10 Burst results for "Garland Thompson"

"garland thompson" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

07:28 min | 6 months ago

"garland thompson" Discussed on Good Life Project

"The deep into the poverty fast. You i want to explore this the bridge that you took because you you went to school Provide your and and it sounded like when you got out okay. So this is what. I'm going to and you start building a career and you're out there in the world As an artist and also get really interested in history and start going down that rabbit hole towards yep that that ends pretty quickly though. And i guess at this time so much is changing your life. you're having kids. Um you have a son who also is living with downs yet Get exposed to and it. Sounds like was like this season of reckoning reimagine nation and really questioning okay. So what am i really doing. What want to be doing. Yeah that's right and and so those things did happen. Sequentially you remember a pivotal moment for me. As much as i loved making paintings a pivotal moment for me was going to the senior thesis show. A friend is undergraduate and all of her paintings were called journal number one journal number two journal number three. I remember having this strong repulsion response and thinking. I can't make. I can't make sarah's private worlds. I can't build a life on that. i can't. I can't think that art is all about this self expression that lands on the wall and his my private universe i just. That's the strongest memory. I have from that season finishing up. And i think what i didn't know at the time i was very hungry to find a partly collaborative practice but also to find a way that ideas live in things that isn't just dependent on the singular that modernist idea right of the singular artist who has a you know inner weather that then they put out on the canvas and that's kind of the end of that exchange and so i went to graduate school at ucla. I mean i was there for four years did this dissertation research and everything studying intellectual and cultural history. Because i had this hunger to go like well. Why do we assume the things we do. And i was like a philosophy minor. And i was just r- really was hungry for with the legacy and inheritance of ideas and then i started going to conferences in in that and thinking. I don't know that. Want to write papers like is this all. There is and had this nagging feeling and so i would stick stick around for the next milestone and got my master's and then got you know did my oral defense and all that and i remember which the netherlands to do my dissertation research with my husband and i said to him i feel like i want to be like a journalist and a furniture maker like i wish that i could do both ideas but represented in a popular voice but then also see the result of my work and in a weird way. That's exactly what happens if you squint write. This book is written in german listrik form and i do a lot of adaptive kind of furniture and tools in my building process but along the way. It looks really neat. But in fact i became a phd dropout. We did decide that was in my early thirty s. That will let you know. We're open starting family. My first my three children. Graham was born with down's syndrome and that ushered into a whole world of visual culture material artifacts and ideas in stuff meaning prosthetics prosthetic and assistive technology. So all the extended gear and appendages that we use to get our bodies through the world and all the ways that his body was a non normative way trying to make its passage through the world. And that's where the journalists furniture maker the artist and the ideas person that's where i'm making this kaleidoscope thing with my hand. Where all the stuff snaps together. The colors and the shapes snap together. That's where that moment happened where my imagination was so captured and the politics were so urgent you know and that's powerful alloy And long story short than i went back to to get an mfa and landed in engineering school in that middle space of design. But i could not have predicted it at the time and it took walking away from some things and some security in some scary moments. Sure yeah. i'm because you're doing this. You know in the context of your husband's documentary filmmaker which is an amazing career but also not known as most like you don't get a paycheck every day you're raising a family together. Y- you're on. His jeep educational path is like this profound radical shift. And you're taking care of a kid who needs a lot. Yeah it's interesting that you said that you know the politics you are so important yacht but it's not just the politics like this is. This is personal. That's right that is right. that is right. It was our life to you know at feminist. Talk about how you know. The we talk about children as dependents. Maybe we think of our old our aging parents as a different kind of dependent but feminists talk about the derivative dependence that that accrues to apparent meaning. You become dependent upon the state. If you're thinking about your local public schools you you become dependent on the capacity for childcare. If you're going to keep your job you become it's not just your child who enters the world who has needs it is the family ecosystem right of care and mutuality there is a condition of dependence and that is of course the history of the world that is the natural and the human but that derivative dependence helped me think through like. Wow yeah got this child. Who is was so loved and wanted and whose story was being written in those in the physical therapy office. In the doctor's office people could only kinda see that genetic mutation and not the the wonder of the human person and i started to think about what it means for him. To thrive in the future. You know and to be a misfit as rosemarie garland thompson calls it to be misfit in that way is not to be you know a broken body but just to be at odds with the normal functioning of the world. So what is it that needs to change is it. You know additions to the body or is it. The structures of the world itself. I mean that's the the the question that was launched in those early years and so it was very personal right because i am in a an ecosystem of care with my son. That's for the long term right and i. It took me a while to see that. In fact that's a human condition that's a shared node. Actually it is not the same right. Met my if be no counterparts bind. Have children who will launch out of the nest and become economic units and yet we know right that over the span of a life when chronic depression arrives for someone you know in your close circle when parents have needs over the long term in need you know real support that dependence and the derivative dependence like. mean to be academic with the terms. I think they give us something to hold onto. That is that care is part of life right. And and yet so much of the k. Twelve education system so much of the way that we structure jobs the way we talk about mobility and transients in industrial cultures assumes kind of atomised. Self you know an optimizing individual whose needs to be you know nurtured through to that can become that the best self that they can we think at the the individual unit and less in terms of care so right. Those those were the politics was really urgent. I started to see like oh you know in those early years with graham. I would go to go to. You.

Graham ucla netherlands sarah rosemarie garland thompson
"garland thompson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:26 min | 6 months ago

