a mass drop sixty one on on on on the Hornets as broken. No, but he. Loved asked, and he'd be going around with a different mentality. That's a whole different ball football and basketball player. The why differently? Enough, realize it always comes back to this guy at some point. Thank you for being here. It's always good to get. Tom Brady is wide receiver group seems to constantly change and the patriots Jordan Mathews yesterday after he signed a one year deal this off season, but he reportedly suffered a significant hamstring injury on Sunday, the patriots maybe adding former titans wide receiver, Eric decker who worked out for the team this week. And yes, remember they will be without Jillian men for the first four games of the season. Shannon, what does this tell you. Kills me that a coach Bela checks. You gonna pull some weight or you guys to go. He was, I guess he was practicing whale playing well, and then he got Nick hamstring and coach Bela check says, you know what? You're not going to be doing this any good rehabbing on our dime. So we'll let you go ahead and go bring air Dicker and it looks like they're gonna sign deck, Jordan Mathews skip. I mean he really hasn't played well since he's left chip Kelly. I mean close to nine hundred yards. I two years, but he's always had this injury almost half thousand. Yeah, he's always had this injury bug that just popped up and I'm sure that factor the coach Bela checks decision of, yeah, you know, I was kinda hoping you're over this bug. Now, the last couple years deck has also suffered the injury bug, but I do believe that Eric decker is an upgrade over Jordan Mathews. He had his best years playing who skip pate, Manny. So you have a guy in Tom Brady that knows what he's doing with the football knows where to go with the ball is in complete command of this offense. And so I expect him to is big debt comes in this offense. I can see him catching. Forty fifty balls especially with Ellerman being the first the first four gay. Hell gronk it's still there not. He's still look at Tom Brady, Tom Brady can win without grunk, but you look at his numbers when gronk on the field. And you look at his numbers when gronk and on the field, this ubstantially different and plus decades. The mole grant Etima you know, they got Gatica got all all the Gallic, a guy. He likes to kind of look, Chris HOGAN. Now. L. look like. Thing shattered shock. I've been trying to tell you for two years Bill. Bella check can get away with near murder when it comes to the white outs this because it just doesn't matter. He has the greatest quarterback in the history of pro football who's also to use your term the greatest makeup artist ever because he can just cover up all the blemishes. It just doesn't matter. Just giving that guy, Joe Smith investors. Investors as the greatest ever. You know what Joe said that under. So. Look what just happened. Jordan Mathews was sort of the off season Saini by the New England Patriots because June Matty's dot, some ability. He played at my school Vanderbilt, and he is still the SEC all time career leader in catches and yards caught. That's pretty great, Nancy. See, it's a pretty good. It's right. And he's still the all time. Career leader is Jordan. Mathews those three years in Philadelphia were they were great, but they were pretty good, right. And guess who fell in love with Jordan Mathews who loved him like a brother was walk into your got Carson Wentz. He loved him some Jordan Mathews and they traded Jordan Mathews straight up for Ronald Darby who's a really good player so that that shows you that buffalo really valued Jordan Mathews that he He was. was. That's that's pretty. That's eighty. Trae they needed receiver they had let wilder would grow in said, we walk and go market Goodwin was gong. Yeah, so they need. They need Darby's a first round talent. Yeah, he's a, he's a playmaking top to your cornerback and so they value Jordan. He's in buffalo, right? And Carson Wentz was devastated and told the Philadelphia media..

Jordan Mathews Tom Brady Bela New England Patriots Eric Decker Chip Kelly Shannon Hornets Ronald Darby Football Basketball Carson Wentz Chris Hogan Patriots Jillian Dicker Philadelphia Joe Smith Murder Trae
"gatica" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"gatica" Discussed on KTRH

