19 Burst results for "Gary Sinise"

"gary sinise" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

Jocko Podcast

02:53 min | 8 months ago

"gary sinise" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

"Gary himself is on twitter and facebook at Gary sinise. And he's on. What Echo calls the Graham at Gary sinise official and with that Once again thanks to Gary for for coming on for sharing his story and more important. Thanks to Gary sinise for what he's doing and continuing to doing. It has done to support the veterans and first responders of our great nation because for many the war doesn't end when the battles over there is a war that can continue physically mentally spiritually and Gary is doing a lot to support America's heroes through that transition and to the heroes that are out there listening to those that are serving and those that have served. Thank you for protecting our way of life. Yes we are grateful in the same goes to our police. Law enforcement firefighters paramedics. Emt's dispatchers correctional officers border patrol. Secret Service you protect us here at home and yes. We are grateful for that as well and to everyone else out there when we talk about being grateful we're not just talking about being grateful for our heroes in the military and our first responders talking about being grateful for life because it's here and it's now and there are so many men and women that have sacrificed so much for us that we can be here in a world that is overflowing with opportunity. So be grateful for that and in show gratitude show gratitude to those that have served not just by saying thank you show gratitude. Not just with your words but by going out taking action. Making things happen. Show them gratitude by going out there in the world and getting after it until next time echo when Jaakko out..

Gary sinise Emt Echo twitter facebook America Graham official
"gary sinise" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

Jocko Podcast

07:47 min | 8 months ago

"gary sinise" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

"You have any closing thoughts before we take off. I look I'm I'm I'm thankful that you you had me on. You gave me some time to talk and That you're interested in in the book. The book came out a year ago. it's done. It's done very very well. And we help Mitt just keeps on going because it's a I think what I think is In some ways a little bit of a call to Action I tried to tell the story of somebody who didn't see it common. But all of a sudden Made a turn toward a service life which is basically. That's what I do now. You know I'm I've I've done well in my acting career. I was grateful that I had. Csi New York as it gave me a lot of resources to do a lot of good things. And now I'm I'm focusing primarily on the mission of the Gary. Sinise foundation will were doing and and the book kind of tells the story of I got there. If people want to support the Gary sinise foundation they can go to Gary sinise foundation dot org also on twitter on instagram and on facebook. Those are all also Gary sinise foundation at Gary Sinise Foundation and then Gary himself is on twitter and on facebook at Gary sinise and then on Instagram at Gary. Sinise official. If you WANNA check out the social media the social media Yeah SO GARY. Lega said it's been over four hours. Thank you so much for what you're doing. Thanks for coming on. It's been an honor to meet you and look forward to having you back on here. Next time you get a spare month we have to talk again. Let me let me just say this to to you for your service to our country. One grateful American. I appreciate what you've you've done for our country and and I don't for one day take it for granted so I hope you know by spreading the word about what we're doing the Gary sinise sound foundation. We can help more of your fellow service members and take care of them and their families. There was an honor deserve. Thank you thanks for coming on Yvette. But and with that Gary has left the building. If we have a brief message for you when it comes to supporting right we WANNA do more with our lives. I think that's pretty straightforward echo. Charles Sir you've been relatively quiet today. We are grateful for that. Yeah if you notice you didn't ask me or you got anything else. Because I had a whole list of movie questions. Oh so yeah you gotTA. I didn't open does that one. What can we do to do more be better? What can we do okay? So workout take extreme ownership Take your son 'til he don't complain and also due to so various reasons for this obviously And you know I don't have to. I will want me to. It's been over four hours. How about we just accept the fact that we're going to do JIU Jitsu. Yes so idea okay. So you need a Geek G. U. Rash Guard GonNa do not need want you want to get one hundred percent forgive. You do need so in an orgy. This is why factually the best in the world. Many options made in America one hundred percent. Those are the the front running reasons really know expansive needed. Those are all Kinda speak for themselves in the world. Many different options made in America hundred percent. You case closed case. We're good on that. What else can we get from origin? How about some supplements filament the big data? Or are you going to say jeans? Well probably thinking well. You can get jeans to chocolate. You don't necessarily need to be a genealogy necessarily but yes so gene. Okay yeah you brought it up jeans yes I was GonNa say that at some point too so he has genes same deal. Best in the world factually multiple will say more than one option more than one. That's right. Yeah technically and more than one and made in America hundred percent boom jeans by the way did I say it was American dental your. That's what it is yes. It's American made a hundred percent also supplements certain supplements supplements. You supplement. That you should take. There's no other ways around it so take joint warfare. Free Take Krill oil all the time. That's just a daily disciplined is Krill oil super KRILL and joint warfare. Get on that. And then you've got some other options. If you need a little weeny get up on. Step a little bit. It's cool take discipline. He can take discipline. Go Pill you can take discipline go powder form mix it up or you can take discipline ready to drink in a can ready to rock and roll. You may need so that can give you a little boost. Is little boost. You might need a boost of your protein intake. If you need that cool we got you if you need desert we got you because those last two kind of the same thing. The desert and protein desert and Protein. Mock all day by the way there is. There is a thing that you can get on. You can get on board. It's called the milk train. Stay on one hundred. And IT'S NOT TO SPLIT HAIRS. Disciplined go is not the powder. Oh yes discipline yes. That's the original bill G. original. Hey let's make powder drink that I can drink to get my then. Hey you know what? Sometimes I don't have time to mix up a drink. How about we make a little pill. I can take cool great I do. Yeah then sometimes. Oh sometimes I want to have a little bit and I want it like right now. I don't want to mix it up you wanted to. Can you display go? Rtd in a camp. That's in just to sorta separate the legacy not split hairs. But Hey you know these details. That aren't unimportant regime. Saying yes also where your kid mocked back to the train where your kid more for the kids a little bit more engineered towards the kids. But let's face it. You're going to get into that that supplies. There's no doubt that I've drink much. I've been on the Mark Thomas the tank in it. Thomas the tank Thomas. The tank engine. Little Kids train okay. A Lotta people call it the little kids milk train the war. You're getting more trained. Get your kids on Thomas. The tank engine train and don't forget about Daca. White t organic certified because because Echo really likes that bre. Yes and by the way everything that we talked about. That's a supplement. You can get it at the vitamin SHOPPE NATIONWIDE USA America to also. If you're not walking into the vitamin SHOPPE nationwide in America. Just go to origin main DOT com. So you get all this stuff all of it. Oh Yeah Giza's well..

Gary sinise Gary Sinise Foundation America Gary Sinise Echo Mark Thomas twitter facebook New York Mitt vitamin SHOPPE Krill JIU Jitsu Lega Yvette Daca Charles Sir front running
"gary sinise" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

Jocko Podcast

03:24 min | 8 months ago

"gary sinise" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

"Think the idea of we can always do a little more is probably a good place to wrap even though it's not the last chapter. The last chapter's actually called. Why I'm still on a mission in. Obviously there's an important message there but that also ties in with the motto. We can always do a little bit more. And I guess they'll have to buy the book to get that last. Yes indeed and the book contains a lot of reasons why we all still need to stay on mission and as I was preparing to do this podcast. I knew that I was going to be reading your words and then I thought back to a time when you actually read some of my words when when Mikey monster was killed in Iraq I gave a speech at his memorial service in Ramadi and the the theme of that speech was was roger that because I told the story where where I had told Mike and the rest of the new guys in the task unit that when the Instructor Cadre from the training attachment came and told them to do something or correct them or yelled at them the only thing they were allowed to say back with Roger that and so a couple of days went by and one of the master chiefs. Who was a friend of mine? He came up to me and he's okay with that was up with this guy and I said what do you mean? He says every time I every time I tell them to do so. We're fixing. He just looks at me and says Roger that and I said Hey man. That's exactly what I told him to say. And and that actually became Mikey's attitude and no matter what he was asked to do no matter how hard the task his response was always. Roger that including when a grenade was thrown that threaten the lives of three of other teammates. Then only one person could save them. Was Mikey and in order to do so. He had to smother that grenade with his own body and sacrifice his life for his friends and in that moment of truth his response was the same Raja. Vat a few years later at the Republican National Convention. There was a tribute to Mikey and it was rooted in the same vein theme and clearly. It'd been taken from the eulogy that I delivered in the dusty hangar with a broken heart and Ramadi Iraq just after Mike was killed in that theme was Roger That and the tribute for Mikey was delivered by none other than Gary sinise and it was a fitting tribute fit.