"garland thompson" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Scott Simon. Numbers are huge, almost 88 million Americans have already voted millions more expected to show up the pole up at the polls on Tuesday. This is, of course, been an election unlike any other with a pandemic social unrest hundreds of voting related lawsuits. We're joined by NPR's Pam Fester who covers elections and voting. Pam. Thanks so much for being with us, My Scott and first, let's note this huge turnout. Tell us about some of these very impressive statistics. Yeah, I mean, we've never seen anything like this. I mean, several states have already had more voters cast ballots early than they had during the entire 2016 election. Most of them have voted by mail, but they're also about more than 30. Million people have used in person voting, and we've seen these long lines that voters sometimes have to wait for hours wearing Ask sitting in their lawn chairs, but election officials have been trying to accommodate them as much as possible. And in Harris County, Texas, they even open some holing sites around the clock from Thursday night into Friday. For those who couldn't come during the day. Jen Rice of Houston. Public media talked to some of those voters at one polling site where there was even a couple were in their bathrobes and voter, Kimberly Mayberry said. It was like a party. It is 12 58 almost one o'clock in the morning and I just voted. It's awesome. Everybody's excited. Everybody's taking pictures. I love it. I love it. Yeah. So Scott, Despite all attention, a confusion around the selection. We're seeing a lot of enthusiasm from voters and you know who want to make sure that their votes count. A lot of voters have also faced hurdles to have anything. Definitely Scott. There have been more than 300 lawsuits. This election ah lot of them over how mail in voting will be conducted. Democrats say that because the pandemic, the rules should be loosened with fewer requirements, like witness signatures, But Republicans argue that those restrictions are needed to protect the integrity of the election. And just this week there were several cases involving when absentee ballots have to be received in order to count. Some states allow them to come in a few days after Election Day, as long as they're postmarked by Election Day, the U. S Supreme Court let those rules stand in Pennsylvania and North Carolina, as didn't appeals court in Minnesota. But the courts left open the possibility that the issue could be revisited after Election Day. And one Republican official yesterday said on background quote that If the vote is really close to be frank, these ballots are going to become a point of contention, so we might very well see these results end up in court Pam having covered this beat for a number of months now should voters be concerned about going to the polls in person on election day? Scott. I think for the most part voters going to be just fine. Many election officials say they have enough poll workers to run the polling sites this year. And that's usually not the case, so that should help. There are also more polling sites than we saw in the primaries. Still, we have a pandemic. So voters an election workers have to take extra precautions such a social distance scene and that'll slow things down. There have also been some threats of intimidation of the poles, either by outside agitators or possibly supporters of President Trump, who has been encouraging them repeatedly to go watch the polls for fraud. We didn't see any major disruption so far during early voting, and that's a good sign. But election officials, law enforcement authorities and voting rights group's heir certainly preparing for the possibility and they'll be on the lookout for any signs that voters are being intimidated, which is a federal crime. NPR's Pam Fessler covers elections and voting, Pam Thanks so much. Thank you. All us presidents have been men. Only one major party presidential nominee hasn't been a man. Is NPR's Daniel Kurtz. Leben reports Donald Trump has taken the image of the president as a manly man to new heights with effects that go beyond just trying to appeal to voters. When President Trump was released from the hospital after being treated for cove in 19. He had a prescription for how Americans could handle Corona virus. Don't let it dominate you. Don't be afraid of it The way Trump has sold strength as a key part of fighting. The virus seems to have rubbed off on supporters. Garland Thompson was in the crowd outside Walter Reed Medical Center when Trump left the hospital. I asked him. How worried are you.

President Trump Scott Simon Pam NPR Pam Fester U. S Supreme Court Scott president Pam Fessler Garland Thompson Kimberly Mayberry Walter Reed Medical Center Houston Harris County Jen Rice Daniel Kurtz Texas
"garland thompson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:25 min | 6 months ago

"garland thompson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Scott Simon. Numbers are huge, almost 88 million Americans have already voted millions more expected to show up the pole up at the polls on Tuesday. This is, of course, been an election unlike any other with a pandemic social unrest hundreds of voting related lawsuits. We're joined by NPR's Pam Fester who covers elections and voting, Pam. Thanks so much for being with us, my Scott and first Let's note this huge turnout. Tell us about some of these very impressive statistics. Yeah. I mean, we've never seen anything like this. I mean, several states have already had more voters cast ballots early than they had during the entire 2016 election. Most of them have voted by mail, but they're also about more than 30. Million people have used in person voting, and we've seen these long lines that voters sometimes have to wait for hours wearing masks sitting in their lawn chairs. But election officials have been trying to accommodate them as much as possible. And in Harris County, Texas, they even open some holing sites around the clock from Thursday night into Friday. For those who couldn't come during the day. Jen Rice of Houston, public media talked to some of those voters at one polling site where there was even a couple were in their bathrobes and voter, Kimberly Mayberry said. It was like a party is 12 58 almost one o'clock in the morning and I just voted this awesome. Everybody's excited. Everybody's taking pictures. I love it. I love it. Yeah. So, Scott just vital attention, the confusion around the selection. We're seeing a lot of enthusiasm from voters and you know who want to make sure that their votes count, But a lot of voters have also faced hurdles to have anything. Definitely Scott. There have been more than 300 lawsuits. This election ah lot of them over how mail in voting will be conducted. Democrats say that because the pandemic, the rules should be loosened with fewer requirements, like witness signatures, But Republicans argue that those restrictions are needed to protect the integrity of the election. And just this week there were several cases involving when absentee ballots have to be received in order to count. Some states allow them to come in a few days after Election Day, as long as they're postmarked by Election Day, the U. S Supreme Court let those rules stand in Pennsylvania and North Carolina, as didn't appeals court in Minnesota. But the courts left open the possibility that the issue could be revisited after Election Day. And one Republican official yesterday said on background quote that if the vote is really close to be, frank, these ballots are going to become a point of contention. So we might very well see these Results end up in court Pam having covered this beat for a number of months now should voters be concerned about going to the polls in person on election day? Scott. I think for the most part voters going to be just fine. Many election officials say they have enough poll workers to run the polling sites this year. And that's usually not the case, so that should help. There are also more polling sites that we saw in the primaries. Still, we have a pandemic, so voters on election workers have to take extra precautions such a social distance scene and that'll slow things down. There have also been some threats of intimidation of the poles, either by outside agitators or possibly supporters of President Trump, who has been encouraging them repeatedly to go watch the polls for fraud. We didn't see any major disruption so far during early voting, and that's a good sign. But election officials, law enforcement authorities and voting rights group's heir certainly preparing for the possibility and they'll be on the lookout for any signs that voters are being intimidated. Which is a federal crime. NPR's Pam Fessler covers elections and voting, Pam. Thanks so much. Thank you. All US presidents have been men. Only one major party presidential nominee hasn't been a man. NPR's Daniel Kurtz Leben reports Donald Trump has taken the image of the president is a manly man to new heights with effects that go beyond just trying to appeal to voters. When President Trump was released from the hospital after being treated for cove in 19. He had a prescription for how Americans could handle Corona virus. Don't let it dominate you. Don't be afraid of it The way Trump has sold strength as a key part of fighting. The virus seems to have rubbed off on supporters. Garland Thompson was in the crowd outside Walter Reed Medical Center when Trump left the hospital. I asked him..