"Is confronted with new and unique bioethical dilemmas right now phenotype eventually gino type which of course this is something that has to be a little worried because you know i never thought that they would go this far but then again i didn't think they would put neanderthal brains in lobster cyborgs and they're doing that and then now this is where they're moving towards a pheno type camera it's only beginning phenotype camera that we'll be able to judge you based on your look now i don't know about you but the old adage never judge a book by its cover is not going to apply with with artificial intelligence and of course the creators of this say well this is this is psycho graphic studies this is something that a computer can do without bias hey i can do this without bias don't think for one minute a computer could be racist but something it's donald the data is raises his how we apply it will destroy biodiversity or destroy the diversity factor and most certainly will put us back in line with evolutionary qualities survival of the fittest dr what is just a a love he's loving this now whoever thought that darwin would love how technology is going to make us all part of that system where we are going to have to admit that only survived because the computer will make the choices who the fit our and they'll make the choices as to who looks like what and what they're pheno types are that make them either gay straight religious nonreligious politically liberal or politically conservative got a christian florida hi chris you're on ground zero hey glide great topic every time you've talked about genetics i wanted to bring up the whole gatica of the argument and the film gatica and it's funny that it's twenty two years old but all of it's coming true the the whole genome typing of all of those people in that film i mean their entire lives were completely lorded over by their own gina sites and essentially the title of the film is like well gatica rhymes with atika which is a prison and they were prisoners of their own genetics but the interesting part about it and nobody seems to ever pick up on it is the word gatica itself and that is wanting at any thyroxine toleration at me sightseeing and adding that those are the those are the four amino acids that are the building blocks of of all human genetic i was waiting for somebody i was waiting for somebody to to actually describe that gatica itself is an acronym for dna that is correct that is amazing and and you know what's also amazing about the film is that they were obvious they had the they have the valid 's they were called the ballots those are the ones that were selected in basically genetically superior than they have the invalid or the invalids which were basically organically consi conceive they weren't conceived with technology and so the ones that were conceived through like intravenous types or after genetic after genetics or whatever they were the ones who are discriminated they were discriminating against those who were part of the process they were excluded they were presumed to be inferior because they differ from this it was becoming a narrowly defined standard of genetic perfection but go ahead if you remember if you remember your genetics but they taught us back when we actually learn something in school you can't have two of the same amino acids together so t together like the tyrosine in gatica that's a that's a genetic mutation so that would make you an invalid right there right well you know with my situation i would be an invalid and the reason why is because i have tse i have to restore a mild case of it and it was because of exposure to my actually my my forebears we're exposed to the nuclear tests in nevada actually utah nevada so it aggravated the tse gene.

twenty two years one minute
"gatica" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"gatica" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"On ground zero hey glide great topic every time you talked about genetics i wanted to bring up the whole gatica of the the argument and the film gatica and it's funny that it's twenty two years old but all of it's coming true the the whole genome typing of all of those people in that film i mean their entire lives were completely lorded over by their own gina types and essentially the title of the film is like well data kate ryan's with atika which is a prison and they were prisoners of their own genetics but the interesting part about it and nobody seems to ever pick up on it is the word gatica itself and that is guangyi at any tyrosine tyrosine at me sightseeing and adding those are the those are the four amino acids that are the building blocks of of all of human genetic i was waiting for somebody i was waiting for somebody to actually describe that gatica itself is an acronym for dna is correct that is amazing and you know what's also amazing about the film is that they were obvious they had the they had the valid 's they were called the ballots those are the ones who were selected in basically genetically superior and then they had the invalid or the invalids which were basically organically consi conceive they weren't conceived with technology and so the ones that were conceived through intravenous types or after genetic after genetics or whatever they were the ones who are discriminated they were discriminating against those who were part of the organic process they were excluded they were soon to be inferior because they differ from this it was becoming a narrowly defined standard of genetic perfection so go ahead if you remember if you remember your genetics but they taught us back when we actually learn something in school you can't have two of the same amino acids together so t t together like the tyrosine tyrosine in gatica that's a that's a genetic mutation so that would make you an invalid right there right well you know with my situation i would be an invalid the reason why is because i have tse i have to ask larosa mild case of it and it was because of exposure to my actually my my forebears were exposed to the nuclear tests in nevada actually utah nevada so it it aggravated the tse gene.

nevada kate ryan larosa utah twenty two years
"gatica" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"gatica" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Technology is pushing us a rapidly towards a future that is impossible to forecast we try to imagine the future as it might look like and we can't help having our predictions shaped by the media that we have consumed nineteen eightyfour terminator gatica x makia black mirror all of these stories present a distortion future but if you look around the world the most successful technologists are usually guided by a sense of optimism technologists themselves are idealistic they see the future through a utopian lens more often than a dystopia and lens but popular media largely tells a different story that we are headed inexorably for a dystopia in world why is there such a gulf in the level of idealism between technologists and the media mike salona found himself asking that question on a regular basis during his work at founders fund where he's a vice president founders fund has a bias towards funding difficult cutting edge technology like gene editing robotics and nuclear energy this technology that mike were seeing made him excited about the future which led to his creation of the podcast anatomy of next anatomy of next has explored biology robotics nuclear energy super intelligence and the nature of reality soon the podcast will explore how our civilization will be settling the solar system specifically mars i've listened through the entire first season of anatomy of next twice and i enjoyed it so much because mike explorers questions that are on the border of philosophy technology questions about the nature of reality and what makes us human and there's nobody that can give perfect answers to these questions but mike does interview top experts on the show which provides me as the listener with a framework for thinking through these impossible questions the guests include nick.

mike salona nick vice president founders
"gatica" Discussed on About to Review

About to Review

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"gatica" Discussed on About to Review