Mikey monster Roger That Mike Iraq Ramadi Republican National Convention Gary sinise Instructor Cadre
"gary sinise" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

Jocko Podcast

05:34 min | 8 months ago

"gary sinise" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

"Yeah you got to a point where you had to kind of consolidate your efforts. Yeah I in the in the back of the book there. There's there's a list of maybe thirty different charities that I was supporting and you know in various ways I would. I wanted to do a lot for as many veterans as possible so I chose to do that initially by not only doing. Uso Tours but supporting Nonprofit organizations that were really doing a good job in the in the military support space so I would do. Psa's for them. I would fundraise for them. I would lend my name. I'd be on their honorary advisory boards. I would it would. It went on and on and on and then I was like you know right before I started. The Foundation Launched Foundation Garysinisefoundation. Two thousand eleven. So the chapter in the book called Flurry of action kind of talks about two thousand nine two thousand ten the two years leading up to the founding of the FOUNDATION BECAUSE THOSE YEAR. I was just ramping more more more and all the while I was shooting and television series by the way at the same time so I was never home. I was shooting the show or gone on the weekends. Doing something helping some organization out and I thought this is you know I need to figure out some other way to do this and having been involved with so many military charities over the years and had established a good reputation within the support space. You know th it's a in people knew I was there for real and I kept coming back and I. It wasn't something I did want and and I was. I was ongoing. It was part of my life so I thought capitalize on that in some way and And create an organization that can You know act as a reliable resource for people who want to support our veterans and military community. And that's why named the Gary Sinise Foundation. I mean people knew who I was at that point. They knew I was in this for good. I could have called the help the troops foundation or something like that but I decided to put my name on it because I had you know. Take an action and And people were supporting that so I thought well the the whole purpose of having a foundation is to raise money so that you can do more and I wanted to raise a lot of money to to do a lot more. And that's what we're doing we'll just like any brand when you know the brand and you know it's quality because let's face it. I mean the charitable organizations. There's good ones and there's bad ones and so if you have a good reputation inside of a brand that people know that you're doing the right thing. Why not like you said capitalize on that and make it obvious. Yeah because I made a decision that this is look. I'm I'm this isn't something I'm going to stop doing. I'm gonNA keep doing so. Let's let's figure out the best way to do it. In the most effective way that we will will be there for a long time. I hope to create a foundation and and I think we're well on our way to doing that That that is here for the long term. That hopefully it will survive me and go on and keep helping people In the spirit of personal touches that I've tried to give it and it will be there You know And last in in for decades. That's that's what I hope I. I'm I'm in it for good. It's a meaningful mission. Service has been a great thing for my life and I think you know we were helping a lot of people now. I can see that That will weave the you know the building blocks that we've laid here over this time are solid and people trusted and want to support it with some of the work that you're doing is incredible and we like You got this. We built a home for us. Army Ranger Sergeant. First Class Michael Schlitz who served as a rifleman platoon sergeant southern Iraq on February twenty seven two thousand and seven. Mike and his crew were conducting road clearing mission near Baghdad when their vehicle struck a hidden. Id burst into flame his gunner. Sergeant Richard Sue Kanka and medic sergeant. Jonathan Cavero. Were killed instantly. His driver corporal. Lorne Henry Junior passed away. Shortly after the blast Mike Rotunda Pastor seat engulfed in flames. He was thrown from the vehicle. You lost both hands and the site left eye and sustained burns over eighty five percent of his body. Early in Mike's Recovery. He started going to a program at UCLA. Called operation. Men consisting of a team of surgeons who helped provide free surgeries to our severely wounded veterans. When I first met Mike you so severely burned. He didn't have knows and he through a hole in his throat. We struck up a friendship over the years. He's had multiple reconstructive surgeries to repair the damage to his eyelids mouth and nose and other parts of his body worth skin was burned. Having last lost both arms he now uses to prosthetic cooks. Mike's living situation posed innumerable challenges form because the fragility.

Mike Rotunda Foundation Launched Foundation Gary Sinise Foundation Sergeant Richard Sue Kanka Lorne Henry Junior Baghdad Michael Schlitz Jonathan Cavero UCLA Iraq
"gary sinise" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

Jocko Podcast

01:53 min | 8 months ago

"gary sinise" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

"Going here. Another busy year plan for two thousand ten thirty five concerts and additional events in support of our troops. They were still out there fighting and I kept doing so much because it needed to be done but I was tired. I was wondering how long could keep up this pace. Would I be able to continue like this award? I burn out yet. I envisioned vision a future doing still more and I wanted to figure out a way to ramp up. Not Pullback my work since I could see the positive efforts we were having. The question was how I began to consider consolidating my mission under one umbrella continuing to work while focusing my priorities in the most effective way possible having teamed up with many organizations and efforts in the military support space. I A great deal about many different areas of need. I could strategically harnessing credible power of the many volunteers who worked alongside me over the years and could help serve them. Our Military Veterans and first responder communities more effectively to I could still point donors in a good direction encourage generosity of the American people to support quality projects. I was involved in but I do it more consistently under this one umbrella thinking through all that the solution became clear my own foundation. And you call it out here. I've been involved in so many different types of initiatives at this point and even though US consolidating efforts I still wanted to keep the mission statement broad reflecting the support work. I don't over the years and so we could always adapt to changing needs of our veterans. We came up with this mission statement at the Gary Sinise Foundation. We serve our nation by honoring. Our defenders veterans first responders their families and those in need we do this by creating. It's supporting unique programs designed to entertain educate inspire strengthen and build communities..

Gary Sinise Foundation US
"gary sinise" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

