17 Burst results for "Gary Burtless"

"gary burtless" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:10 min | 3 months ago

"gary burtless" Discussed on KCRW

"Spicy little sweet. It's called real dogs, and it has claimed the coveted spot just outside of the Chase office tower for 23 years before the pandemic, the line to get a hot dog sausage or teres. Oh, But sometimes stretch around the block these days, with many white collar workers still staying away from the office owner Jeremy McCown says business is way down. It's hurt us big time. The the fact that we're hearing that they're coming back is like a God send a recent survey of downtown Milwaukee office workers found that about half plan to return to work by September and about 70%. Plan to be back in the office by the end of the year, and that's been the case throughout much of the country. Gary Burtless is an economist who researches income distribution at the Brookings Institution in Washington, D. C. He says all across the country cities that have large business districts also have ancillary businesses like dry cleaners, flower shops and barbershops. That are suffering. Even though business activities inching up in those central business district neighborhoods, it is nearly as close to normal as those neighborhoods where the local businesses rely on local residents. In many cities, there's an entire ecosystem built up to support people who work in offices. And many of those businesses suffered a huge financial hit after office is closed for the pandemic. But most businesses are still paying the same high rents to be located in downtown neighborhoods. Many of Catherine Fuchs clients used to step in for a haircut at Milwaukee Street barbershop on their way to work or over the lunch hour. It's shifting. I'm seeing some of the old faces again. I'm seeing some new faces, who are just simply back at work and trying us out now, because somewhere you know they're old places since closed. Unfortunately, there were definitely barbershops that have not made it back open again. Jill Roughing thought locating a sandwich shop on the first floor of a downtown Milwaukee office building was better than being in the suburbs, while her competitors in the suburbs are thriving. Our customers are still not back at work. Sometimes I get frustrated because I'm like, Come on, people come back. Economist Gary Burtless was recently in New York City, where he saw firsthand the neighborhoods like Jackson Heights in Queens are back to normal. But in midtown Manhattan, it's a different situation. There is much less foot traffic and it's It's bad for Lot of the local businesses, which are there to serve the office workers back in downtown Milwaukee. The steam press machines that ran constantly at Avenue fabric air dry cleaners are now mostly idle. Manager was seemed dull. Shad says the attorneys and guests from nearby hotels no longer needed services as frequently now with strike me twice a week instead of every day like we used to do beg real dogs. About a dozen people are in line for a hot dog. Jeremy McCone isn't sure if business will ever be back to normal. But for him and the thousands of business owners who make their livelihoods from white color workers, the long term economic effects of the pandemic are still being felt. For NPR News. I'm Korean House..

Jeremy McCown Jeremy McCone Gary Burtless New York City Jill Roughing Brookings Institution Jackson Heights Shad September Milwaukee Street Washington, D. C. Catherine Fuchs first floor NPR News 23 years thousands about 70% Queens About a dozen people Chase
"gary burtless" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:06 min | 9 months ago

"gary burtless" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Discusses another season of basketball. Made the coronavirus thistles, the PBS news hour from W. E T Studios in Washington and in the West from the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism at Arizona State University. The coded relief bill passed by Congress will provide urgent help too many around the country. But the size of the aid is smaller than many economists say, is needed and million still struggle to find full time work. For many older Americans who have lost their jobs. Prospects are especially damn their savings Evermore eaten away. Economics correspondent Paul Solomon looks at what they're facing. Part of our series on older workers, unfinished business. 75 its difficulties. Persuade people to take you on. You know, I lost my home and you know my job I have worsens made. And it's been hard. I have, um about $250 in my checking account, and I have $100 in savings. That your entire cushion Yes. It is. Of course, this year has been crushing for almost all of us because of Cove it but especially for older Americans, without savings or a well paying work from home job. I did start taking anti depressants. My COPD has gotten worse. You know, there's a limited amount of Stuff I can do for I have to take a break. I'm not able to buy gifts of my grand babies. That's the biggest thing that really hurts that I'm not able It's a purchase what I would like to purchase for there for Christmas. Older workers are really up against it for a host of reasons. First, of course, age and the bias against it, says 59. Year old Donna Rushing. I call it the invisible stage of life where you stand at the meat counter, and everyone has helped around you. Except you. It's just this invisible thing that happens in a certain point in age And indeed, says labor economist Teresa Ghilarducci, older workers have a much harder time finding another job. They're on unemployment. Longer. Latest numbers almost a million people 55 plus out of work for half a year or more, and if and when they do find a job, good luck getting anything that pays nearly as well as before, said Gary Burtless, pre pandemic older worker. Finds it more difficulty locating employer willing to offer them that kind of a job or even a job that potentially in five years time we'll get them back to their previous Pete's office worker and Nanny Celia Stevens has been jobless since March has no prospects. You just get so beat up interview after interview when they're not hiring you. She's an older lady. You know, when you somebody younger, I was always being interviewed by, you know, 2030 year olds, and it's really emotional for me to go through that again. That was hard 62 year old Victoria Taylor. A baker has been striking out on her job search since her layoff in May. I haven't found anything yet. I hate this is, you know not being able To toe work that I'm a working hard workers dedicated worker, and I just hate the fact that I'm not able to work now. 66 year old Ohio driver Dave Hind filled cared for a sick wife told his boss he wouldn't deliver to food processing plants he was can I just didn't want to play Russian roulette with my health. If I was 30 instead of 66, it would all be different. Hind filled his stopped looking for work. As have roughly one million older workers who've dropped out of the labor force in the past year. You know he's got license plate arms. Here's his heart. These are from the New Mexico Paree. Celia Stevens has been crafting to keep afloat. You know, it's just my way of, you know, let's keep them off the streets. I just recently sold down my crafts. I only made $50 But hey, so that's like when utility at 62 Stevens just received her first monthly social Security payment, $987 a lifesaver, she says. But if she lives into her seventies and beyond, it's going to cost her and says researcher now re re. If you claim Social Security before full retirement age, which at this point is 67. So if you do it at 62 when you're first eligible, Doc and basically slash your lovely Chuck compared to if you had waited until age 67, but that's a luxury. Stevens can't afford, much less wait until 70 for the maximum benefit. I'm just I'm just squeezing by Down a Russian, too young for Social Security was building a 401 k with help from her employer. It was my only hope of having some kind of a retirement because they matched a large percentage of my salary and so matching that in another position is gonna be really hard and she didn't just lose her job in Summit County, Colorado. I lost my housing that was attached to this job as well. In. I moved about an hour away in with my boyfriend. If I had had this took place to go to where would I be? Researcher Narry rezone mother needed a retail job to supplement Social Security. But her store closed and due to Cove in her mom says it's too risky to work. First, There's the question of one of the money run out. And then there's a question of one Does my body gave out. But re also has to worry about her daughter. I have a child and I have a mother, who is in her seventies had y se for my daughter's college funds and then help support my mother when she really needs that. And we're also still in the process of trying to save enough for our little If Donna Rushing has no family to help, it really is just me out there. So that's part of the sinking feeling. I don't have relatives. I don't have Children. You know I'm out there. And that makes her future even scarier. I could actually really be living out of my car. You know what's gonna happen? 10 years that's gonna go so quick. I'll be almost 70. Where can I go? To afford to live for the PBS news hour. This is Paul Solman more and more grateful for the job. I'm lucky enough to have Way returned to Britain and the pandemic. Special correspondent Malcolm Brevin has traveled to some of Europe's virus hot spots during the pandemic. He's covered northern Italy and demonstrations.

