18 Burst results for "Gary Hoover"

"gary hoover" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:03 min | 3 months ago

"gary hoover" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It is Tuesday, the 22nd Day of June. Good as always to have you along everybody. Yes, Voting rights is on the agenda today in the Senate, a try by that body to begin debate on what Congressional Democrats say is their biggest priority, But we direct your attention on this Tuesday. To the other side of the rotunda and a hearing by the House Select subcommittee on the Coronavirus Crisis. Guest of Honor. One Jerome Powell, There was the usual potpourri of congressional questions for the Fed chair. And his usual catalog of answers. In his remarks, though, chair Powell did take pains to point out that the worst of the Corona recession has fallen mostly on black and Hispanic Americans, noting specifically how their unemployment rate is still disproportionately high market plays a Nancy Marshall Ganz er gets us going with a look into that The overall unemployment rate for May was 5.8%, the rate for Hispanic workers was more than a percentage point above that for black workers more than 3% points higher, And so it's like, Well, why is that Kristen Brody is an economist at the Brookings Institution. I think much of it is structural racism. When you think about who was able to get vaccinated first, it was People that had broadband who probably had such. Brody says People of color may have less access to training and education or employers might discriminate against job applicants because of their race. Rebecca, given who teaches Labor studies at Rutgers University, says it's also the ability to live in a place with good transportation quality housing access to affordable Child care If you don't have housing, transportation or child care, it's hard to work. Also given says Black and Hispanic workers are more likely to have low paid service positions, and some of those jobs were automated. During the pandemic, Tulane University economist Gary Hoover says We won't see those jobs again. Remember, There was a time when we had elevator operators. That's a job Once it left. It never came back and never will. Hoover says it could take more than four years for the unemployment rate for black and Hispanic workers to get back to where it was before the pandemic. Which even then was higher than the overall jobless rate. I'm Nancy Marshall Ganz er for marketplace you might remember, But maybe not. It's been busy. I know that back in May, President Biden said the United States would send 80 million vaccines to other countries by the end of June. We're almost there. Less than 10 Million doses are reported to have been sent so farm there is no shortage of vaccines, the White House says. It's a logistics thing. Marketplaces Samantha Fields is on the increasingly busy supply chain desk today. Lot needs to happen to get vaccines from one country to another and into people's arms. You don't want to just put vaccines on a plane wave goodbye and hope for the best. Joshua Me show at the Kaiser Family Foundation says it's an enormous challenge just from the US perspective. There are three different vaccines that they are donating. At the moment, Each of the vaccines may have its own. Transportation requirements, cold storage requirements, and most countries have their own regulatory requirements, Rebecca Weintraub at Harvard Medical School says right now that is one of the biggest hurdles, some countries have decided to conduct clinical child on their local populations before authorizing the use of the vaccine. You can imagine the delay. Many countries also need other supplies. In addition to the vaccine, says Allah Valente at the research company Forester. What those countries need is first of all to be able to have the syringes that they need to administer the vaccine. They also need enough people who are trained and authorized to give shots. Valenti a says both of those are things the U. S. Could help supply if the U. S also contributed the human capital to be able to, um good at these countries and help with that distribution effort. I think that would go a long way and there is a very long way to go. In most countries in Africa, for example, less than 1% of the population has been vaccinated. I'm Samantha Fields for marketplace. On Wall Street today. Traders don't care about Jay Powell. They don't care about vaccines. They are just doing their thing. We'll have the details when we do the numbers. Mhm. On the docket of the Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry. Tomorrow is a hearing.

Rebecca Weintraub Rebecca 5.8% Samantha Fields Kristen Brody Brookings Institution Jay Powell Harvard Medical School Kaiser Family Foundation Allah Valente Gary Hoover Africa Brody Tulane University Tuesday Tomorrow Nancy Marshall Ganz Powell Jerome Powell Hoover
"gary hoover" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:04 min | 3 months ago

"gary hoover" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Tuesday, Tuesday, the 22nd Day of June. Good as always to have you along, everybody. Yes, Voting rights is on the agenda today in the Senate to try by that body to begin debate on what congressional Democrats say is their biggest priority, But we direct your attention on this Tuesday. To the other side of the road Tundra and a hearing by the House Select Subcommittee on the Coronavirus Crisis. Guest of Honor. One Jerome Powell, There was the usual potpourri of congressional questions for the Fed chair. And his usual catalog of answers in his remarks, though, Sure, Pal did take pains to point out that the worst of the Corona recession has fallen mostly on black and Hispanic Americans, noting specifically How their unemployment rate is still disproportionately high marketplace Nancy Marshall Ganz ER gets us going with a look into that. The overall unemployment rate for May was 5.8%, the rate for Hispanic workers was more than a percentage point above that for black workers more than 3% points higher, and so it's like, Well, why is that? Kristen Brody is an economist at the Brookings Institution. I think much of it is structural racism. When you think about who was able to get vaccinated first, it was People that had broadband who probably had jobs. Brody says People of color may have less access to training and education or employers might discriminate against job applicants because of their race. Rebecca, given who teaches labor studies at Rutgers University, says it's also the ability to live in a place with good transportation quality housing access to affordable Child care If you don't have housing, transportation or childcare, it's hard to work. Also given says Black and Hispanic workers are more likely to have low paid service positions, and some of those jobs were automated. During the pandemic, Tulane University economist Gary Hoover says We won't see those jobs again. Remember, Uh there was a time when we had elevator operators. That's a job once it left. It never came back to and never will. Hoover says it could take more than four years for the unemployment rate for black and Hispanic workers to get back to where it was before the pandemic. Which even then was higher than the overall jobless rate. I'm Nancy Marshall Ganz er for marketplace you might remember, But maybe not. It's been busy. I know that back in May, President Biden said the United States would send 80 million vaccines to other countries by the end of June. We're almost there. Less than 10. Million doses are reported to have been sent so farm there is no shortage of vaccines. The White House says. It's a logistics thing. Marketplaces Samantha Fields is on the increasingly busy supply chain desk today. Lot needs to happen to get vaccines from one country to another and into people's arms. You don't want to just put vaccines on the plane wave goodbye and hope for the best. Joshua Me show at the Kaiser Family Foundation says it's an enormous challenge just from the US perspective. There are three different vaccines that they are donating. At the moment, Each of the vaccines may have its own. Transportation requirements, cold storage requirements, and most countries have their own regulatory requirements, Rebecca Weintraub at Harvard Medical School says right now that is one of the biggest hurdles. Some countries have decided to conduct clinical trials on their local populations before authorizing the use of the vaccine. You can imagine the delay. Many countries also need other supplies in addition to the vaccine, says Allah Valente at the research company Forester. What those countries need is first of all to be able to have the syringes that they need to administer the vaccine. They also need enough people who are trained and authorized to give shots. Valente says both of those are things the U. S. Could help supply if the U. S also contributed at the human capital to be able to, uh good at these countries and help with that distribution effort. I think that would go a long way and there is a very long way to go in most countries in Africa, for example, less than 1% of the population has been vaccinated. I'm Samantha Fields for marketplace. On Wall Street today. Traders don't care about Jay Powell. They don't care about vaccines. They are just doing their thing. We'll have the details when we do the numbers. Kind of I'm on the docket of the Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry. Tomorrow is a hearing entitled examining.

