35 Burst results for "Gartner"

The Emerging Role of SASE and the Cloud

Recorded Future - Inside Threat Intelligence for Cyber Security

03:46 min | 2 months ago

The Emerging Role of SASE and the Cloud

"Want to touch on this this notion of Sassy and how that applies to things like zero trust, let let. Can we start with just some basic syrup for folks who might not be familiar with? Can you describe to us? What is Sassy? Sassy it stands for secure access. Edge and it's an emerging concept I think that Gartner kind of put out into the market about a year or so ago. And it's really about moving the The network security stack to the cloud. And when you think about what a network security stack is, it's a combination of things that include. firewalls and secure web gateways and VPN type technology software defined perimeter. remote browser isolation. The number of things that you used to have in your organization on premise, all of those things that entire security stack is now kind of migrating to the cloud, and when that occurs, users of this new security stack this residing in the cloud have a better scale ability better security better control. and there's a lot of. Lot of larger corporations that are starting to put these security stacks together and an offer. Sassy type services if I if I were to go back in time I remember when there was a an appliance for every one of those things that I just described you know a firewall appliance, secure web gateway appliance of VPN appliance and then. During my fortinet days I saw that consolidation occur into what was called a UTM unified threat management where all those different technologies. Instead of being separate appliances, they kind of consolidated into a single appliance all in one appliance. What's now happening is that same concept of consolidation is occurring, but it's not an appliance anymore. It's all moving. To a cloud and consolidated into a single cloud. Are, there any limitations there are. Are there any shortcomings to to moving to Sassy? Argue that you know. They really want best of breed and they. They will argue that you can't really get best of breed when you select. No one single cloud provider to offer all of those services, so some organizations will see that as a weakness and say well I want. This part of the security stack provided by a vendor. Era Acts in a different part of the security stack offered by vendor Y so that they can build a kind of best of breed approach. That I think is probably one of the biggest limitations to doing it. And what are some of the major benefits? Then we'll the benefits are that you don't have to go out and purchase all of these different appliances, and then try to deploy them everywhere. You have offices. It's all centrally located in the cloud, so it reduces your. Deployment footprint significantly, and the administration of all of those things starts to get a lot easier because the cloud provider is doing a lot of that a lot of that work for you updates and things like that so I think huge benefits come from that and I. Think one of the things that. was very telling. When covid nineteen hit, a lot of organizations scramble to figure out how to get their employees working remote better, and they were using the appliance approach. Their appliances weren't necessarily enough to handle the the low that they were now being tasked to put on them before they might have had on hundred users connecting to the VPN. And now it's a thousand users connecting to the VPN to get remote access to the network. So if they had deployed a Sassy solution is just a really a matter of dowling up more capacity from the Sassy cloud provider dialing down once they don't need any anymore.

Cloud Gartner Dowling
How offices will change after coronavirus

Motley Fool Answers

00:36 sec | 3 months ago

How offices will change after coronavirus

"Office. Work will never be the same. And Ron Ronnie writes that of the thirty four percent of workers who are estimated to be working from home. Many will not go back. A survey of senior finance leaders by the research from Gartner found that seventy four percent of organizations plan to shift employees to remote work permanently consulting company global workplace analytics. Such a serious name estimates that when the pandemic is over thirty percent of the entire workforce will work from home. At least a couple times a week before the pandemic, that number was in the low single digits.

Ron Ronnie Gartner
Making Time for Meditation With Ariel Gartner

Live Happy Now

08:42 min | 6 months ago

Making Time for Meditation With Ariel Gartner

"I'm your host and this week we're going to talk about something we all know about. We all know we should do but we might have trouble finding time for it in our busy lives. Meditation has incredible healing value for their mind and our body and today's guest is on a mission to get the whole world meditating. Reo Garden is a neuroscientist psychotherapist mom former fashion designer and the founder of Tech Company Muse created to make meditation easier. She has spoken about the benefits of meditation on stages around the world ranging from Ted talks to mit to south by South West. This week. She's here to talk about how we can. Master the art of meditating and find ways to fit it into our hectic wives are welcome to live happy now. It is a complete pleasure to be here. I mean what is better than living happy now? All exactly and you have so much to say about this. We have so many points that we can touch on with you. Because of what you've done and your interest in meditation and the things that you're doing to move meditation forward so I guess a great starting point is to find out how you personally got interested in meditation shirt so my own background is trained as a neuroscientist and I was working as psychotherapists promised a decade and I began working with an early brain computer interface device. So a little electrode that could track the changes in your brain activity and we recognize that the best thing we could do with this device was teach people to meditate. We had some insight into what was going on in people's brains and you know the brain is the seat of all of our experience. Anything youth think see smell talk about it as all mediated by your brain but we have so little access to it and when he recognized that we had way to help people reflect back on what was going on in their mind We realized that the best way to use this was to apply the tool to teach people to meditate so I was a psychotherapist in private practice. I'd be trying to teach my patients to meditate but frankly I sucked at it. I was somebody. Brain bounced all over the place. And I'm like I'm not good at meditation and I was teaching my patience and you know they would rarely really established the habit and we recognize that if we had a tool that could make meditation easier. We could fundamentally deploy broadscale a win. Did Meditation Become so accepted and embraced? You know when I was growing up I didn't hear about it. So when did it become accepted and also scientifically became something that they embrace as a practice? It's a good question so now there's over a thousand published studies documenting the scientifically validated impacted. Meditation on People's lives as a clinician as a therapist. The early two thousands like two thousand five thousand six it started to become part of our training and then towards the later to thousands. You heard about it more and more by twenty ten. It was one of the front line approaches for trauma and other obviously. There's lots of purchase trauma but meditation was something you were told to reteach patients from a general consumer perspective. It wasn't really until twenty fourteen. Twenty thirteen that you started to hear about it. In the general public at that point meditation was on the cover of Time magazine and it just cracked open that trend and you started to see a flood of articles of big. Ceo's were meditating athletes who are meditating and now only six or seven years later. Meditation is known as something that you should be doing along side brushing your teeth eating well and exercising. It's just understood among the educated populace that it's what you should be doing for your home. It's been a very fast ramp and we hear that you should do it but can you explain why because we here. It's good for you. It's going to help you be more calm. Be MORE PRESENT. But how does it really benefit us? What is it doing to our brains shirt? So meditation very simply is a practice or training that leads to healthy and positive mind states and there are many different forms of meditation. That you might have heard of a zen meditation walking meditation. Mindfulness the most common form that people learn. I is focused attention. Meditation so in focused attention meditation. What you're doing is you're putting your attention on your breath and when your mind eventually wanders away from her breath taller mountains. Do you then noticed that your mind has wandered and the new. Choose to come back to your breath. So it's actually incredibly simple exercise your attentions on your breath. Your mind wanders onto the grocery list or something else you say. Oh my mind wandered away. Okay backed my breath now. Well this might sound really simple. It's actually quite hard to do consistently and the simple thing leads to some tremendous benefits as I mentioned. There's over a thousand published studies demonstrating meditations ability to impact your brain your body your health. Your interpersonal relationships your productivity and more and so breaking down this very simple exercise most of us go through our lives with their minds. Just on autopilot you. We have thoughts in our head and we assume that those are supposed to be the thoughts that are there. That's just what happens and a lot of those thoughts are negative repetitive stressful when not particularly helpful. And they simply loop in our minds and we follow them and we think about them and then they make our experience of life somewhat negative stressful in repetitive. And Meditation. What you're doing when you notice that your mind has wandered and you choose instead of following. That thought like you normally would and now thinking about the grocery list or your upcoming basketball game or wherever. Your mind wanders. You're saying no I'M NOT GONNA follow that wandering thought. I'm going to choose to take my mind elsewhere onto something that is neutral like your breath and as soon as you do that you change your relationship to your thoughts see you now for the first time recognize that you have a choice about what you were thinking and so you can take your mind off of thoughts that are negative stressful repetitive. It's Nope I don't need to be there. Let me go back to something neutral and so as you do that over time you train your mind to stay in a place that is neutral. That is calmer that is not filled with thoughts. And that is actually in the present moment. And when you're in the present moment you're not thinking about the past or the future which is where your worries and concerns live the present moment you just have. What's Hyun in front of you? It's one thing to have that experience while you're meditating. How long does it take until you have that same experience when not meditating? You know even after you've stopped you're mad at the moment you have control over whether your mind is going so like anything. It's a practice. You can't just go to the gym once and then expect to be strong among later. You know you do it consistently as you do it consistently you built the practice so for some people you know. It takes a couple sittings of meditation to kind of get. What's going on and then it takes a couple of weeks maybe to start to notice that okay you feel a little bit calmer and then after a few months you recognize that you have more ability to really manage your mind. You feel less distracted throughout the day. You find yourself more focused you know. Maybe your relatives are noticing changes. How long does someone need to meditate in like daily because people say I don't have five minutes I don't have ten minutes? I don't know how long I'm supposed to meditate. How long do you need to meditate every day for it to be effective? So that's a good question and what you WanNa be doing is starting off with a small amount because the most important part about meditation is doing it regularly and building the habit. So if you start off with ten minutes Dan Meditation and that amount of time. It's frustrating to. You're probably not GONNA do it. So some people start with as little as three minutes or four minutes five minutes and then build their way up to ten. Most of the studies are done with twenty minutes per dave meditation. But it's also been shown that you can get benefit with ten minutes of meditation and that will give you an ice consistent practice us and is it something you necessarily have to do sitting in a corner quite a you know. Do you need to make space for it? Does it become something that you can do really anywhere. Ideally at something that you can do anywhere because what you're ultimately building is the skill of being able to be focused and attentive and in the moment wherever you are in a meeting in a crowded environment in times in real life where you're frustrated and you need those skills. So people find it useful to have a spot in their homeowners. Quiet because you can then spend that time really sitting with yourself and observing your thoughts but as you get better at it you want to be putting yourself in all sorts of situations where you practice your meditation so that you can draw on that scale when you need it anywhere

Time Magazine Brain Reo Garden Private Practice TED MIT South West Basketball Founder CEO Hyun
Jason Lemkin Clip: Why now is the best time to start a SaaS company