President Trump Scott Simon Pam NPR U. S Supreme Court Pam Fester president Pam Fessler Garland Thompson Walter Reed Medical Center Harris County Houston Jen Rice Kimberly Mayberry Texas fraud
"garland thompson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:25 min | 6 months ago

"garland thompson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Scott Simon. Numbers are huge, almost 88 million Americans have already voted millions more expected to show up the pole up at the polls on Tuesday. This is, of course, been an election unlike any other with a pandemic social unrest hundreds of voting related lawsuits. We're joined by NPR's Pam Fester who covers elections and voting. Pam. Thanks so much for being with us, My Scott and first, let's note this huge turnout. Tell us about some of these very impressive statistics. Yeah, I mean, we've never seen anything like this. I mean, several states have already had more voters cast ballots early than they had during the entire 2016 election. Most of them have voted by mail, but they're also about more than 30. Million people have used in person voting, and we've seen these long lines that voters sometimes have to wait for hours wearing Ask sitting in their lawn chairs, but election officials have been trying to accommodate them as much as possible. And in Harris County, Texas, they even open some holing sites around the clock from Thursday night into Friday. For those who couldn't come during the day. Jen Rice of Houston. Public media talked to some of those voters at one polling site where there was even a couple were in their bathrobes and voter, Kimberly Mayberry said. It was like a party. It is 12 58 almost one o'clock in the morning and I just voted. It's awesome. Everybody's excited. Everybody's taking pictures. I love it. I love it. Yeah. So Scott, Despite all attention, a confusion around the selection. We're seeing a lot of enthusiasm from voters and you know who want to make sure that their votes count, But a lot of voters have also faced hurdles to have anything. Definitely Scott. There have been more than 300 lawsuits. This election ah lot of them over how mail in voting will be conducted. Democrats say that because the pandemic, the rules should be loosened with fewer requirements, like witness signatures, But Republicans argue that those restrictions are needed to protect the integrity of the election. And just this week there were several cases involving when absentee ballots have to be received in order to count. Some states allow them to come in a few days after Election Day, as long as they're postmarked by Election Day, the U. S Supreme Court let those rules stand in Pennsylvania and North Carolina, as didn't appeals court in Minnesota. But the courts left open the possibility that the issue could be revisited after Election Day. And one Republican official yesterday said on background quote that If the vote is really close to be frank, these ballots are going to become a point of contention, so we might very well see these results end up in court Pam having covered this beat for a number of months now should voters be concerned about going to the polls in person on election day? Scott. I think for the most part voters going to be just fine. Many election officials say they have enough poll workers to run the polling sites this year. And that's usually not the case, so that should help. There are also more polling sites than we saw in the primaries. I'm still we have a pandemic, so voters an election workers have to take extra precautions such a social distance scene. And that'll slow things down. There have also been some threats of intimidation of the poles, either by outside agitators or possibly supporters of President Trump, who has been encouraging them repeatedly to go watch the polls for fraud. We didn't see any major disruption so far during early voting, and that's a good sign. But election officials, law enforcement authorities and voting rights group's heir certainly preparing for the possibility and they'll be on the lookout for any signs that voters are being intimidated, which is a federal crime. NPR's Pam Fessler covers elections and voting, Pam Thanks so much. Thank you. All us presidents have been men. Only one major party presidential nominee hasn't been a man. As NPR's Daniel Kurtz Leben reports, Donald Trump has taken the image of the president as a manly man to new heights with effects that go beyond just trying to appeal to voters. When President Trump was released from the hospital after being treated for cove in 19. He had a prescription for how Americans could handle Corona virus. Don't let it dominate you. Don't be afraid of it The way Trump has sold strength as a key part of fighting. The virus seems to have rubbed off on supporters. Garland Thompson was in the crowd outside Walter Reed Medical Center when Trump left the hospital. I asked.

President Trump Scott Simon Pam NPR Pam Fester U. S Supreme Court Scott president Pam Fessler Kimberly Mayberry Walter Reed Medical Center Houston Harris County Jen Rice Garland Thompson Texas fraud
"garland thompson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:25 min | 6 months ago

"garland thompson" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Scott Simon. Numbers are huge, almost 88 million Americans have already voted millions more expected to show up the pole up at the polls on Tuesday. This is, of course, been an election unlike any other with a pandemic social unrest hundreds of voting related lawsuits. We're joined by NPR's Pam Fester who covers elections and voting. Sam. Thanks so much for being with us, My Scott and first, let's note this huge turnout. Tell us about some of these very impressive statistics. Yeah, I mean, we've never seen anything like this. I mean, several states have already had more voters cast ballots early than they had during the entire 2016 election. Most of them have voted by mail, but they're also about more than 30. Million people have used in person voting, and we've seen these long lines that voters sometimes have to wait for hours wearing Ask sitting in their lawn chairs, but election officials have been trying to accommodate them as much as possible. And in Harris County, Texas, they even open some holing sites around the clock from Thursday night into Friday. For those who couldn't come during the day, Jen Rice of Houston public media talked to some of those voters at one polling site where there was even a couple were in their bathrobes. And voter, Kimberly Mayberry said. It was like a party. It is 12 58 almost one o'clock in the morning and I just voted. It's awesome. Everybody's excited. Everybody's taking pictures. I love it. I love it. Yeah. So Scott, just vital attention a confusion around the selection. We're seeing a lot of enthusiasm from voters and you know who want to make sure that their votes count. A lot of voters have also faced hurdles to have anything. Definitely Scott. There have been more than 300 lawsuits. This election ah lot of them over how mail in voting will be conducted. Democrats say that because the pandemic, the rules should be loosened with fewer requirements, like witness signatures, But Republicans argue that those restrictions are needed to protect the integrity of the election. And just this week there were several cases involving when absentee ballots have to be received in order to count. Some states allow them to come in a few days after Election Day, as long as they're postmarked by Election Day, the U. S Supreme Court let those rules stand in Pennsylvania and North Carolina, as didn't appeals court in Minnesota. But the courts left open the possibility that the issue could be revisited after Election Day. And one Republican official yesterday said on background quote that If the vote is really close to be frank, these ballots are going to become a point of contention, so we might very well see these results end up in court Pam having covered this beat for a number of months now should voters be concerned about going to the polls in person on election day? Scott. I think for the most part voters going to be just fine. Many election officials say they have enough poll workers to run the polling sites this year. And that's usually not the case, so that should help. There are also more polling sites than we saw in the primaries. Still, we have a pandemic. So voters an election workers have to take extra precautions such a social distance scene and that'll slow things down. There have also been some threats of intimidation of the poles, either by outside agitators or possibly supporters of President Trump, who has been encouraging them repeatedly to go watch the polls for fraud. We didn't see any major disruption so far during early voting, and that's a good sign. But election officials, law enforcement authorities and voting rights group's heir certainly preparing for the possibility and they'll be on the lookout for any signs that voters are being intimidated. Which is a federal crime. NPR's Pam Fessler covers elections and voting, Pam. Thanks so much. Thank you. All US presidents have been men. Only one major party presidential nominee hasn't been a man. Is NPR's Daniel Kurtz. Leben reports Donald Trump has taken the image of the president as a manly man to new heights with effects that go beyond just trying to appeal to voters. When President Trump was released from the hospital after being treated for cove in 19. He had a prescription for how Americans could handle Corona virus. Don't let it dominate you. Don't be afraid of it The way Trump has sold strength as a key part of fighting. The virus seems to have rubbed off on supporters. Garland Thompson was in the crowd outside Walter Reed Medical Center when Trump left the hospital. I asked.