Jocko Podcast

09:37 min | 8 months ago

"gary sinise" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

"Reach. You're living in in California at the time in. La Malibu in Malibu and even in Malibu they broke out the American flags yeah Yeah Friday night so it was a Tuesday and there were candlelight. Vigils all over the place and if you remember and we heard about something going on On one of the corners in In Our neighborhood so I grabbed. I grabbed an American flag that I had hanging by my front door. And we walked down the street with kids and we went and all the neighbors were gathering around People were singing and At one point everybody I had my flag up and at one point everyone turned and said the pledge of allegiance and he was God bless America and it was America. The beautiful and it was a star. You know the national anthem and and people were just singing with candles On the corner and Malibu Just coming together. People were paying all over the place and everyone was looking for something and during the day that day we went to our little Catholic Church. I don't know if you remember but George. Bush said he was going to make that Friday a national day of prayer for the nation and so the churches and houses of worship everywhere in the country. We're just champ packed with people trying to find some peace. Some you know some like trying to understand what was going on trying to find something and we got to our little Catholic Church At the school that my kids went to and there was only standing room. It was packed and we ended up standing off to the side leaning against the wall. I remember the priest. His first thing he said I don't remember everything he said but he said this has been a tough week and everybody was home and at the end of the mass and then We Sing God bless America in the Church and I couldn't even get the words out. I mean just tears rolling down my face. Everything changed for me at that. Point the chapter in the book that kind of Explorers that is called turning point. And it was. You know the things we talked about in the eighties with regards the Vietnam veterans in my family and tracers. And all these Vietnam Veterans Things Lieutenant. Dan Comes along and I. I start working with our wounded after that with a disabled American Veterans Organization. They contacted me and asked me to come to their national convention in the game in award for playing tennis. Dan and there was a sea of wheelchairs and wounded veterans from going back to World War. Two and they were all applauding me and everything. I was very moved by that state involved with them Tried to support the DAV for a number of years and then long come September eleventh and the seeds that had been planted in those eight years with the veterans in my family Vietnam veterans and then working in support of the Dav some that all kind of grew into this thing after September eleventh and and I turned never to return to business as usual I turned toward service in a very very active way and it just got more and more and more and I. I wanted to help our veterans than the men and women who were responding to those attacks and deploying to Afghanistan Iraq and elsewhere and I wanted to support them one of the things that you say here around that is throughout my entire life. I've always been the type of person who chose to act not the theater since the way word although I did a lot of that but I mean take action whether we're starting a band that lip sync for living room full neighborhood kids or working with my fellow high school students to fashion our own theatre company or taking a great production New New York or moving out to Los Angeles so I could work in the movies. Never been the kind of guy who sat around and talked or wondered or thought about stuff without doing something about it at least not for long. My response has always been to take action and hopefully doing so would benefit other people along the way in those early months of two thousand and three and again I jumped ahead to get here I realize like never before the cost of freedom and I knew freedom needed to be defended new places that existed in our world without freedom and new that without freedom nothing of the good and fulfilling ways we in America spire deliver. Lives would be possible. This realization helped fuel me more than ever before. It made me profoundly grateful for being American able to live in this land of Freedom. Able to make something of my life when it came to service. I wanted to be all in all the time. Living Out my calling every single day for the rest of my life I can. Almost I can say most certainly that what happened to our country on September eleventh broke my heart and changed me forever. It forced me to rethink everything. What do I really believe? How do I WANNA raise my kids? What kind of example do I WANNA set for them? What can I do to give this great country? What can I do give back to this? Great Country I love. How can I use my good fortune to help? It was a turning point. Mark the beginning of a new level of service. I found that the more I gave the more I healed two months. After watching the statue of Saddam Hussein being pulled down I was on a plane to Kuwait. Nothing would ever be the same kind of kicked off. You know. The name of this. Next chapter is a bridge between worlds. You know and and bridging this thing you've got this here hi I'm Gary sinise and I'd like to go on a USO tour. Please call me back. I left my number on the voicemail. A couple of weeks went by all I heard was crickets. I concluded the USO Receives Large Vonda calls with similar requests as mine. So I called again and left the second message. Hi This is Gary sinise and I'd like to go on a USO tour to support the troops. Please back to me. Chirp CHIRP. Those crickets were deafening. Now you get tactical and you say I called again in May and left a third message. This time more strategic. Hi this is Gary sinise calling again. I'd like to go on a USO tour. I want to do as much as I can't support the troops. Please call me back. Oh by the way. I'm the guy who played lieutenant. Dan Forrest Gump Representative from the USO. Returned my call the very next day. Yeah I wasn't a recognizable name at Lieutenant Dan. Dan is so. That's that started. You go to Camp Doha. You go to camp. Dari You end up at one of these bases. Us Representative motion for us to follow him and let us to the big tent near the center of Camp. The ten headed entrance on each side generators working overtime to pump air conditioning. We headed for one door and at the other side. A line of at least a thousand troops waited in the heat to get in as we headed and they started to applaud the atmosphere inside crackled. Maybe another thousand uniform troops already inside. The tent broke into applause. When we came into the tent I took a deep breath. What have we done? They deserve the applause not us. But wow this is amazing. Even with little even with a little air conditioning was Hamas Helen. There nobody seemed to care we lined up and the truth lined up and started to file past us. We smiled and shook hands and posed for pictures and everything happened quite quickly. The very first soldier I met said. Hey Lieutenant Dan you got legs and then each one down. The line just kept calling me lieutenant Dan over and over. I realized they didn't know my real name so I went with it. I tried to look each person. The I tried to ask you so to where he or she was from. Tried to ask how things were going but nothing. I did felt very deep because we had to keep the line moving. There's so many people and then you guys have to leave and you kind of you kind of ask yourself that we do any good now. You're traveling around. You're getting ready for a next a next trip. I think you're heading into Baghdad. You say this. The man to the writing wore a button on his shirt bearing the photo of two young men in New York City police officer and the other a firefighter with the F. D. N. Y. We struck up struck up a conversation. I learned he wasn't an entertainer. The two young men were his sons and both sons died on nine eleven. He was there because he wanted the troops overseas to know that America supported them. The man was maybe in his mid sixties spoke of low rasp scars ran across his neck and later. I found out he'd survived throat cancer. The main character chunk of rock concrete made maybe he showed it to me than past it in my direction so I could feel it too. I ran my hands over. Its rough surface. It felt like an old piece of rubble puzzle. I asked him what it was all about why he was carrying all this extra weight. He swallowed once twice then. His eyes grew wet. He West whispered more horsely than before. It's a piece of.

Lieutenant Dan America Gary sinise USO Vietnam New York Malibu little Catholic Church Catholic Church Representative California tennis American Veterans Organization throat cancer Bush George Saddam Hussein Dan Forrest Gump Kuwait
"gary sinise" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

Jocko Podcast

04:20 min | 8 months ago

"gary sinise" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

"So you you you take her. You Take Rehab. She's freaks out on on the way there. You compare to Linda Blair in the exorcist in terms of her behavior on the way there. And you're asking yourself like who who. Who is this person? What's happening fast? Forward a bit here. You say an average stay in Rehab is twenty eight days. My wife stayed in Rehab for seven weeks. She was there the entire time. I was shooting the movie. I received a call from the facility at one point and Rehab supervisor indicated. They were having a hard time getting to admit she had a problem. She thought she was fine and that everybody there was messed up. That meant trouble. If you never admit you have a problem. You'll never get better at you when she when they were telling you that she didn't. She wasn't admitting to order. She wasn't owning the problem. That the you kind of knew this is not good. Yeah yeah that was. That was not surprising Because I I knew she was kind of deep in the throes of the devil. Ad is hands around her neck and We had to come up with tried to come up with some additional ways to get her to to admit it and to to face it and she wasn't going to get better if she didn't realize what her issue was and that it was real so Rehab After seven weeks I brought her home and within Within Gosh probably within four months she F- had fallen again and had to go to Rehab again. And that's that's when things began to to get better and change for the second time. Yeah it seemed like that was a point where you know you. You you describe Finding out that she's basically you're on the road. You're doing another Thing stake a snake eyes. And you're on the road doing that. You get a call from your daughter basically saying what you know. Mom still drinking You say here in the book I wanted to be the loving husband the gentle husband. I wanted to ask nicely. Please don't drink again but with the vicious enemy of alcohol taking over the life of the woman I loved. I learned that you could show no mercy fighting this enemy. I called the John. Frankenheimer and said Moore has relapsed. I'm heading back to Los Angeles but I don't know what I'm GonNa do. John said it's time to take the gloves off and he told me exactly what I needed to do when I arrived home the next day. More to open the door and I spotted it right away. She'd been drinking again. I came in the House gave the kid her and the kids. A hug acted as if everything was normal. And fine after a short wireless had more. Honey you tired. Why don't you go down and take a nap? She said you know I am kind of tired. I think will she went to lie down in the back bedroom? Twenty minutes later I checked on her. She was out like a light. I packed three suitcases. Called a car to pick us up and Mora the hardest letter I've ever had to write I explain. We'd reached a point of decision. She couldn't have our family and still have alcohol. She needed to choose between us and she needed to get serious about her choice. Because I was finished I told her I loved her so much and I wanted her to be okay what I wanted most in life for her to be sober and happy for us to be together again as a family but we couldn't do that if she continued to drink. I was taking the kids. And that's that's you know that's an easy thing to do. You always WanNa you know. I remember because.

John Linda Blair Moore supervisor Los Angeles Frankenheimer
"gary sinise" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