Equity

10:57 min | 6 months ago

Jason Lemkin Clip: Why now is the best time to start a SaaS company

"A few weeks ago I had the opportunity to chat with former founder. Active venture capitalists and driving force behind. Sastre Jason Lincoln. Jason Zoster a community for Sassan cloud founders also organized the annual Sastre Conference in San Jose. That now attracts five figures. Were the folks each year. We spoke with Jason before the novel. Corona virus had evaded containment efforts affecting domestic markets after upending their counterparts abroad the current community since dacians forced Jason Deport. Sastre back a bit. But that doesn't mean that our chat with him any less timely in our forty five minute conversation we covered a ton of stuff from the potential for cloud slow down to how founders should use or not use venture debt to Jason's outlook on SAS consolidation. And even half asked. He's writing checks today. We're sharing one of our favorite clips here. The rest is over on techcrunch for excellence subscribers we're GONNA get into VC's lately that have been talking about the beginning of cloud. Slow down and I I. This is a very specific thing. What they mean is cloud is no longer an upstart phenomenon. Saas LONGER NASCENT. We've now seen a large percentage of the inner voice software world move over to SAS and nine means that the growth rate will descend as the actual aggregate basis larger and critically. They think that this might lead to income and squeezing out startups from certain spaces in the Saas market. That might have been attractive before. And this is from Alex over at scale venture partners recently and I thought it was interesting hypothesis. I don't see why wouldn't be correct. But I want to get your take on. I know your cloud optimist. You've always been a believer in my experience. So when you think about the maturing of this ass market does that leave less space for starts in as you look at the the overall landscape. Well let's see. I think there are two different points. I have two different perspectives. If you look at data from Gartner which is imperfect. But at least we haven't you. Can you can say that. Maybe thirty percent of old school on Prem type software has gone to SAS thirty percent so the pollen of user seventy percent left but the flipside is. That's a lot of market penetration right. It actually starts approach forty fifty percent. You should see a slowdown this secular trend into SAS. When when even when you started doing sas certainly when I started doing it was risky. It was quirky. It was weird. It was it disliked. It was it was not trust about two thousand sixteen through about Twenty Sixteen. Maybe even a little later at the first astronaut. Aaron Levy came one week after the box roadshow and asked him what the public markets. He said they're starting to learn about it. They're starting to get comfortable in two thousand fifteen. That's that's only twenty five years ago so we are so that thirty percent was probably eight percent right and so there is so there's so so there's a the good news is seventy percent left. The the risk is like you know there's only so much of this crazy growth and another thing happened. Which if you look at any Gartner or whatever this and this no one anticipated more of. It went we all knew there would be a substitution that of however you define it a trillion three and there's different metrics how much infrastructure include. We all knew that like the old the old on Prem Safra would go to sas we didn't realize that it would. It would take up thirty to forty percent more of those. It budget so they used to so we got an extra boost. People are spending more on software. No no one from scale no one from anybody realized we would spend more on business software because of SAS but has physical limits. It budgets are only be so much of global two thousand budget so these Amazing Trans created many many Saas companies. Doing a billionaire are billionaire are but but they're gonNA hit headwinds there. There's no question those headwinds that's different from whether that's going to box out startups. By the first half of the apotheosis there is going to be a slow down as we just forty fifty percents over the next five years. Yes there has to be and as we stop putting more and more of our fixed. It budget into SAS. These are two great trends and they will reach saturation. Got It okay. Now on certain point and and being boxed out using more skeptic I think this is the best time to start a startup time. Tell me why because all the SAS leaders are billion. Two BILLION COMING UP ON A billionaire. Zenda shop is the hub spots. They don't have taught they don't have time so if you're a billionaire and they're all growing like a weed growing thirty forty percents shop advice. Going fifty percents off. But they're all growing. They're all growing with a few exceptions. They're all growing north of twenty percent. All the leaders true. So let's imagine you're in a building air which now they're like twenty of these companies. How much do you have to add this year? Two hundred even three hundred. Maybe a lot you're thinking about non-organic time to compete with your little startup. That was just on tech crunch. You know ten years ago. Five Years Twenty fifteen. When when Aaron came from box Aaron would see a startup. Doing five millionaire. Get a little worried. I mean not literally worried but they. Hey this may disrupt me. Is that right Stewart. Butterfield doesn't have time he's GonNa read it. He's all over social media. He's an incredible founder but slack doesn't have time going to a billionaire to worry about someone that did five million has got to worry about. Microsoft has gotta worry big guy so that means you have a lot of air cover to get not just to a million before your competed with by maybe one hundred million owes underneath the. We'll just ignore you because they have to focus they have to hold it and adobe turning around now and everyone from fig on down is competing aggressively with them. But why because they're stupid of course not? They're very smart. Sap there they were busy. It's too small. It was too small right and there's too much growth in creative cloud creative cloud fuel the dobies text market cap growth. So they just. It's not that they don't watch what's happening with web flow and figment everyone. It's just too small until it's nine figures in revenue because figure has become materialists. I don't know how they're all super successful and it's not because anyone was dumb. It's just because you can't compete when they were small you just can't. You're too big. You're they've grown too quickly so it sounds like instead of this problem. It's actually there's there's more freedom because become now too busy to kind of mess with you get up to ten fifteen twenty million a are before they even begin the guns on your ship and because cloud got so big. These niches got big. Every niche. That used to be a millionaire NECC- now can be one hundred million Monday dot Com. Where you're talking about who we needed another project. Management for Non Tech folks that went from one hundred twenty million in four years. But that's a that's a piece like ten years ago. That would be a two million dollar business going to two hundred million so let's whole years one hundred times bigger. This little niche that Monday found and they're going to do a billionaire art. So let's talk about Vertical Saas. Jump ahead my question because this is what I wanted to get. Borough Ready It seems like you're thinking about Vertical Saas than isn't that this is GonNa be constricting idea but inside these these these takes on like the dentist industry or whatever and building software for those could be enormous because the niches have gotten larger to your points. I presume your a bowl on vertical sats. I've always been a ball. I would say even more simply. Look at any company to billionaire. Look at his desk job. Okay which is already two billion. That means they're gonNA keep growing. That means they're going to get to five or ten billion. My rough math is there's another billion vertical version of that so there's another billionaire could be more and that means there could be ten UNICORNS. One hundred million ten verticalised desks right And doesn't even have time to meet with them right. I Investment Company gorgeous which is like a vendetta ECOMMERCE. They're almost all on shop. Affi- it's very niche right. They're gonNA be growing three. X Ten million error. Is that tune it? People thought this company was to NICCI twelve. Apparently it's not nine. Three hundred percent honest has an offering it as a great product but all they do is make sure your fulfillment from instagram to shipping. That your contact center works magically. Which is good enough. Note is enough. It is enough to build a three hundred million Arab business. But it's just a niche today. That's so big because cloud is look how shoplifting. Today seventy million dollars in two thousand fifteen it was worth eight hundred million so these niches have grown astronomically and that means these vertical SAS things. We've like gorgeous and others. You turn around. And how could we do be a unicorn? Well it wasn't four or five years ago right when I met I met the founders only twice twenty fifteen. They were great but it wasn't clear it could be as big today but cloud. Gubbay point about Zen desk in there being room for ten unicorns underneath the desk at one hundred air. The implications vertical sights will still generally smaller companies than the original broader. Sass play so to me even smaller than salesforce. That's an example I don't Viva is a Pharma. Sierra Viva is the most successful verticals ass company so the CTO salesforce left salesforce a decade ago founded VIVA. It only raised three million dollars from emergence plus. It's now worth twenty billion dollars. Today he was also in my class. Like everyone did better than me in my bye-bye on the show but you should just get out. We should bring Peter Gassner. He's like a hundred times would have been me and vivas was twenty something billion and then how to products and he. He said look sales versus a great horizontal play I WanNa do Pharma and there. There is a legacy vendor in the space and it's big. It's a big space and all their deals are seven figure eight figure deals. But it's still. It's still a thirty billion dollar company and salesforce is one hundred fifty billion so I can't think of a vertical SAS that is bigger than its horizontal play but it may well it may well exist but thirty billion still outcomes. You're at three million dollar investment. Even if they are smaller by definition you know there's going to be enormous your general point about the client it's up it's becoming growing the high antigone larger piece of the overall. Everyone seems to be very hot. Verticals ask these days. So that's why I wanted to ask because they like it because the cloud got bigger and because competition is simpler the amount of domain expertise you have to do to build a viva is. It's rich compounds on itself and there aren't going to be twenty startups out of y Si. They're going to build that. But but and so there are these verticals because finally they realized they can be three hundred air business and then they can actually millionaire and they realized look it actually works. I can like I. Invested in in a SAS company just for environmental compliance called map history right. They disclosed their first. One million dollar deal okay. They have like no competition not in the whole space but in what they do they can have a few bumps and they can get through it. They have time they have times. There's not ten other players in the exact same thing. We've guys may disagree. But they had like one or two competitors and their original competitor was I think. Ms Dos based in offices. So you have time and so like this because you just. You're you're overwhelmed with the competition. You're overwhelmed with everyone. Wanted to take on snowflake and data dog and and there are many great apm companies. But it's exhausting. How do you know what's the next day doc?

Aaron Levy Salesforce Gartner Founder Jason Unicorns SAS Jason Lincoln Jason Zoster Techcrunch Dacians Prem Safra Jason Deport Sassan San Jose Adobe Microsoft Alex
The 7 Best Marketing Conferences 2020

Marketing School

03:47 min | 7 months ago

The 7 Best Marketing Conferences 2020

"Welcome to another episode of Marketing School. I'm Eric Su and I'm Neil Patel and today we are going to talk about the seven best marketing conferences to go to in twenty twenty. I will start with the first one. I'm always looking at content marketing world. I think that's a great one because you have the best content marketers in the world talking about the Trans and the content marketing means not just konta marking. We're talking SEO as well. We're talking about how demand generation fills in with that too. We're talking about social media too so I think that's always a good one to take a look at number two traffic and conversion summit San Diego. Now they're trying to do events on the east coast as well in different states or countries. The reason I like traffic and conversion summit as you got marketed from all types of industries like INFO copywriting ECOMMERCE SAS and. They're sharing different tactics that they're using so most conferences out there. You'll see segments. Small businesses only or only enterprise fortune one thousand companies. But the reason I like. This is the variety of size of companies and the industries gives you a very broad range of new marketing tactic. style that you may have not heard about before. Yup That's plus one on that one. The last couple of years on three good so number three inbound inbound is put on by hub spot and actually become a really big congress. They actually have really good keynote speakers and just learning a lot about inbound marketing strategies in general so. I think the conferences. Maybe I might be wrong here. But over. Twenty thousand thirty thousand people or so. It's become really big. Neil yes a huge event number four so if you WANNA get into marketing or do while you may not have the to spend a ton of money paid ads. You may not have the time for. Seo So what other option do you have? I love performance based marketing specifically affiliate marketing. And you can check out affiliate world. Affiliate world has a ton of affiliate conferences throughout the world. Whether it's in Asia or Europe the. Us version is affiliate summit. And at this event. You'll not only need a lot of people that can grow your traffic also learn about Philly at tactics but the reason I liked the event is more so you can meet people who will promote your product or service for you and only charge you a fee. Every time they drive you lead or a sale all right so this is number five. I think so. Gartner Marketing Symposium. That's happening I think it's June and basically I mean Garner's while no research firm but the talk about insights top on new technologies strategy all that kind of stuff all marketing cool stuff and I think it's in San Diego Neil number six marketing school. Eric and I are marketing school. We have an event. It's in San Francisco March eighth ninth and Tenth. Which is actually very soon. You can learn more about marketing school dot. Io Slash live and we have really unique speakers and education that you can't get anywhere else. For example we have like the guy who grew facebook twitter Gora Talking about growth strategies that most of us have never heard of we have people talking about pricing. And how you can optimize the price of your pocket or service or SAAS APP and generate extra fifteen percent per year in revenue. So we have very specific speakers that a healthy solves problems in your business that you can see immediate growth. Plus we have an event also New York that's July thirteenth fifteenth. And then another one. Beverly Hills that one's November ninth through the eleventh. But we're trying to keep the group purposely small so that's another thing around it. The last one I'll put in. Here is the adobe summit so adobe is really good at just kind of all things around design but have a whole kind of creative cloud as well. This has about twenty thousand. Attendees I believe and they do this one in Vegas so you can have some fun. There eat some good food as well