President Trump Scott Simon NPR U. S Supreme Court Pam Fester Pam Scott president Sam Kimberly Mayberry Pam Fessler Walter Reed Medical Center Houston Harris County Jen Rice Daniel Kurtz Garland Thompson
"garland thompson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:28 min | 6 months ago

"garland thompson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Good morning. The time is 6 21. This is weekend edition from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Numbers are huge, almost 88 million Americans have already voted millions more expected to show up the pole up at the polls on Tuesday. This is of course, been an election, unlike any other with a pandemic social unrest Hundreds of voting related lawsuits. We're joined by NPR's Pam Fester who covers elections and voting, Pam. Thanks so much for being with us, my Scott and first let's note this huge turnout. Tell us about some of these very impressive statistics. Yeah, we've never seen anything like this. I mean, several states have already had more voters cast ballots early than they had during the entire 2016 election. Most of them have voted by mail, but they're also more than 30. Million people have used in person voting, and we've seen these long lines that voters sometimes have to wait for hours wearing masks sitting in their lawn chairs, but election officials have been trying to accommodate them as much as possible. And in Harris County, Texas, they even open some holing sites around the clock from Thursday night into Friday. For those who couldn't come during the day. Jen Rice of Houston public media talked to some of those voters at one polling site where there was even a couple were in their bathrobes and voter, Kimberly Mayberry said. It was like a party is 12 58 almost one o'clock in the morning and I just voted this awesome. Everybody's excited. Everybody's taking pictures. I love it. I love it. Yeah. So Scott just vital attention to confusion around the selection. We're seeing a lot of enthusiasm from voters and you know who want to make sure that their votes count, But a lot of voters have also faced hurdles to have anything. Definitely Scott. There have been more than 300 lawsuits. This election ah lot of them over how mail in voting will be conducted. Democrats say that because the pandemic, the rules should be loosened with fewer requirements, like witness signatures, But Republicans argue that those restrictions are needed to protect the integrity of the election. And just this week there were several cases involving when absentee ballots have to be received in order to count. Some states allow them to come in a few days after Election Day, as long as they're postmarked by Election Day, the U. S Supreme Court let those rules stand in Pennsylvania and North Carolina, as didn't appeals court in Minnesota. But the courts left open the possibility that the issue could be revisited after Election Day. And one Republican official yesterday said on background quote that if the vote is really close to be frank, these ballots are going to become a point of contention. So we might very well see these results end up in court. Pam having covered this beat for a number of months now should voters be concerned about going to the polls in person on Election day? Scott. I think for the most part voters going to be just fine. Many election officials say they have enough poll workers to run the polling sites this year. And that's usually not the case, so that should help. There are also more polling sites than we saw in the primaries. I'm still we have a pandemic, so voters on election workers have to take extra precautions such a social distance scene and that'll slow things down. There have also been some threats of intimidation of the poles, either by outside agitators or possibly supporters of President Trump, who has been encouraging them repeatedly to go watch the polls for fraud. We didn't see any major disruption so far during early voting, and that's a good sign. But election officials, law enforcement authorities and voting rights group's heir certainly preparing for the possibility and they'll be on the lookout for any signs that voters are being intimidated, which is a federal crime. NPR's Pam Fessler covers elections and voting, Pam Thanks so much. Thank you. All US presidents have been men on Ly one Major party presidential nominee hasn't been a man. NPR's Daniel Kurtz. Leben reports, Donald Trump has taken the image of the president as a manly man. To new heights with effects that go beyond just trying to appeal to voters. When President Trump was released from the hospital after being treated for cove in 19. He had a prescription for how Americans could handle Corona virus. Don't let it dominate you. Don't be afraid of it The way Trump has sold strength as a key part of fighting. The virus seems to have rubbed off on supporters. Garland Thompson was in the crowd outside Walter Reed Medical Center when Trump left the hospital. I.

Scott Simon President Trump Pam NPR U. S Supreme Court NPR News Pam Fester president Pam Fessler Walter Reed Medical Center Harris County Houston Jen Rice Kimberly Mayberry Daniel Kurtz Garland Thompson Texas
"garland thompson" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