"And so a borrowed ladder is a kind of a nice parallel because cause dna looks like a ladder luckily and so that is is kind of the overall idea he wants to go to work for a company called gatica which is a company that ascending manned space missions all over the solar system and in order to even be considered he needs to have that perfect top top and i love the meticulous nature of of what it takes for him he's got he has to collect urine samples lead transfusion mud from using fake has like a fake finger pad put over because they when you walk into a building you put into the building for security purposes but your finger down into lameda tely read your genetic code and say whether or not you're valid or invalid now all of this sounds very terrible yes yeah so far what i think the fact that he is able to to persevere through this whole thing is very much an uplifting story but on top of that the science of is just cool and it and the whole idea that you can improve humanity by taking away some of the things that are clearly negative like cystic fibrosis and some other but you know the the older i get i do have when i look at the movie see that yes that is going to be much more applied to the wealthy or the already al off immediately but you know as a younger like when i was younger and and really looking at the world is like guess but there's so much.

gatica
"gatica" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

VIBES-LIVE

03:21 min | 3 years ago

"gatica" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

"Will show for it irvin ahmed it again as well number one he has not only for an idea to take an opening bid against it has been it's been running we'll do it again is the b both but that was occupied his before that but the madam gained twenty annette as the bank of bam yet can't pay for it the denver powers minded in his mind really gone to the scene of butter tech big pod oh my goodness ninety nine anomaly did these uh in this day i found nate gatica i'm like get this ninety and now mcginty saw and if they act in funding the net gatica us do these sure guinness alone right again ten thousand off please kedo survey law sure two day threat today sir james bag threatening to lag trapped in the desert bag teens fritz lang threatens man france dragged bag in certain bag trap men man was possible bag fathom sean unless muscle bag pm with traffic all day any bag kid with trump proudest playing bag kim travel label prizes sonia hey hey gatumba trap nonomanis of problem bag came the trapped result will look good person pete lau back came amid charge you leave mile mark is bad habits drag uganda be swan and paying low bagged pinned trapped rewarded those mode mitch travel boggles band at home bank pinned traveling hopeful blow we pray back bank kim's it's terribly makers.

annette nate gatica mcginty guinness fritz lang france pete lau uganda kim irvin ahmed denver sir james bag two day
"gatica" Discussed on Show Me the Meaning!

Show Me the Meaning!

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"gatica" Discussed on Show Me the Meaning!

"I'm reminded of the end of antonsen vesa gatien and scarves interaction with judy in madelin's death are basically when i got this i just wanted that say max i agree with you i thought that but there's you know there's the whole exactly switching personalities thing running for both in the very similar and i love vertical scenic go see it it's awesome yet another film that i'd love to do this podcast that also borrows lot from vertigo is takashi miki's audition oh hell you uh and vertigo in in general seems to be a favorite of it's like a filmmakers phil yeah and a lot of filmakers do draw upon various things from vertigo mostly because the the the creation of it in this and the cinematic senator so dense but and it just so juicy of of of a premise it is and at akashi me case film is similarly it's interesting how vertigo is silas dick li split down the middle yeah once you find out that there's you know this is a spoiler miers for her to go yeah once he realized that there is a eldest to say vague conspiracy going on the film changes colors at changes the direction that the camera moves and similarly into koschnik's audition when you similarly rupp find out that there is a conspiracy or a switch in identity it also starts breaking the one a degree were rule it starts getting with lauded jump cuts and so i think that you know if we ever kind of broaden the format of this i think we can do a whole episode on films that evoke data i'm not gatica vertigo yeah blue yeah so i've got another email this is from casper he says a big fan loved that you guys they say nothing is to cerebal or to uncultured to be unworthy of discussion at wisecracked which is definitely laudable thinking casper says the reason i'm writing is after being a silent listener of for so long is that i listened to your mingles episode of prompted me to watch the film while i really liked it i was flabbergasted at your superficial criticism of the portrayal of africa and the film which flies completely off the hinges as austin makes the conclusion that africa equates the wild while american high school equates to civilize this is the opposite of the point of the metaphor in mean girls which is that.

judy madelin vertigo senator silas koschnik casper austin american high school takashi miki rupp wisecracked africa
"gatica" Discussed on WCTC