Marketing School Neil Patel Eric Su San Diego Adobe Beverly Hills San Francisco Vegas Facebook Philly Garner New York Asia Europe
Use the new Find My app to hunt down your stolen Mac

KCBS 24 Hour News

01:07 min | 1 year ago

Use the new Find My app to hunt down your stolen Mac

"According to a study by Gartner tech research firm a laptop is stolen every fifty three seconds out of someone's home car or office and we've all heard or most of us have heard of these find my iPhone apps well see net senior reporter Shara tip can tells us there's something similar now for laptops with the new mac operating system that apple just released this year they have something they just rename that find my and it's actually gonna be able to work with your mac now so what it does is it uses Bluetooth signals from your iPhone that's nearby to kind of try and get late where your mac could be there's also services from third parties that you could buy a like lock it tight and that one actually offers a free service the key to be is is you have to be online so if somebody steals your laptop and immediately wiped said shuts it off you're not gonna be able to find it but if it's able to get an internet connection you'll be able to hopefully be able to track where your mac or at PC has ended up seeing at senior reporter Shara

Shara Tip Apple Reporter Fifty Three Seconds
Nissan to cut 12,500 jobs as crisis deepens after profit wipe out

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:00 min | 1 year ago

Nissan to cut 12,500 jobs as crisis deepens after profit wipe out

"Have you along everybody up i in the yes business it is hard but how does that happen category today nissan prophets the japanese automaker fell ninety nine percent in the last quarter compared to the same period a year ago ninety nine percent and because of course the company announced it's going to lay off nearly ten percent of its workforce as a result almost thirteen thousand jobs worldwide what went wrong you ask says marketplace's megan mccarthy carino go just about everything nissan's troubles started piling up with the arrest of former chair and c._e._o. carlos gone on corruption charges last year that really put the company into a tailspin michelle crabs analyst for auto trader says that came on top of an ill-fated strategy to grow market share at the expense of profitability that caused some bad behaviors like relying on deeply discounted sales to car rental companies for a disproportionate share of its business that cut profits and tarnish the brand michael ramsey an analyst with gartner says says consumers used to see

Nissan Analyst Gartner Megan Mccarthy Michelle Michael Ramsey Ninety Nine Percent Ten Percent
The design legacy of Apples Jony Ive is iconic, but eco-problematic

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

07:19 min | 1 year ago

The design legacy of Apples Jony Ive is iconic, but eco-problematic

"Apple is known for beautiful expensive products that get replaced pretty often either for status or because the battery is dying when longtime designer Gianni. I've left apple last month to form his own design company. Lots of people looked back at his time at apple and his influence on creating. Waiting products that were hard to repair prioritized thinness and beauty over sometimes reliability and whether as apple gears up to announce new iphones this fall that might actually change now that I've is Gone Kyle Wiens is the founder of the electronics repair site. I fix it. He wrote a blog post about ives mixed legacy at apple especially when it comes to the environment and he said sometimes simple isn't better. It's this idea that it should be so simple to use the you shouldn't have to worry about how it works. What's under the hood? They decided intentionally that they were going to hide the complexity of the battery from us but what that did is a side effect was it limited the lifespan it made these last shorter and and so then when the new you know a sexy renew features comes out next year like Ammiel one doesn't work as well. I'm going to get a new one. How much did these design choices influence? The rest of the tech world like phones used to have walkable batteries until the iphone came along and Apple Paul really you could argue drove the rest of the industry into this sort of more throw away tack. Absolutely they drove the rest of the industry this idea that it was acceptable that you could get away with say integrating the hard hard drive onto the main motherboard. If you want to separate the computer from the data. There's no way to do it. That's the kind of thing that that most other companies would have said No. That's a red line. We won't Cross Apple crosses that line and then everyone else follows you've also. Written recently about how Johnny is designs based on the style of German industrial designer deter roms and a principal like a really important principle of deter ROMs design was sustainability environmental sustainability and you talk about how Johnny lives is leaving apple without having reconciled really a big gap there. Why do you think that that shift happened and really hasn't been addressed right out of design? Principles Design Zayn is is sustainable and design long lasting and I think those things get coupled together when you do something like like doing in a battery that artificially limits the life of the entire device to the life of its shortest component. You're getting on this consumer a treadmill treadmill where we just have to go out and buy more things and the the environmental impact of manufacturing these things is significant. It's it's over two hundred pounds of raw material to make an iphone but the fundamental product architecture of saying as thin as possible and damn the consequences it really is a challenge. What we've seen is apple's environmental team who is very good have done everything they can to make? The products is sustainable except change the design that has been driven by Johnny Ivan his team and there have been A. A number of very specific decisions that they've made that of limited lifespan of these devices I think probably to the Chagrin of apples embarrasment team who then has to support it in the best possible late how much of it is on us the consumer I I mean we have certainly bought them all the time. We've complained about them. You know you've got rid of the headphone Jack. Oh I can't slot my battery out. This is so annoying and yet we we do keep buying them absolutely and this is a challenge that we have is a culture. Is it when you when you have something where there's multiple variables that you have to choose from you want the best audio player but you also would like something that will last a long time <hes> because it doesn't have stamped on the box. Hey this thing last eighteen months. I think we tend to forget we put out of our minds. Were not very good. <hes> psychologically it making long term decisions and then then later we tend to justify say oh well you know it's not running as as long as it used to but <hes> you know there's a new one that came out so I think I think that is <hes> they've been able to take advantage of psychology <hes> that yes we bear some responsibility but I think the lack of disclosure if they said hey if a single key on this computer breaks it's going be over a thousand dollar repair that might change people's mind when they're purchasing things up front but people don't have that information and how do you think that that mentality that psychology is starting to change sort of like as you get to the point where you're feeling like <hes>. I'm about to buy my fifth iphone. Phone this one seems fine except the battery for example and then of course there was the scandal about it. Do you think that as these devices get longer in the tooth. There's more awareness that they don't last as long as maybe they should or could I think so we're starting to see people wanting to push their devices longer part of that is the improvement in smartphones is not as great every year as it used to be so as that's potatoing. We don't need to get new phones <hes> all that frequently but the batteries don't last any longer than they used to so all of a sudden. We're GONNA keep our phones twice as long as did three four years ago <hes> we're going to have to be replacing the battery and at that point making those batteries available <hes> is going to be an important competitive differentiator and that's where you have companies like Motorola that have come out and said we're going to sell service parts for our funds. We're going to make them available both to repair shops into consumers <hes> there's a there's a crack that apple has left in the market that perhaps mother all will exploit so we could start circling back around to the beginning where we have phones with <hes> swap -able batteries and maybe S._d.. I D cards lots and so this is something really funny people as as because we take these things apart I take apart every iphone. There is room inside the Iphone S._d.. Card Slot. There's room for some cards. There's room for Nestea card. They put that in there the only reason that you can't upgrade. Upgrade the memory on the iphone is is because they want to charge you an extra hundred or two hundred dollars for the extra storage Kyle Wayans the founder of the electronics repair site. I fix it and now for some related links lots of words have been written about apple and whether it still has its legendary Mojo and what will happen now that Johnny Ive is gone but I fought Jonathan Troy Aikman in the New York Post put a really well a week or so ago you said apple needs to figure out how to keep creating things that we didn't even know we needed. We of course also have linked to Kyle wiens piece on our website Marketplace Tech Dot Org and obviously it isn't only design. That's made apple products especially the iphone more likely to get replaced then repair. It's also the fact that a new device gifts introduced every year always at least in theory with some must have set of features that means the old one is now useless or at best unwanted and then new features in its operating system. Them Aren't always available for older phones like in the upcoming thirteen. There's a software fix to keep your battery from overcharging which should prevent your battery from getting old and not holding a tarred so quickly after you buy a new phone except that I._S.. Thirteen will only be available on newer iphone models but it does seem like consumers increasingly want off the hamster wheel research firm Gartner forecast last week that smartphone shipments will have their quote worst ever decline in two thousand.

Apple Kyle Wiens Founder Ives New York Post Johnny Ivan Gianni Design Zayn Johnny Ammiel Jonathan Troy Aikman Motorola Gartner Johnny Ive Kyle Wayans Nestea
In a changing climate, we need tech to adapt

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:10 min | 1 year ago

In a changing climate, we need tech to adapt

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by vast a global cybersecurity company trusted by over four hundred million people avast is dedicated to protect you online. So you can connect to the internet confidently avast keeping the world safe from cyber attacks. Visit them at a vast dot com and by Laci. Analytics, lots of business intelligence, vendors, claim their is the best, but they can't all be winners. Lodge analytics is offering five reports from analysts like Gartner, and Dresdner comparing twenty-six BI vendors, get help folks in your evaluation, prioritizing features and determining what solution fits your tech stack. Visit lachey analytics dot com slash tech to claim your free reports. That's L. O. G I. Analytics dot com slash tech. In a changing climate, a closer look at the tech, we're going to need to survive from American public media. This is marketplace. Tech demystifying the digital economy, I'm Ali would. We're continuing our series on how tech can help us adapt to climate change called how we survive as you've heard throughout the week solutions can involve a lot of things transferring existing technologies to more vulnerable parts of the world, updating infrastructure, applying, artificial intelligence and maybe eventually space colonies today. We're looking at a few areas on earth, where innovation is already occurring one big market risk assessment, Emily Maza karate is founder and CEO of the climate data firm four twenty-seven based in Berkeley, we hear a firm specialized in helping businesses corporations investors understand an integrate projections from global climate models and plan for the physical impacts of climate change her job. She says is all about big data the company pulls for more than forty different models for predicting climate events at the global scale those models are not for the faint of heart sue. We have developed a set of tools. That extract and process, the data and apply it to real economic assets. The customers for twenty-seven creates can help real estate, developers decide, what to buy and wear or convinced building owners to prepare better for extreme weather. Other scientists and entrepreneurs are thinking much lower on maslow's hierarchy of needs food, and water. Laura cool is a professor at Northeastern University who studies climate adaptation in agriculture, one of the biggest problems across the board will be water management's. She says transferring, simple tech, like drip, irrigation to developing countries or small farmers will be a good start. And then it's all about using tech to tell people when to irrigate in the US. There's really fascinating innovations occurring in terms of how we actually use artificial intelligence to do precision irrigation. And when it comes to water self sufficiency is a huge deal in terms of that. Station. So there are start ups trying to figure out how to make houses or schools, or neighborhoods, less reliant on local water utilities, Cody Franson is CEO of the startup zero mass water, which is harvesting water straight out of the air. So a source hydra panel effectively take sunlight and air, only and produces perfect water, so no pipe input. No electricity. Input, basically, it's a six thousand dollar internet connected panel system that creates water out of water vapor, for drinking super cool, but it is still early days, and professor, Laura, cool notes that tech can't solve everything. So I guess one can have cautionary note, I would say is that there's a danger of kind of technological optimism that could start to creep in cool says true change and true adaptation requires major political and social changes to otherwise the tech won't be available to the people who need it most. And only those who. Can afford? It will benefit so tomorrow in the show. We'll talk with a longtime marketplace climate reporter about how this shift toward adaptation, isn't sitting quite right with everyone. And now for some related links. So yesterday, we talked about private money getting into the climate adaptation game. And today, we talked about the tech and startups and the New York Times had a story last week about both of those things you can find it on our website marketplace tech dot org. Unfortunately, the story is about how venture capital funding for cleantech startups has fallen for most of the last decade because investors don't think there's money to be made there, a lot of BBC's rushed into cleantech, and solar about ten years ago, most of them didn't make any money and they don't wanna get burned again. Now, most of the discussion in this piece is around carbon capture technologies technically in the mitigation category because they'd either repurpose carbon or figure out how to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere altogether. But either way it's kind of a bummer in future. Episodes will look at how Silicon Valley is reacting or not reacting to climate change. Especially considering that the expensive and fancy office headquarters of Facebook, Google, and several other Silicon Valley companies are likely to end up underwater even under pretty conservative models of sea level rise. You guys are gonna want to adapt. I'm Ali would. And that's marketplace tech. This is APN. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by low G planning to update the dashboards and reports in your application, lots of business intelligence benders claimed their software is the best, but they can all be winners. Loggia analytics is offering five reports from analysts like Gartner and Dresner comparing twenty-six vendors, get help focusing your evaluation, prioritizing features and determining what solution fits your tech stack. Visit loggia analytics dot com slash tech to claim your free reports. That's L. O. G I. Analytics dot com slash tech.