Nanny Celia Stevens Donna Rushing Dave Hind researcher Paul Solomon Walter Cronkite School of Jour basketball Washington Teresa Ghilarducci Congress Gary Burtless W. E T Studios Paul Solman Arizona State University Europe Malcolm Brevin Victoria Taylor
"gary burtless" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:54 min | 1 year ago

"gary burtless" Discussed on KQED Radio

"13 October. Good is always to have you along Everybody A little bit of good news A little bit of bad news from the International Monetary Fund today. The IMF published its world economic outlook this morning more than a 4% shrinkage in the global economy this year. That's the bad news. Here's the good news is that that's actually a little bit better than its June forecast and Next year is not looking so bad, provided Here's the news. The IMF says all countries, not just the United States ought to stop worrying about their dead loads and spend what is needed to keep people out of poverty. Marketplaces Nancy Marshall Ganz or gets is going, the IMF says close to 90 Million people could fall into extreme poverty that is living unless than a dollar 90 per day as covert 19 widens the global wealth gap. Eric LeCompte head Stupidly Yusa Network, a coalition of aid organizations, he says people on the lowest rungs of the economic ladder, migrant workers, low skilled factory workers. Are most at risk. We are looking at perhaps half the world's population living in extreme poverty. The solution says the IMF country should borrow and spend big to strengthen the social safety net. That means health care coverage. Unemployment benefits job retraining. Oxford Economics economist Ben May says that government spending fiscal policy can be a lifeline, so I think there is an understanding the moment The fiscal policy is particularly powerful, Andi. Actually, it does play a role in lifting these economies out of recession. Plus borrowing is cheap right now, interest rates or super low But developing countries that borrow should remember they'll have to pay it back. She hoco Goto is with the Wilson Center, and it will be incredibly difficult for industrialized countries to be able to wave off. Those debts and just to say that you don't need to pay us fact. But countries that borrow from the IMF are getting a bit of a reprieve. The IMF has decided to give them more time to repay their debts. I'm Nancy Marshall denser for marketplace. You know how we talk about inflation all the time. Maybe not all the time, but a lot. Here's one reason why the Social Security Administration announced this morning that people who get social Security benefits are going to get a cost of living increase next year. Of 1.3% 20 Bucks a month. On average. It's the lowest annual increase since 2017 and comes as there is a disagreement about what the number on it actually be. And what exactly the cost of living is for people living through a pandemic Marketplaces of revenge. Ishwar has that one. How much has the cost of living changed? Well, kind of depends on who you are right. That number the 1.3% cost of living increase that is based on a particular group of Americans, all urban wage earners and Clarence workers. Bruce Trouble is a consulting actuary. Government looks at what inflation is like for this group looks at the Consumer Price Index for urban wage earners and clerical workers. Thing is that is not seniors. It's just the only survey Congress had when the law was written in 1972 Christina Martin for Veda is with AARP. The formula really doesn't take into account. The actual budget and expenditures of most retirees. So, for example, senior spend more on health care and health care costs have surged 4.9% this year. The formula doesn't take into account Medicare premiums either, and the pandemic has added costs for seniors in particular. Gary Burtless is with the Brookings Institution agent household may need to restrict themselves too consuming groceries that can be delivered to them, and that carries a higher price head. Mary Johnson, an analyst with Senior Citizens League says decades of low cost of living increases that don't reflect seniors, budgets have added up. We estimate that social Security benefits have lost 30% of the buying power since 2000. The senior Citizen's league is lobbying Congress for AH, higher cost of living adjustment for 2021 3% instead of 1.3 in New York. I'm sorry, Ben, ashore for marketplace on Wall Street today, there was, Shall we say a lack of enthusiasm will have the details when we do the numbers. What do you do when a big chunk of your business depends on people really large numbers of people? Getting together in sometimes cramped quarters think cruise ships and movie theaters and theme parks and sports stadiums. That would make you Disney. Or Disney, which has been knocked sideways by the pandemic, and so has announced a big restructure its going.

International Monetary Fund Ben May Nancy Marshall Ganz Congress Disney Social Security Administration Eric LeCompte Nancy Marshall United States Wilson Center Gary Burtless Yusa Network Oxford Economics Ishwar Brookings Institution Mary Johnson
"gary burtless" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