13:07 min | 1 year ago

"garland thompson" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Details Michael yeah they will the one thing about that is the deadline was supposed to be this week for anybody who's interested but we've extended the deadline out until January third so if anybody is still interested in getting involved in that and be taking part is as as a speaker we are taking everything up until January third all right so in the studio with us is our good friend best Haller who is PhD and she is a professor of journalism new media and the graduate your rector of communication management and masters program Alitalia in university and and that's part of the department of mass communication and it's always wonderful to have you in thanks for coming in tonight thanks for having me and the you know I was I was looking through everything and you're one of our probably most of visited guests and that's that's it's always great to have you in because we always have these very great conversations about everything all all things media and disability and so we eat couple things that you that you aren't we that you've done in the past where you did the by lines of co pilot of hope at live which is a a book of ratings by Helen Keller was was very good and and also I want to thank you so much and you can ask Lou this you're you're representing disability and enables world has saved my **** so many times and the Sunday night when I was looking for a great little stories to bring in here with regards to disability so your Facebook group on that and the book has also just been it's it's a wealth of information and it's it's it's something that I really think is is fantastic because it kind of keeps everybody up to date with what's going on in the disability world and I want to really thank you for what you do with that you're welcome and also I think what's really great is just we see I go on the social media and I see this constant stream of disability stories now I really think we've kind of hit this point where there's just lots and lots of good content out there both being news being covered and entertainment media that kind of thing so hope that momentum keeps going yeah it's it seems as though has really kind of started snowballing over the last two or three years there is a lot of information that's out there in in each you see The New York Times and a lot of big time publications that are starting to come up with some great disabilities stories there's no book actually out about it's all the essays they were doing weekly essay from disable people for over a year and so one of the disability studies professors rose Marie garland Thompson contact the New York times and said that should be a book so the book came out month or so ago and so it's kind of like a bunch of the essays all in one place so you don't have to go find them and it's all voices of disabled people about a variety of topics and so you know The New York Times I don't think realized how much this was needed and they keep publishing these essays because they keep getting great essays so yeah what's the what's the name of the book about us about us okay let's get to know how to check that out as well speaking of books you are involved again in and this time it was you were co editor on a new a new book that just came out right yes rhet which companion on disability and media so two other editors three other editors actually in Australia and I and so has chapters from all around the world activists scholars all about disability media ranges from the movie the sessions to Paralympics to authentic representation I have a chapter about historic political cartoons that use disability and kind of a narrative troponin there cartoons so just a variety of things about lots of different countries articles about our chapters about Nigeria and the news about disability there or South Africa and assistive technology so I think it's been a real good addition to a lot of hopefully university libraries and libraries around the world really wonder what's going on with me and disability worldwide so is it more of a reference book for four at universities in the kind of thing or well I mean you can buy it if you want I suppose it's kind of expensive I saw how expensive so we're trying to get people to get it into their college and university and local libraries because that way a lot of people go and it's gonna be an ebook form too so it's also an accessible format so is it possible you think to get that on two books share as well it sucks yeah just go requested okay it's amazing what gets you know put on the books here so I know I my disability enables world is on there yeah I've I've seen some really crazy things on there and then I wondered why can't find other things right but some of it is that that's a great service but yeah that's that's really really interesting and you know just kind of ties right into the fact you know what we were just talking about as how on you know how it just seems to be in a very prominent in a lot of headlines as well and so let's let's talk a little bit about Hollywood here is is some is Hollywood making any headway on closing this gap about now hiring disabled actors I think television yes film no and I think it's the difference in the kind of business models I mean television they can do a kind of right the ship in a different way if they even I mean they've done it with non disabled actors you know like suddenly that person didn't test very well in the pilot episode she's out a new person comes into play the mom or whatever reason they can just take story lines different directions based on the popularity that they're having you know because they're not they're producing the shows just a few weeks in advance of them airing for broadcast television in film is just such a long process from the idea to the years it takes to get it green left and then to find people to be in the film and then to get it may so you know certain things knock around Hollywood for ever as a film but television I think it's just becoming so there's also somebody straining formats and film it hasn't gotten you know we saw the controversy over the Irishman wanting to stream and be in theaters so I think television has a lot more flexibility with Netflix and Hulu and apple plus like apple plus you know now has the apple TV plus has a show called see that their original show that everybody in this is supposed to be about Cup a couple of hundred years past from the twenty first century and some viruses wiped out the population of the earth and everybody left as blind and so they have very interesting concept were every I mean there are enough blind people to play all those I have a blindness expert consultant on set and I was reading article about him I forget his name choose something and anyway he you know they ask about for plot points you know what will be the the best way to like in the fight or distract true somebody that you're fighting with something like that because it's very even though it's a hundred years several hundred years past the twenty first century they're kind of like and primitive style life and has only two million people left on the planet earth but anyway it's kind of like kind of like we're planning to the school yeah yeah that kind of the first thing where you needed they destroyed and test everybody went back to wearing one Clawson right so they know they have and then I guess the whole major plot point that starts the series is these twins are born and one of them has site and so this is if you speak about site it's heresy in this world so you know it's kind of interesting concept of saw saw the pilot episode and it's not my Cup of tea just because I don't like primitive should but what was really interesting it was so visual and and it got me thinking like so are all the because I watch it on my phone and like sorely captioning all these new streaming services are they having video description I know the show that we're gonna talk about in the dark this on the CW that was the first time they did anything with with regards to description right but the because there it's it's a C. B. C. B. S. I guess on CW but apparently they weren't having the audio description because I read article by a blind journalist who said he was already to watch this new show and there was no audio description on it so interesting in the person who is a consultant for that show is a blind woman who works for a guide dog school and I guess apparently she gave some talk with the CW some kind of event and they found out that she worked with his guide dog school and that's what gave them the idea to set in the dark kind of in a blind person's guide her parents run this guide dog school and the woman who plays obviously the main character there's been a lot of controversy because she's not blind it is also interesting thing because he's a very unlikable character yelling you know it's going to get into this now since since we've gone down this rabbit hole yeah is it I think when he was with the Maxfield that field and the other was it was a big controversy with regards to you in why didn't they hire a blind person to play this part and yeah the same they said that they contacted twenty different blindness organizations they did audition a ton of blind actors they did hire a blind actor to play this teen girl they actually came to her school blind school in Canada and they were looking to hire people so they auditioned her and she got the job was at the girl that played Khloe Khloe okay I think she does a great job there are like problems with you know me I think the character is supposed to be so unlikeable of people are complaining like I don't like the way she treats are guide dog she's supposed to be means so why was she treat anything nice well she's the she's a promiscuous drunk what you'd expect right of it and it the interesting thing too is the fact that in the it was it was renewed for a second season so I kind of had to be the way that they must of known they're getting renewed because they really left on a major cliffhanger because I happen to binge watch the holes season last week couple of last couple days and I think she does a pretty decent job which is a good actor the one who plays the main character it got me thinking also about if they had hired a blind person you know they basically have to carry the show and so that's a lot of burden to put on someone's shoulders if they haven't had a long run as a actor before I mean it's kind of like a chicken and egg thing people need to get the opportunity so they can get the experience but if they have no experience very little experience as a blind actor are they gonna be able to carry a show and what if they fail is that gonna be worse than if the show tanks because a blind actor does a bad job as I can be worse than having a sighted actor who's gets the show renewed for second season right a list we have to take a quick break when we come back I want to talk a little bit about we can finish up on in the dark in also you you opened my eyes up to raising Dion so great is which is really great I I'm I was like I don't I just finished the second episode I can't wait to get out of here get into the next one because it is so good and we'll talk about one of the actresses in there who is who has a disability who is absolutely adorable right so we're talking with that Haller and we're and we're going to talk with no here live in a little bit as well so let's take a quick break we'll be right back I hope the Maryland center.