Gartner Laura Cool ALI L. O. G Professor Loggia Analytics Founder And Ceo Laci United States Dresdner Lachey Cody Franson New York Times Northeastern University Emily Maza
Will drivers cash in on Uber stock when the company goes public?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:20 min | 1 year ago

Will drivers cash in on Uber stock when the company goes public?

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by. Indeed, are you hiring with? Indeed, you can post job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist. Qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started today and indeed dot com slash marketplace. That's indeed dot com slash marketplace. And by lodge, analytics lots of business intelligence vendors claim their software is the best, but they can't all be winners. Logic analytics is offering five reports from analysts like Gartner and Dresdner comparing twenty-six BI vendors get help folks in your valuation, prioritizing features and determining what solution fits your tech stack. Visit lachey analytics dot com slash tech. To claim your free reports, that's L O G I, analytics dot com slash tech. Movers early employees will make a lot of money from its IPO. But we'll drivers cash in on the stock to from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Molly would. Uber is going public tomorrow listing its shares on the new York Stock Exchange some employees of the company stand to make millions even billions of dollars and Uber is giving drivers with more than twenty five hundred rides on the platform. Cash bonuses that they can use to buy stock at the initial public offering price the amounts ranged from one hundred bucks two maybe up to forty thousand dollars depending on how many rides at driver has. But how much of a benefit is that two drivers who are already unhappy with their pay Shaly Ramirez, drives for Uber. She's eligible for the stock. But says I don't think it's enough. I think they're China throw crumbs at us at the end of the day. What we need is something that is guaranteed on a weekly basis on a daily basis on a yearly basis. On Wednesday in New York City Ramirez and other drivers protested outside Uber's headquarters calling for higher wages from Uber, and lift and better treatment, they were similar protests all over the country Ramirez drivers simply need to make more money. That stock is not going to stop us from becoming homeless that stock is not going to have that help pay our rent and care for our children. So they need to come up with something a little bit better than that. One academic says the ideal scenario would be for companies to give drivers equity before the company goes public as if they were engineers or product managers designers. A Cinderella Zhang is an NYU professor who wrote a book on gig employment and how it's changing the economy. He says securities law hasn't really caught up with the gig economy. The challenge for the privately held company is that it's extremely complicated to have hundreds of even thousands of people who don't have sort of a strong relationship or an employment relationship or onto credited investors to own sort of small numbers of shares in a private company, but he says he thinks the law will involve to allow private companies to give equity to their part time workers that would be a nice outcome. It would be sort of reflective of the fact that the made important. Tribulations to lake you know, the evolution and success of the company. Now, of course, having stock in a company doesn't mean you'll actually make money when it goes public lift also led drivers by shares when it went public, but its stock price has fallen since its public debut. Some drivers like J crater who also writes about the rideshare industry are pragmatic. You know, I think if you have the right mindset, it's it's not a problem. I mean, this is the relationship we have I am an expense. And they're gonna try and do everything they can to pay me as little as possible when Burgos public this week. It says it will reserve five point four million shares about three percent of its offering for drivers to buy with their cash. Bonuses, anything they don't buy. We'll be returned to the public market. Related links lift reported its first earnings as a public company on Tuesday. And although it gave a generally encouraging report it also held back some information that it used to give investors like the number of total rides and bookings. It had in the previous quarter, which is obviously fairly useful indicator of whether the service is growing, and I mean lift also lost over a billion dollars last quarter, which is more than it lost an all twenty eighteen, but okay, investors were mostly worried about the lack of data lift shares closed at an all time low on Wednesday, but lift did in partnership with Waymo the self driving car company owned by alphabet, which investors do like because they don't wanna see the company get put out of business by someone else's army of self driving cars, although obviously long-term that's not great news for drivers either. Because if the cars drive themselves who needs a human. I'm Ali would. And that's marketplace. Tech. This is a PM. Hi, I'm Zach and I listened to marketplace in Arlington Virginia. I think what I appreciate the most about marketplace's their ability to take the economic news of the day issues such as tariffs rate hikes and tax reform cut through the political noise, and clearly and concisely explained not only how these issues affect our country and the rest of the world, but how they impact people like me. I hope you'll consider joining me as marketplace investor and donate today at marketplace dot org to help make their work possible. Guess marketplace podcast is brought to you by low G planning to update the dashboards and reports in your application lutts of business intelligence vendors claim their software is the best that they can all be winners. Loggia analytics is offering five reports from analysts like Gartner and Dresner comparing twenty-six BI vendors get help focusing your evaluation. Prioritizing features and determining what solution fits your tech stack. Visit loggia analytics dot com slash tech. To claim your free reports, that's L O G I, analytics dot com slash tech.

Uber Shaly Ramirez Gartner Loggia Analytics Lachey NYU Molly China New York J Crater Dresdner York Cinderella Zhang Burgos Professor
Social Robots: The New Face of AI

WSJ Tech News Briefing

06:05 min | 1 year ago

Social Robots: The New Face of AI

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from Deloitte, a global leader in digital transformation helping clients apply. Technologies like cloud an AI to their unique business challenges Deloitte got com slash look again. This is tech news briefing im Tanya boost does reporting from the newsroom in New York. And the journal learns that blending robots artificial intelligence and voice tech is the secret formula that actually makes humans comfortable with talking with chat bots, because as you know, we are not there's help it's from robot. Introducing you to her it him after these tech headlines. Walt Disney has a bet that in order to stay on top. It needs to come to you by streaming entertainment directly to TV's and phones, it is preparing to launch a service called Disney. Plus that will for a monthly fee stream new and old shows built around its most popular franchises, thus breaking off a lucrative relationship with Netflix and instead competing against it Thursday. Disney is expected to reveal the details in a major presentation to investors laying out the company's streaming strategy in a cloud enabled a I push Google targets. CIO's enterprise technology executives are at the center of Google's new strategy to drive business to its cloud based artificial intelligence services, the company cloud, a division looking to carve out a larger slice of the enterprise market announced tools this week aimed at helping chief information and technology officers addressed common business problems. The tools include prepackaged AI services that can understand invoice. And contracts and offer supply chain recommendations and predictions. The competition remains stiff as Google fights for bigger stake in the cloud market. Microsoft had thirteen percent of the worldwide market in two thousand seventeen and according to Gartner's most recent data, Amazon which pioneered the business held nearly fifty two percent Google share three point three. The journal says AI has been a critical component of the cloud business for Google and it intends to dramatically boost the sales and support staff for its cloud services division and for quick market. Check in the journal says investors hunger for growth are pushing stocks to record highs a group of the largest technology companies. Just hidden all time, high highlighting investors renewed faith in software and chip companies after a fourth quarter route this week the S and P five hundred information technology sector, logged its first record close since early October following a seventh advance in previous eight sessions, apple and Microsoft have helped power the tech sector higher while fighting for the title of world's largest company. But the journal says. Because many tech stocks are associated with market momentum some analysts cautioned that a setback on trade or downbeat economic data gettin the group tumbling once again coming up why giving machine learning a face is about to take a I to the next level support for this podcast and the following message. Come from Deloitte, a global leader in digital transformation helping clients apply. Technologies like cloud and AI to their unique business challenges Deloitte got com slash look again. In the podcast special coverage of the WSJ pro artificial intelligence, deep dive, we get to meet a robot with a human like face. That's trying to take talking to our machine friends like Siri and Alexa to the next level. One company for hat. Robotics is already there. Gabriel Skansi the co founder of the company says we're ready for new machine assistance. The first step a face for fixes developing this Roble, it's both the hardware around the software running it, and the ideas religious sort of revolutionized the way we interact with machines. So if we look back interacting with machines with graphical user, interfaces or smartphones. And so on we believe that the Uman face is really sort of the way we are using direct with other people, and we can use that to interact with machines. We think that the face has been neglected in like, voice assistance, and so on. And we think that the face Carrizo much important information that we already know how to interpret all so we don't have to invent a new set of signals for the system to show them to use for these robots by this point is fairly clear. So the ideas that we develop in this platform with the tools for developers to develop applications on top of it. Without further ado, the robot would like to introduce it self this is for hat. Go ahead. My name is for hat, and I am a socially intelligent robot in a near future. You might meet me at airports, hotel, receptions, bangs schools, and hospitals. I can't wait to see what interesting applications people will come up with. Can you have different demotions? Sure, my voice and facial animation. Allows me to express all kinds of emotions I can't be very happy. And cheerful. But sometimes I can feel a bit sad other times, perhaps even be angry. Unlike other. Robots? I can have many different personalities and there are big plans in development. So get comfortable. We have a lot of different partners working in different verticals. So we have for example, working with Chaban as they are putting the robots in airports and train stations. So actually, it's it's they're working on it. Now, we had it at the Frankfurt airport last year as a test pilot. It worked really well, we have a collaboration with Swedish recruitment firm having the robot. Doing job interviews in order to reduce bias in the recruitment process. So these are two examples we also have. Collaboration with Mark from a surgical or the robot is doing asking questions in order to to sort of do an assessment diagnosed you for Debbie and so them for more on for hat, robotics, and the latest on all things artificial intelligence head to wsJcom that does it for the tech news briefing, im Tanya Bustos reporting from the newsroom at the Wall Street Journal.