05:05 min | 1 year ago

"gary burtless" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Today 13 October. Good is always to have you along Everybody A little bit of good news A little bit of bad news from the International Monetary Fund today. The IMF published its world economic outlook this morning more than a 4% shrinkage in the global economy this year. That's the bad news. Here's the good news is that that's actually a little bit better than its June forecast and Next year is not looking so bad, provided Here's the news. The IMF says all countries, not just the United States ought to stop worrying about their dead loads and spend what is needed to keep people out of poverty. Marketplaces Nancy Marshall Ganz or gets US going, The IMF says close to 90 Million people could fall into extreme poverty that is living unless than a dollar 90 per day as covert 19 widens the global wealth gap. Eric LeCompte heads Jubilee USA Network, a coalition of aid organizations, he says people on the lowest rungs of the economic ladder. Migrant workers. Those skilled factory workers are most at risk. We are looking at perhaps half the world's population living in extreme poverty. The solution, says the IMF. Country should borrow and spend big to strengthen the social safety net. That means health care coverage. Unemployment benefits JOB retraining. Oxford Economics economist Ben May says that government spending fiscal policy Khun B, a lifeline So I think there is an understanding that at the moment the fiscal policy is particularly powerful. Andi. Actually, it does play a role in lifting these economies out of recession. Plus borrowing is cheap right now, interest rates or super low but developing countries that borrow should remember. They'll have to pay it back. She hoco Goto is with the Wilson Center. And it will be incredibly difficult for industrialized countries to be able to wave off those debts. And just to say that you don't need to pay us back. But countries that borrow from the IMF are getting a bit of a reprieve, the IMF has decided to give them more time to repay their debts. I'm Nancy Marshall Genser for Marketplace. You know how we talk about inflation all the time. Maybe not all the time, but a lot. Here's one reason why the Social Security Administration announced this morning that people who get social Security benefits are going to get a cost of living increase next year. Of 1.3% 20 Bucks a month. On average. It's the lowest annual increase since 2017 and comes as there is some disagreement about what the number auto actually be. And what exactly the cost of living is for people living through a pandemic Marketplaces. Suburban Ishwar has that one. How much has the cost of living changed? Well, kind of depends on who you are right. That number the 1.3% cost of living increase that is based on a particular group of Americans, all urban wage earners and clerical workers. Bruce Trouble is a consulting actuary. Government looks at what inflation is like for this group looks at the Consumer Price Index for urban wage earners and clerical workers. Thing is that is not seniors. It's just the only survey Congress had when the law was written in 1972 Christina Martin for Veda is with AARP. The formula really doesn't take into account. The actual budget and expenditures of most retirees. So, for example, senior spend more on health care and health care costs have surged 4.9% this year. The formula doesn't take into account Medicare premiums either. And the pandemic has added costs for seniors in particular, Gary Burtless is with the Brookings Institution. Agent households may need to restrict themselves too consuming groceries that can be delivered to them, and that carries a higher price. Ted Mary Johnson, an analyst with the Senior Citizens League, says decades of low cost of living increases that don't reflect its seniors. Budgets have added up We estimate that Social Security benefits have lost 30% of the buying power since 2000. The senior Citizen's league is lobbying Congress for AH, higher cost of living adjustment for 2021 3% instead of 1.3. In New York. I'm sory been ashore for marketplace on Wall Street today, there was, Shall we say a lack of enthusiasm will have the details when we do the numbers. What do you do when a big chunk of your business depends on people really large numbers of people? Getting together in sometimes cramped quarters think cruise ships and movie theaters and theme parks and sports stadiums. That would make you Disney. Or Disney, which has been knocked sideways by the pandemic, and so has announced a big restructure its going to focus on its content Business on streaming Disney Plus Hu Lu and ESPN plus Disney is, of course, just the latest to make on demand content. The priority, which means more energy.

International Monetary Fund Nancy Marshall Ganz Disney Congress Social Security Administration United States Eric LeCompte Nancy Marshall Genser Gary Burtless Wilson Center Ted Mary Johnson Ishwar Jubilee USA Network Oxford Economics Brookings Institution Khun B
"gary burtless" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:54 min | 1 year ago

"gary burtless" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"13 October. Good is always to have you along Everybody A little bit of good news A little bit of bad news from the International Monetary Fund today. The IMF published its world economic outlook this morning more than a 4% shrinkage in the global economy this year. That's the bad news. Here's the good news is that that's actually a little bit better than its June forecast and Next year is not looking so bad, provided And here's the news. The IMF says all countries, not just the United States ought to stop worrying about their debt loads and spend what is needed to keep people out of poverty. Marketplaces Nancy Marshall Ganz or gets US going, The IMF says close to 90 Million people could fall into extreme poverty that is living unless than a dollar 90 per day as covert 19 widens the global wealth gap. Eric LeCompte head Stupidly Yusa Network, a coalition of aid organizations, he says people on the lowest rungs of the economic ladder, migrant workers, low skilled factory workers. Are most at risk. We are looking at perhaps half the world's population living in extreme poverty. The solution says the IMF country should borrow and spend big to strengthen the social safety net. That means health care coverage. Unemployment benefits JOB retraining. Oxford Economics economist Ben May says that government spending fiscal policy can be a lifeline. So I think there is an understanding that at the moment the fiscal policy is particularly powerful on the actually It does play a role in lifting these economies out of recession. Plus borrowing is cheap right now, interest rates or super low but developing countries that borrow should remember. They'll have to pay it back. She hoco Goto is with the Wilson Center. And it will be incredibly difficult for industrialized countries to be able to wave off those debts. And just to say that you don't need to pay us fact. But countries that borrow from the IMF are getting a bit of a reprieve, the IMF has decided to give them more time to repay their debts. I'm Nancy Marshall Genser for Marketplace. You know how we talk about inflation all the time. Maybe not all the time, but a lot. Here's one reason why the Social Security Administration announced this morning that people who get social Security benefits are going to get a cost of living increase next year. Of 1.3% 20 Bucks a month. On average. It's the lowest annual increase since 2017 and comes as there is some disagreement about what the number auto actually be. And what exactly the cost of living is for people living through a pandemic Marketplaces. Suburban Ishwar has that one. How much has the cost of living changed? Well, kind of depends on who you are right. That number the 1.3% cost of living increase that is based on a particular group of Americans, all urban wage earners and clerical workers. Bruce Trouble is a consulting actuary. Government looks at what inflation is like for this group looks at the Consumer Price Index for urban wage earners and clerical workers. Thing is that is not seniors. It's just the only survey Congress had when the law was written in 1972 Christina Martin for Veda is with AARP. The formula really doesn't take into account. The actual budget and expenditures of most retirees. So, for example, senior spend more on health care and health care costs have surged 4.9% this year. The formula doesn't take into account Medicare premiums either. And the pandemic has added costs for seniors. In particular, Gary Burtless is with the Brookings Institution agent households may need to Restrict themselves to consuming groceries that can be delivered to them, and that carries a higher price head. Mary Johnson, an analyst with the Senior Citizens League, says decades of low cost of living increases that don't reflect its seniors. Budgets have added up We estimate that Social Security benefits have lost 30% of the buying power since 2000. The senior Citizen's league is lobbying Congress for AH, higher cost of living adjustment for 2021 3% instead of 1.3. In New York. I'm sory been ashore for marketplace on Wall Street today, there was, Shall we say a lack of enthusiasm will have the details when we do the numbers. What do you do when a big chunk of your business depends on people really large numbers of people? Getting together in sometimes cramped quarters think cruise ships and movie theaters and theme parks and sports stadiums. That would make you Disney. Or Disney, which has been knocked sideways by the pandemic, and so has announced a big restructure its going.