Jocko Podcast

13:19 min | 9 months ago

"gary sinise" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

"Division Vietnam. Jack earned two bronze stars and two Purple Hearts. When Arthur came home from Vietnam he withdrew from things and I would seem only on rare occasions when more than I would visit her mother but from time to time Mac Jack and Amy came to visit us in Chicago and would see our place. I didn't spend a ton of time with these veterans at first but any time we got together we talked about deeper matters and as I slowly learned more and more about the people who protected our freedoms I began to look for ways to give back in one thousand nine seventy six and nineteen seventy seven. Mac came to see a few of our basement plays whenever he was on leave from assignment as tactical officer at West Point I was a pretty ragged kid then with torn up jeans and a T-SHIRT and lots of hair. He was spit shined. Strong isn't as strong as atlas and had a deep powerful voice Gary. What are your goals? Mac asked me one day after a show he wasn't grilling me. I sensed kindness within this roughness. He was interested in other people's lives and genuinely wanted to know about my goals but I wasn't sure if he was asking me about my goals in life for my designs on his sister possibly he wanted to know where we wanted to go as a theater company so I describe my goals for Steppenwolf and how I wanted it to make it as big as possible. We had a conversation a real conversation. This elite former company commander in Media Longhaired American Twenty Year. Old with big dreams of all things we connected on the subject of leadership in highschool to hide the war. I'd been oblivious to so much of what was happening in Vietnam yet. In the early years of Steppenwolf I begin to form genuine friendships with these military veterans. They begin to open my eyes so much more of the war. I knew the war had gone. Well I remembered casualty reports on the news and new reports were grim but now is meeting actual veterans who live there serve their fought there and knew that many of the Vietnam veterans who'd returned home hadn't been honored for their service. I didn't know what to do about this if anything but I felt something stirring inside of me. Honor needed to be granted. Respect was do a simple thanks needed to be said it would take a few years before I figured out. Any sort of nextstep. But in the meantime I had a theater and more as family members and I knew something in our country desperately needed to change I would start where I could with. Steppenwolf and without being able to articulate it in this way yet I would begin to do my part to give back so I really liked about that not not to say that. I'm any thing close to a guy like mack but when I meet people right like I'll you know some friend of my daughter's or some friend of my sisters. You know some people that are clearly pretty close to a long haired. Gary sinise in nineteen seventy five or whatever and you can I can. I can feel that. They're looking at me. Thinking stereotypical image of what I'm going to be like right and I have a genuine conversation with them because I am genuinely. Oh so what do you do? We know so what would happen in life and I think it's like the same way you said. Hey this was a what you call this. This elite former company commander. And you're having a normal conversation with and there's a there's like a A revelation that. Oh this guy's a person this guy's just person that yeah he's got spit shine and yeah he's got a high tight but he's just a person and he's going to come and watch are freaking crazy. Plays in our theater which which are kind of crazy. Some of them are really crazy. I forget is the one where everyone's naked on stage yet. That happened yet at this point until yeah that was Yeah one of the one of the plays that you guys do is about what they need. Peruvians is approved. What COUNTRY AND DOWN IN SOUTH AMERICA? And it's a small small tribe living. You know very in a very remote area the jungle so you guys put twenty-five actors on stage naked. Don't blame it on me. I did. This was so Malkovich decides twenty-five and you actually. When I heard that I was like okay I get it you know. They're trying to break down some barriers. But then what got me. Was you go into the details of that? The fact that this place is really small. It's hot and all of a sudden you're sitting in a small Roman. There's only eighty eight seats so you got eight people in the bleachers. Or whatever in the seats and there's thirty people make it on your almost outnumbered by sweaty naked people. It wasn't the biggest hit Of Our early days but I can see macro in there from west point going. What is my sister doing yet? No he didn't see that thankful that and thankfully thankfully So we're GONNA cut you off now now that Mac was an interesting. I let me just talked about You Know He. He passed away in one thousand nine hundred. Eighty three of cancer and But he made a very big impression on me as some. You know I'd never met anyone like him before As I said I had veterans in my own family but I'd never really met in a West Point graduate to tour Vietnam veteran in fact You know General Vic Vince Brooks. I know I don't know him. But General Mike Scaparrotti right These are to their their newly retired. But they're they're friends of mine and I met them I met Mike when he was a two star and I met Vince. When he was one star they both went on to earn four stars. They retired their final job. Sir Vince his last assignment was running. Korea and SCAPARROTTI Was the Supreme Allied Commander in Europe? Right so both of these guys were at West Point when Mac was there and that's why I'm close with them because when I met them early earlier on in their star stardom They they said they went to West. Point and I said well did you happen to know Mac Harris and both of them when I met each of them. Their faces lit up and they started gushing about my brother-in-law and how much of an influence he had on them When he was attack officer at West Point so he was a really significant guy. They they and they actually just about four years ago. Two Thousand Sixteen. They inducted Mac and this is thirty years after his death into the fort. Leavenworth Hall of fame. And you know Omar Bradley and General Patton. All those kind of people are in the Fort Leavenworth Hall of fame because he revolutionized some things in the army back in in the day. Back in nineteen seventy six seventy seven and into you know. Eighty one eighty two eighty three when he his final assignment was at at the Leavenworth where he rewrote the leadership manual and That manuals still taught today and principals at each champion and he came up with and so they thought it was a significant contribution to today's army so they put him in. Fort Leavenworth Hall of fame. And this is the guy who came and you know I was a little bit scared of him and everything but then I got to know him and he was a lovely lovely guy Just unlike anyone I'd ever met any made a big impression on me and I went to his funeral. You know. I went to his military funeral when he when he died in nineteen eighty three and that was that was very very powerful. And so when you know ten years later when I started working with our wounded and getting more involved and everything like that all those memories of spending time with this particular individual Came flooding back in and some pretty significant ways. And that's why right about them in the book. Well I I. I mentioned Echo Charles before we started recording. Before you got here today. Said there's you're gonNA see some layers today because echo likes to talk about layers the way things are connected and we often infuse layers intentionally and things but we record. We podcasts about a lot of podcasts. About military stuff and we've covered dozens of military manuals on this podcast. And I think podcast one seventy two we cover. Fm Field Manual Twenty to tack ten which is an earlier edition written in nineteen fifty one of leadership for the army. So now we get to go back and I will. I will get the newer version. I'll get the one that mack wrote and I'll compare the two and see what things what lessons he brought. Because if you think about it the reason I picked one thousand nine hundred fifty one was po post World War. Two right so we're talking immediately after World War Two these guys that sat down and said Hey. Here's what we should be teaching. So I don't even think they revised it after Korea but now Max will be post Vietnam so it'll be an interesting study and you're right. You know these guys and one thing that I've talked about. I talked about a lot of these manuals when we cover them. Is You know I'll be saying I'll be saying whoever wrote that like. Who wrote that part right there? That that right there is solid that one and I was used. I sometimes I joke about it. Being a comedian there. That's there's one guy that's really good. And and and Lieutenant Colonel Pogue or Colonel. Pogue is on the other side saying no. We can't type thing that'll be offensive to whatever there's always that guy and then there's like the combat that that's putting it straight so now I got a name to go with the Combat Guy. That's putting it straight. His name is Mack Harris. And just so you know. He got He was his last assignment was was to rewrite the leadership manual at Leavenworth. That's and he got a lot of pushback from from top folks who didn't want to go in the direction that he was taking it and he wanted to tell He wanted to talk about leadership through very personal stories of history and those leadership manuals can be very sort of dry and a little bit technical and just sort of Blah Blah Blah and Mac tell stories about little round top and Pickett's charge and all this stuff in there and they. He was getting a lot of pushback from people but he push-back himself and they they may they publish the leadership manual about a month after passed away it was it was finally published and brought to light and they're still using it today at West Point and throughout the army awesome. Where if jumped forward a little bit here more than I made a decision break from Steppenwolf move out to Los Angeles. Your parents had moved out there and live with my parents for a while. We decided we also decided to get married. Mom was thrilled and jumped in a wedding planning with more. But I could tell. Something was churning in moir's mind one day shortly again skipping around because I can't read this whole book people by the Book One day shortly before the wedding date Moore told me she planned to fly home to Illinois to spend some time with her mom before coming back for the wedding a couple of days after she landed in Chicago. The phone rang Gary. I don't want to get married. Maria said I'm not coming back what I said she pausing added. I can't do it wait. Invitations have gone out. We've got all the food ordered. I know but I'm not GONNA do it. I can't I just can't so that's kind of I mean that's that's got to be a big hit or were you nervous about it to enough to be like well. I guess we're good. Well how were you? There were some. I was more afraid of my mom. Who is spending the money on the Napkins? And the and the table cloth and and things like that and Okay I accept it you know I was disappointed but then I accepted and we kind of went our separate ways for about a year and a half and here we are all these years later back together and we married Many many years. I had to talk about this in late summer. Nineteen seventy nine. I found out that Robert Redford was making a big movie called ordinary. People and I landed an audition.