Google Deloitte AI Tanya Bustos Disney Microsoft Walt Disney Netflix Wall Street Journal New York Frankfurt Gartner Alexa CIO
Using AI to Fix Everyday Business Problems

WSJ Tech News Briefing

03:33 min | 1 year ago

Using AI to Fix Everyday Business Problems

"According to research firm, Gartner seventy percent of organizations will seek to boost employee productivity by integrating. A I in workplace systems will happen within the next two years. But I they need to make sure employee's outside of technology hubs are involved in the process at the recent WSJ pro artificial intelligence event in New York, Gina Chung, for example, DHL's lead of innovation for the Americas addresses, first and foremost, how may I can greatly help business. We're working on a range of different AI base problems that the child were structured and unstructured on I'll start with one which was actually what we started with five years ago, which is the use of machine learning for full costing algorithms for variety of different applications, if right planning volume planning on what we did that then was to see if we could shift the way we make how full costs from traditional kind of way of full costing and shifting using machine. Lou. Winning and that was a huge project at the time five years ago at DHL required. Also, a lot of business transformation in by using machine learning and being able to increase the accuracy of L full costing we're actually able to generate an eight digit saving, and that's really what's triggered. I would say data analytics and the topic of AI Michael Clemente, one of Unilever's, vice president of human resources talks about how a is efficiency has been crucial to his business. We started down the journey really talking about fixing the the speed to candidacy so one of the things that many of you probably work on now like when you go to campus recruitment. It's really the same process that you've followed for one hundred years where you go to campus, and you got to pick your schools and go and meet lots of people, and it just takes a long time and it's expensive. So we thought if there's got to be a better way to do that. So the business problem we are really getting at. This. How can we be more efficient more effective save time reduce cost? And so what we tried to what we did is we stop going to campus, and we wanna mentally took that spend and invest it both in in technology and online branding. So people would come to us. It was pretty cool actually what we found in the first year. Just starting that discussion was that we went from being able to go to twenty campuses, spending, months and months and months to go into every campus in America, creating an incredibly diverse base of of applicants and all of the key all of the key KPI's. We wanted to see went in the right direction, increasing diversity increases speed. We went from six months to four weeks in the process, and you know, so it wasn't that the was solving all problems, it was solving the first level of difficulty. And I think that that's one of the cool things that businesses. Now figuring out is the integration of these things. Right. How do you get technology to work with business problems and meters? And if you're thinking that this stuff is getting easier by now, it's not the key to success as always expectation management. So even when we think that eight I would be able to Seoul, something I make it very clear from the beginning. You know, this is cutting edge technology, it's still very nascent at least in our world. And let's just you know, have a fail fast approach and just try it out and do a technical proof of concept before we do a full blown project and governance board around it. So I try to do kind of both, you know, bring people along

DHL America Gartner AI WSJ Gina Chung Michael Clemente Seoul Vice President Of Human Resour New York LOU Unilever Five Years One Hundred Years Seventy Percent Eight Digit Four Weeks Six Months Two Years
Do AirPods Make You Look Rich? (According to Memes, Yes, Likely)

WSJ Tech News Briefing

08:59 min | 1 year ago

Do AirPods Make You Look Rich? (According to Memes, Yes, Likely)

"Get exclusive insider access to Milan style and design with WSJ magazine and into Garay make private visits to galleries top restaurants and shops lake coamo and much more book this once in a lifetime trip at Indy. Gory dot com slash WSJ magazine or call six four six seven eight zero eight three eight three. This is tech news briefing. Im Tanya boosts does reporting from the newsroom in New York. Today's question do air pods. Make you look rich, or at least cool probably because as the journal looks into what is taken over as the luxury item for younger people air pod had phones remain everywhere and show, no signs of stopping more. So than beats headphones or a slew of other better sounding ear wear yet that which resembles crystallized globs of sweat dangling from your ears. We have WSJ's Jacob Gallagher to thank for that. Accurate. Description has emerged as the trendiest tech must for the masses. How did it happen will talk about it after these tech headlines? Has slow is losing its general counsel two months after hiring him? Replacing the veteran trial lawyer with a longtime insider who helped the electric car company, navigate some of its biggest legal issues Dane, but Swinkels said in a statement he looks forward to returning to Washington to continue his work with tesla in and outside counsel role as in the past his exit marks and other high profile executive departure for the company during the past two years as it works to turn the model three into its first mass market electric car. The journal notes swift departure is reminiscent of another quick exit in September Tesla's accounting chief left the company after only a few weeks, citing the intense pressure and scrutiny of the company. Pinterest has stopped returning search results for terms relating to vaccinations, which is a drastic step aimed at curbing the spread of misinformation. But one that also reflects the challenge facing social media companies in curbing hot button health issues, Pinterest which is preparing for an initial public offering this year says it's also looking to develop better machine learning tools to aid with curation and this year, the company is tripling the number of engineers focused on content safety and now for the top data trend of twenty nineteen it's not blockchain because blockchain the digital ledger. Underlying bitcoin other currencies that's actually dropped to the bottom of Gartner's annual list of the most disruptive data analytics capabilities topping the list, augmented analytics, essentially, the tools that leverage a an machine learning last year, the value of crypto currencies lost more than eighty percent of their market value by contrast, data and analytics tools continue to evolve. All from supporting internal decision making to continuous intelligence. Gartner said augmented analytics will be dominant driver. It also urged corporate data leaders to adopt augmented analytics as platform capabilities mature coming up why the explosion of airport headphones shows, no signs of stopping. The explosion of the expensive yet attainable. Air pot headphones remains in full force. It is the luxury item of the moment shows, no signs of stopping. Why do you suddenly feel out of place? If you're not forcing white plastic into your ears. Let's find out joining us in the podcast studio with more is Wall Street Journal reporter Jacob Gallagher. Welcome. Hi, welcome. Thanks. So when it became clear air pods weren't going anywhere. We actually talked about it on the podcast because it was emerging as this fashion statement and this status symbol of sorts. And it was a new phenomenon that we were just kind of accepting. We're like, we don't get it. But it's sticking around whatever. Now, it's sort of like, not only are we accepting it, but it's become this. This thing that we embrace an inspire to how do you think this happened? They can happen. I'm glad you mentioned that, you know, airports were kind of a slow burn because they you know, they released about two years ago roughly now, and when they first came out. It was kind of the joke was that. They looked weird and they were kind of funny, and then people got them and said, oh, the sound quality is really great, and they're amazing, and blah, blah, blah. And they kind of went along like that for a while. And then sometime around last Christmas just prior to that around the holiday you saw I I started observing online. There was a lot of jokes going around that were basically predicated upon the idea that air pods made you look rich and made you look wealthy, and they were a very conspicuous item which made it kinda easy for them to be Mimi fide, and and for jokes to kind of ping around the internet because everyone knew what they looked like and you can kind of play with the visuals of them, but it's just this prevalent joke now that doesn't seem to be going away amongst like teens and twenty somethings and even thirty somethings about like, yeah, I have air pods. I'm rich and wealthy and they're kind of a new status symbol in that. I have to say even myself. I was a late adopter. And I it did change my life. And I have to say, I'm almost snobby about it. I'll be like oh, look at that person. Wired to like how how can it be? But yeah, like you said there's a mean for any everything. And it's because it's so relatable. Because there's there's I mean the internet comes through off the spoke to this kid who came up with like, I think it was. I wanna get the verb is right. But he was it was like just got airports than Bill Gates has called me this morning to go to a meeting for the one percent like being wealthy. Sure. As tiring like just like, the ones that were hard division is in the story where you know kids putting an image on and then being like it smells like poor in here. No one has has air pods. Like, they're they're they're they're very cruel out of the time. Yeah, they're kind of in that in that that part of humor. But these kids really, you know, it was funny because I keep saying kids a lot of the people I spoke for the story where in high school were in college, and you know, talking to them they were saying like this is really translated over into their actual lives. And, you know, people around their cafeteria or amongst their friends will say, you know, oh, look at our rich. I am I have. These and it it is a very funny thing. It's kind of weird reframing of what a luxury item is air pods are expensive. But they're not the most expensive head funds for sure. And right. Well, that's what kills me is because you know, someone who works in audio. I'm actually a very forgiving audio file. But I must say they're they're not even that good. Is what's funny about it? But that goes to show it doesn't necessarily matter because it's just it's the it item is your, and it doesn't it's keeping with what's cool. I think at this point. Yeah. Someone I spoke with mentioned that they reminded him that they were like sneakers sneakers with other thing in his high school with the kids kind of talked about like that. And it does kind of there are a lot of parallels. There like, you know, Nike's the hottest Nike's might not be the quote, unquote, best shoes, whether for you know, athletic purposes, or how they're made or what have you, but because of their, you know, desire ability, and and they look cool. They become this item that people. Really want air pods are basically treated the same way. It's interesting that we're at this age where a headphone in one that's basically the size of like two tic TAC stack together comfortable and not and not that comfortable. Yeah. Are are. You know, you know, they're the big thing. It's very funny. Do you? And I'm just curious because I know we don't have official numbers. But is there anything that? We can just look too says. Yes, this is really true people are getting these massive amounts. Well, there was I was getting a lot of Antic data from people. I was interviewing they were saying like, I've noticed a lot more my friends buying them, blah, blah, blah. And I was trying to figure out a way to to figure that out. And though as you said apple does operate down data for air pods. I if you look at Google trends over time, which is kind of the the search engines in house popularity measure air pods really started to spike in that like late November of last year early December period, and they've really only continued to to be popular. I think that their peak of popularity seemingly was like a week or so ago, so it still enduring an. And people have really continued to me it. And now, there's even this like next layer of me m- that is about how people have air pods, and they can't hear. So they're going to get hit by trucks. It's really confusing to but there's like as with any viral Meam. There's just becomes these added layers. And you know, it just goes to show like, you know, young people are really inventive. And they really put their heart into this. And a lot of energy. And it's pretty funny. Yeah. They're they're very dependable. And I encourage anyone to go down a rabbit hole. And check it out. That's what I did take. Thank you so much. Thank you. That's it for the tech news briefing reporting from the newsroom in New York. I'm Tanya boost does thanks for listening.

WSJ Jacob Gallagher Tesla New York Pinterest Milan Gartner General Counsel Nike Lake Coamo Bill Gates Garay Mimi Fide Apple Google
News is a hard business. Now add millennials and Facebook. Yikes?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:11 min | 1 year ago

News is a hard business. Now add millennials and Facebook. Yikes?