Rebecca Weintraub Samantha Fields 5.8% Rebecca Allah Valente Brookings Institution Jay Powell Kaiser Family Foundation Kristen Brody Tulane University Africa Brody Gary Hoover Harvard Medical School Tomorrow Forester Hoover Nancy Marshall Ganz end of June Rutgers University
"gary hoover" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:01 min | 7 months ago

"gary hoover" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Kind of Bristol. It is Wednesday. Today, the 24th Day of February. Good is always to have you along, everybody. You know you want things to happen? You've got to put in the work, but sometimes the work you put in doesn't pan out. So with that as the set up the global economy News of the day President Biden signed an executive order today that the White House says is going to make supply chains in this economy more resilient and more secure. We saw just by way, of example, shortages of PPE early in this pandemic. There's been news the past couple of weeks about problems with semiconductor supplies, hitting carmakers. Those supplies in both those categories coming sometimes from overseas and those air on Lee, the two most recent high profile examples One House says it's going to take a hard look find out where the vulnerabilities aren't come up with a way to fix him. The United States has been offshoring. It's manufacturing for decades now and doesn't really have much to show for the work. It's done trying to fix that marketplaces of replenish or gets us going. It is not just that we didn't have enough masks during the pandemic. This order is about the future of U. S competitiveness promoting that involves altering global supply chains. It won't be easy, but there are ways Steven Vogel chairs the political economy program at UC Berkeley. It could be stockpiling certain things. In some cases, it could be trying to create a domestic manufacturing capacity. Whether isn't in a particular niche. Practically speaking, that could mean public funding for research and development. For it could mean having the government promised to buy a strategic product US promised by covert vaccines before they were developed, for example, propping up pharmaceutical companies. There are lots more options. So CJ Muse at Evercore IAS I It's you know, tax subsidies right? It's providing incentives to making investments here, right. And so I would like to see Washington D C and get creative. In the past. The U. S has relaxed antitrust rules to encourage US companies that normally compete with one another to work together on research. When it comes to supply chains, making them reliable doesn't mean going it alone. Arthur Herman is a senior fellow at the Hudson Institute. Making a secure supply chain for critical industries doesn't necessarily mean everything has to be made here in the 48 states or even the 50 states. Even the Pentagon relies on a handful of trusted countries like Canada and the U. K to supply materials. Rearranging global supply chains and nurturing sensitive industries. This is not some small side project, Asia's highest tech semiconductor manufacturers, for example, took hundreds of billions of dollars in multiple decades to get where they are now. In New York. I'm simply been ashore for marketplace story, too, on the theme of how you're going to get done in this economy. What you want to get done in this economy comes to us from Federal Reserve chair Jay Powell, testifying this week on Capitol Hill among the many other things, Mr Powell said. Is that the Fed is trying real hard to get this economy back to full employment about which this first of all, we're still down 10 million jobs. From where we were at the beginning of all of this. Second of all, the official unemployment rate in this economy is 6.3%, as we have told you, but both Powell and Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen Say the pandemic has done such violence to the American Labor force and how we measure it that the real jobless rate a year on now is probably closer to 10%. So knowing all that we suppose it might take to get back to full employment. Here's marketplaces Mitchell Harmon. Think of full employment as an economic sweet spot. The unemployment rate is low enough that workers confined jobs easily and earned steadily higher wages. But it's not so low that employers can't find workers and have to be in wages up dramatically. Jesse Rothstein is an economist at U C. Berkeley. You don't have to worry that you're just queuing with the whole lot of other unemployed workers for scarce jobs. It means you have some negotiating power, economists say We hit full employment before the pandemic when unemployment was it 3.5% now Unemployment's officially at 6.3%, or upwards of 10%, including all the folks who aren't being counted or have stopped looking. No matter what measure you use, we're in a very serious recession. Harvard economist Jason Furman says millions of jobs they're still missing in bars and restaurants, hotels, education. He thinks many of them can be restored with another round of stimulus and widespread vaccination. I think we can get a lot of the way back to full employment by the end of this year. I don't know that we can get all the way back that quickly. Just because for some people, it's going to take them time to find new jobs, and it will be hardest for low wage workers of color to get back to pre pandemic employment levels, says economist Gary Hoover at Tulane University. Even at its very best black unemployment was twice that of white unemployment. The response of blacks to a shock like this takes longer and goes deeper. Hoover says Getting the whole country back to full employment will take specific policies like assistance to black small business owners and help paying for child care. I'm Mitchell Hartman for Marketplace never heard the phrase by the dip. That's what was going on at the corner of Wall Street and broad in lower Manhattan. Today, we will have the details when we do the numbers. There are as you might imagine a whole lot of moving parts as.

Jesse Rothstein Jay Powell Steven Vogel New York Mitchell Hartman Arthur Herman 6.3% Gary Hoover Jason Furman Today 3.5% Mitchell Harmon Wednesday Powell Hudson Institute Hoover White House Wall Street CJ Muse American Labor force
"gary hoover" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

06:00 min | 7 months ago

"gary hoover" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"The 24th Day of February. Good is always to have you along, everybody. You know you want things to happen? You've got to put in the work, but sometimes the work you put in doesn't pan out. So with that as the set up the global economy News of the day President Biden signed an executive order today that the White House says is going to make supply chains in this economy more resilient and more secure. We saw just by way, of example, shortages of PPE early in this pandemic. There's been news the past couple of weeks about problems with semiconductor supplies, hitting carmakers. Supplies and both those categories coming sometimes from overseas and those air on Lee, the two most recent high profile examples The White House says it's going to take a hard look find out where the vulnerabilities are and come up with a way to fix him. The United States has been offshoring. It's manufacturing for decades now and doesn't really have much to show for the work. It's done trying to fix that marketplaces. Obree Benesch war Gets us going It is not just that we didn't have enough masks during the pandemic. This order is about the future of U. S competitiveness promoting that involves altering global supply chains. It won't be easy, but there are ways Steven Vogel chairs the political economy program at UC Berkeley. It could be stockpiling certain things. In some cases, it could be trying to create a domestic manufacturing capacity. Whether isn't in a particular niche. Practically speaking, that could mean public funding for research and development. Or it could mean having the government promised to buy a strategic product US promised by covert vaccines before they were developed, for example, propping up pharmaceutical companies. There are lots more options. So CJ Muse at Evercore IAS I It's you know, tax subsidies right? It's providing incentives to making investments here, right. And so I would like to see Washington D C and get creative. In the past. The U. S has relaxed antitrust rules to encourage US companies that normally compete with one another to work together on research. When it comes to supply chains, making them reliable doesn't mean going it alone. Arthur Herman is a senior fellow at the Hudson Institute. Making a secure supply chain for critical industries doesn't necessarily mean everything has to be made here in the 48 states or even the 50 states. Even the Pentagon relies on a handful of trusted countries like Canada and the U. K to supply materials. Rearranging global supply chains and nurturing sensitive industries. This is not some small side project, Asia's highest tech semiconductor manufacturers, for example, took hundreds of billions of dollars in multiple decades to get where they are now. In New York. I'm simply been ashore for marketplace story, too, on the theme of how you're going to get done in this economy. What you want to get done in this economy comes to us from Federal Reserve chair Jay Powell, testifying this week on Capitol Hill among the many other things, Mr Powell said. Is that the Fed is trying real hard to get this economy back to full employment about which this first of all, we're still down 10 million jobs. From where we were at the beginning of all of this. Second of all, the official unemployment rate in this economy is 6.3%, as we have told you, but both Powell and Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen Say the pandemic has done such violence to the American Labor force and how we measure it. But the real jobless rate a year on now is probably closer to 10%. So knowing all that we suppose it might take to get back to full employment. Here's marketplaces Mitchell Harmon. Think of full employment as an economic sweet spot. The unemployment rate is low enough that workers confined jobs easily and earned steadily higher wages. But it's not so low that employers can't find workers and have to bid wages up dramatically. Jesse Rothstein is an economist at U C. Berkeley. You don't have to worry that you're just queuing with the whole lot of other unemployed workers for scarce jobs. It means you have some negotiating power. Economists say We hit full employment before the pandemic. When unemployment was it 3.5% Now unemployment officially at 6.3% or upwards of 10%, including all the folks who aren't being counted or have stopped looking. No matter what measure you use. We're in a very serious recession. Harvard economist Jason Furman says. Millions of jobs they're still missing in bars and restaurants, hotels, education. He thinks many of them can be restored with another round of stimulus and widespread vaccination. I think we can get a lot of the way back to full employment by the end of this year. I don't know that we can get all the way back that quickly. Just because for some people, it's going to take them time to find new jobs. And it will be hardest for low wage workers of color to get back to pre pandemic employment levels, says economist Gary Hoover at Tulane University, Even at its very best black unemployment was twice that of white unemployment. The response of blacks to a shock like this takes longer and goes deeper. Hoover says. Getting the whole country back to full employment will take specific policies like assistance to black small business owners and help paying for child care. Mitchell Hartman for Marketplace You ever heard the phrase by the dip? That's what was going on at the corner of Wall Street and broad in lower Manhattan. Today, we will have the details when we do the numbers. There are as you might imagine a whole lot of moving parts as the White House and Democrats in the House.