West Point Mac Vietnam Gary sinise Mack Harris army commander Leavenworth Mac Jack Fort Leavenworth Hall of fame officer Chicago Steppenwolf Korea Leavenworth Hall of fame Mike Scaparrotti
"gary sinise" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

Jocko Podcast

04:42 min | 9 months ago

"gary sinise" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

"Which is the wolf of the step which is on in German daas step in but that's kind of cool go because this is what's tugging humans right and the thing that when I was saying earlier that like I kinda. I don't know if we recorded the thing that I kind of relate like when I was a kid you know we all had bands I was into hardcore punk rock and it was everything was kind of diy that was the that was the mindset. The mindset was. We're doing this ourselves like oh the man doesn't support. Us Cool will do. We're doing this ourselves. I still have that attitude. I I started my own publishing company. Why because I didn't like what my publisher said about something. I was like cool. I got this watch this by publishing for now. You know so that attitude. It's pretty cool that you guys had this attitude of we're going to start our own theatre company. We're GONNA you know there you go you make the name and you start getting out there and it's been around now for however many years forty almost fifty years. Well is forty-six years. Yeah had You know we own Several buildings that we built from the ground up. We're building another one right now It's it's really is a great American dream story. Where you you start off with just some kids with kind of a passionate desire to do something and you know forty six years later it's It's a multi million dollar gigantic place in lots of great actors. Come out of there and it's You know when you walk in. I always think about the eighteen year old kid who's in highschool walk into that place and looks at all the you know all the pictures and everything and it's a giant theater. There's three or four theaters in their restaurants. Everything like that and then you can see this picture of eighteen year old kids up there on the wall and they're like me you know they built this thing You know it really is an inspirational sort of theater story. I think yeah I mean it's not just it's it's personal theater store. It's it's an inspirational story of what's what human beings free. Human beings are capable of executing if they if they put their mind to it. Yeah and in the book I write about a lot of the early years struggles off. All the crazy stuff is going to get away with talking about. I don't know if you go through there. But eventually we ended up with a total of nine people for our new steppenwolf and today these nine or sometimes referred to as the original members even though the name Steppenwolf it already been used since nineteen seventy four. The nine original members were John Malkovich. Morua Harris. Nancy Evans H. E. Baucus is that right. Lauri METCALF AL WILDER. And the three founders. Which is Terry Kinney Jeffrey? And you Gary sinise and Again just kind of what you were. Just referring to the summer of Nineteen seventy-six not everything so neatly resolved as our ensemble was getting wild trying to get along and learn to work together. In those first months of Steppenwolf things quickly grew messy and complicated his personal life at theatre life intertwined. Moya Harris had particularly caught my eye. She was brilliant young actor beautiful passionate full of fire. I convinced her to date me. We soon fell in love. She was on like anyone ever met. But our love affair wasn't without its ups and downs. We were all over the place in our relationship to passionate personalities on again off again in love Outta love clinging to each other mad at each other breaking up making up you know. I work with businesses all the time I've been salting company and getting grown adult educated human beings to resolve. Problems is challenging having these you know whatever nine eighteen nineteen twenty twenty one year old kids all of them you know with these fiery personalities and it must have been crazy not to mention you mix in you know chemicals and what not it gets really crazy you go here at one point. Terry decided to leave again and again I skip a bunch here. Some of the things that you're talking about the craziness. I skipped some of that. But that's why people need to get the book at One Point. Terry decided to leave again. Then he wanted back in again this time we held a meeting to decide if Terry could rejoin. We all argued.

Terry Kinney Jeffrey Morua Harris Lauri METCALF AL WILDER One Point Gary sinise Nancy Evans H. E. Baucus highschool John Malkovich publisher
"gary sinise" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

Jocko Podcast

06:03 min | 9 months ago

"gary sinise" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

"Thought but kept reading. My eyes kept scanning down scanning down toward the very end. When I saw this a soft light came on inside my soul peppy. Is that right peppy? Peppy peppy to be played by Gary sinise. How many lives this peppy? Half peppy has a couple of words. Okay a couple of words. I would call them lines okay. Well that's something gang. Was you know it's the sharks and sharks and the jets? Everybody knows west side story and I was one of the sharks in so You go on here. I'd come to high school and falling into a powder smoking dope skipping class. Smoking more dope all the while trying to find friends. Just another kid caught up in this American craziness wasn't much going. There wasn't much hold together and this is this. I could go off ten generally on this forever but you're talking about basically about America. That wasn't much to hold us together. Culture that was changing morals. What were they? This is one thousand nine hundred ninety one religion my mom. My family stopped going to church when I was a little kid and we weren't raised with any sort of faith. Nothing to provide an anchor as a family as a nation. These were tough times. Most days I was floating on the open sea every evening images the Vietnam war splashed across the TV screens. So yeah it's kind of wild times and you're at a party and there's some guy it's it's I actually picked up on this immediately when I read it you described some guy that's in there and Some guy at the Party and you. How do you describe it? It's actually kind of funny. He looks like he's older. Like someone's older brother and he wants to buy some pop- from you and you sell it to them and as it turns out big surprise he's a cop You get a call from one of your friends. Do the police raided. The party. Came in with a real show of force round everybody up. What are you talking about? I said then it clicked. The dogcatcher wasn't lying about what he did for a living which is slang he worked for the police department. And I'd sold pot to the Dogcatcher. I was the source of weed. Yeah my friend. My friend's voice dropped on the phone. And they're looking for you and you know what this is. I mean pot is a crime. I mean ten years ago in America. I mean we live in California. Maybe it wasn't that big of a crime in but that you know it was a crime but certainly in nineteen seventy one. I mean that could be jail time without a doubt right. Yeah Yeah it was There was a whole juvenile department at the police headquarters at at the police station Just to go after young kids that were abusing themselves with drugs and The head of that was a guy that right about in here and that they called officer rash officer rash led this raid and the dog catcher said the guy who sold me the pot left right before the rate So but all these people know who he is so they started asking everybody involved and I was so scared I mean. Can you imagine that? Now at this buddy calls me up. And he says they've raided the house and they're looking for you and you're the you're them big drug pusher you know and so I I ended up getting on a train We had lived in the town Glen Ellyn the year before. And then we moved back to this town highland park and the raid was in highland park. So I got on the train and went out to Glen. Ellyn to hide out. I was on the Lam you know and finally I came back and told my parents were to happen and we. They drove me the police station. I turn myself in turn. Myself in lights were blaring. Just crying cried but the main thing there is I had just gotten into this play west side story and I thought some words to deliver. I had a couple. Yeah two two two words deliver and I was fearful that They were gonNA pull me out. Send me to like juvenile or something. Boss Me Really Bust me and I begged the police to to let me off the hook. Because I just discovered this new thing that I think you know is is going to change my life and it will and it did and it turned everything around for me being in this play and all of a sudden you know. I can't say that I didn't smoke pot anymore. Anything like that but Through high school But I found this thing that I was good at. I was a terrible student as I said and I was struggling all the time and really. I was probably near being kicked out of school at the time that this thing in this incident with the police APP. Was that just a regular public school or private. There's regular public skin bumps go you know big school. I mean like twenty five hundred students at the high school so it was pretty big big school but it had a wonderful theater department and this this teacher that I mentioned there was just. She changed my whole life. Barbara kitson standing in a hallway. We've all had moments where something happens or an individual walks into our lives that we didn't see come in and the course of our lives just changes you know and we go this way. And that's what happened there standing in that way She sent me right to the theater. World and from that moment on. I never stopped doing it. You guys You do four shows of West side story and the last show obviously batteries time in the fourth. Show you guys crush it and here. We go back.

America Dogcatcher Gary sinise officer sharks highland park Glen Ellyn California Barbara kitson jets Ellyn skin bumps Glen
"gary sinise" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

03:27 min | 9 months ago

"gary sinise" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Yeah all right Gary Sinise is awarded the congressional medal of honor and they could have given it to a better guy the most selfless guy in the world and he's out there helping veterans every single day raising money form plane you know is he has a a band that he plays them out there raising music and spending his own money and the most charitable guy probably you know per dollar per dollar per capita percentage wise than anybody in Hollywood and perhaps anybody the United States is not a billionaire but yet he raises tons of awareness and my name I trends and veterans causes one of the greatest guys and I met him at one of these events one of the greatest guys would ever ever meet a special honor for a Hollywood hero you know him as lieutenant Dan Gary Sinise start in the classic film Forrest Gump and in the years since he has spent his off camera time raising money for veterans groups last night at the Reagan library Sinise received the patriot award it is the highest honor given out by the congressional medal of honor society that is the station on he showed it back any award coming to that guy is deserved a hundred percent one of the coolest guys side absolutely ever all right mail through fifty five thousand pieces of mail found in a guy is a storage shed right then came knew there was a problem right away when the clerk at the postal counter told him you've got too much mail to walk through the front door so we drove around back and then he saw a postal workers we allowed to massive carts full of trays of mail he and I were shocked really are you kidding who makes that kind of mistake turns out to college Avenue student loans company made that mistake seventy nine trays of letters with about seven hundred letters in each tray that's fifty five thousand letters give or take all of them exactly the same a statement from the company regarding his daughter student loan to one guy right one guy gets fifty five thousand they're all the same I really like it junk mail where I'm like really what a waste of paper these when they stop right defect but how let let's say you are fifty five thousand the same letter how many do you think you would before you go I see a pattern I don't know forty thousand yeah right a lot right from the company regarding his daughter's student loan the company told them it was a glitch in their system and apologized now yes to figure out a way to get rid of them and they just start a fire bonfire and burn it all to make matters worse the state again missed the humor in that when we go back I may just start a fire bonfire and burn it all I think I missed it again I may just start a fire bonfire and burn it all it is okay get it now I'm getting closer.