"This. Marketplace podcast is brought to you by orvis outfitting for the outdoors since eighteen fifty six offering everything from apparel to dog beds to fly fishing gear. This holiday give orvis not ordinary use the code market to save twenty five dollars on select orvis purchases. See stores or orvis dot com slash radio for details and restrictions and by lachey analytics, lots of business intelligence vendors claim their software is the best, but they can't all be winners. Logic analytics is offering five reports from analysts like Gartner and Dresdner comparing twenty-six BI vendors get help folks in your valuation, prioritizing features and determining what solution fits your tech stack. Visit lodge analytics dot com slash tech. To claim your free reports, that's L O G I, analytics dot com slash tech. News is a hard business now. Add millennials and Facebook. Yikes. From American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Ali would. Earlier this month Twitter put out a list of the top ten. Most tweeted about news organizations only one outlet on the list is what's called digital. I all online without the TV or print baggage. It's now this news a media company that delivers news to millennials using mostly video across all kinds of platforms, Facebook, Snapchat, Instagram YouTube, it's as it gets two point six billion video views each month and reaches seventy percent of millennials at any given time, but lots of digital media companies, especially the ones aimed at millennials had layoffs or closed in two thousand eighteen and publishers found that relying on Facebook or even Google for views could be risky Teaneck sorrows is chief content officer at now this I spoke with her at fortunes most powerful women next-gen conference, and I asked her if it's scary to be at the mercy of an algorithm, it's really really challenging for any publisher. But I think for news. In particular, where this is maybe not what you expect that a young person goes to Snapchat. I four, but increasingly it is where they're getting their news. So just really being incredibly nimble and adaptable to just the changing tides of each of these platforms is the only way to succeed, and you can be pretty nimble. But you still don't know what they're going to do or or frankly, whether your audience is going to abandon them. Yeah. Well, I think first and foremost, and and this is I think the privilege or the the beauty of being a little bit more kind of building from the startup space is if you build it, and they come then you have to believe that the business model will follow. So we spent a large portion of the first few years of our lives that now this just creating great content that built huge scale. So make sure that you have a loyal audience that is following you and engaging with you every day and work closely with each of these platforms to develop diverse revenue streams and. Now thinking about what our content might look like off of these socially distributed platforms. And are you are you venture funded? Now, we were and now we have a great investment from discovery communications that happened about two years ago, and we merged together with three other brands, and we formed what's called group nine. So now, this is part of group nine which also includes the dodo thriller and seeker, which is a science brand that discovery launched a few years back. How has if at all this kind of tech lash, right? This sort of even just suspicion of some of these platforms in general, how does that change the way that you approach those partners from a distribution and kind of like user trust perspective. So while certainly there's I think a lot of hand wringing right now around in what's going on different platforms. Nothing's going away. They're still the huge huge majority of our country and people around the world are getting their news off. Of these platforms. So I think what we can do as a publisher is the best job we possibly can and to tell the truth. And to fact, check what we're doing. And that's what we're doing. Every day. Teaneck our hosts is chief content officer. And now this media. And now for some related links to be fair. It is still a very open question. How digital media companies can make money going forward group nine media that parent company of now this last week launched a new studio for creating branded content called brand shop, that's one way. The economist has a story this week on vice media, the other may be former darling of millennial news, or as I like to call it news for cool people vices big challenge headed into twenty nineteen is how to get advertising when all the money currently goes to Facebook and Google the article in the economist notes that Bice BuzzFeed and vox media combined the big three in all digital news n-nor taint get less than one percent of the internet ad market in the United States that economists story by the way is behind to pay well because well like I said tough business. I'm Ali would. And that's marketplace tech. This is a PM. You know, firsthand how important marketplaces to your life, bringing depth and context issues that matter to you and your family as a nonprofit organization, we depend on individuals. Like you to help us provide trustworthy, news that adds value to your life. If you're not yet a marketplace investor, please consider donating today at marketplace dot org, and your gift will be matched dollar for dollar. Thanks for your support. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by Amazon web services. Did you ever wonder how we're streaming millions of movies on demand or doing our banking from the beach and how we're watching a live mission for Mars smart business minds dreamed up those ideas and Amazon web services is how they built them with the broadest functionality and the most experienced leading enterprises trust the AWS cloud to build the next big idea. Are you ready to build it? Learn more at AWS is how dot com slash podcast.

Facebook Chief Content Officer Orvis Publisher ALI Lachey Analytics Amazon Google Snapchat Gartner Twitter Dresdner Discovery Communications Vox Media United States Bice
Are your kids at a house party? No, not the scary kind

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:20 min | 1 year ago

Are your kids at a house party? No, not the scary kind

"This. Marketplace podcast is brought to you by Mozilla makers of the brand new fire FOX monitor a free service to help you stay safe from Akers. You'll get a full report if you have compromised accounts and notifications if you appear in new data breaches, take care at monitor fire, FOX dot com and by wizard pins dot com. Create custom pins for any occasion, wizard pins can work with all types of designs from hand-drawn sketches to professional design files to create custom pins of any size or shape. It's perfect for small brands to large businesses and everyone in between had wizard pins dot com and enter code tech to get twenty percent off your first order. Are your kids at a house party? No, no, not the scary kind the video app from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Molly would. The number of teenagers using Facebook that's been on the decline for years. They've migrated to Snapchat Instagram and about twenty million of them are over on house party a live video app where people drop in on each other and chat or leave video messages, and they can hang out with up to eight people at a time. I know the name house party sounds like kids doing I don't even want to know what on video, but actually co founder and chief operating officers Seamus Donnie, told me she wants house party to be for real personal, connections, and empathy literally no filters, you friend, a group of people ahead of time. And when you open the app, it actually notifies them that you're there, and you're ready to have a conversation. And so it sort of takes the emotional hurdles out of actually video chatting with somebody. Why video there obviously, inherent risks and interacting live on video. Not to mention, you know, just. Bandwith and appearance issues. You know, talk to us about the value of video as a communication tool. That's at the heart of the empathy and how we do that you say appearance like I want people to be proud of. You know, I woke up this way. Right. And if the tool is just about you, and the people you care about you shouldn't need filters. Right. You shouldn't be trying to project yourself as content. You should just be there to have like affirmation from a qualitative perspective, not validation by numbers. And I really hope that like we have a generation grows up knowing the right reaction to sadness, not just the right emoji. So talk to me about how that's reflected in the product design. Like, I assume that you're getting rid of things like likes and little hearts that pop up the screen and things that feel sort of addictive and engaging as opposed to. Antic? Well, we're not getting rid of it. We just never even built it. There's no feed it's been built by designed to promote the human connection and just showing up. We just want it to be as easy as showing up and being able to connect with people you care about. And I I see that with my kids. You are daily habit is during dinnertime, so my family's in Alabama. My husband's family's in Virginia. My best friends are in Chicago. And we'll just open it up. And it's whoever's there, but it's a predetermined group of people that I've decided that I fronted and my son now has like a very meaningful. My daughter have a very meaningful online relationship with these people. And that's not something you can do a synchronised Li it's not something that you can do in a news feed. And I'm not saying that those things shouldn't exist. There's world for them. I just think that we can all do a better job of time. Well, spent that see MRs Donnie co founder and chief operating officer at house party as. As for how you make money off empathetic and real interactions. Sustained said, the company will have monetization news in January. We spoke at fortune's most powerful women next-gen conference last week in southern California tomorrow and Wednesday. We'll talk with more powerful women from Amazon and millennial media powerhouse. Now. This. And now for some related links. Happy Monday, everyone, you might have noticed the press blitz. Bercy ES is starting that is of course, the big tech extravaganza in Las Vegas in early January. And if you're in the media, especially whether you've registered or not you're getting emails, and it's kind of my favorite time of year because you find out fast who in the tech world is going to see us and who would like to get off this PR roller coaster will remiss at slate has changed. His Twitter handle too will remiss is not going to see. Yes. Rachel king. From fortune tweeted an all caps flee for peace. She's not going either a quick search of not going to see us on Twitter. Turns up some hilarious results. One enterprising PR person. Even created a spreadsheet of tech turn lists who aren't going in hopes that they will be removed from the press emails as for me. I'm going Email your little hearts out. I already set up my outlook filter. I'm Molly would and that's marketplace tech. This is a PM. Here's an investment opportunity with a guaranteed return when you donate to support. Marketplace today, your gift will be matched dollar for dollar by our friends at the Condado fund listeners like you who give to marketplace do more than help keep the show on the air. You help us grow and get better. It's a way to directly support independent reporting and journalism you trust. And the payoff comes with what you hear every day. Don't miss out on this chance to make your donation. Go twice as far give today a marketplace dot org, and thanks this. Marketplace podcast is brought to you by low G planning to update the dashboards and reports in your application, lots of business intelligence vendors claim their software is the best that they can all be winners. Loggia analytics is offering five reports from analysts like Gartner and Dresner comparing twenty-six BI vendors get help focusing your evaluation prioritizing features and determining what solution fits your tech stack. Visit loggia analytics dot com slash tech. To claim your free reports, that's O G. I am. Analytic dot com slash tech.

Twitter Seamus Donnie Molly Fortune Co Founder Fox Dot FOX Facebook Loggia Analytics Akers Snapchat Instagram Virginia Las Vegas Gartner Sustained Alabama Chicago California Millennial Media
Sails made global shipping possible. Can they make it greener?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:44 min | 1 year ago

Sails made global shipping possible. Can they make it greener?

"This. Marketplace podcast is brought to you by Colgate. University now in its bicentennial year. Colgate university is celebrating a proud tradition of intellectual rigor at it's beautiful campus in central New York. The deadline for early decision this November fifteenth. Learn more at Colgate dot EDU 'em by lachey. Analytics Lana lyrics is offering five reports from analysts like Gartner and Dresner comparing twenty-six BI vendors get help focusing your evaluation. Prioritizing features and determing what solution fits your tech stack. Visit Lana Lennox dot com slash tech. To claim your free reports, that's L O G I, analytics dot com slash tech. Sales made global shipping possible. Can they make it greener from American public media? This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm jed Kim in for. Molly would. The UN's international. Maritime Organization is committed to cutting shipping. Emissions in half by twenty fifty that matters because shipping moves ninety percent of global trade right now, if shipping were a country is emissions would ranks sixth in the world. It would fall between Japan and Germany, and it would fall, of course, below the biggie matters in the China, the US that's James Corbett, a professor in the school of marine science and policy at the university of Delaware. He says part of the solution will be tech. I talked to Corbett I about high-tech sales. And no, these aren't the flapping sheets. You're thinking of corporate mentioned one solution being developed in Japan, a rigid surface covered with solar panels, having the ability to create a hybrid power system that is using the opportunity to expose these rigid surfaces to light and and extract the solar power from them. And. Store that into batteries. That's that'll be located down near the engine spaces and use those big solar panels as movable sales to adjust to the angle for maximum wind assist is going to be a real exciting. Kind of innovation that will work on some vessels. And it'll work on those vessels better in some routes where they can best take advantage of both sun and wind anytime you're talking about any of these changes, we're talking about affecting potentially impacting something that's incredibly vital, which is global trade. Are there any potential risks that could come with transitioning away from fossil fuels well in two thousand seven and two thousand and eight vessels unilaterally on container ships, especially unilaterally slowed down without waiting for the world supply chains to say it was okay? And what ended up happening is we shifted to larger vessels used economies of scale. And if you look at the seaborne trade curves today, you'll see that we're continuing to increase the amount of goods we deliver per year. But we're delivering them in larger delivery units less often with a slower supply chain. So I don't see that. There will be a imminent threat to the global trade of goods ships have known since Phoenician times that their first job is to serve the world's economies. Their second job is to not saying and their third job is to be good stewards of the environment. And what's happening this century is they're paying a little more attention to that to that third goal without compromising the other two James Corbett is a professor in the school of marine science and policy at the university of Delaware. He also told me adoption of newfangled sale technology. She might bring back some of the romance to being on an ocean crossing vessel this futuristic sailing. Take could very well. Attract a new generation of c travelers though Corbett has been time on a giant boxy cargo ship, and he thought it was plenty romantic in other arguably more gigantic tech news, Google CEO's Sundar Pichai finally had his day before congress. What do lawmakers do what the chance to hold one of the planet's most powerful people accountable. Well, wired says it was three and a half hours of political posturing, a lot of accusations and essentially a wasted opportunity. We'll have a link on our website. I'm jed Kim. And that's marketplace tech. This is APN. Here's an investment opportunity with a guaranteed return when you donate to support. Marketplace today, your gift will be matched dollar for dollar by our friends at the Condado fund listeners like you who give to marketplace do more than help keep the show on the air. You help us grow and get better. It's a way to directly support independent reporting and journalism you trust. And the payoff comes with what you hear every day. Don't miss out on this chance to make your donation. Go twice as far give today. Marketplace dot org, and thanks this. Marketplace podcast is brought to you by low G planning to update the dashboards and reports in your application. Lots of business intelligence vendors claimed their software is the best. But they can't all be winners. Loggia analytics is offering five reports from analysts like Gartner and Dresner comparing twenty six B I vendors get help focusing your evaluation. Prioritizing features and determining what solution fits your tech stack. Visit Logi analytics dot com slash tech. To claim your free reports, that's L O G. I. Analytics dot com slash tech.