WCTC

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"gatica" Discussed on WCTC

"On the far side line shovel pans side for freeman on the way optout baker bakers one step comes back baker on the right side of the rack logo over the shoulder throw those two freeman turning spitting on the wing jump shot back at the rim no good late whistle and a foul called on rutgers and here comes mad bullock suv meant sick can dido's saw jay gatica in shack gorshenin that is what you called you fight not get it done we'll go with another five fluid i like this i really wages this guy's are sitting on the bench saying hey i could do better now than coach mike look down the benches guys thinking to go beyond again exactly right sixteen to three indiana twelve forty four to play here on the first johnson left elbow being chased by mensah crosscourt pass the durham right in front of steve pikal on a switch dorsan there give it to mixed wayne right back to durham shot clock at eight now it's johnson and he certainly centrecourt shock clock five johnson dribble dr gets by mid saw high shut off the glass no and midsea comes up with the rebound took away from justin smith who is falling down mensah all the way the glass no the followed has got either for pull it can the ball rebounded by indiana johnson one on one with data could goes around and gets absolutely clobbered by bold data and kwalik gatica had the first contact though and likely to pick up the fao good move by dagger don't give them the basket back in shoot free throws one more energy on that on a note our defense a time everybody crashing aboard grab it pushed me down like with mitzi did he had saw little seem there does explode to the basket just missed it coach judge louis the free throw got eight points already as he misses the first foul shot seventy six percent on the season averaging thirteen point two points per game who said he could be one of those guys go off second free throws good he goes one for to make roberts comes.

freeman baker rutgers jay gatica mike indiana johnson mensah crosscourt durham steve pikal wayne justin smith mitzi roberts kwalik gatica judge louis seventy six percent
"gatica" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"gatica" Discussed on WGN Radio

"See arrival guy had a chance yet that's an as a great piece of science fiction bertus did you see that israel arrival now i have a it's going to it's on netflixing that he should you should definitely see at any adams jeremy renner truth of them from the director of labour twenty forty nine it's a it's a pretty i think it's pretty astonishing movie and so all right is rather what what else pops india anything else bob in your head was looking at a list just online and on it they mention gatica paul that's a good move in yeah i really nj gatica yeah that's a good movie you know and it inada not a big hugely successful movie of very smart film um all the performances are terrific in it one of the early jude law movies that year the first one first times i remember seeing jude law in in a movie things great and had and of course it's houma and lethem yeah comes in at number fifty or fifty four on a list of the top one hundred as roma nice gatica i really i really enjoy the i think it's a very very good movie tina the trivia behind the the title no i do not so obviously to movie a bow experimentation and dna and things like that the news may biology memory is gone but g stands her something that dna a stands for something the dna teeth santo it all the letters to ali so that's how they develop gatica from that because result whatever it is and the dna there's a there's a there's a t i remember i remember when that movie came out it didn't do very well to box office in it got kind of mediocre reviews but over the years like many movies do it's gained a.

director houma israel jeremy renner bob g ali
"gatica" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"gatica" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"I don't know if you're dry on breaking mea i've just need you to be in one place thanks so i listen i had delegate marshall on to talk about the race and oh commercial never mentioned your gender identity that i can recall during the conversation i mean so on buddy you're listening to look at what this quote i mean it was he ended up going to gainful are increased by foreign apor he's had white you call ganic a email gatica dna testing and he's missed 'gendering little red wet or at low i see okay so it would so it's coming up over and over and over again and he was taking away you know my focus on you take one huawei the rate you know where she said that this was going to eat based on all theme and you know at dna wine whatever you want to move one thing i'm a tall problem i can take that by any buying but currently it courageous because you're a kid one or the kids in that adam particular essentially trying to discredit their varying for that point wait wait discredit glorified weighing up don't you think that's a little a discrediting their very existence that's a okay galaxy s q summit since that's part of the conversation now let me ask you tell me is there a biological difference between men and women yeah various okay and cow is that biological difference manifest is there a dna difference between men and women yeah i mean so they will that case so there should be very different things that you're talking about an even a permanent part even if you have no extra at quite you can he'll be able to.

marshall adam
"gatica" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"gatica" Discussed on WRVA

"Off don't you think stephen hawking would rather have reigler iq and walk around like the rest of us i think you're missing my point no you're missing my point you may be just because you can do something doesn't mean you should do something would you do this if you had the option right now you're about to have a baby instead of letting random chance develop your baby or if you believe god having a hand in creating your baby depending on your point of view i happened to be christians so i believe that god is at work with every single human being and that he has a purpose for one of us by understand everybody believes like me so if you believe in random chance between a man and woman making a baby do you think that's the way to go with this be smarter i mean greg if you could screen out a gene that would cause your child child's get colon cancer win you want to scream at out i mean otherwise aren't you a horrible parent at some point are we going to get to the point where the government says you must screen out these illnesses for savings for the government in money and because otherwise the child abuse that you're not see that's what happened in the movie gatica they stopped making babies you'll fashioned way for most people they started doing this for they would select the best possible child from the mother and the father they did it slightly differently in the movie but they were trying to pick out the very best dna for child between these two people and if you did that your child was labelled a valid he or she was a valid human being and for valid they got the best schools and they got the best jobs and they god the best opportunities and they were putting the best positions but if your parents insisted on making children the old fashioned way you're label by the government as an invalid i mean you might need glasses i mean you might have asthma i mean you might have some problems in your life so we can't allow you to have the.

stephen hawking colon cancer greg