Gary Sinise
"gary sinise" Discussed on Newt's World

Newt's World

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"gary sinise" Discussed on Newt's World

"It's a great honor to have Gary sinise with us. You've had very very interesting career and done some very cool movies and been recognized and honored for your abilities. But how did that happen. Did you know from childhood. You wanted to be an actor. Well thank you for having me. Well the funny story in my book of how I stumbled into acting. I was a high school kid in the seventies it was a tricky time then I was in high school during during the Vietnam War and it was a very kind of crazy time in our country. I was not a good student I had struggled from from the time I was in kindergarten. All the way up until my high school days back endemically. I've always struggled now is partially due to the fact that my dad. Dan was always at work and my mom and her hands full with my brother and sister and also my mom was taking care of her mother and her sister and I just kind of ran and off on my own and got into trouble. One of the things that I was interested in at that time was music. I got my first guitar when I was in fourth grade. And that's pretty much all I wanted to do so in high school band and that was the only thing I like doing when I was a sophomore in high school. I'm standing in this hallway with my rock band. And we were looking pretty scruffy and this little lady comes walking down a hallway and she's kind of like a hurricane. I'm just blowing through. And she looked at US did a double take and then turned around and came back to us and said she was the drama teacher and she said I'm directing west side story. It's about two gangs and you guys look perfect for the gang members. So coming auditioned for the play and then she blew out all and we looked at each other and we kinda laughed laughed but after school. I decided to go and see what the audition thing was about. I saw the pretty girls walking into the audition so I just followed them a and they gave me a script and said okay. Read this part and I didn't know what I was doing. I didn't know what was I didn't know what reading department and so I was trying to look at the script and figure out what everybody was doing and I really behind couldn't keep up and it came to the time where I was supposed to say my line line and there was a big pause because I didn't know where everybody was in the script so I just started making jokes and everybody started laughing and everything next thing I know the next next morning they put the list up got cast in the play and my name was on and so I got a little part couple of lines not much but I was in the chorus and I just just fell in love with it. How old were you at this point? I was probably sixteen then I fell in love with it. Made all these new friends and then from that point on all I wanted to do was be in place so I was playing my rock by and I was auditioning for everybody. I could and I started getting leads in the place plays by the time I was done with high school. I played a bunch of big parts and I knew that's what I wanted to do and so right as I graduated high school. I got some kids together and started theater company and some of the kids were still in high school so they would finish their school day and then come over to the church space that we found were they let us use it to put on plays and we started putting on plays next. Gary describes how he struggled in school but overcame his challenges to become the founding artistic director of the Steppenwolf Theatre Company.

"gary sinise" Discussed on The Strategerist

The Strategerist

12:07 min | 1 year ago

"gary sinise" Discussed on The Strategerist

"And that's to me the best part of the book is that over and over there. That lesson that you gotta go take action yourself and from eighteen year old kid, the will Steppenwolf theatre to the man that made the Gary Sinise foundation, which now supporting veterans and and doing such great work there. Well, yeah. Yeah. I mean, that's the question. Good one. It's I tell you. I I think the title of your book is so meaningful and so property it, of course, as we all should kind of reflect on the blessings that we have in this nation. So I was very taken with your book and with the title, but I'm always fascinated with those decisional inflection points in somebody's life. So I think it was you randomly on a whim audition for west side stories that right? You're your first ever in highschool. Can you just I mean, so that was a decision you made that really started a path that leads to today almost and what was that decision? What was the call of the theater was just some new or in? You know, what we we all have those moments in our live where we're standing there. And just something happened on next thing, you know, ten years later. It was the moment that changed our line. Right. You know, and you look back at it and say, if I wasn't at that particular place or didn't meet that particular person at that moment. I I don't know what I'd be doing now. Same thing with me. I mean in in high school. All I just happened to be standing there when the, you know, with I was as I said, I was really struggling student and so much so that it's possible. I would have been asked to leave. Gently asked to to leave the school because I of the trouble I was getting in and music was kind of the only thing that was keeping me motivated. I love playing music I had bands. I was standing this hallway with some of the people in my band, and we looked pretty pretty rugged, you know, and the drama teacher walked by and saw us and said, she was directing west side story, you know, about the the gangs. Right. And she's thought we look good representing again. Gang members. So so she invited us to come in audition for the show on me. And another guy one of the other band members did and I didn't know what an audition was at no idea what any of that was. But I saw all the pretty girls going into them. We just followed him in, you know, sat down and didn't know what. And then they handed me a script. And I was like what are they what am I doing all the you could tell all these theater kids were used to it they on dishing before? And so they were getting up, and they were very poised and polished and spitting their lines out. And I was I could barely read. And I just started making jokes when it got to my turn, the talk, and and everybody was laughing, and she she was the teacher was even laughing. So next thing I know next day, I see my name on the cast list. And I got in the show, and she put me in the show the chapter in my book that I talk about this is called baptism. And and it was it really was. The moment that I was kinda baptized into this new world that changed everything for me. I I mean, I went into the business. I created a theater company. I ended up making a living at it. I had a film career all and the moment that it started. Was that moment where she walked down the hallway? And and I got in the play. And I remember I I was such a struggling kid that I didn't know what it was going to be like, but by the end of that by the end of that experience in west side story, I was totally submerged into it. I remember crying my eyes out when the play was over because it was so life changing. And it's I think it's kind of a very moving section in the book for for any young student to kinda may be searching for something or not connecting to his fellow students or anything, I all of a sudden stuff. Doubled into this thing and the community of the theater kids kind of embraced me. And saw that. I something was something special was happening to this kid who was just about to get kicked out of school, and it was life changing. And from that point on. I auditioned for every play. I could I went to build the sets I painted the sats. I'm ran the lights. I did the sound whatever theater experience I could have in high school. I did. And as soon as I graduated I started the theater company that still here forty five years later. So a good teacher. Absolutely. Was you know, what I I didn't go to college. But the experience that I got from her and the the incentive that she gave me to just rely on my instincts and to trust my natural ability to sort of just get up there, and do it that I learned so much there in those early days, and I just took that right into the founding of. Theater company, and then and that theater company included John Malkovich and Laurie Metcalf and Joan Allen the woman who would become my wife five years later. And and we're we've been together now for, you know, since nineteen seventy six so a lot of things happen because of that theatre life, and we have a nice space at the Gary Sinise foundation called our center for education and outreach. And it sort of tells the Gary story of how I kind of stumbled into the acting world, and then kind of took that it's a little bit like the subtitle of the book here, it's called a journey from self to service, and it tells that story, and it starts with the it starts with the theater and the acting part and then moves into into the service work, but without the theater and without the acting career and with item. You know, I would have never played Lieutenant, Dan, right? If I wasn't an actor, and that, you know, life would have been very very different. Lieutenant Dan was something that changed my life in many ways, you know, not just as an actor because I hadn't done that many movie parts up to that point. But it had set the stage for so much of the of the good things I've been been doing with regard our veterans, and that that was twenty five years ago, the the movie came out that's a proud organization that you create an Steppenwolf and before we get to more important things. I have to ask why Steppenwolf? Yeah. I it's funny. So I as I said was when I was eighteen we just got some high school kids together. I tell a story in the book that my class my graduating class was nineteen Seventy-three. But because I was such a screw up in high school. I didn't have enough credits to graduate with my class. So it was either just not graduate or go back and graduate with the next class nineteen seventy-four class and take another semester of school. So you know, I wanted to get a diploma. So I went to bed. And did another semester in high school. And I was and I talk about this in the book how I felt just terrible. You know, like terrible failure, even though I was one of the top theater kids at that time. I was still I didn't I didn't feel good about myself. But I ended up doing another play, and it was very meaningful. And it was a good play to do. So I graduated with the class. We we say in the book nineteen seventy three and a half. Yeah. That's that was my graduating class reunions. If you wanna have to either. You're absolutely right younger one. I thought. And so when I graduated I just you know, I I wanted to keep that feeling that I was having in high school with the with doing place. So I just got some kids together there were still in high school kids. I knew from the theater barmen and we started doing plays and the first play. We did we did at this church that my parents knew the architects of the church, and I asked them can you talk to the church and see if they'll let us use the space to put on a play. And so they they did they let us they gave us a key. Instead, just log up when you're when you're done or her sing. And we went in there. And you know, we didn't charge for tickets or anything like that. But we advertise all the parents were coming all the cousins and nephews of everybody and everything that's what the audience wasn't. We wanted to have something on our program that said, we were theater company. So we were looking for a name and we were at rehearsal one day, and we're all just sitting around. What are we gonna call this thing and? Somebody happened to be reading the book. Do you know the book it's by Hermann Hesse ES as he -solutely and it's called stepping. Okay. He was reading that book. And we looked at it. And I said, let's put that on the program. And so we put stepping we'll Steppenwolf theatre on the program. I I never read the book. I never read it since. Then I I think it's a better story that keeps saying that. I haven't read, and I thought it was your favorite band. We we would have people call the theater and say Steppenwolf plan. Say yes. Which is in stepping well, those early days in those theater days brought you to the play tracers, which according to the book is really where a lot of your work. The veterans started. Did you anticipate at that point that play was going to be such a a life changer in your career? I didn't know what what it was was because of the veterans in my own family, and particularly the Vietnam veterans because they were they were not that much older than I was Vietnam veterans on my wife's side of the family. I started to meet them when when I got together with her and she introduced me to her brothers and her sisters husband, all who served in Vietnam. All in the US army. They started to cut it educate me a little bit. And when I was a kid Vietnam war was raging on. I mean combat operations were over in nineteen eight seventy three year, I was supposed to graduate from high school. So all through my high school years and all those years preceding, the Vietnam war was raging on and yet and on television. You would watch the casualty reports, and I knew my mom and dad were kind of fearful that I was going to graduate and get drafted all these things. It was a difficult time for country difficult time for our soldiers. And but as a kid, I was preoccupied with by rock band, and my theater stuff, and the girlfriend is usually. Actually, I surely I wasn't. I was just being a kid. I wasn't paying attention to what was going on with the war that much, but when I met her brothers and her sister's husband, they changed everything for me. They start telling me about Vietnam, and what it was like the come home to a divided nation and a nation that had turned his back on the veterans. So I when I took over as artistic director of Steppenwolf theatre, I was so kind of tuned into Vietnam and wanting to do something for the Vietnam veterans, and and so as artistic director of theater, your