Jesse Rothstein Steven Vogel Mitchell Hartman New York Jay Powell Arthur Herman 3.5% Gary Hoover 6.3% Jason Furman Hudson Institute Powell Today Mitchell Harmon Wall Street Democrats Tulane University Obree Benesch UC Berkeley White House
"gary hoover" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:01 min | 7 months ago

"gary hoover" Discussed on KCRW

"In Los Angeles. I'm kind of Bristol. It is Wednesday. Today, the 24th Day of February. Good is always to have you along, everybody. You know you want things to happen? You've got to put in the work, but sometimes the work you put in doesn't pan out. So with that as the set up the global economy News of the day President Biden signed an executive order today that the White House says is going to make supply chains in this economy more resilient and more secure. We saw just by way, of example, shortages of PPE early in this pandemic. There's been news the past couple of weeks about problems with semiconductor supplies, hitting carmakers. Those supplies in both those categories coming sometimes from overseas and those air on Lee, the two most recent high profile examples White House says it's going to take a hard look find out where the vulnerabilities are and come up with a way to fix him. The United States has been offshoring. It's manufacturing for decades now and doesn't really have much to show for the work. It's done trying to fix that. Marketplaces of re Benesch war gets us going It is not just that we didn't have enough masks during the pandemic. This order is about the future of U. S competitiveness promoting that involves altering global supply chains. It won't be easy, but there are ways Steven Vogel chairs the political economy program at UC Berkeley. It could be stockpiling certain things. In some cases, it could be trying to create a domestic manufacturing capacity. Whether isn't in a particular nish. Practically speaking, That could mean public funding for research and development. Or it could mean having the government promised to buy a strategic product US promised by covert vaccines before they were developed, for example, propping up pharmaceutical companies. There are lots more options. So CJ Muse at Evercore IAS I It's you know, tax subsidies right? It's providing incentives to making investments here, right. And so I would like to see Washington D C and get creative. In the past. The U. S has relaxed antitrust rules to encourage US companies that normally compete with one another to work together on research. When it comes to supply chains, making them reliable doesn't mean going it alone. Arthur Herman is a senior fellow at the Hudson Institute. Making a secure supply chain for critical industries doesn't necessarily mean everything has to be made here in the 48 states or even the 50 states. Even the Pentagon relies on a handful of trusted countries like Canada and the U. K to supply materials. Rearranging global supply chains and nurturing sensitive industries. This is not some small side project, Asia's highest tech semiconductor manufacturers, for example, took hundreds of billions of dollars in multiple decades to get where they are now. In New York. I'm simply been ashore for marketplace story, too, on the theme of how you're going to get done in this economy. What you want to get done in this economy comes to us from Federal Reserve chair Jay Powell, testifying this week on Capitol Hill among the many other things, Mr Powell said. Is that the Fed is trying real hard to get this economy back to full employment about which this first of all, we're still down 10 million jobs. From where we were at the beginning of all of this. Second of all, the official unemployment rate in this economy is 6.3%, as we have told you, but both Powell and Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen Say the pandemic has done such violence to the American Labor force and how we measure it. But the real jobless rate a year on now is probably closer to 10%. So knowing all that we suppose it might take to get back to full employment. Here's marketplaces Mitchell Harmon. Think of full employment as an economic sweet spot. The unemployment rate is low enough that workers confined jobs easily and earned steadily higher wages. But it's not so low that employers can't find workers and have to bid wages up dramatically. Jesse Rothstein is an economist at U C. Berkeley. You don't have to worry that you're just queuing with the whole lot of other unemployed workers for scarce jobs. It means you have some negotiating power, economists say. We hit full employment before the pandemic when unemployment was it 3.5% now Unemployment's officially at 6.3%, or upwards of 10%, including all the folks who aren't being counted or have stopped looking. No matter what measure you use, we're in a very serious recession. Harvard economist Jason Furman says millions of jobs they're still missing in bars and restaurants, hotels, education. He thinks many of them can be restored with another round of stimulus and widespread vaccination. I think we can get a lot of the way back to full employment by the end of this year. I don't know that we can get all the way back that quickly. Just because for some people, it's going to take them time to find new jobs, and it will be hardest for low wage workers of color to get back to pre pandemic employment levels, says economist Gary Hoover at Tulane University. Even at its very best black unemployment was twice that of white unemployment. The response of blacks to a shock like this takes longer and goes deeper. Hoover says Getting the whole country back to full employment will take specific policies like assistance to black small business owners and help paying for child care. I'm Mitchell Hartman for Marketplace You ever heard the phrase by the dip? That's what was going on at the corner of Wall Street and broad in lower Manhattan. Today, we will have the details when we do the numbers. There are as you might imagine a whole lot of.

Jesse Rothstein Jay Powell Steven Vogel New York Mitchell Hartman Gary Hoover 6.3% Los Angeles 3.5% Jason Furman Today Arthur Herman Wednesday Powell Hudson Institute Hoover Mitchell Harmon Wall Street UC Berkeley Bristol
"gary hoover" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:02 min | 9 months ago

"gary hoover" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Andy Euler. And for David Brancaccio, President Trump extended a ban on work visas and green cars that was set to expire yesterday. Marketplaces Nova Safia joins me to explain over Good morning Good morning. So many businesses have been outspoken about what this band means for them. What's the president's rationale for keeping the ban in place? The president cited lost jobs because of the pandemic and concerns about keeping the Corona virus from spreading. He's previously said he wants to keep American workers from having to compete with foreign workers. Especially with the country struggling to bring back jobs that have been lost now. The ban effects several types of immigration green cards issued abroad, mostly for the purposes of family reunification. Also worker visas, such as the popular H one B visas. Those air used a lot by the tech industry to bring in highly skilled workers. And J. One visas used by students and a number of others, Andy. And what about the practical implications? These band both for those immigrants and for businesses? Well, that's unclear. The extension Trump just signed would keep the bands in place through March. But these bands are largely not in effect now because business groups sued and a federal judge issued an injunction that allows most worker visas to continue. The focus now is what will the Biden administration do? Will they keep the bands in place until March? Well, we know Biden supports worker visas for highly skilled foreigners. He hasn't specifically addressed these bands, but he has bowed to undo a lot of Trump's immigration policies. Marketplaces. Nervous office. Thanks. You're welcome. Around 20 states raised their minimum wages with the new year. 30 States and the District of Columbia now have higher minimum wages than the federal rate, which sits at $7.25. And hasn't increased since 2000 and nine marketplaces. Nancy Marshall Dancer explains Faith Booker works at McDonald's and Burger King in Lakeland, Florida making $9.70 an hour, McDonald's and 8 56 and our Burger King. She worked full time at both chains for about nine months. And McDonald's cut her hours. I'm just pretty much struggling right now, just trying to make ends meet if there's like paycheck to paycheck pretty much Booker's now choosing between paying bills and buying clothes for her kids. Florida voters approved a ballot measure in November, raising the state's minimum wage to 8 65 an hour now and 10 an hour next September, Booker says right now making member Wade is that I loved, so above all. This year, especially voters are sympathetic to minimum wage workers on the front lines during a pandemic, according to University of Oklahoma economist Gary Hoover. The people who work at your local grocery store the people work at the gas stations where you get gassed. Over, says states were minimum wage workers still earn the federal minimum of 7 25 and our insists that's enough because the cost of living is lower their I'm Nancy Marshall again, sir for Marketplace. Major markets around the world are closed for New Year's Day..