International Monetary Fund Nancy Marshall Ganz Congress Disney Social Security Administration United States Eric LeCompte Nancy Marshall Genser Gary Burtless Wilson Center Yusa Network Oxford Economics Ishwar Brookings Institution Mary Johnson Ben May
"gary burtless" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"gary burtless" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm sorry Ben, ashore in for David Brancaccio, who's on assignment. Republicans are still trying to come up with a plan to replace or modify the pandemic unemployment benefits, which millions of Americans have been receiving that $600 a week benefit expires at the end of this month. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said early Thursday that Republicans were thinking about capping wage replacement at 70% of workers prior pay. It's not clear this will be the plan Republican Settle on. But marketplaces Jasmine Gars takes a look at what it might mean. One of the arguments the Republicans have made is that $600 a week is more than some people were earning so they don't have an incentive to go backto work for someone who used to earn minimum wage 70% of their prior salary could be just a couple $100 a week and in the end, economist Gary Burtless from the Brookings Institution says It's too complicated for each state to figure out what 70% of everyone's past wages would be. It is crazy to have waited this long. They should be planning on having something like six days a week, at least before states are going to be able to implement then in the uniform way. Instead, some expect Republicans to end up proposing a flat rate. Ernie Tedeschi is an economist with ever corps. I think that the ways that they're probably going to try to do this is just to give everyone roughly $200 per week. Mom? No, regardless of who they are. Meanwhile, the clock is ticking on the current benefits expiring. I'm Jasmine Garza for marketplace. Hong Kong's national security law appears to be trickling into everyday life through the financial sector. Financial companies afraid of getting caught up in the law and upsetting Beijing. Our self censoring our China correspondent Jennifer Pack joins me from Shanghai. Hi, Jennifer. Hi Sabri. Hong Kong's new National security law is well, it's about national security. What does that have to do with financial institutions? Well, the law is very vague, and it gives special police unit extra powers to search conduct electronic surveillance, seize assets, Chinese officials say this will only be targeted towards a small group of people. But now even professionals are worried. Well, it sounds like the financial sector is itself quite word in particular. Yeah, yeah, and they're self policing. So Reuters has recently reported that global banks are looking into whether their clients in Hong Kong have ties to the pro democracy movement in case this will get them in trouble under the new law. A pro democracy activists named Joshua Wang says he received a call last week from HSBC, asking him about a recent transfer from a book publisher. And now he's worried about whether he can open another bank account in the future. Something which he calls financial censorship, quote unquote. Financial censorship. Do you think people are are actually afraid to speak Because of this? Yeah, I mean, lawyers, bankers and investors who might have been okay to talk about the pro democracy movement a year ago are now not only silent on social media, but they're also watching what they say in private chat apse. So the fear is that this national security law is going to crush free speech and the independent legal system, both of which are very key to Hong Kong's success as a financial help. Marketplaces. China correspondent Jennifer Pack in Shanghai Thank you so much. Thanks, Sabri. Let's do the numbers. The Dow Jones industrial Average is down 70 points that is 4/10 of a percent. D S and P 500 is down 6/10 of a percent in the NASDAQ, down 1.2%..

Hong Kong Jennifer Pack Shanghai Joshua Wang David Brancaccio Jasmine Gars Jasmine Garza Ernie Tedeschi Sabri Brookings Institution Gary Burtless Steven Mnuchin Ben China Beijing Reuters HSBC
"gary burtless" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:45 min | 1 year ago

"gary burtless" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm sorry Ben, ashore in for David Brancaccio, who's on assignment. Republicans are still trying to come up with a plan to replace or modify the pandemic unemployment benefits, which millions of Americans have been receiving that $600 a week benefit expires at the end of this month. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said early Thursday that Republicans were thinking about capping wage replacement at 70% of workers prior pay. It's not clear this will be the plan Republican Settle on. But marketplaces Jasmine Gars takes a look at what it might mean. One of the arguments the Republicans have made is that $600 a week is more than some people were earning so they don't have an incentive to go backto work for someone who used to earn minimum wage 70% of their prior salary could be just a couple $100 a week and in the end, economist Gary Burtless from the Brookings Institution says It's too complicated for each state to figure out what 70% of everyone's past wages would be. It is crazy to have waited this long. They should be planning on having something like 60 weeks, at least before states are going to be able to implement that in a uniform way. Instead, some expect Republicans to end up proposing a flat rate. Ernie Tedeschi is an economist with ever corps. I think that the waves that they're probably going to try to do. This is just to give everyone roughly $200 per week. Mom? No, regardless of who they are. Meanwhile, the clock is ticking on the current benefits expiring. I'm Jasmine Garza for marketplace. Hong Kong's national security law appears to be trickling into everyday life through the financial sector. Financial companies afraid of getting caught up in the law and upsetting Beijing. Our self censoring our China correspondent Jennifer Pack joins me from Shanghai. Hi, Jennifer. Hi Sabri. Hong Kong's new National security law is well, it's about national security. What does that have to do with financial institutions? Well, the law is very vague, and it gives a special police unit extra powers to search conduct electronic surveillance, seize assets, Chinese officials say this will only be targeted towards a small group of people. But now even professionals are worried. Well, it sounds like the financial sector is itself quite word in particular. Yeah, yeah, and they're self policing. So Reuters has recently reported that global banks are looking into whether their clients in Hong Kong have ties to the pro democracy movement in case this will get them in trouble under the new law. A pro democracy activist named Joshua Wang says he received a call last week from HSBC, asking him about a recent transfer from a book publisher. And now he's worried about whether he can open another bank account in the future. Something which he calls financial censorship. Quote unquote financial censorship. Do you think people are are actually afraid to speak Because of this? Yeah, I mean, lawyers, bankers and investors who might have been okay to talk about the pro democracy movement a year ago are now not only silent on social media, but they're also watching what they say in private chat apse. So the fear is that this national security law is going to crush free speech and the independent legal system, both of which are very key to Hong Kong's success as a financial Marketplaces. China correspondent Jennifer Pack in Shanghai Thank you so much. Thanks. Let's do the numbers. The Dow Jones industrial Average is down 70 points that is 4/10 of a percent. D S and P 500 is down 6/10 of a percent in the NASDAQ, down 1.2%. Marketplace.