Michael Haller professor of journalism hundred years three years
"garland thompson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"garland thompson" Discussed on KCRW

"President's women a detailed account of trump's history with women from his youth to the presidency including forty three new allegations of sexual misconduct all the president's women book dot com and divide bared more than investment professionals for one hundred years Baird is partnered with individuals businesses institutions and communities working together toward their financial goals more information is available at bed one hundred dot com you're listening to the daily distributed by American public media support comes from UCLA where in honor of the university's centennial UCLA arts invites you into the classroom for ten questions an innovative public forum shaping the future on Tuesday November fifth designer and artist Rebecca Mendez bioethicist in disability justice scholar rose Marie garland Thompson and botanist Evan Meyer explore the question what is nature don't miss this opportunity to become a student again R. S. V. P. now at arts dot UCLA dot EDU slash ten questions I'm sherry Glaser on the next morning edition the house of representatives is getting ready to vote on a resolution laying out the next steps in the impeachment inquiry a look at why the democratic majority is bringing the issue up for a vote now plus the latest on the wildfires across southern California and the powerful Santa Ana winds helping to drive them angel take a deep dive into the backstory of zombies and find out why we're so obsessed with them that's on the next morning edition here on KCRW and.

"garland thompson" Discussed on VS

VS

16:36 min | 1 year ago

"garland thompson" Discussed on VS

"On the parameter so you found ways. It's a wonderful well then to just stay visit. Yeah we got to overlap summit the vermont studio center last summer two summers ago something i think that <hes> in twenty percents sometimes injury previous now and i remember you giving me some advice about navigating sort of strangeness in the poems like how to tether certain parts of the poems in order to allow for strangeness to happen in other parts and i think this is something that was on my mind so much as i was reading the collection of how you navigate the <hes> stranger moments in language george while keeping it so readable i guess <hes> legible throughout and not allowing that strangeness to keep the reader away. Can you talk about how you navigate strangeness and here you know sexual quieter from you to talk about about my own work talked about other push. It would be easier yeah but let me explain why it's hard for me to talk with my own worth. Let me talk about that. Pose a lotta emily dickenson or many other words. You can see how they create read their own language in my experience. It's exactly the opposite because i'm not a native speaker. I'm walton strangeness and my actual show job is to make the ball because if he wants to engineer service is gonna be strange though my job is to make those <hes> <hes> johnson but maybe if i just to make sense to actually honestly quick question if you talk about a great strange foyt after engineers emily dickinson you realize that shoes meeting up inlet landless accordion to confirm and she teach you you how to speak english language or gordon dickinson and then using coca and devices issues and then you realize while should only have <hes> ooh i don't know no more than five devices shoes then you start in the bologna tradition oh what about wedeman and she probably half and half you undivided that you like about this great dugway poured and then you then co ever since the tommy schools at newton evanston has actually just propaganda reports nowhere fusing really really deeply in two thousand since like the way you'd maneuvers enough for everybody knows but close the side of bench for the rest of the syntax and you realize file together gordon live from the oprah dickinson. Everybody's gonna talk starts in the buzzer debt. Of course a dash is of course also very deny survive when you must expect it and usually literally happens to have an idea to bring it to you to unionize you the music so in that silence you get hurt but i wanna talk about metaphors modify some seemingly isn't they should think about over the single most memorable line that you have from the boss to the logged gun without that particular divide there would be no emily dickinson was ever so stewart genius for her existence those device in the way you can argue the damage was the first american syria lists. You know what i'm saying. <hes> to engineers really has to do is what you find for <hes> um but it is a lot easier to talk but other polka fabulous jerry in that case so you know you talked about how for you. The project is to move from the strangeness into something that can translate for a reader. What does that process look like. Oh i just follows all of the joy ride a lot for what actually work and so i have a lot of boxes of lung bills that i hope is but that is just a building material published many books fitted but what's the point. I'm waiting eighteen until i have emotions or any kind of states of minds. Beachside language has more fresh <hes> <hes> and that kind of i hope for your question when you combine emotion and vote clarity visa language satisfation hopefully stange stern jr. You have the little marriage. Hopefully they make a baby shower above so i'm wondering we're talking about. Strangeness and i'm i want to jump back to something for any was asking earlier. I think it was about the city that is involved in the book and i want to ask about the relationship between location and strangeness in your work location yeah in place because when i think about your questions right i think differ public dancing in odessa both collections are so centralized in what land and what place clayson with city community means people does being tethered to a location give you permission to be stranger in language or is there anything about the lands in which you're writing that you find your or that your existing in that you're able to cold the strangeness of those places into your homes. You kind of told them about different kinds of forms you create a formative issue but whatever it is you make another to make soap union a union fan yes true but it can also be a person you can also do. A character could also be a breyer established is that you talk to god and then you can say whatever that you want to say. Oh don't want you to have some kind of <hes> view the radios as your who knows on bulletin from a point upon that breach but what you're breaches made out of what kind of weather what kind of human vote in kind have cat voted on that bridge. She's totally up to begin the real locations you use a stanch place for former me your society for a number of reasons but i'll talk about to number one <hes> the russian lumber spokesman yasser completely not likes watching lund but spoken in moscow russia is because it has really truly the only international place in the country. It was warm support so there's a lot the view of ukrainians bulgarians moldovans greeks and many other humans leaving at city that do not leave say in moscow use a laboratory. I battle even big cities so the language was extremely different. People brought their own speech and met the russian you much <music> formulas extremely liberated. I remember whether finding the book by isaac babel addressed writer opening the kitchen table and i was terrible both students and a fifth grade school the country is falling apart forget about the country defying the party's just smoke cigarettes and and <hes> finding isaac bubbles boop and if they will invention of this is how maman that's fake ones. I make dinner not how how