Trump president Andy Euler David Brancaccio Nancy Marshall Biden Faith Booker McDonald Nancy Marshall Dancer Nova Safia Florida Burger King Gary Hoover District of Columbia Lakeland University of Oklahoma Wade
"gary hoover" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:04 min | 9 months ago

"gary hoover" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Andy Euler. And for David Brancaccio, President Trump extended a ban on work visas and green cars that was set to expire yesterday. Marketplaces Nova Safia joins me to explain over Good morning Good morning. So many businesses have been outspoken about what this band means for them. What's the president's rationale for keeping the ban in place? The president cited lost jobs because of the pandemic and concerns about keeping the Corona virus from spreading. He's previously said he wants to keep American workers from having to compete with foreign workers. Especially with the country struggling to bring back jobs that have been lost now. The ban effects several types of immigration green cards issued abroad, mostly for the purposes of family reunification. Also worker visas, such as the popular H one B visas. Those air used a lot by the tech industry to bring in highly skilled workers and J one visas used by students and a number of others. Andy And what about the practical implications? These band boats for those immigrants and for businesses? Well, that's unclear. The extension Trump just signed would keep the bands in place through March. But these bands are largely not in effect now because business groups sued and a federal judge issued an injunction that allows most worker visas to continue. The focus now is what will the Biden administration do? Will they keep the bands in place until March? Well, we know Biden supports worker visas for highly skilled foreigners. He hasn't specifically addressed these bands, but he has bowed to undo a lot of Trump's immigration policies. Marketplaces. Nervous offer. Thanks. You're welcome. Around 20 states raised their minimum wages with the new year. 30 States and the District of Columbia now have higher minimum wages than the federal rate, which sits at $7.25. And hasn't increased since 2000 and nine marketplaces Nancy Marshall Ginza explains. Faith Booker works at McDonald's and Burger King and Lakeland, Florida making $9.70 an hour McDonald's and 8 56 and our Burger King. She worked full time at both chains for about nine months. And McDonald's cut her hours. I'm just pretty much struggling right now, just trying to make me look like paycheck to paycheck pretty much Booker is now choosing between paying bills and buying clothes for her kids. Florida voters approved a ballot measure in November, raising the state's minimum wage to 8 65 an hour now and 10 an hour next September, Booker says right now making member wage is that I loved, so above all. This year, especially voters are sympathetic to minimum wage workers on the front lines during a pandemic, according to University of Oklahoma economist Gary Hoover. The people who work at your local grocery store the people work at the gas stations where you get gassed. Over, says states were minimum wage workers still earn the federal minimum of 7 25 an hour insists that's enough because the cost of living is lower their I'm Nancy Marshall again, sir. For Marketplace. Major markets around the world are closed for New Year's Day. Marketplace.

Trump Nancy Marshall Ginza president Andy Euler David Brancaccio Biden Faith Booker Nancy Marshall McDonald Nova Safia Burger King Florida Gary Hoover District of Columbia Lakeland University of Oklahoma
"gary hoover" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:05 min | 9 months ago

"gary hoover" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Andy Euler. And for David Brancaccio, President Trump extended a ban on work visas and green cars that was set to expire yesterday. Marketplaces Nova Safia joins me to explain over Good morning Good morning. So many businesses have been outspoken about what this band means for them. What's the president's rationale for keeping the ban in place? The president cited lost jobs because of the pandemic and concerns about keeping the current a virus from spreading. He's previously said he wants to keep American workers from having to compete with foreign workers. Especially with the country struggling to bring back jobs that have been lost now. The ban effects several types of immigration green cards issued abroad, mostly for the purposes of family reunification. Also worker visas, such as the popular H one B visas. Those air used a lot by the tech industry to bring in highly skilled workers and J one visas used by students and a number of others. Andy And what about the practical implications these bamboos for those immigrants and for businesses? Well, that's unclear. The extension Trump just signed would keep the bands in place through March. But these bands are largely not in effect now because business groups sued and a federal judge issued an injunction that allows most worker visas to continue. The focus now is what will the Biden administration do? Will they keep the bands in place until March? Well, we know Biden supports worker visas for highly skilled foreigners. He hasn't specifically addressed these bands, but he has bowed to undo a lot of Trump's immigration policies. Marketplaces. Nervous offer. Thanks. You're welcome. Around 20 states raised their minimum wages with the new year. 30 States and the District of Columbia now have higher minimum wages than the federal rate, which sits at $7.25. And hasn't increased since 2000 and nine marketplaces Nancy Marshall Ginza explains. Faith Booker works at McDonald's and Burger King in Lakeland, Florida making $9.70 an hour, McDonald's and 8 56 and our Burger King. She worked full time at both chains for about nine months. And McDonald's cut her hours. I'm just pretty much struggling right now, just trying to make me feel like Patriot Patriot Pretty much Booker is now choosing between paying bills and buying clothes for her kids. Florida voters approved a ballot measure in November, raising the state's minimum wage to 8 65 an hour now and 10 an hour next September, Booker says right now making member wage is that I loved, so above all. This year, especially voters are sympathetic to minimum wage workers on the front lines during a pandemic, according to University of Oklahoma economist Gary Hoover. The people who work at your local grocery store the people work at the gas stations where you get gassed, Hoover says. States were minimum wage workers still earn the federal minimum of 7 25 an hour insists that's enough because the cost of living is lower there. I'm Nancy Marshall again, sir. For Marketplace. Major markets around the world are closed for New Year's Day. Marketplace.

Trump Faith Booker president Andy Euler McDonald David Brancaccio Florida Gary Hoover Biden Nancy Marshall Ginza Nova Safia Nancy Marshall Burger King District of Columbia Lakeland University of Oklahoma
"gary hoover" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

05:32 min | 1 year ago

"gary hoover" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"The unprecedented forced sale of a foreign owned company to an American one in this case, two American companies, the Trump Administration announced Sunday. That the tech firm Oracle and the retailer WalMart will take a stake in TIC Tac and create a new entity headquartered in the United States. Now there are still a lot of questions about national security and user data, especially since Chinese owner Bite Dance remains the majority stakeholder and the US based entity may not actually control the underlying technology. We actually don't know for sure yet. So for today, let's put on our business hats and look at what Oracle and Wal Mart would get out of the deal. Marketplaces Mariel Segarra reports for Oracle. This is really about growing. It's cloud storage business. It rents server space to other companies like Zoom and soon Tic Tac so they can store their data, but that business is a lot smaller than its cloud competitors. John Freeman at Safari Research, says Amazon, Google and Microsoft have a lot of very large data centers, and that's an asset. An entire data center can go down. They can keep on chugging. That's the kind of reliability that you get when you have that kind of scale. So he says, Getting bigger thanks to this TIC tac deal could help Oracle land even more high profile lucrative contracts. As for Wal Mart, this partnership is also about data the kind TIC tac collects on this users. Lay Duran is a senior VP at Cantar. They're tracking engagement. Time spent what you're looking at where you came from, and then any click throughs that could help WalMart figure out what's trendy, particularly among the people who tend to use Tic Tac. You know, the youth's at impress men is a managing director at Alex Partners with TIC Tac. You're getting a global audience with highly engaged users in a demographic that retailers across the world are seeking to better understand Tourism riskier for both companies. John Freeman at CFR says, Sure Tic tac is the hot social media app right now, But maybe in a couple of years we don't talk 10 year old demographic. You know, uses Nick Macher. Blue blue. Perceptive, You know, whatever, Right, whatever the next flavor of cool mobile app is right. Also buying a stake in Tic Tac could put both companies in the middle of the endless fights between the US and China over technology. And everything else. I'm Ariel Segarra for marketplace. We turn now to the cove it economy. Hundreds of thousands of Californians are still waiting to receive unemployment benefits three weeks or longer after applying for them. That's according to a special commission that Governor Gavin Newsom appointed to look into the state's unemployment system. In fact, the governor's so called strike team documented so many problems that it actually told the state to stop accepting new applications for two weeks, while California catches up and starts working on a new system. But as marketplaces Mitchell Hartman reports, these problems are not just happening in California. The surgeon. Jobless claims revealed some deep seated problems with California's unemployment system, among them antiquated software and a glitchy I D verification system for preventing fraud. These kinds of problems have surfaced nationwide since the pandemic hit, says Michael Strain at the American Enterprise Institute. It's not a surprise that it was a shock to the system. In a matter of weeks in March, claims nationwide jumped from around 200,000 to more than six million and have remained historically high ever since strain, says states under invested in their unemployment systems for decades before the pandemic, the infrastructure that many states we're using is really outdated and needs to be upgraded. Every state runs its own unemployment system with different eligibility rules and application process. Is Michelle ever more at the national employment Law Project points out in some states to reset your password? You have to call in and get a new one sent in the mail. Her list of fixes starts with more uniform national standards having that system be able to reset your password having it be open 24 7. Making sure that you can upload forms with a mobile device being able to get information easily about where you are in the process. The current system isn't serving its primary function for many laid off workers, says University of Oklahoma economist Gary Hoover, namely providing income so they can keep paying their bills and that's hitting the workers who need it the most the hardest. It went the bottom of the income distribution. Women. Minorities are going to be damaged even more so than the general public, he says. Those workers have less in the way of assets to tide them over until the next job comes along. I Mitchell Hartmann for Marketplace. On Wall Street today, a big BuzzFeed news report had markets rattled. Leaked documents showed that the world's biggest banks seemed to have ignored some $2 trillion in suspicious transactions. You know, dirty money, and there may be more bombshells coming, bank stocks dropped in, so did the rest of the market. We'll have the details when we do the numbers. Already this year, California has battled.