Hong Kong Jennifer Pack Shanghai Joshua Wang David Brancaccio Jasmine Gars Ernie Tedeschi Jasmine Garza Brookings Institution Gary Burtless Steven Mnuchin Ben Beijing Reuters China HSBC
"gary burtless" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"gary burtless" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To ten percent here the Dow future is down two tenths percent the S. and P. futures down a tenth percent with the United auto workers on strike in picketing fourteen General Motors manufacturing locations there are early predictions about economic impacts the Detroit news today sites economists saying Michigan Ohio and Indiana would feel the sharpest effects with the chance that Michigan falls into recession if the strike goes longer than a week and a half fifty thousand workers for GM struck as the week began after contract negotiations broke down it's the union's first national strike since a short walk out in two thousand seven market places Erica bears takes a look at what has changed since two thousand seven for GM workers and their employer a lot has changed economically in the past twelve years there was very much economic disaster for two thousand and seven that's Arthur we in with Cornell University he says given the terrible economy the U. A. W. was willing to make concessions in two thousand and seven like a green to a system where new workers get paid at lower scale and temporary workers receive different benefits so now it GM says Eric Loomis a labor historian at the university of Rhode Island they are employing people next to each other doing the same job that are making different wages since two thousand and seven GM has said hands of thousands of workers filed for bankruptcy and was bailed out by the US government now GM is profitable and part because it shifted its focus to trucks and SUVs says Gary burtless an economist with the Brookings Institution they're gradually getting out of the sedan business today's labor dispute centers on health care benefits wages bank closing that pay gap for new and temporary hires the union also wants GM to re opened recently shattered factories American..

General Motors Michigan Ohio Indiana Michigan GM Erica Arthur Cornell University Eric Loomis Rhode Island Brookings Institution Detroit US Gary burtless twelve years ten percent
"gary burtless" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"gary burtless" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Ten percent here the Dow future is down two tenths percent the S. and P. futures down a tenth percent with the United auto workers on strike in picketing fourteen General Motors manufacturing locations there are early predictions about economic impacts the Detroit news today sites economists saying Michigan Ohio and Indiana would feel the sharpest effects with the chance that Michigan falls into recession if the strike goes longer than a week and a half fifty thousand workers for GM struck as the week began after contract negotiations broke down it's the union's first national strike since a short walk out in two thousand seven market places Erica bears takes a look at what has changed since two thousand seven for GM workers and their employer a lot has changed economically in the past twelve years there was very much economic disaster for two thousand and seven that's Arthur we in with Cornell University he says given the terrible economy the U. A. W. was willing to make concessions in two thousand and seven like a green to a system where new workers get paid at lower scale and temporary workers receive different benefits so now it GM says Eric Loomis a labor historian at the university of Rhode Island they are employing people next to each other doing the same job that are making different wages since two thousand and seven GM hash that hands of thousands of workers filed for bankruptcy and was bailed out by the US government now GM is profitable and part because it shifted its focus to trucks and SUVs says Gary burtless an economist with the Brookings Institution they're gradually getting out of the sedan business today's labor dispute centers on health care benefits wages and closing that pay gap for new and temporary hires the union also wants GM to re opened recently shattered factories..

General Motors Michigan Ohio Indiana Michigan GM Erica Arthur Cornell University Eric Loomis Rhode Island Brookings Institution Detroit US Gary burtless twelve years Ten percent
"gary burtless" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"gary burtless" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Jobs report is when it and John and I were talking about was good. But there are some I guess you'd say finer points that'll help to really understand what's going on both in today's data and in the longer term because when it comes to the economy there is a difference between knowing how it has been doing. And how it is gonna do. Marketplace's Justin ho has that one. When you see a jobs report for December Francis. Donald at Manulife asset management says you actually learn more about how companies were doing three to six months ago because it takes time for companies to respond to good news to then translate that into hiring to find the right people and get them in the right place. That's why jobs reports are often considered lagging indicators numbers that say more about the recent past and the future housing data is another one those reports tend to reflect what happened over the last month Donald says, some lagging indicators are just not that helpful like GDP in large part. It's because we already know all the pieces of the entire US 'economics story by the time. Jeannie, P even land. That's because economists also use another type of data to predict the future leading indicators like permits for a new building surveys of how CEOs and manufacturers are feeling. And if you know where to look the jobs report has a few of those hints to the university of Oregon's him. Do he watch for the number of new temporary workers generally when firms starts to see weaker economic condition? The first people they lay off or stop hiring temporary help workers, but temporary workers have been rising. Do he says that's a sign employer's plan to keep hiring people gala fixed income strategist at Janney. Montgomery Scott says jobs reports don't tend to turn on a dime. In fact, he says good jobs reports create momentum for more good reports. So between jobs momentum and forward-looking surveys. The economic outlook is by far from negative, but far from negative isn't the same thing as really positive Lebas stock and bond markets have been signaling their belief that economic. The growth is flattening in New York. I'm Justin how for marketplace. There was a certain element of what looked like not great news in today's jobs report turning out to actually be pretty good news. After all I'm talking about the part that saw the unemployment rate go up from three point seven percent to three point nine percent last month. How can that be? I hear you asking when we added three hundred something thousand new jobs last month. Kyw I'm gonna tell you. Marketplace Zandi Euler is going to introduce us to something called the labor force participation rate. The labor force participation rate is a measure of the country's working age population that engages actively in the labor market or in normal. People terms people who are working plus those who want to work but remain unemployed and unemployed specifically means to search for a job in the last four weeks and they're available for a job as one is offered to them. That's Princeton economist Alan Krueger. So is it fair to say that the uptick in the unemployment rate last month is because of the rising labor force participation? Rate that is fair. Thanks, Allan floors yours. We saw the participation rate tick up by two tenths of a percentage point and the unemployment rate rise by two tenths of a percentage point. So the reason why the unemployment rate rose last month is more people came into labor force participation rate in December ticked up a bit. But for the last few years, it's been pretty flat. Gary Burtless at the Brookings Institution says that has a lot to do with demographics each composition of the population is getting older. So we have more people pass sixty five past eight where we expect them to be participating. So even a small increase in the participation rate. Well, that is good news because we have been worried about the decline in labor force participation. Especially among primates dolts. A higher participation rate is a sign of a strong job market and continued recovery from the great recession in recessions, some people get too discouraged. Even look for job today, though. More people are feeling good about their job prospects. I mean dealer for marketplace..