might teach us fixing school. That's not how people spend t._v. And i didn't do the little shows yearly alive near an immediate and i'm making a moment that's stain down that is i support the way of village of the language and location by the second than would be san diego elliott but were just moving away from it. We soon entirely movin. Boarder changes changes all the time. I wanna i had students limited. Johanna commuters like i actually had a bad ones students. The the bad was for mutable walkout unabridged by ford to mexica took about the train gone. The like a regular public transferred you get out you can celebrate your mexican great. You buy ice cream back. Welcome back about four <hes>. Uh has you know there's your line of people but whether it's amazing this is not an aligned. He's alive the life of sewn phone. People are children foods their story as the big city in other people's shoes them before you know what i mean. There's even wanted to write a play about the lion will happen but it's still in my head. What is the language of that is definitely allegation and then thought into students who you have some of their families not legal in this country allied delivered here for generations and border move back and forth but few here the board is moving through us so what are the language for that also yields because i'm not going to have them in the book but those were experiences because of my life <hes> while the book was leading. I want to ask about the role of hope and the role of resistance in this book as a fable of people who are experiencing the invasion of their town and and the like a military presence. Do you consider this. A hopeful buck is a difficult question. <hes> i'll tell you about personal done more. The wetlands dourson asked him because maybe even more important college regions of book by <hes> of women name. It was a garland thompson who is great disability skyla <hes> who in her book and professors disabilities taylor talk about it shouldn't in this country in the united states should move from zero of the hospital does political minority and and that really made meals differently about millions. I think it's a great statement which is a great color and disability doesn't just apply to me as a fume burson it applies to every human has this country who doesn't have health insurance some of hospital to the rim of political minority not then the question for each one of us now okay so that is a very personal kind of <hes> moron elite level breath. I want you to turn the both and to make toughness into positive change but i'm also writer on on a half dollars. The fact that human beings deeply flawed and so the end of book of not exactly happy and if i made happy i would <unk> divided propaganda <hes> you hope maybe i hope so but i don't want to be <hes> standing here and saying the other hope because look around us too late empire and it's not a happy place and he's getting progressively uh more dangerous <hes> the lawyers dole was being fake in this country but now does is openly effect. What are your obsessions. The your europe so you wanna talk about it. Okay cool. This is is your podcast now. What our sessions right now you'll brooklyn both exactly the same time i believe in with so i would love to know what a europe searching settlement <hes> triggering question right now for me i just finished my next book and that was so turned in the final draft the other night that was so obsessed with friendship and intimacy and really exploring <hes> not only the texture of intimacy between people what friendship does so the self as a saving grace and i think you know a lot of that collection. That was the later part of the election. It also very much deals with how class and race affect intimacy how illness affects the body a good friend of mine committed suicide and so a big seed of the book was trying to write my way through grieving him and also like being a person who's dealt with suicidal thoughts just what that meant to have it as close in near the frame but right now. I feel obsession lists in poems a little bit and i'm a little worried about that because i've never not had a thing to work on of always kind of had the next thing right there as i i was finishing up the thing before and now i've been writing poems a little bit. Maybe i'm obsessed with like prose poems those offer <hes> in terms of you know what it somebody say the tyranny of the lion. I forget who credit to somebody. Putting the line side has been offering me something but i feel like my looking has really fought flat. I think with each book or each poem. Maybe we should've are teaching of ourselves to see again or you know how take in the world man analysis early site dependent but but i don't know how to see right now. I'm trying to find that and i'm trying. I'm hoping to take a little bit of time away from writing. I don't know how to see yeah but are you enjoying the most. It's not poetry right now. You know i love it. You know like i feel like i've heard a lot of poems written a lot of poems i like stories and nature and having like low stakes conversations with my mom and my grandma returning the monday miss it's i guess and i'm like that right now and i'm trying to give myself space to not be a poet. A little bit <hes> and to not have to pose is is the world i've had a friend once said the hardest form to ride over things to write about just sitting on a chair. That's it makes good boy. You really are told about the challenge and i think it's it's also a challenge. Maybe fighting a little bit less poetry more the career. You're of the poet. Is i feel like what i'm pushing up against right now. Is this sort of need to answer. What are you working on. What are you thinking about and i'm out of time. We're like i think i'm thinking about a lot of internal work. <hes> a lot of other things that you know i don't know if the largest job in my life right now is to be a poet and i'm glad to you know i still go out and do the readings i teach and that's a particular kind of joy rights. I guess maybe some of it is less so about the sessions of my own work and trying to figure out how to help my students unlock their obsessions and really start to take more risk inside of the work but for me right now i feel like for the last couple of years i feel like poet was like sort of like my like number one or number two jobs of what i was in the world. Maybe not even in the top ten right now. I'm not really supposed to be a poet. At this moment. Freak you out scares. The living shit the good i mean you're supposed to go hide <hes> that the beauty of blazes like where we are right now. It'd be making then that we're supposed to have a lot more community in a lot more corporate but you community. You're always going to be like five ten. People and <hes> ninety nine percent is being far over hiding in a book. Tom <hes> <hes> thank you for being honest obsessions ngos sessions enjoys. You know i also feel slightly slightly in orbit right now. I think you know my book is about to be in the world. It's newly in the world but it's been finished for a while. You know we know the gap between finishing the book and and then other people being allowed to start encountering and and so that like we are time displacement and and at the same time. I feel that i'm i'm not done thinking about about the book or i'm not done thinking about the poems i'm not done thinking about the seams of the <hes> of the book so technology and about being a soft organic feeling thing and what that has to do with the various technologies analogies of america and of.

emily dickenson united states gordon dickinson writer europe vermont studio center isaac babel odessa oprah dickinson george engineer san diego newton evanston johnson breyer moscow russia Tom
"garland thompson" Discussed on VS