TIC Tac Oracle Wal Mart California United States John Freeman Mariel Segarra Governor Gavin Newsom Trump Administration Bite Dance Ariel Segarra BuzzFeed Mitchell Hartmann Zoom WalMart Nick Macher Mitchell Hartman Michelle American Enterprise Institute
"gary hoover" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

05:17 min | 1 year ago

"gary hoover" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"Tiktok and the unprecedented forced sale of a foreign owned company to an American one. In this case to American companies, the trump administration announced Sunday that the tech firm or and the retailer. Will take a stake in TIKTOK and create a new entity headquartered in the United States. Now, there are still a lot of questions about national security and user data especially since Chinese owner bite dance remains the majority stakeholder and the US based entity may not actually control the underlying technology. We actually don't know for sure yet. So for today, let's put on our business hats and look at what Oracle and Walmart would get out of the. Deal Marketplace's Mary Sagarra reports for Oracle. This is really about growing it's cloud storage business it rents server space to other companies like zoom and soon tiktok. So they can store their data but that business is a lot smaller than its cloud competitors John Freeman at cf ram research says Amazon Google and Microsoft have a lot very large data centers and that's an asset an entire data center to go down the could keep on truckin that's the. Kind of reliability that you get when you have that kind of scale. So he says getting bigger thanks to this TIKTOK deal could help or land even more high-profile lucrative contracts. As for Walmart this partnership is also about data the kind tick tock collects on its users lay durant is a senior VP Kantar they are tracking engagement time spent what you're looking at where you came from an enemy click throughs that could help Walmart figure out. What's trendy particularly among the people who tend to use Tiktok you know the US at impressment is a managing director at Alex partners with Tiktok. You're getting a global audience with highly engaged users in a demographic that be killers across the world are seeking to better understand there is some risk here for both companies John, Freeman at cf are a says, sure tiktok is the hot social media APP right now but maybe in a couple of years. TIKTOK ten year old. Demographic you know you make Bacher bloop bloop or something you know whatever whatever the next flavor of cruel mobile APP is right. Also buying a stake in tiktok could put both companies in the middle of the endless fights between the US and China over technology and everything else. Mariel Sagarra for marketplace. We turn now to the COVID. Any hundreds of thousands of Californians are still waiting to receive unemployment benefits, three weeks or longer after applying for them that's according to a special commission that Governor Gavin newsom appointed to look into the state's unemployment system. In fact, the governor's so called strike team documented. So many problems that it actually told the state to stop accepting new applications for two weeks while California catches up and starts working on a new system, but as marketplace's Mitchell Hartman. Reports these problems are not just happening in California the surgeon jobless claims revealed some deep seated problems with California's on employment system among them antiquated software and a glitch ee ID. Verification System for preventing fraud. These kinds of problems have surfaced nationwide since the pandemic kit says Michael Strain the American Enterprise. Institute it's not a surprise that it was a shock to the system in a matter of weeks in March claims nationwide jumped from around two hundred, thousand to more than six, million and. have remained historically high ever since strain says states underinvested in their unemployment systems for decades before the pandemic, the IT infrastructure that many states are using is you know really outdated and needs to be upgraded. Every state runs its own on employment system with different eligibility rules and application processes Michelle Evermore the national. Employment. Law Project points out in some states to reset your password you have to call in and get a new one sent in the mail her list of fixes starts. With more uniform national standards having the IT system be able to reset your password having it be open twenty, four seven making sure that you can upload forms with a mobile device being able to get information easily about where you are in the process. The current system isn't serving its primary function for many laid off workers says University of Oklahoma economist Gary Hoover namely providing income. So they can keep paying their bills and that's hitting the workers who need it the most the hardest. At the bottom of the income distribution women minorities are going to be damaged even more. So than the general public, he says, those workers have less in the way of assets to tide them until the next job comes along I'm Mitchell Hartman for marketplace. On Wall Street today a big buzzfeed news report had markets rattled leaked documents showed that the world's biggest banks seemed to have ignored some two trillion dollars in suspicious transactions. You know dirty money and there may be more bombshells coming bank stocks dropped, and so did the rest of the market we'll have the details.

United States Walmart Tiktok John Freeman Oracle Mitchell Hartman California Governor Gavin newsom Deal Marketplace Michael Strain Mariel Sagarra Gary Hoover buzzfeed Bacher COVID Michelle Mary Sagarra VP Kantar fraud
"gary hoover" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"gary hoover" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To foreign buyers in the year ending in March sales of existing US homes to international buyers reached seventy eight billion dollars that is down thirty six percent from the year before market place's Amy Scott reports for years foreign buyers many from China poured money into houses in southern California Miami New Jersey and New York whether to live or park their cash what's changed Lawrence you chief economist of the national association of realtors points of a slowing global economy the strong U. S. dollar in Chinese restrictions on investments abroad but the large magnitude in the decline is quite surprising so one has to attribute something beyond the normal economic factors like the trade war if that maybe scaring off fires he says Danielle hailed chief economist of realtor dot com says the decline is taking some of the pressure off home prices and while that may be bad news for sellers the fact that we have some buyers leaving the market or not coming in create opportunities for the buyers that remain namely domestic buyers especially at the higher end of the market foreign buyers tend to buy more expensive houses and pay cash my name is Scott for market place the house of representatives is expected to vote today on a bill to raise the federal minimum wage for the first time in a decade it's seven twenty five an hour we go to fifteen by the year twenty twenty five and Democrats strongly support the bill but it's unlikely that Republicans who control the Senate will take it up anytime soon market place's Mitchell Hartman takes us through some key numbers seven twenty five an hour buys about fifteen percent or less today than it did back in two thousand nine after adjusting for inflation more than half the states have now adopted minimum wages higher than the federal standard university of Oklahoma economist Gary Hoover says we're neighboring states have different minimum wages it might be advantageous for the employer to go for one border to the other relocating to find cheaper workers in theory workers can move from lower to a higher minimum wage states Letitia II born supports her nine year old son working for seven twenty five an hour at a Burger King in Durham North Carolina that would be a blessing to move to another state that higher with the minimum wage but you got to have money I can't save enough right now to just pack up and leave California Washington and Massachusetts have a twelve dollar an hour minimum wage now while Washington DC tops out at fourteen dollars an hour I'm Mitchell Hartman for market place let's do the numbers the footsie in London is down five tenths percent Dow S. and P. and nasdaq futures here our mixed the S. and P. future is little changed at last check.