Jeannie Justin ho Donald Montgomery Scott US John university of Oregon Manulife asset management Gary Burtless Alan Krueger Zandi Euler Brookings Institution New York Lebas Janney Allan Princeton seven percent
"gary burtless" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"gary burtless" Discussed on KCRW

"Jobs report is Lynette, and John and I were talking about was good. But there are some I guess you'd say finer points that'll will help to really understand what's going on both in today's data and in the longer term because when it comes to the economy, there is a difference between knowing how it has been doing and how it is gonna do marketplace adjusted ho has that one when you see a jobs report for December Francis. Donald at Nannu life asset management says you actually learn more about how companies were doing three to six months ago because it takes time for companies to respond to good news to then translate that into hiring to find the right people and get them in the right place. That's why jobs reports are often considered lagging indicators numbers that say more about the recent past and the future housing data is another one those reports tend to reflect what happened over the last month. Donald says some liking indicators are just not that helpful like GDP in large part. It's because we already know all the pieces of the entire US economic story by the time June. VP even land, that's because he communists, also use another type of data to predict the future leading indicators like permits for a new building surveys of how CEO's and manufacturers are feeling. And if you know where to look the jobs report has a few of those hints to the university of Oregon's Tim, Dewey watches for the number of new temporary workers. When firms starts to see weaker economic condition. I people they lay off or stop hiring temporary help workers temporary workers have been rising due. He says that's a sign employer's plan to keep hiring people gala a fixed income strategists that Janney. Montgomery Scott says jobs reports don't tend to turn on a dime. In fact, he says good jobs reports create momentum for more good reports. So between jobs momentum and forward-looking surveys. The economic outlook is far from negative, but far from negative isn't the same thing as really positive Lebas stock and bond markets have been signaling their belief that economic growth is flattening in New York. I'm Justin how for marketplace. There was a certain element of what looked like not great news in today's jobs report turning out to actually be pretty good news. After all I'm talking about the part that saw the unemployment rate go up from three point seven percent to three point nine percent last month. How can that be? I hear you asking when we added three hundred something thousand new jobs last month. Kyw I'm gonna tell you. Marketplace Zandi Euler is going to introduce us to something called the labor force participation rate. The labor force participation rate is a measure of the country's working age population that engages actively in the labor market or in normal. People terms people who are working plus those who want to work but remain unemployed and unemployed specifically means to search for a job in the last four weeks and they're available for a job as one is offered to them. That's Princeton economist Alan Krueger. So is it fair to say that the uptick in the unemployment rate last month is because of the rising labor force participation rate that is fair. Thanks, Allen floors yours. We saw the participation rate tick up by two tenths of a percentage point and unemployment rate rise by two tenths of a percentage point. So the reason why the unemployment rate rose last month is more people came into the labor force participation rate in December picked up a bit. But for the last few years, it's been. Pretty flat. Gary Burtless at the Brookings Institution. Says that has a lot to do with demographics age composition of the population is getting older. So we have more people pass sixty five past acres where we expect them to be participating. So even a small increase in the participation rate. Well, that is good news because we have been worried about the decline in labor force participation. Especially among primates adults. A higher participation rate is a sign of a strong job market and continued recovery from the great recession in recessions, some people get too discouraged. Even look for a job today, though. More people are feeling good about their job prospects I-.

Donald Montgomery Scott US Lynette Nannu university of Oregon Janney Alan Krueger Gary Burtless Zandi Euler Lebas VP Brookings Institution Justin John CEO New York Allen
"gary burtless" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:02 min | 2 years ago

"gary burtless" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This morning's jobs report is when it and John and I were talking about was good. But there are some I guess you'd say finer points that'll help to really understand what's going on both in today's data and in the longer term because when it comes to the economy there is a difference between knowing how it has been doing. And how he's gonna do. Marketplace's Justin who has that one. When you see jobs report for December Francis. Donald Manulife asset management says you actually learn more about how companies were doing three to six months ago because it takes time for companies to respond to good news to then translate that into hiring to find the right people and get them in the right place. That's why Johnson reports are often considered lagging indicators numbers that say more about the recent past and the future housing data is another one those reports tend to reflect what happened over the last month. Donald says some lagging indicators are just not helpful like GDP in large part. It's because we already know all the pieces of the entire US economic story by the time. Dp even land. That's because economists also use another type of data to predict the future leading indicators like permits for a new building surveys of how CEOs and manufacturers are feeling. And if you know where to look the jobs report has a few of those hints to the university of Oregon's Tim, do he watches for the number of new temporary workers generally when firms starts to see weaker economic condition. The first people they lay off or stop hiring temporary help workers temporary workers have been rising. Do he says that's a sign employer's plan to keep hiring people gala fixed income strategist at Janney. Montgomery Scott says jobs reports don't tend to turn on a dime. In fact, he says good jobs reports create momentum for mortgage reports so between jobs momentum and forward-looking surveys. The economic outlook is far from negative, but far from negative isn't the same thing as really positive Lebas stock and bond markets have been signaling their belief that economic. Growth is flattening in New York. I'm Justin how for marketplace. There was a certain element of what looked like not great news in today's jobs report turning out to actually be pretty good news. After all I'm talking about the part that saw the unemployment rate go up from three point seven percent to three point nine percent last month. How can that be? I hear you asking when we added three hundred something thousand new jobs last month KYW Intel you marketplace Zandi Euler is going to introduce us to something called the labor force participation rate. The labor force participation rate is a measure of the country's working age population that engages actively in the labor market or in normal. People terms people who are working plus those who want to work but remain unemployed and unemployed specifically means to search for a job in the last four weeks. And there are available for a job as one is author to them. That's Princeton economist Alan Krueger. So is it fair to say that the uptick in the unemployment rate last month is because of the rising labor force participation? Rate that is fair. Thanks, Allen floors yours. We saw the participation rate tick up by two tenths of a percentage point and the unemployment rate rise by two tenths of a percentage point. So the reason why the unemployment rate rose last month is more people came into the labor force participation rate in December ticked up a bit. But for the last few years, it's been pretty flat. Gary Burtless at the Brookings Institution says that has a lot to do with demographics age composition of the population is getting older. So we have more people pass sixty five past eight expect them to be participating. So even a small increase in the participation rate. Well, that is good news because we have been worried about the decline in their participation. Especially among primates adults. A higher participation rate is a sign of a strong job market and continued recovery from the great recession in recessions, some people get to discourage Stephen look for a job today, though. More people are feeling good about their job prospects. I need for marketplace. So there's the US labor force one hundred sixty two hundred and sixty three million people plus or minus according to the bureau of labor statistics as of last month. And then there's the labor force participation rate is eighty was telling us sixty three point one percent last month. Also from the bureau of labor statistics. But look who are these people, especially the ones who decided in the past month or so that now was the time they wanted to get back to work. Marketplace's Granada's say go talk to some people who are looking or who just started working after some time away to find out. What's going on? Lynn Stewart left her longtime job as an administrative assistant at a nonprofit back in two thousand sixteen. She was seventy years old at the time and thought after devoting her whole career at a social service would have to work again. That's until rent started rising and her social security couldn't cover it. I felt I was in danger of becoming homeless you did not have additional income. So I started looking for part time work. It's not like I had a whole lot of savings. So at seventy two she's working again, this time helping other seniors find jobs in Orlando's labour-market Jimmy Martin is an employment specialist for goodwill. He sees lots of seniors and people with disabilities. Submitting their resumes because the benefits they receive aren't enough bills a higher for them because of leaving. Then there are people seeking full work as a path to financial stability. Shinnied Burton is thirty years old. She started looking for a job in December after ten years of doing here on and off and dealing. With inconsistent income, but she's waiting to find the right fit position and salary. I want to find a job that I love something that I can go to that. I love them. They love me. Meanwhile, Rosario will take any job. She can find the sixty one year old lost hers in November. She's getting about eight hundred dollars and unemployment a month. But it's not enough to cover her expenses. Even with a strong job market. She's cautious about putting some things on her resume like a salary history that might take her out of the running for a lower paid position. I don't want to put any style because I know I put something they're gonna just go back off even with the low unemployment rate. She says it can be tough for older workers like her to find a job. I'm Renata sago for marketplace. Movie credits. So very.