James Corbett Gartner Jed Kim Dresner Colgate University Of Delaware Lana Lennox Colgate University Japan School Of Marine Science Professor Loggia Analytics New York Lachey UN Molly Sundar Pichai Maritime Organization
Gartner and Fever discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:19 min | 2 years ago

Gartner and Fever discussed on TechStuff

"Hype cycle is a concept from research firm Gartner, and it describes the life cycle of a technology, not just sleep tech. But every technology as it goes from the initial concept all the way up to widespread mainstream adoption, assuming it makes it that far the typical chart for the hype cycle. Looks like a really big hill on a roller coaster ride that then goes into a deep deep, and then a gradual climb afterward, and it involves things like your expectation and your adoption levels. So it all starts with the innovation trigger or the ten electrical breakthrough. The gets things started. This would be the initial announcement of something really cool and groundbreaking at this stage. There may not be anything that a consumer can get their hands on it may all be in the prototype or conceptual stage and people start hearing about and they get interested in it that leads into the peak of inflated expectations. This is the high point on that roller coaster hill that I was talking about. It's typically a pretty sharp steep hill. And this is where publicity gets people really really excited for this technology. Everyone is at a fever pitch. They think this technology has the potential. To change everything. There may not be an actual product out there. Or maybe there's only a very limited number, and they can only be adopted by like bleeding edge technology fans who have a lot of income that they can use to buy this kind of stuff. But typically, it doesn't it's not widely available enough for for the average person to get experience with it next after the peak of inflated expectations comes the trough of disillusionment. This is that dip I was talking about a low point in the life cycle this happens when people realize that the thing they got the actual product. They were able to buy doesn't meet those high expectations. They had now high expectations can come from multiple sources. They can come from PR folks, who are really promoting the heck out of technology. So it could be a misrepresentation of the tech or it could be a misinterpret. Rotation on the part of the consumer. It's not necessarily the fault of publicists, although they do tend to really tout the positives of technology. I mean their job is to sell stuff. So I'm reminded of virtual reality both when it heads initial run the nineteen nineties and the more recent attempts was stuff like the Oculus and the vibe products. Those products are still around, but I say that they failed to deliver upon some of the unrealistic expectations that we had built up around them. And as a result they had to go through this trough period. The trough of disillusionment next would be the slope of enlightenment. That's when we start to see implementations of this technology

Gartner Fever
Optymyze, Three-Time Leader in the Gartner Magic Quadrant for SPM

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

09:36 min | 2 years ago

Optymyze, Three-Time Leader in the Gartner Magic Quadrant for SPM

"Six hundred and fifty episodes. Unlike to think I've captured information on every industry and shared stories of out technology is transforming them, but don't think that we covered the world of sales performance management or SPAM to the cool kids in. Industry. So when I discovered a company called optimize which is a sales performance management platform, which combines data science process, all amazing enterprise planning, an advanced analytic combined with the fact of course that gotten recently listed as the leader in sales performance management. I had to get them on the show to find out more so book hold on tight. As I beam your ears all the way to the east coast of the US just outside Philadelphia, believe where John from optimizes waiting into speak to us about the digital transformation will challenges that he sees working first time with large enterprise clients, but also how sales office can overcome. A massive, warm, welcome to the show John. Can you tell the listeners a little about who you are and what you do? Sure. Certainly. So my name is John studio. I work for optimize as the SBP of operational planning. I've been in the sales performance management and sales operation space for about twenty years, and I've been with optimize since it's formed a few years ago. I spent most of my time in that period in the professional services side of our business doing things like consulting with our customers about their different SPN problems, sales performance management use that acronym allot consulting with them about their problems, doing business process, design system design earlier in my career, helping them implement the solutions that they need, and then helping them manage the ongoing operations for customers that need that. And then as I've gotten a as I've progressed through my career, I've spent much more and more time on the overall engagement manage. Managing our internal operations, managing our engagements with clients. I've also spent time in the sales and marketing organization within optimizing in my career. So I know how it feels to be on the other side of sales performance management, not just providing solutions, but getting the outputs of what what sales operations does. Right now I'm responsible for operational planning, which really means that I'm in contact on a daily basis with both our professional services teams that are responsible for delivery as well as the clients. As it esscalation point, helping them handle day-to-day issues as as an escalation at helping them think ahead beyond just what they're doing today, what their short-term priorities are, which is a key part of our engagement model. Something that I'll probably talk about a lot as as we continue the conversation. I'm not gonna faint and we all gonna hit the acronym SPAM a luxury. So most most likely? Yes, not when we what else should have been shown? You quickly found that you combine data signs process automation and to price planning an advanced analytics. An essentially you seem to be leveraging technology to enable your clients to execute new sales strategies and effectively drive sales performance and Salesforce productivity. But anyone listening to the show that's hearing about optimized for that very first time. Can you just offer an overview of what you do and what makes you unique from other SPM's out there? Sure. Certainly. So optimize is really, I think if I were to summarize it one sentence, which I'll obviously elaborate on, I would say that really what makes us unique is that our solution is an integrated solution. The technology includes as you already pointed out, multiple integrated platforms on the same software. And in addition to that, it also has services integrated as well. So it's an overall engagement model not just software, it's the technology and the engagement model together. That's all integrated. So from the technology side and you already kind of mentioned, this is that optimize is comprised of five overall platforms. They're all no code platforms. So everything that I'm talking about in these platforms can be done without someone going in and writing sequel code or scripting or anything. It's all configuration, which is a unique item as well in our space, the the, the base, the first thing. The thing that we started with really where the sales performance management platforms platform itself, and that includes SPAM apps for managing incentive in sales compensation for managing quotas for sales people for managing territory, alignments and so forth for salespeople, how you define whatever when's area responsibility is what customers they call on and then

John Studio Professional Services Salesforce United States Philadelphia Twenty Years
"gartner" Discussed on Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Insights - By Mitch Joel at Mirum

Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Insights - By Mitch Joel at Mirum

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"gartner" Discussed on Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Insights - By Mitch Joel at Mirum

"The very first one I read, I was sixteen or seventeen was in search of excellence in right behind that was seven habits of highly effective people. There's sort of I two books, and so it's been a full circle moment actually to to segue for a second that that Tom Peters author of in search of excellence gave me an endorsement for my book. It's almost like a full circle moment. It's really cool for me. I, I have to say he's just been lovely. But then it was, how do I get my normal medium which is talking right? So speaking on stage or talking to customers on the phone, or you know, spending days with them at their offices, trying to work through problems and really identify ways to grow to then translate that to paper seventy thousand words and get that concept in an understandable digestible way where I can't be standing next to them explaining things like it has to literally stand on its own. Was it was an interesting process for me because way out of my comfort zone, even though at Gartner I had to write research, this is a different kind of writing than the heavy sort of academic research based content that that we put out at Gartner. So talk a bit about that part now because being produces a ton of content as you do too, you have to sort of as you're navigating curated and thinking about where you wanna go with your content, you are picking your slots. You've got a super popular podcast. You're doing a lot of presentations. You're helping facilitating a lot of just thought leadership driven pieces and research. So we do have sort of kindred spirits in terms of that type of putting content out of that type of frenetic pace under our names. What point are you where you're like, okay, but there's something bigger here with this idea that became growth. I q that is a book that is not just necessarily white paper or a presentation. How did you, how did you feel that especially being someone who loves writing? I love to write, so I'm like, oh, book, perfect, locked in a room. I'd love that. How did you? How did you navigate that? It's great question because I'll tell you that what I learned. I was an executive sort of a practitioner sales marketing customer service executive before I joined Gartner and so I didn't have to write, you know, that's not really what we did. Right. And then when I got to Gartner, I had to learn how to take a concept and get it onto paper. And it took me time to figure out first of all to get my sort of sea legs underneath what it even mean. And then a couple of years after that, it's okay. Now I have something I can say a couple years after that now now. Okay. Now I get it now. I'm really gonna start to push the envelope and then sort of my last couple of years. I found my groove in in how to. Use that medium. I e writing research note as a way to lay the foundation by which we could then double click or triple click in person. So it gave me a way to get everyone on the same page. When I walked in the door, we were working from stage four or five, right? And then we can round out what was left versus spending time of me. You know, working my way through of helping us get to the same starting point. And once I saw that actually happened where people would go, I read that note, totally understand. Here's my three questions, and then I realized the power behind that that people who liked to consume the written word. So it helps educate them where they can learn something or get them to think differently. Appreciate the fact that then when they're sitting in front of you or speaking to on the phone that I now want to know very specifically how this would apply to me and you have this very powerful conversation. Once I saw that inaction, then I said, you know. Minus the fact that multiple people were saying you, you're the Mitch, we speak a lot around the world that everyone's like, oh, I've got a book. I've got a book like, you know, in everyone's pictures on the event card is like, here's their has their book. And then it would be me and I had no book people..