Mitchell Hartman Washington Massachusetts Durham North Carolina university of Oklahoma national association of realto California London Letitia II Gary Hoover US Senate Danielle chief economist Lawrence New York
"gary hoover" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:50 min | 2 years ago

"gary hoover" Discussed on KCRW

"Foreign buyers in the year ending in March sales of existing US homes to international buyers reached seventy eight billion dollars that is down thirty six percent from the year before market place's Amy Scott reports for years foreign buyers many from China poured money into houses in southern California Miami New Jersey and New York whether to live or park their cash what's changed Lawrence you chief economist of the national association of realtors points of a slowing global economy the strong U. S. dollar in Chinese restrictions on investments abroad but the large magnitude in the decline is quite supplies and so one has to attribute something beyond the normal economic factors like the trade war if that maybe scaring off fires he says Danielle hailed chief economist of realtor dot com says the decline is taking some of the pressure off home prices and while that may be bad news for sellers the fact that we have some buyers leaving the market or not coming in create opportunities for the buyers that remain namely domestic buyers especially at the higher end of the market foreign buyers tend to buy more expensive houses and pay cash my name is Scott for market place the house of representatives is expected to vote today on a bill to raise the federal minimum wage for the first time in a decade it's seven twenty five an hour we go to fifteen by the year twenty twenty five and Democrats strongly support the bill but it's unlikely that Republicans who control the Senate will take it up anytime soon market place's Mitchell Hartman takes us through some key numbers seven twenty five an hour buys about fifteen percent or less today than it did back in two thousand nine after adjusting for inflation more than half the states have now adopted minimum wages higher than the federal standard university of Oklahoma economist Gary Hoover says we're neighboring states have different minimum wages it might be a better way to school with employer go for one border to the other relocating to find cheaper workers in theory workers can move from lower to a higher minimum wage states Letitia II born supports her nine year old son working for seven twenty five an hour at a Burger King in Durham North Carolina that would be a blessing to move to another state that higher with the minimal wage but you got to have money I can't save enough right now to just pack up leave California Washington and Massachusetts have a twelve dollar an hour minimum wage now while Washington DC tops out at fourteen dollars an hour I'm Mitchell Hartman for market place let's do the numbers the footsie in London is down five tenths percent Dow S. and P. and nasdaq futures here our mixed the S. and P. future is little changed at last check.

Mitchell Hartman Washington Massachusetts Durham North Carolina university of Oklahoma national association of realto California London Letitia II Gary Hoover US Senate Danielle chief economist Lawrence New York
"gary hoover" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"gary hoover" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In Los Angeles. I'm KAI Ryssdal. It is Monday. The twenty eighth of January today is always to have you along everybody from the newly reopened the bureau of economic analysis at the Commerce Department came this press release today bureau of economic analysis reports scheduled for this week and next will be delayed because of the effects of the partial government shutdown. It went on to list a couple of three of them including its first pass at gross domestic product, which was spoken about on Wednesday. And then this press release said the be has not yet set new release dates for those economic reports. So how's that economy doing that? We haven't really been able to measure since before Christmas. Marketplace's Mitchell Hartman gets his going with what it takes to get all that economic data reporting machinery up and running again on December twenty first twenty eighteen we got the final report on third quarter GDP from the bureau of economic analysis. The very next day. A B E A and other agencies shutdown today government, economists were trying to figure out how to get back up to speed. And it's an urgent matter gross. Domestic product is the total of all goods and services produced in the economy. Gary Hoover at the university of Oklahoma says it's important to business leaders, and the fed if I want to know how fast the economy is growing I use these data as indicators of what I should expect going forward. Pulling the GDP report together is complicated in normal times. Now, it'll be even trickier. It includes data on manufacturing trade farming construction all from agencies that were also shot down. Erica, grocery ran, the bureau of labor statistics during the shorter twenty thirteen government shutdown. The federal statistical system is some fought like a group of factories each program. Finely honed to produce. The releases on time with the highest possible quality the fourth quarter GDP report will get done says Mark measure at the tax policy center, the raw material that goes in. There will have been collected or will be collected. And so I think that they'll be able to pull together those estimates at some point. And I think the key question when you ask is when is that point today, the EPA issued a statement saying that this week scheduled economic releases will be delayed. No new release dates have yet been sat so GDP on Wednesday morning. Nope. Eventually definitely I'm Mitchell. Hartman for marketplace. And lest you think it's only data that's going to lag. The actual economy is things get back going after the shutdown. Let me disabuse you of that notion just like all those statisticians at the bureau of economic analysis, the private sector has been waiting on the government as well. And businesses are scrambling to get ahead of the inevitable bureaucratic and regulatory backlog and. With the not out of the question possibility of another shutdown and a couple of weeks there is some urgency here. Marketplace's Kimberly Adams has that one from Washington. I I spoke with Justin Cox a couple of weeks ago at the height of the shutdown. He runs atlas brew works here in DC, the shutdown delayed labels. He needed for his new beer now that the government is back open. How long the backlog is or where we are within that q. He and other craft brewers are rushing to get approvals. Who knows what's going to happen in three weeks, whether we'll have another shutdown again, and these crazy times, I don't think that's out of the run the possibility. There's also a line for small business loans, the small business administration put those on hold during the shutdown to Tracy ward is with self help ventures fund in North Carolina one of the businesses that we're working with is a childcare facility in western North Carolina. They serve low income children in that area. There. Their loan was on hold during the shutdown now, they have to hustle there in the position of purchasing the building that they've been leasing and they need that purchase to happen by a certain date or they might lose. The building small businesses aren't the only ones who've learned a hard lesson from the shutdown the securities and Exchange Commission was also affected and several big companies had to hold off on their initial public offerings. So far in January. We've had no issues this year. Whereas last year we had seventeen IPO's at the same point. Kathleen Smith is with Renaissance Capital..

Mitchell Hartman Justin Cox KAI Ryssdal Los Angeles Commerce Department bureau of labor North Carolina Kathleen Smith Renaissance Capital Gary Hoover university of Oklahoma Erica Exchange Commission EPA Kimberly Adams Mark Washington
"gary hoover" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

05:42 min | 2 years ago

"gary hoover" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"In Los Angeles. I'm KAI Ryssdal. It is Monday the twenty eighth of January today. Good is always to have long everybody from the newly reopened a bureau of economic analysis at the Commerce Department came this press release today bureau of economic analysis reports scheduled for this week and next will be delayed because of the effects of the partial government shutdown. It went on to list a couple of three of them including its first pass at gross domestic product, which was spoke about on Wednesday. And then this press release said the be has not yet set new release dates for those economic reports. So has that economy doing that we haven't really been able to measure since before Christmas? Marketplace's Mitchell Hartman gets going with what it takes to get all that economic data reporting machinery up and running again on December twenty first twenty eighteen we got the final report on third quarter GDP from the bureau of economic analysis. The very next day. May be EA and other agencies shutdown today government, economists were trying to figure out how to get back up to speed, and it's an urgent matter gross. Domestic product is the total of all goods and services produced in the economy. Gary Hoover at the university of Oklahoma says it's important to business leaders, and the fed if I want to know how fast the economy is growing I use these data as indicators of what I should expect going forward. Pulling the GDP report together is complicated in normal times. Now, it'll be even trickier. It includes data on manufacturing trade farming construction all from agencies that were also shot down. Erica gross ran the bureau of labor statistics during the shorter twenty thirteen government shutdown. The federal statistical system is some fought like a group of factories each program. Finely honed to produce. The releases on time with the highest possible quality the fourth quarter GDP report will get done says Mark measure at the tax policy center, the raw material that goes in. There will have been collected or will be collected. And so I think that they'll be able to pull together those estimates at some point. And I think the key question of when you ask is when is that point today? B E A issued a statement saying that this week scheduled economic releases will be delayed. No new release dates have yet been set so GDP on Wednesday morning. Nope. Eventually definitely I'm Mitchell. Hartman for marketplace and less, do you think it's only data that's going to lag? The actual economy is things get back going after the shutdown. Let me disabuse you of that notion. Just like all those data stations at the bureau of economic analysis. The private sector has been waiting on the government as well. And businesses are scrambling to get head of the inevitable bureaucratic and regulatory back. Log. And with the not out of the question possibility of another shutdown and a couple of weeks there is some urgency here. Marketplace's Kimberly Adams has that one from Washington. I I spoke with Justin Cox a couple of weeks ago at the height of the shutdown. He runs atlas brew works here in DC, the shutdown delayed labels. He needed for his new beer now that the government is back open. I don't know how long the backlog is or where we are within that q. He and other craft brewers are rushing to get approvals. Who knows what's going to happen in three weeks? Whether we'll have another shutdown again in these crazy times, I don't think that's out of the realm of possibility. There's also a line for small business loans, the small business administration put those on hold during the shutdown to Tracy ward is with self help ventures fund in North Carolina one of the businesses that we're working with is a childcare facility in western North Carolina. They serve low income children in that area. Their loan was on hold during the shutdown now, they have to hustle there in the position of purchasing the building that they've been leasing and they need that purchase to happen by a certain date or they might lose. The building small businesses aren't the only ones who've learned a hard lesson from the shutdown the securities and Exchange Commission was also affected and several big companies had to hold off on their initial public offerings. So far in January. We've had no PEOs this year. Whereas last year we had seventeen IPO's at the same point. Kathleen Smith is with Renaissance Capital. It's a wakeup call to companies that are planning to go public because there's a risk that may be the regulator won't be ready when they're ready even with the furloughs at the SEC now over there's no guarantee how long they'll be open for business in Washington. I'm Kimberly Adams for marketplace. A quick turn the geopolitics before we go on today. The Trump administration posed Sancti. On Venezuela's state run oil company paid a visa it's known as the White House is gonna block about seven billion dollars of the company's assets also cost the country about eleven billion dollars in lost exports over the next year or so trying to put some economic pain in the nNcholas Maduro hold on power in that country. Crude oil on global markets down about three percent today. Wall Street and the major indices also down not quite as much though. We'll have the details when we do the numbers. I honestly didn't know this until this.