VS

11:40 min | 1 year ago

"garland thompson" Discussed on VS

"Because of my life <hes> while the book was leading. I want to ask about the role of hope and the role of resistance in this book as a fable of people who are experiencing the invasion of their town and and the like a military presence. Do you consider this. A hopeful buck is a difficult question. <hes> i'll tell you about personal done more. The wetlands dourson asked him because maybe even more important college regions of book by <hes> of women name. It was a garland thompson who is great disability skyla <hes> who in her book and prefaces disabilities taylor talk about it shouldn't in this country in the united states should move from zero of the hospital does political minority and and that really made meals differently about millions. I think it's a great statement which is a great color and disability doesn't just apply to me as a fume burson it applies to every human has this country who doesn't have health insurance some of hospital to the rim of political minority not then the question for each one of us now okay so that is a very personal kind of <hes> more on literary level breath. I want you to turn the both and to make toughness into positive change but i'm also writer on on a half dollars. The fact that human beings deeply flawed and so the end of book of not exactly happy and if i made happy i would <unk> divided propaganda <hes> you hope maybe i hope so but i don't want to be <hes> standing here and saying this whole because look around us too late empire and it's not a happy place and he's getting progressively uh more dangerous <hes> the lois dole was being fake in this conflict but now it it was open. What are your obsessions. The your europe so you wanna talk about it. Okay cool. This is is your podcast now. What our sessions right now you'll brooklyn both you'll even in exactly the same time i believe in with so i would love to know what a europe searching settlement <hes> triggering question right now for me i just finished my next book and that was so turned in the final draft the other night that was so obsessed with friendship and intimacy and really exploring <hes> not only the texture of intimacy between people what friendship does so the self as a saving grace and i think you know a lot of that collection. That was the later part of the election. It also very much deals with how class and race effect intimacy how illness affects the body a good friend of mine committed suicide and so a big seed of the book was trying to write my way through grieving him and also like being a person who's dealt with suicidal thoughts just what that meant to have it as close in near the frame but right now i feel obsession lists in poems a little bit and i'm a little worried about that because i've never not had a thing to work on of always kind of had the next thing right there as i i was finishing up the thing before and now i've been writing poems a little bit. Maybe i'm obsessed with like prose poems those offer <hes> in terms of you know what it somebody say the tyranny of the lion. I forget who credit to somebody putting the line aside has been offering me something but i feel like my looking has really fought flat <unk> i with each book or each poem. Maybe we should've are teaching of ourselves to see again or you know how take in the world man analysis early site dependent but but i don't know how to see right now. I'm trying to find that and i'm trying. I'm hoping to take a little bit of time away from writing. I don't know how to see yeah but are you enjoying the most. It's not poetry right now. You know i love it. You know like i feel like i've heard a lot of poems written a lot of poems i like stories and nature and having like low stakes conversations with my mom and my grandma and sort of returning the monday miss it's i guess and i'm like that right now and i'm trying to give myself space to not be a poet. A little bit <hes> and to not have to pose is is the world i've had a friend once said the hardest form to ride over things to write about just sitting on a chair. That's it makes good boy. You really are told about the challenge and i think it's it's also a challenge. Maybe fighting a little bit less poetry more the career. You're of the poet. Is i feel like what i'm pushing up against right now. Is this sort of need to answer. What are you working on. What are you thinking about and i'm out of time. We're like i think i'm thinking about a lot of internal work. <hes> a lot of other things that you know i don't know if the largest job in my life right now is to be a poet and i'm glad to you know i still go out and do the readings i teach and that's a particular kind of joy rights. I guess maybe some of it is less so about the sessions of my own work and trying to figure out how to help my students unlock their obsessions and really start to take more risk inside of the work but for me right now i feel like for the last couple of years i feel like poet was like sort of like my like number one or number two jobs of what i was in the world. Maybe not even in the top ten right now. I'm not really supposed to be a poet. At this moment. Freak you out scares. The living shit the good i mean you're supposed to go hide <hes> that the beauty of blazes like where we are right now. It'd be making then that we're supposed to have a lot more community in a lot more corporate but you community. You're always going to be like five ten. People and <hes> ninety nine percent is being far over hiding in a book thought in tacoma <hes> <hes> thank you for being honest obsessions ngos sessions enjoys you know i also feel slightly slightly in orbit right now. I think you know my book is about to be in the world. It's newly in the world but it's been finished for a while. You know we know the gap between finishing the book and and then other people being allowed to start encountering and and so that like we are time displacement and and at the same time. I feel that i'm i'm not done thinking about about the book or i'm not done thinking about the poems i'm not done thinking about the themes of the <hes> of the book so technology and about being a soft organic feeling thing and what that has to do with the various technologies analogies of america and of our bodies etcetera and so i've been sort of like wrestling with fat what to do with that feeling unfinished and i think the solution that i've come to is by writing the poems even if i don't think that they'll be in a book or you know since apparently this book is finished and also trying to wrestle with those themes in other mediums so also i've been like writing more pros more essays specifically and then a few like a little bit a fiction here and there although fiction it's so hard and i can't i really struggle with fiction and then also some visual things it's also been adapting the poems that are in the book into different mediums to share them with the world and i think that's been a good way to allow me to keep working on it. Even it's been printed and maybe that has to do with the fact that like a lot of my work hours right now are having to do with like telling people that the book exists in like talking about where i'm going to be reading it and going out there and reading it. You know so i have. I'm i'm in that mindset <hes> so i'm trying to figure out how to use that mindset in a kind of like creative artistic way. I don't know what shape it'll it'll be but i think the next project is going to be about. I haven't actually written a lot in these last last two books about korea and about <hes> the division of korea and what that does for my identity and so that's been what all of my new poems basically gli have been about. It's been about korea and my grandma korea. My grandma yeah some kind of career exactly yeah yeah her korea. Korea is the one that i'm interested in. Oh that's title her career as a title yeah. It's really beautiful as good sonics are korea but but yeah i love the rhythm of titles yeah. Blood percussion is still one of my favorite ones. Even it's nate marshalls chat book. It was a chap book but blood percussion. Shen rhythmically is like what are the best titles yeah <hes>. We wanted to ask you about your role. In the world of poetry knocked somehow one. That's not true please just as a writer of poems but also as a an editor and a teacher of poems and a champion <music> of poetry which i think that you really are a cheerleader for poetry. I conversation yesterday number of poets who are a little bit of my age or a little older and we were actually thought about you. Guys your generation. Yes you know mine way hi. You guys have a community. I never really knew them. Say i want to law school work in public dirt and i've got great dunes however however i always in the back of my heart father little newly <hes> like i don't have a community that i can call in the middle of the night underside phone to have some could france but i'm a favor you kind of diffuses structure of leaving others about voter for two of the years that you guys do have partly because i did not have that i was trying to talk to other poets in terms of translating slayton them often pose in my own doing intelligence just trying to have an ongoing education of a the whatever i do use folded into others but also listening and that's how i educate mataafa educated person and <hes> i i. I feel like it's working for me and i hope it is also even fountain to others. I like loading about new foil sunshine about bozo. It feels like hell to learn to do it does look a healthy. Thank you for saying that about the community athens. I think <hes> yeah. I don't think it's something we created created. I think it's a symptom of the spaces that raised us <hes> a lot of us coming. It's also some things that we created well. I think we harnessed it and i think we made it intentional yeah yeah but i think a lot of us are coming from spoken word backgrounds that necessitate community to be poet and a lot of the institutions that a lot of us even.

korea writer united states taylor europe lois dole tacoma brooklyn athens america slayton france editor ninety nine percent