Steppenwolf theatre Vietnam Gary Sinise foundation Lieutenant Dan US army director Gary John Malkovich Hermann Hesse ES Joan Allen Laurie Metcalf nineteen eight seventy three y twenty five years forty five years eighteen year five years ten years one day
"gary sinise" Discussed on The Strategerist

The Strategerist

04:57 min | 1 year ago

"gary sinise" Discussed on The Strategerist

"The classic American success story is a kid with a dream making a big by creating his own opportunity and starting a company Oscar-nominated actor Gary Sinise did just that by starting a theater company. The now prominent Steppenwolf theatre in Chicago, and though many of Gary's connections with veterans came about because of his work in film and theatre particularly in portraying Lieutenant Dan enforced Gump the seeds of his passion for veterans were planted by members of his own family. But when I met her brothers and her sister's husband, they changed everything for me. They just start telling me about the now what it was like to come home to a divided nation. Gary shared insights into life before Lieutenant, Dan and Forrest Gump as a young actor with an entrepreneurial spirit. And we talk about house foundation and new book grateful American Journey from self to service highlight the importance of serving our veterans. I'm Andrew Kaufman. And this is the strategic presented. The George W Bush institute. What happens when you cross the forty third president late night, sketch, comedy and compelling conversation. This strategic podcast born from the word strategically which was appointed. By the now in braced by the George W Bush administration. We highlight the Americans feared of leadership and compassion through thought provoking conversations. And we're reminded that the most effective leaders are the ones who laughed. Well, we are really fortunate today. We have the wickedly awesome. Go trying to east coast theme and honor Madame Don here, but we had the wickedly awesome. Gary sinise. Joining us today, a real league awesome. Exact band co hosting with us today is Matt Amazon or director the Bush institutes military service initiative. Matt, thank you. Thank you honored to be here. Gareth? Thank you so much you met and welcome to the Bush center seated on the beautiful SMU campus. Thanks and a real gem at SMU is the meadows school of the arts where they bake entrepreneurship into their curriculum. And a big part of your story is that you founded the Steppenwolf theater. So for the students out there listening. Did you ever envision yourself as an entrepreneur? Well, if I guess if you look look back at some of the things that are in the book that I wrote. You see a kid who kind of is a little bit loose a little bit lost a little bit trying to find his way and eventually having to to make up things to to to get along. And you know, I I was from an early age. I think I was always the type of person who just took initiative. My dad was working all the time, and my mom and her hands full with my brother and sister, my grandmother her sister, they all live with us, and my mom just had her hands full. So I was kind of running around like on my own trying to figure things out. And so I ended up being the kid who kind of organize the baseball game in the neighborhood or the football game or hockey game or the rock concert or whatever it was took initiative after high school to start a theater company, and because I. I was not a good student in high school and and. The idea of going to college just wasn't wasn't making them after struggling through high school so much. So I I, but I wanted to continue doing what I was doing in high school. I learned how to act in high school I stumbled into feeder in high school, and I wanted to continue that and so what do you do if you're not going to college you either go as an actor you go to Hollywood or you go to Los a- or New York or. You know at that time. There wasn't a whole lot going on in Chicago, theater wise, there were few theaters. But I just wanted to continue doing that. So started the theater company at eighteen years old, and and that theater companies now forty five years old he owned four buildings in Chicago. And it's started by kids. So it really is. There's a there's a part of grateful American the book, I wrote here that really talks about the freedom that we have here in this country to take initiative to do things if you can dream it up, you can figure it out you can do it. And that that's kind of there's some pretty funny stories about the the loss kid in this book, but it all sort of manifested itself into action, and that's kind of the kind of person I've been you know, my life is just kinda see something and go get it. Right. And

Gary Sinise Lieutenant Dan Matt Amazon Chicago SMU Steppenwolf theater Gareth George W Bush administration George W Bush institute Steppenwolf Andrew Kaufman Bush center Forrest Gump Bush institutes meadows school Madame Don president New York Hollywood director
"gary sinise" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

03:15 min | 1 year ago

"gary sinise" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"Us on ESPN radio. How much did your life change with that one roll? Well, it certainly changed the career on a great deal. You know, I hadn't done that many movies before I started the theater company when I was young with my pals, and we did a lot of grey work. It's step. And wolf feed and Chicago, I write about the early origins of Steppenwolf. And how that really, you know, how much I learned there that I would take into the movie and television business, but prior to Lieutenant Dan, I mean, I hadn't done that many movies. I did of mice and men as a movie, and I talk about that in in grateful American, and I think mice and men got the attention of the producers of Forrest Gump, and they called me and on dish in for it. I auditioned for it. And I find out three weeks later. I got the part the movie came out about a year later, and I mean within within a couple of months there. I got some really good parts. With us on ESPN radio. What do you view as your greatest role? Father husband. Maybe that's a good answer. But that's not what I was asking Sinise. Yeah. It's it's hard for me to say that with with regards the acting career Jimmy shaker. It was Jimmy shaker. We played for years. Gimme back my son. Mel Gibson was out of his mind. You made him crazy before you actually became crazy. You made him crazy. Well, it's fun playing the villain. That's that's for sure. I had a great time working on that. Ron Howard directed. The movie, I know already done Apollo thirteen with Ron. So it was great to work with him twice back to back on on movies. And he was doing the astronauts never get back without your help. It was an important thing. You did. I was bland to play that part for sure. What was hard to put in the book? Well, there's some challenging moments in the book that I put I mean dif- difficult things to look back on difficult moments. There's moments within my family that you know, we're on the outside. It looked like the everything was going great. And the career was was ascending. And yet at home things were much more challenging, and we were having a lot of difficulty. And I write about some of that in the book because I wanted people to know part of that journey has some real, you know, serious difficult moments. If I may you wrote in the book about your wife's alcoholism, I don't wanna keep the audience in the dark about that you chose to bring that to her and only with her permission. I imagine all of that was a little hard to digest with her permission. Yeah. I wanted her approval on that I told her this was such a, you know, during this time where I was playing Lieutenant Dan, and I was doing Harry. Harry Truman and Jimmy shaker. And all these things awards were coming in the movie and television industry, all these things that we're looking very very positive on on the career side yet behind the scenes, there was a lot of difficulty. Grateful American Journey from self to service is available now. Gary Sinise with us on ESPN radio..