Mitchell Hartman Kimberly Adams North Carolina KAI Ryssdal Los Angeles Commerce Department Erica gross bureau of labor Venezuela Gary Hoover university of Oklahoma Kathleen Smith Justin Cox Renaissance Capital Washington Mark
"gary hoover" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:42 min | 2 years ago

"gary hoover" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In Los Angeles. I'm KAI Ryssdal. It is Monday, the twenty eighth of January today could is always to have you along everybody from the newly reopened bureau of economic analysis at the Commerce Department came this press release today bureau of economic analysis reports scheduled for this week and next will be delayed because of the effects of the partial government shutdown. It went on to list a couple of three of them including its first pass at gross domestic product, which was spoken about on Wednesday. And then this press release said the be has not yet set new release dates for those economic reports. So how's that economy doing that? We haven't really been able to measure since before Christmas. Marketplace's Mitchell Hartman gets his going forward. It takes to get all that economic data reporting machinery up and running again on December twenty first twenty eighteen we got the final report on third quarter GDP from the bureau of economic analysis. The very next day. May be EA and other agencies shutdown today government, economists were trying to figure out how to get back up to speed, and it's an urgent matter gross. Domestic product is the total of all goods and services produced in the economy. Gary Hoover at the university of Oklahoma says it's important to business leaders, and the fed if I want to know how fast the economy is growing I use these data as indicators of what I should expect going forward. Pulling the GDP report together is complicated in normal times. Now, it'll be even trickier. It includes data on manufacturing trade farming construction all from agencies that were also shot down. Erica Grossen ran the bureau of labor statistics during the shorter twenty thirteen government shutdown. The federal statistical system is some fun like a group of factories each program. Finely honed to produce. The releases on time with the highest possible quality the fourth quarter GDP report will get done says Mark measure at the tax policy center, the raw material that goes in. There will have been collected or will be collected. And so I think that they'll be able to pull together those estimates at some point. And I think the key question when you ask is when is that point today, the EPA issued a statement saying that this week scheduled economic releases will be delayed. No new release dates have yet been set so GDP on Wednesday morning. Nope. Eventually definitely I'm Mitchell. Hartman for marketplace and less, do you think it's only data that's going to lag? The actual economy is things get back going after the shutdown. Let me disabuse you of that notion just like all those statisticians at the bureau of economic analysis, the private sector has been waiting on the government as well. And businesses are scrambling to get ahead of the inevitable bureaucratic and regulatory back. Log. And with the not out of the question possibility of another shutdown and a couple of weeks there is some urgency here. Marketplace's Kimberly Adams has that one from Washington. I I spoke with Justin Cox a couple of weeks ago at the height of the shutdown. He runs atlas brew works here in DC, the shutdown delayed labels. He needed for his new beer now that the government is back open. I don't know how long backlog is or where we are within that q. He and other craft brewers are rushing to get approvals. Who knows what's going to happen in three weeks, whether we'll have another shutdown again, and these crazy times, I don't think that's out of the the possibility. There's also a line for small business loans, the small business administration put those on hold during the shutdown to Tracy ward is with self help ventures fund in North Carolina one of the businesses that we're working with is a childcare facility in western North Carolina. They serve low income children in that area. There loan was on hold during the shutdown now, they have to hustle there in the position of purchasing the building that they've been leasing. And they need that purchase to happen. Die certain date or they might lose. The building small businesses aren't the only ones who've learned a hard lesson from the shutdown the securities and Exchange Commission was also affected and several big companies had to hold off on their initial public offerings. So foreign January we've had no issues this year. Whereas last year we had seventeen IPO's at the same point. Kathleen Smith is with Renaissance Capital. It's a wakeup call to companies that are planning to go public because there's a risk that may be the regulator won't be ready when they're ready even with the furloughs at the SEC now over there's no guarantee how long they'll be open for business in Washington. I'm Kimberly Adams for marketplace. A quick turn to geopolitics before we go on today. The Trump administration posts sanctions on Venezuela's state run oil company paid a visa it's known as the White House is gonna block about seven billion dollars of the company's assets also cost the country. About eleven billion dollars in lost exports over the next year or so trying to put some economic pain in the nNcholas Medeiros hold on power in that country. Crude oil on global markets down about three percent today. Wall Street and the major indices also down not quite as much though. We'll have the details when we do the numbers. I honestly didn't know.

Mitchell Hartman Kimberly Adams North Carolina KAI Ryssdal Los Angeles Commerce Department bureau of labor Erica Grossen Gary Hoover Venezuela university of Oklahoma Medeiros Kathleen Smith Justin Cox Renaissance Capital EPA
"gary hoover" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:41 min | 2 years ago

"gary hoover" Discussed on KCRW

"In Los Angeles. I'm KAI Ryssdal. It is Monday the twenty eighth of January today. Good is always to have you along everybody from the newly reopened bureau of economic analysis at the Commerce Department came this press release today bureau of economic analysis reports scheduled for this week and next will be delayed because of the effects of the partial government shutdown. It went on to list a couple of three of them including its first pass at gross domestic product, which was spoken about on Wednesday. And then this press release said the be has not yet set new release dates for those economic reports. So how's that economy doing that? We haven't really been able to measure since before Christmas Margaret Mitchell. Hartman gets us going what it takes to get all that economic data reporting machinery up and running again on December twenty first twenty eighteen we got the final report on third quarter GDP from the bureau of economic analysis. The very next day. A B E A and other agencies shut down today. Government economists were trying to figure out how to get back up to speed, and it's an urgent matter gross. Domestic product is the total of all goods and services produced in the economy. Gary Hoover at the university of Oklahoma says it's important to business leaders, and the fed if I want to know how fast the economy is growing use these data as indicators of what I should expect going forward. Pulling the GDP report together is complicated in normal times. Now, it'll be even trickier. It includes data on manufacturing trade farming construction all from agencies that were also shot down. Erica Grossen ran the bureau of labor statistics during the shorter twenty thirteen government shutdown. The federal statistical system is some like a group of factories each program. Finely honed to produce. The releases on time with the highest possible quality the fourth quarter GDP report will get done says Mark measure at the tax policy center, the raw material that goes in. There will have been collected or will be collected. And so I think that they'll be able to pull together those estimates at some point. And I think the key question. And when you ask is when is that point today? B E A issued a statement saying that this week scheduled economic releases will be delayed. No new release dates have yet been sat so GDP on Wednesday morning. Nope. Eventually definitely I'm Mitchell. Hartman for marketplace and less, do you think it's only data that's going to lag? The actual economy is things get back going after the shutdown. Let me disabuse you of that notion just like all those statisticians at the bureau of economic analysis, the private sector has been waiting on the government as well. And businesses are scrambling to get ahead of the inevitable bureaucratic and regulatory backlog and. And with the not out of the question possibility of another shutdown and a couple of weeks there is some urgency here. Marketplace's Kimberly Adams has that one from Washington. I I spoke with Justin Cox a couple of weeks ago at the height of the shutdown. He runs atlas brew works here in DC, the shutdown delayed labels. He needed for his new beer now that the government is back open. I don't know how long the backlog is or where we are within that q. He and other craft brewers are rushing to get approvals. Who knows what's going to happen in three weeks, whether we'll have another shutdown again, and these crazy times, I don't think that's out of the possibility. There's also a line for small business loans, the small business administration put those on hold during the shutdown to Tracy ward is with self help ventures fund in North Carolina one of the businesses that we're working with is a childcare facility in western North Carolina. They serve low income children in that area. There. Their loan was on hold during the shutdown now, they have to hustle there in the position of purchasing the building that they've been leasing and they need that purchase to happen. Die certain date where they might lose. The building small businesses aren't the only ones who've learned a hard lesson from the shutdown the securities and Exchange Commission was also affected and several big companies had to hold off on their initial public offerings. So far in January. We've had no issues this year. Whereas last year we had seventeen IPO's at the same point. Kathleen Smith is with Renaissance Capital. It's a wakeup call to companies that are planning to go public because there's a rest that may be the regulator won't be ready when they're ready even with the furloughs at the SEC now over there's no guarantee how long they'll be open for business in Washington. I'm Kimberly Adams for marketplace. A quick turn to geopolitics before we go on today. The Trump administration posts sanctions on Venezia. Wailers state run oil company paid a visa it's known as the White House is gonna block about seven billion dollars of the company's assets also cost the country about eleven billion dollars in lost exports over the next year or so trying to put some economic pain in the nNcholas Medeiros hold on power in that country. Crude oil on global markets down about three percent today. Wall Street and the major indices also down not quite as much though. We'll have the details when we do the numbers. I honestly didn't.