Gartner Tom Peters executive Mitch
"gartner" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"gartner" Discussed on WGN Radio

"And he's in a scooter so that gives bill hater an excuse to just bump into stuff and purposely make people laugh he crushes vinet one point he crushes vanessa senor villas senor vs in your against the wall and she's dying she's laughing her head off and the whole thing was about it was it was silly as hell but it was bill and especially strong was sitting on top of him because he they wanted to have a baby and he was ready at that moment so she's sitting on top of a molly smashed into walls and stuff completely absurd next one on the list that he chose is horns i don't agree with this one this is luke no is a new cast member and clearly of the three new cast members the weakest or at least he didn't have a good season i don't you know but they tried to give him a couple of things they gave him a classroom sketch to do and then they gave him this and he played one of those guys who has tattoos and piercings and corns embedded in his head and he wants to have them removed john mullany plays the surgeon who's going to remove the horns heidi gardner comes in as his girlfriend and and is upset because he wants to have his horns removed and it gets more absurd from there it's not very funny howdy gardeners good in it and this is the first time that this man a mentioned patty gardner which for me by far the best thing about this last season was was the debut of hoti gartner gartner is the it's the strongest first season for a cast member maybe ever since the first season when everybody was new she killed every week and she brought in really memorable characters and even when a sketch wasn't funny she was always one of the strongest things about it she is she's only been on the show for one year and she's like my one of my favorite cast my purse and and what what jason number wrote here was that people shouldn't worry that eventually kate mckinnon is going to depart because we got heidi gardner and he's absolutely right next was one of my favorite sketches that's not a lot of people really liked.

bill john mullany heidi gardner patty gardner gartner jason kate mckinnon one year
"gartner" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"gartner" Discussed on WJR 760

"Probably the number one issue that most hr or organizations are dealing with is the is the turnover and we that was not unexpected i mean we know that people been sitting in their jobs for long time as it came out of this recession salaries have been pretty stagnant until just recently and so there's a desire for a new job higher salary in almost to obtain that people are going to have to move companies the third thing is retirements there are sectors and even subsectors in manufacturing were we are an issue but universally it's not thing it's propelling the labor market as for as much as some people might think he says employers are interested in hiring prepared students from all majors and employers are looking for what gartner calls boundary spanning skills more commonly known as soft skills when you focus down on college recruiting in who because who's on campus and have been traditionally on campus yoyo always see the computer science the engineering the accounting in the business but really what we're seeing is again a because of the competitive nature of the labor market the fact that there's probably the supply isn't prepared supply is not as big anymore i mean we've we've reached the supply eliminate campaigns are going to have to one expand their pool and who they consider in that pool and and look at some alternative mater an example would be computer science or it where they think they need a computer science somebody that's into software development hardware development that's not what they really want they really want somebody that can manage content and manipulate web pages and websites and do some basic social media and we have people looking oh i can look over in humanities can come communication arts and things and they fought find those those people with those skills in there and they get kind of excited but it's kinda hard the other thing is though the emphasis is on prepared because the focus is on these broader when i now call boundary spanning skills rather than soft skills eight that's kind of i don't like that term but but soft skills but.

gartner
"gartner" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

WiLD 94.9

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"gartner" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

"Lorde he is the ooh iheartradio music you should know featuring bruno mars with tardy be fidesz sao paulo google the been quite eastern pennekamp found lost up the law that he feels a survey all the total kc abhu not the path of what would thank you yeah hey good there's a reason they will arizona no gartner by the way no i am the suit in hich no mozilla nasa living his here fears way yes way.

Lorde bruno mars arizona
"gartner" Discussed on Movin 92.5

Movin 92.5

02:36 min | 2 years ago

"gartner" Discussed on Movin 92.5

"No gartner and by the way two okay am hedge the is nasa his fears way yes me did did the the sheep the the wait you eighty the this emme the one the no i am before that he had gotten.

gartner
"gartner" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

WiLD 94.9

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"gartner" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

"Quite days pennekamp thrown most up in that please call them feel safe all the time not the top of others five hey good together they were shown that no gartner by the way no i am hich housing and no yes living his day here fears way jim we logitech is the should hich.

logitech
"gartner" Discussed on Movin 92.5

Movin 92.5

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"gartner" Discussed on Movin 92.5

"Gartner the panel by the way a man in the suit hich mozilla nasa living here fee has more she mm david but john showed shoot the hinge the one hugh eighty the is.

david john hugh
"gartner" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

KIIS 102.7

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"gartner" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

"Of nonstop kiss music starts now you're on air with the ryan seacrest sao paulo google three times of the i'd say guiding these pennekamp though both of anathema his mother the field all the void ballots now the controversy jehnny beth are you hey joe goods together they were ours no gartner by the way no the it the suit there hich no no nasa maye his here fears way yes wait.

"gartner" Discussed on WFEB 1340 AM

WFEB 1340 AM

02:47 min | 2 years ago

"gartner" Discussed on WFEB 1340 AM

"Gartner what come on wow by the another two know one come on one one one i don't think they're right away yeah my god oh call them ellen the fact that was one the home mike conley.

mike conley
"gartner" Discussed on KKAT

KKAT

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"gartner" Discussed on KKAT

"And i woke up still allowed then again the internet service and pass away we have an hour to stay i woke up the field on the and then wolf up still on dead yet gartner did not five in attleboro bullying word that people say i woke up the steel not then again the row in the game you got ta go essay pays for kale normal man never ban ki moon not in any way gums still non again today the partying first there was the lost generation then came the greatest generation followed by the silent generation the me generation most of been men generationx now comes the over scheduled overprotected hyperparented generation.

gartner
"gartner" Discussed on WRFR-LP Rockland

WRFR-LP Rockland

03:19 min | 3 years ago

"gartner" Discussed on WRFR-LP Rockland

"Gartner in a tim real she will be boom boom the two two no way yes he is his name the sun had seen sure no really jio need to know after well it's as hungry he is madam third as a mugging jet turned into by the man no and the man maggert who yep joe dedmon be low ustr two sara dallin bam bam yes two skiing gene madison bumgarner in the yes jio asked of ghanaian yes he is gene be back.

Gartner joe dedmon ustr
"gartner" Discussed on REAL 92.3

REAL 92.3

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"gartner" Discussed on REAL 92.3

"Gartner trump try rock it was good perry two ooh i wanna say.

perry
"gartner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:06 min | 3 years ago

"gartner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Gartner no one here turkey right fifty years on the rumors reverberate on thursday the national archives was set to release the last traveled of some three thousand documents about the murder of jfk that president trump held hundreds back for national security review low in the neck six months reportedly cia director mike pump pale pushed for the delay it's just the latest chapter in the mystery of why lee harvey oswald did what he did and whether he did it alone and early chapter was penned just a year after the shooting publication of the findings of a presidential commission known as the warren report there was no evidence found by the promotion that proved day and the either horn or domestic walled active all based on what abbott on we all the commission's methods where flawed hence the enduring effort tough determined investigators amateurs on cranks to fill in the blanks to generate conspiracy theories and to quash them the documents set for release this week had represented that last one percent of the government's record might those have settled the issue further those who have spent decades focused on the fossets of the murder from the grassy knoll to the magic bullet to cuba nath not just because some documents are still being withheld but because it's unlikely anything can ever later rest the suspicions surrounding that day in november 1963 among those long captivated by the case is the journalist essayist and author ron rose i actually attended a lecture by notorious warren commission critic mark elaine the summer after my high school graduation he was the granddaddy of jfk's assassination conspiracy theorists i would say the extreme wearing a you know he did this kind of power point slide show with arrows pointing many directions trying to show that the pictures of oswald work early photo shops now the question is if the bullet hit the present the back of the neck and rip through his adams apple how was it possible of him to say clearly and distinctly not new england accent my got an hit lane pointed out genuine flaws and absences in the warren commission however he soon jump to conclusions that it was the military industrial complex was right wing oil million in airs there were so many people are wanting to kill kennedy there might have been a traffic jam it dearly applause i think everyone agrees that the warren report was deeply flawed at this point the members of the commission who included.

murder jfk president mike pump lee harvey oswald warren abbott mark elaine warren commission cia director cuba ron rose apple kennedy fifty years one percent six months
"gartner" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

103.5 KISS FM

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"gartner" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

"Was number one hit music station persson dealers the garley illness billions dues too de villiers the guardrail myself a els a no he may want no your elbeshir's i left the city hold gartner admits boy oh god got me gun stress izetbegovic says i lived a city bank and dole glasses the ship as wrong was them now used to call me all myself tall dana waging a hey all my cell phone a ma i know no he may want no ever since i lived a city we just don't allow lamy gullit is way ever since i love the city hall pass his aim was god save used to call me all my cell phone leinna away an ghani all cell myself data away i know are you want.

dole lamy gullit gartner
"gartner" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

Power 105.1 FM

02:43 min | 3 years ago

"gartner" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

"Gartner guarded by we go we were there got a rough they said rebels got rebel the footsie straw man the stones firm drought represent yup the morning everybody is bj nv angel ye shall to me the guy we all the breakfast laws happening good morning let's get in some front page news let's talk about what would happen out genius yes heather hair's mother has spoken sees the one who was murdered insurance let's details on the white supremacy in hate groups and this is what he had to say during a powerful speech hermansson brow at a memorial service at the paramount there other heather was a caring and compassionate person so a lot of you and i think the reason that what happened the heather has struck a chord is because we know that what she did is achievable we don't have to die we don't have to sacrifice our lives nice try to kill my child the shudder well guess what you just magnified or wow god bless her the him now have mom also has this to say uh about her daughter's death at least being worth something now because it's the tragic thing is you have questions rather have her daughter here if you're not outraged you're not paying attention and i want you to pay attention find what's wrong don't ignore it don't look the other way you make a point to look at it and say to yourself what can i do to make a difference and that how you're gonna make my child's death worthwhile i'd rather have my child that by golly flag gotta give her a we're going to make it counts while god bless lulu true white allies so white than her mom uses word like by golly in by golly god bless that young lady had the hill katie if you the truth you would be richie died on the right side of history a love everything she stood for now even though she died doing what i keep telling you every good white person should do and as used a white privilege the combat prejudice god bless her and deaf to the white double that killed net spotify in the meantime has pulled the racist hate bandstand near music catalogues even though labour's.

Gartner katie spotify labour heather hair richie
"gartner" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

03:36 min | 3 years ago

"gartner" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"Gartner sure woah congress mart the oregon or owners of zone early mazar room or not now we believe though nonbiding or visuals on unrelated in reality luke oh boy are working among the view however and enrolling was i i don't know how that makes all of you feel in order these beyond anything else it's a letdown it's a disappointment it say frustration it said that there's a certain shock to the system that they really can't be that week that visionless and that bad you know i keep saying the difference between donald trump and the republican party is this and the president went out there hard and he fired back at mcconnell's complaint here and he literally really at high expectations excessive expectations after seven years repeal and replace why isn't it done this president has an identity he has an agenda he's fighting for every day it's not he hasn't varied in his agenda he says he's ready to sign that he wants to keep his promises on everything else he doesn't need help on his keeping them publicans don't what a colossal failure and disappointment news radio 1040 who staying informed thom tillis than the current of the hands being a detains poloto little bit of sports thrown in there for too much lower within the community knowing what's happening in the world around you fit into wrote news in general is what gives you an edge in an everchanging world status the peace me the most at today's telling cbn today on my current event i talk about it just about everything it's in the new send all of that can happen here's what he four twenty four seven news radio 1040 who fox news radio i'm karen mccue more reaction to the president's threat of fire and fury for north korea that contrary jerry state rex tillerson tried to lower the volume by saying that he doesn't believe there is any imminent threat of an attack from north korea but hours after tillerson's comments defense secretary james mattis took the temple back up a notch warning that north korea should stand down because quote allied militaries now possess the most precise were hurst and robust defensive and offensive capabilities on earth fox is trace gallagher the fbi rigs.

Gartner oregon donald trump republican party president mcconnell thom tillis cbn karen mccue north korea rex tillerson defense secretary james mattis fbi seven years
"gartner" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"gartner" Discussed on WDRC

"Britain and originally recorded by brenda holloway here's blood sweat and tears you've made me so very half the big d is back last pablo report gartner benkler for girl butcher's shop just forms joe is you now i an was so much you've done so i'm appalled mary so glad the but cain does the cayman hitter you've got your mouth hugh hewitt show so from jio london.

Britain joe cain jio london brenda holloway pablo gartner mary hugh hewitt