bureau of labor US Justin Donald Manulife Donald John Johnson university of Oregon Gary Burtless Intel Alan Krueger Lynn Stewart Janney Renata sago Stephen Montgomery Scott Brookings Institution Lebas
"gary burtless" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:38 min | 2 years ago

"gary burtless" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Report is Lynette, and John and I were talking about was good. But there are some I guess you'd say finer points that will help to really understand what's going on both in today's data and in the longer term because when it comes to the economy there is a difference between knowing how it has been doing. And how it is gonna do. Marketplace. Justin who has that one? When you see a jobs report for December Francis. Donald Manulife asset management says you actually learn more about how companies were doing three to six months ago because it takes time for companies to respond to good news to then translate that into hiring to find the right people and get them in the right place. That's why jobs reports are often considered lagging indicators numbers that say more about the recent past and the future housing data is another one those reports tend to reflect what happened over the last month Donald says, some lagging indicators are just not that helpful like GDP in large part. It's because we already know all the pieces of the entire US economic story by the time June. Dp even land. That's because economists also use another type of data to predict the future leading indicators like permits for a new building surveys of how CEOs and manufacturers are feeling. And if you know where to look the jobs report has a few of those hints to the university of Oregon's him, do he watches for the number of new temporary workers generally when firm starts to see weaker economic condition. The first people they lay off or stop hiring are the temporary help workers the temporary workers have been rising. Do he says that's a sign employer's plan to keep hiring people gala fixed income strategist at Janney. Montgomery Scott says jobs reports don't tend to turn on a dime. In fact, he says good jobs reports create momentum for mortgage reports so between jobs momentum and forward-looking surveys. The economic outlook is by far from negative, but far from negative isn't the same thing as really positive Lebas stock and bond markets have been signaling their belief that economic. Growth is flattening in New York. I'm Justin ho for marketplace. There was a certain element of what looked like not great news in today's jobs report turning out to actually be pretty good news. After all I'm talking about the part that saw the unemployment rate go up from three point seven percent to three point nine percent last month. How can that be? I hear you asking when we added three hundred something thousand new jobs last month. Kyw, well, I'm gonna tell you. Marketplace Zandi Euler is going to introduce us to something called the labor force participation rate. The labor force participation rate is a measure of the country's working age population that engages actively in the labor market or inaugural. People terms people who are working plus those who want to work but remain unemployed and unemployed specifically means to search for a job in the last four weeks and they're available for job as one is offered to them. That's Princeton economist Alan Krueger. So is it fair to say that the uptick in the unemployment rate last month is because of the rising labor force participation? Rate that is fair. Thanks on floors yours. We saw the participation rate tick up by two tenths of a percentage point and the unemployment rate rise by two tenths of a percentage point. So the reason why the unemployment rate rose last month is more people came into labor force participation rate in December ticked up a bit. But for the last few years, it's been pretty flat. Gary Burtless at the Brookings Institution says that has a lot to do with demographics each composition of the population is getting older. So we have more people pass sixty five past eight where we expect them to be participating. So even a small increase in the participation rate. Well, that is good news because we have been worried about the decline in labor force participation. Especially among primates adults. A higher participation rate is a sign of a strong job market and continued recovery from the great recession in recessions, some people get too discouraged. Even look for a job today, though. More people are feeling good about their job prospects. I mean Euler for marketplace. So there's the US labor force one hundred sixty two hundred and sixty three million people plus or minus according to the bureau of labor statistics as of last month. And then there's the labor force participation rate is any was telling us sixty three point one percent last month. Also from the bureau of labor statistics. But look who are these people, especially the ones who've decided in the past month or so that now was the time they wanted to get back to work. Marketplace's Granada's say go talk to some people who are looking or who just started working after some time away to find out. What's going on? Lynn Stewart left her longtime job as an administrative assistant at a nonprofit back in twenty-six teen. She was seventy years old at the time and thought after devoting her whole career to social service wouldn't have to work again. That's until rent started rising and her social security couldn't cover it. I felt I was in danger of becoming homeless if I did not have additional income. So I started looking for part time work. It's not like I had a whole lot of savings. So at seventy two she's working again, this time helping other seniors find jobs in Orlando's labour-market Jimmy Martin is an employment specialist for goodwill. He sees lots of seniors and people with disabilities. Submitting their resumes because the benefits they receive aren't enough. The bills a higher for them because of leaving. Then there are people seeking full time work as a path to financial stability. Shinnied Burton is thirty years old. She started looking for a job in December after ten years of doing here on and off and dealing. With inconsistent income, but she's waiting to find the right fit position and salary. I want to find a job that I look something that I can go to that. I love them. They love me. Meanwhile, Dario we'll take any job. She can find the sixty one year old lost hers in November. She's getting about eight hundred dollars and unemployment a month, but it's not enough to cover her expenses. But even with the strong job market, she's cautious about putting some things on her resume like a salary history that might take her out of the running for a lower paid position. I don't want to put any style ary because I know I put something they're gonna just go back off even with the low unemployment rates. She says it can be tough for older workers like her to find a job. I'm not a sago for marketplace..