Kimberly Adams Hartman North Carolina KAI Ryssdal Los Angeles Commerce Department bureau of labor Margaret Mitchell Erica Grossen Gary Hoover university of Oklahoma Kathleen Smith Trump Justin Cox Renaissance Capital
"gary hoover" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:22 min | 2 years ago

"gary hoover" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In Los Angeles. I'm KAI Ryssdal. On Monday, the twenty eighth of January today. Good is always to have you along everybody from the newly reopened the bureau of economic analysis at the Commerce Department came this press release today bureau of economic analysis reports scheduled for this week and next will be delayed because of the effects of the partial government shutdown. It went on to list a couple of three of them including its first pass at gross domestic product, which was spoken about on Wednesday. And then this press release said the be has not yet set new release dates for those economic reports. So how's that economy doing that? We haven't really been able to measure since before Christmas. Marketplace's Mitchell Hartman gets his going what it takes to get all that economic data reporting machinery up and running again on December twenty first twenty eighteen we got the final report on third quarter GDP from the bureau of economic analysis. The very next day. May be EA and other agencies shutdown today government, economists were trying to figure out how to get back up to speed, and it's an urgent matter gross. Domestic product is the total of all goods and services produced in the economy. Gary Hoover at the university of Oklahoma says it's important to business leaders, and the fed if I want to know how fast the economy is growing I use these data as indicators of what I should expect going forward. Pulling the GDP report together is complicated in normal times. Now, it'll be even trickier. It includes data on manufacturing trade farming construction all from agencies that were also shot down. Erica Grossen ran the bureau of labor statistics during the shorter twenty thirteen government shutdown. The federal statistical system is some fun like a group of factories each program. Finely honed to produce. The releases on time with the highest possible quality the fourth quarter GDP report will get done says Mark major at the tax policy center, the raw material that goes in. There will have been collected or will be collected. And so I think that they'll be able to pull together those estimates at some point. And I think the key question of when you ask you when is that point today, the EA issued a statement saying that this week scheduled economic releases will be delayed. No new release dates have yet been set so GDP on Wednesday morning. Nope. Eventually definitely I'm Mitchell. Hartman for marketplace. And lest you think it's only data that's going to lag. The actual economy is things get back going after the shutdown. Let me disabuse you of that notion just like all those statisticians at the bureau of economic analysis, the private sector has been waiting on the government as well. And businesses are scrambling to get ahead of the inevitable bureaucratic and regulatory back. Log. And with the not out of the question possibility of another shutdown and a couple of weeks there is some urgency here. Marketplace's Kimberly Adams has that one from Washington. I I spoke with Justin Cox a couple of weeks ago at the height of the shutdown. He runs atlas brew works here in DC, the shutdown delayed labels. He needed for his new beer now that the government is back open. I don't know how long the backlog is or where we are within that q. He and other craft brewers are rushing to get approvals. Who knows what's going to happen in three weeks? Whether we'll have another shutdown again in these crazy times. I don't think that's out of the run the possibility. There's also a line for small business loans, the small business administration put those on hold during the shutdown to Tracy ward is with self help ventures fund in North Carolina one of the businesses that we're working with is a childcare facility in western North Carolina. They serve low income children in that area. There loan was on hold during the shutdown now, they have to hustle there in the position of purchasing the building that they've been leasing. And they need that purchase to happen by a certain date or they might lose. The building small businesses aren't the only ones who've learned a hard lesson from the shutdown the securities and Exchange Commission was also affected and several big companies had to hold off on their initial public offerings. So foreign January we've had no PEOs this year. Whereas last year, we had seventeen IPO's at the same point Kathleen Smith with Renaissance Capital, it's a wakeup call to companies that are planning to go public because there's a risk that may be the regulator won't be ready when they're ready even with the furloughs at the SEC now over there's no guarantee how long they'll be open for business in Washington. I'm Kimberly Adams for marketplace. A quick turn to geopolitics before we go on today. The Trump administration posts sanctions on Venezuela's state run oil company paid a visa it's known as the White House is gonna block about seven billion dollars of the company's assets also cost the country. About eleven billion dollars in lost exports over the next year or so trying to put some economic pain in the nNcholas Maduro was hold on power in that country. Crude oil global markets down about three percent today. Wall Street and the major indices also down not quite as much though. We'll have the details when we do the numbers..

Mitchell Hartman Kimberly Adams EA North Carolina KAI Ryssdal Los Angeles Commerce Department bureau of labor Mark major Erica Grossen Gary Hoover Venezuela university of Oklahoma Maduro Justin Cox Washington
Consumer companies try price hikes as U.S. wages climb

Ron and Don

01:51 min | 3 years ago

Consumer companies try price hikes as U.S. wages climb

"And a half years. Not a huge surprise, right? Unemployment is crazy. Low companies are complaining to anybody. Who will listen about how hard it is to find qualified workers and tight labor markets can lead to higher wages, but you know, what higher wages can lead to higher prices. And you know, who might have something to say about that. Well, the fed that's marketplace's Mitchell Hartman has promised has that one anything that raises employer's costs to make things or provide services can push up the prices. They charge consumers, for instance, higher fuel prices or tariffs or workers wages and Josh Gibbons at the Economic Policy Institute says today's jobs report shows that employers are grappling with higher labor costs were starting to finally see. The flywheel engage for wage increases. I've been surprised like everyone else that it's taken such a low unemployment rate to get there. Now, keep in mind. The Federal Reserve has a dual mandate to keep unemployment low and inflation in check the fed has already raised interest rates three times this year in part to prevent inflation from getting out of hand as the economy runs. Hot Gary Hoover at the university of Oklahoma worries that rising wages could lead the fed to raise rates higher. Sooner. Why be so quick to hit the button to cool things down that's not necessarily appropriate. At this point given is more catching up as opposed to searching ahead, but there are pitfalls if the fed waits too long to act says Samir Simona at the Wells Fargo investment institute, you risk letting me inflation genie out of the bottle in which case, then we need rate hikes at a much faster pace, which would likely slow the job market and squelch wage gains before. Workers have caught up after years of mediocre raises. I'm Mitchell Hartman for marketplace. It is a fact of

Mitchell Hartman Federal Reserve Samir Simona Economic Policy Institute Josh Gibbons Wells Fargo Investment Institu Gary Hoover University Of Oklahoma