Jimmy shaker ESPN Gary Sinise Mel Gibson Ron Howard Dan Forrest Gump Harry Truman Chicago three weeks
Actress and paralympian criticises The Rock for playing amputee in 'Skyscraper'

Barsky Radio

02:46 min | 2 years ago

Actress and paralympian criticises The Rock for playing amputee in 'Skyscraper'

"Have to hire. So just look for. I dunno Caitlyn Jenner As the transgender massage parlor owner in a first. Acting role starring role as Dante text Gil I can't think of, anybody else is out there maybe. The woman who. Plays in the orange is? The, new black, maybe a couple of those. People I don't know are they are the transistor. Yes transgender actors one. Or two of them I think, oranges or at least. One, black woman I, forget her name she's pretty well, known a great great job of actor yeah forget her name but there's a couple of Betsy but the point the point is you want to hire. Somebody who's got acting chops? To play a role to play. A. Man when they're a woman. You, know what I mean that's that's what. The whole idea right so it doesn't stop there apparently there's, a film that it's called skyscraper it's like one of those big disaster movie types and Dwayne the rock Johnson is in it, and he's playing a a. Paraplegic Yeah so I guess they had. To. Use a lot of CGI. So, a former Perot Libyan is blasting Dwayne. Johnson for playing an amputee in this movie this well why, don't you hire somebody who doesn't have legs the play the part Johnson not gonna go to, that movie The want to see the rock Let's go. See? The. Rock with no legs really yeah he's only missing one leg Yeah it's all the same right so, they're saying why don't you so now I guess if you're going, to be playing so it's kind of like if you're, gonna redo the movie Ray. You're gonna hire, a blind person to play Ray Charles who doesn't really have any first of all you have to really. Work hard to get a braille script that's going to. Be too. Much of a there's. Only one person they're going to play that. Role? It. Was it was Jamie FOX He was brilliant in that movie is Ray Charles, you believe he was Rachel's. That's called acting, I don't need a blind person play another blind person like you said unless it's a documentary so this. Is the PC police have gotten completely out of hand. In this. World that's like getting Amputate actor, to replace Lieutenant Dan and forest exactly exactly. Was great in that brilliant yeah and they could have, gotten somebody but, probably nobody has a. Is Gary Sinise and plus you put a lot of CG guys out of work. That's not right Radio. On news talk eight fifty w., f. t. l. Shannon Bill rich Joyce and barsky now on I tunes and Google play your favorite shows smell. Available on demand Stay connected, whenever you want news talk eight fifteen T. l. This report brought to you..

Johnson Ray Charles Dwayne Caitlyn Jenner Gary Sinise Dante Shannon Bill Rich Joyce Betsy Google Jamie Fox GIL Lieutenant Dan Perot Barsky Eight Fifty W
Milwaukee Bucks' Sterling Brown says he felt 'defenseless' during arrest

Orlando's News at Noon with Scott Anez

02:32 min | 2 years ago

Milwaukee Bucks' Sterling Brown says he felt 'defenseless' during arrest

"At noon i'm darrell moody milwaukee bucks player sterling brown speaking out after police released video showing him being shocked with tasers arrested back in january the confrontation began after an officer question brown about parking and a handicapped zone at a walgreens he spoke with abc's robin roberts in an exclusive interview we can do is just keep fighting know keep bringing attention came you know putting pressure on the police departments and offices in the mayor's and everybody to charter may maintain round says he plans to take legal action the national memorial day concert honors korean war veterans and marks the fiftieth anniversary of the battle of chisun in vietnam army sergeant first class leah and hester the first woman in us history to get a silver star for valor in combat will participate in with along with well known entertainers several great actors and actresses i'll be joined by joe montana gary sinise general colin powell to name a few the concert airs at eight o'clock sunday night on pbs one of the nation's largest pop culture events is in full swing at the orange county convention center today is the second day of mega com which is expected to draw one hundred thousand people to the orlando area over the weekend started yesterday and continues through sunday features celebrity guests include jeff goldblum billy dee williams and this legendary sarasota resident whenever anyone says the word peewee herman himself paul reubens ray computer news ninety six point five wdbo he where have you been twelve forty nine here at news ninety six point five wdbo five day forecast here's our meteorologist brian shields we're tracking sub tropical storm alburto now is subtropical because the winfield's a little bit larger the winds aren't totally concentrated at the center slightly different structure either way this is going to head through the northern gulf and to make landfall most likely early monday with winds around sixty five miles per hour close to alabama the florida panhandle our forecast is right on track this is what we expect it so again we've been tracking the scattered showers and storms today tomorrow about a fifty percent chance of rain but a much higher chance on sunday and monday sunday in particular ninety percent chance of rain downpour several inches of rain and localized flooding will be a threat we'll keep you posted from channel nine eyewitness news i'm meteorologist brian shields right now we are looking at eighty five degrees in qasimi it is eightyfive and sunny at orlando's severe weather station reno grant is back safetouch security triple team traffic okay scott accidentfree on our expressways i for eastbound busiest for michigan up.

Scott Accidentfree Michigan Reno Florida Alabama Sarasota Billy Dee Williams Gary Sinise Hester Vietnam Army Brown Officer Milwaukee Orlando Winfield Brian Shields Paul Reubens Jeff Goldblum Orange County Convention Cente
"gary sinise" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"gary sinise" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"Assad berri child on broadway gary sinise as production terry kenny nitel a story about it that was the night such an intense heavy plane there is that scene were the character watt comes in with all the corny picked and the night i was know air drops to corn and one of the cornes just rolled all the way down stage right to the whip at this stage and was a powerful moment because two things happened there is at yale incomprehensible tableau of everybody in the room and he walks in with the corn and you're like what the fuck is going on and in the meantime he swell e being upstaged by rolling ear of corn while it lie like the the was like i'm gonna riff corn decorum rift and berry child umbrella didn't less arm is beautiful production but just one of those things man it just like i i got it in just gotta deal now with a shepherd wyss earth with a sam shepard with earth and a sheppard wizard's with in a waterways let's read into it let's let's keep rolling with the metaphor right hey how do you how do you have time to go shopping for close no e e don't right because nobody does it's just one of those things you have to do and it's rarely convenient will now there is an easier way to get better clothes bomb fell bomb fell as an online personal styling service it helps men find the right clothes for them.

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"gary sinise" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"gary sinise" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"But a gary sinise issue usually the he's he's one of the mc also trove on pain the actor joe montana most normally the dnc gary sinise was there he is yeah for the costa emigrated was not there but they got another guy little van fish for fish per he was fantastic but i'm telling you steve it was the most beautiful it is amazing what a treat you have you have got to walk this if you get a chance it may still be on my show it was on pbs separately uh and they show it over and over again but it was absolutely the most moving tearjerking oh tribute to the troops the way they have it set up it's pretty much the same every year the progressional actors actresses that will give they'll stay that there and tell the story of a particular soldier and if you ever the the story you'll have either but why for this survivor the story organ soldier himself will be there in person and then the oh it is absolutely beautiful some of those stories and the most moving it made me so very much thankful for what our soldiers have been through in particular the iraq afghanistan soldiers where we had so many thousands by whereas one one or the other wars what happened met the medical right the girl that almost pot but uh some of that they have won god it was in a wheelchair oh my goodness unbelievable what he went through literally came up on stage they rolled him up on stage and he was able to saying with uh with some of the shares their short final better appointment wars but the story of recovery and his wife the beside him anyway that was such that with such a blessing so far what were soldiers have done it what you're doing now uh oh liu story i don't know if you saw this with him oh here we go on the website patriot post dot u s unbelievable website it's wonderful a conservative website but anyway story about the carrier jobs that donald trump you know it stood up and said yeah i was able to help you save awesome well it apparently carry europe's carrier has changed their minds and bigger shipping six hundred thirty five jobs to mexico kicker if this of course the folks that are gonna be doing that worked out of air making three dollars.

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