Justin ho US bureau of labor Donald Manulife Donald Lynette university of Oregon Zandi Euler Gary Burtless Alan Krueger Janney Lynn Stewart Montgomery Scott Brookings Institution Lebas Kyw New York
"gary burtless" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"gary burtless" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"But for the last few years, it's been pretty flat. Gary Burtless at the Brookings Institution says that has a lot to do with demographics each composition of the population is getting older. So we have more people pass sixty five past ages where we expect them to be participating. So even a small increase in the participation rate. Well, that is good news because we have been worried about the decline in labor force participation, especially among primates adults. A higher participation rate is a sign of a strong job market and continued recovery from the great recession in recessions, some people get to discourage Stephen look for a job today, though. More people are feeling good about their job prospects. I need for marketplace. So there's the US labor force one hundred and sixty two hundred sixty three million people plus or minus according to the bureau of labor statistics as of last month. And then there's the labor force participation rate has any was telling us sixty three point one percent last month also from the bureau of labor statistics. But look who are these people, especially the ones who've decided in the past month or so that now was the time they wanted to get back to work. Marketplace's Renata say go talk to some people who are looking or who just started working after some time away. The find out what's going on Lynne Stewart left her longtime job as an administrative assistant at a nonprofit back in twenty-six teen. She was seventy years old at the time in thought after devoting her whole career at a social service wouldn't have to work again. That's until rent started rising in her social security couldn't cover it. I felt I was in danger of becoming homeless if I did not have additional income. So I started looking for part time work. It's not like I had a whole lot of savings. So at seventy two she's. Working again, this time helping other seniors find jobs in Orlando's labour-market Jimmy Martin is an employment specialist for goodwill..

bureau of labor Brookings Institution Gary Burtless Lynne Stewart Jimmy Martin Renata Orlando Stephen US seventy years one percent
"gary burtless" Discussed on Fareed Zakaria GPS

Fareed Zakaria GPS

02:03 min | 4 years ago

"gary burtless" Discussed on Fareed Zakaria GPS

"And the stock market his added all time high dallas and be a nasdaq keep hitting record highs is this a trump boom toys of trump bobble ready to burst two top experts morgan stanley's ruchir sharma and goldman sachs is abby joseph cohen will debate but first he has my take if the republican tax plan passos congress it will mark a watershed for the united states the medium and longterm effects of the plan are clear a massive drop in public investment which will come on the heels of decades of declining spending as a percentage of gdp on infrastructure scientific research skills training and core government agencies the united states cannot coast sean past investments forever and with this legislation we are ushering in a bleak future the tax bill is expected to add at least one trillion dollars to the national debt over the next ten years and many experts believe that the real lost to federal revenues will be much higher we can expect big spending cuts in the near future which would happen on top of an already dire situation as gary burtless of the brookings institution points out combined public investment by federal state and local governments is at the lowest point in six decades relative to gdp the united states is at a breaking point in august the world bank looked at fifty countries and found that america will have the largest unmet infrastructure needs over the next two decades looking in any direction according to the american road and transport builders association the united states has almost fifty six thousand structurally deficient bridges about one thousand nine hundred of which are on inter's.

stock market dallas morgan stanley ruchir sharma abby joseph cohen united states gary burtless america inter nasdaq goldman sachs sean one trillion dollars six decades two decades ten years
"gary burtless" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

01:40 min | 4 years ago

"gary burtless" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"Gary burtless economist at the brookings institution thank you so much thank you bye beck bennett we love your feedback on the show and we asked her followers on facebook to tell us how they feel about minimum wage dini good in overland park kansas said inflation of the price of everything is all it ever clauses kevin greene said as a business owner minimum wage dust to things number one at least for now at payroll tax basically doubles the cost to employers and number two at the cost of labor rises the incentive to automate task increases and tom hendrickson dallas asked us not forget about theodore workers who he says are paid the lowest wages and benefits allowed by law we encourage your comments and you can email us anytime weekend at marketplaceorg and while you're writing to us what else up for the newsletter do that by also gonna marketplace dot org as you may know we hear it marketplace love to do the numbers simple little context behind them and that is why we bring you this week's news by the numbers with producers sara mendez antoni wagner headed sarah thanks lizzy ri number is sixty six thousand that's number of posts facebook deletes per week for hate speech investigation by pro publika found some interesting ways facebook's content reviewers those are real people are being trained to identify hate speech for example the phrase white men is okay because both the words white and men are protected categories.

Gary burtless brookings institution facebook kansas kevin greene marketplaceorg business owner tom hendrickson theodore
"gary burtless" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

01:52 min | 4 years ago

"gary burtless" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"I currently make 1050 an hour i have a five year old brother who is starting school in august i and i have a ninemonth old sister by mother is currently not working so i help her with um any necessities that either my mom needs or other that my brother and my sister neat so it's like baby formula baby food a close this would be the only semester that i skip out on on going to school because i don't have enough money my money i spend on pay my car insurance guys my phone bill basic a grocery stuff like milk cereal i managed to make ends meet i honestly don't know how what it's like to work on a minimum wage is constantly is constantly receiving harassment from customers who are belittling you who don't think that you can comprehend something simple a lot of the times management doesn't take time to actually make you feel safe it's hard it gets hard in it's super frustrating because i have all these bills to pay i have you know my my two on siblings to take care of my main concern is them regardless if they aren't my children exactly i love my job i love talking to people into customers and it's also hard at the same time but even just like the little you know dollar fifty raise it does make a difference just two stories of life on minimum wage but for more on how it works at a history behind it we have gary burtless as senior fellow at the brookings institution welcome to the show we have all these arguments about numbers but i want to go even broader um from a philisophical standpoint what is the minimum wage.

harassment senior fellow brookings institution gary burtless five year ninemonth milk