35 Burst results for "Ganz"

Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court Chief Justice Ralph Gants dies after heart attack

WBZ Afternoon News

00:22 sec | Last month

Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court Chief Justice Ralph Gants dies after heart attack

"More now on our top story, the chief justice of the state's highest court has died after suffering a heart attack earlier this month. The death of Chief Justice Ralph Gantz was announced in an emailed statement by the associate justices of the Supreme Judicial Court. Ganz himself. It released a statement just last week, saying he suffered a heart attack. September 4th. It had been admitted to the hospital where two stents

Chief Justice Ralph Gantz Heart Attack Supreme Judicial Court Ganz
A Culture of Silence

In The Thick

05:44 min | 2 months ago

A Culture of Silence

"Hey welcome to the. podcast politics, race, and culture from a multi layered POC perspective I'm money. and. Joining us from Overland Ohio professor. Jeanette. Is Cultural anthropologist author and professor of Comparative American Studies at Oberlin College Hey Gino welcome to the show. Thank you so much for having me and thank you for being in Ohio. We need you and joining us from New Jersey. Also, very important state is Pam Gumbo spot mashes a veteran of foreign policy organizer and a senior political strategist. At the Working Families Party welcome. Pam. Thank you so much for inviting me. All right. So we are looking at a sad story, the story of Vanessa Gin. But we're going to put it into a larger context. Right? We hope everybody knows the story of. She's twenty year old specialist in the US Army who went missing from Fort Hood army base in Killeen Texas, which is about. Fifty minutes away from Austin. Right at the end of April. When many of us at least here in the east coast were in the throes of like pandemic insanity more than two months. Later, there was an extensive manhunt. Finally, there was a grassroots campaign led by let the women service members and veterans, and there was national each and the family was finally told that their daughters remains had been found with the backdrop of a global pandemic and you know this real. For Racial Justice long-held accusations have reemerged into the national spotlight around the military sexual violence in the military. Violence and how you protect yourself from other people who have guns and you're living on a base in the military and so many other intertwined injustices in systems that ultimately were responsible for says, disappearance and death. So Pam you've been actively involved in the campaign for justice for Vanessa is well is speaking out on these issues in fact, for years Gina You as an academic have written extensively about the military's relationships specifically with Latino and Latina communities. So gene, we're going to start with you talk about the significance of this case and what it's putting into the national spotlight from your perspective. Well, as you say, this is such a tragic set of circumstances that brings us here together but I think it's also really kind of an important opportunity to honor Vanessa's life and. Hannity, incredible activism, an extraordinary advocacy of her sisters, her younger sister Lupe and her other sister and her mother to bring this to national attention and I. Think. For me one of the things that. So extraordinary about this is that for some people, this is new that this is something that is surprising to people because I think for many people like Pam and others who are have been in the military know that issues of sexual violence and sexual harassment in the military have a long history. And Violence Against Latinos and the way that in social media and used media have framed this as femicide. We also know that this has a long history in our communities alongside history and our communities. So for me, this is a real opportunity to draw attention to things that we don't want to pay attention to enter really hold our elected officials accountable to addressing these longstanding problems that have is incredible impact. On Latina's and women's lives and on their families and communities that they have sworn to protect and that they have enlisted in the military to try to protect, and so I see this as a tragedy that is also a real opportunity. Pam Do you see it the same way tragedy? That's an opportunity from your perspective as somebody who served in the military what stands out about the importance of this case I. Will tell you. I. Organized Around Pretty Heavy topic sprayed ending wars, militarism violence holding the department, of Defense, accountable and when I heard about the disappearance, right because we can't forget that she was disappeared choose disappeared for months and I learned about it through Spanish language media and social media networks not through the English. Media networks and the sowed and devastating part is that Vanessa is one of thousands on thousands. And I think the social media explosion that happened with Vanessa that Hashtag shows you how prevalent this is what is different however, I do think that we are in a reckoning moment in this country where everyday people are no longer satisfied with hypocrisies. Yeah and what greater of hypocrisy than the daughter of an immigrant joining the military to give her life for what rate what caught my ear when I heard. Gloria. Vanessa. Ganz immigrant mother on the Spanish language news. She was very clear about what was happening. She said me e my daughter told me that she was being sexually harassed by a superior right and nothing was done. There was little to no urgency. has also done what often doesn't happen, which is she has not treated the military the Department of Defense generals she has not treated them with blind allegiance or ability. She has said I don't care that I'm a working class, Latina you're going to respect me and you're going to give me answers which is different right and I think that blind allegiance we'll get into it but blind allegiance to the. Institutions have really lead US astray and not had any accountability for

Vanessa Gin PAM Ohio Professor Of Comparative Ameri Working Families Party Oberlin College Jeanette Us Army New Jersey Professor United States Killeen Texas Department Of Defense Fort Hood Austin Gina You Hannity
"ganz" Discussed on Couples Therapy

Couples Therapy

03:42 min | 2 months ago

"ganz" Discussed on Couples Therapy

"Hey everyone. Welcome to couples therapy. My name is Andy and I am Naomi, we are real-life couple a real life couple of Comedians on couples therapy in quarantine we talk to good friends great comics about love, romance and everything in between Ooh like it. You guys. Today's episode is a fun one. We have dear friends and power couple Meghan Ganz and Humphry car Meghan a writer for shows like community modern family. It's always sunny in Philadelphia. She's the CO creator of Mythic West. Hello and Humphrey is an actor and writer who you know from shows like mythic West and you can see him in. The upcoming NBC, Sitcom, American Auto, and hey you know what? I'm going to spill the tea as they say and I'm going to tell you. So there is episode we did I dunno year or two ago where we talked about going to a friend's house to to they made an escape room their house. Well, you know what we didn't name them. Then we're naming them now that was Meghan Humphries House true geniuses true genius. It codebreakers they created a multimedia multi sensory experience in their home, and they're about to give you a multi media multi sensory experience right now. Yes. Genus Comedians. Third thing third they. Copyright Andy, Kenmare. Naomi. Before we get into that though last week on Tony Nuisance episode we had an advice question now, as we said that you are famously sex negative. I am famously sex neutral and sex question and Tony is also sex neutral. Yes. So we've got a question about a couple in quarantine and. One of the partners has a higher sex drive than the other partner and we were just like, oh Jerk off in the other room. and. So someone wrote in I. Don't know if they want their name on there. A wonderful listener came in with some hot tips that we thought we would share with both the person who called in and anyone else who might have the issue. Okay. This person says I have been married for around ten years at this point and him always had a much higher sex drive then my husband. which is great for him because he pretty much gets it whenever he wants but his presented some problems for me, the solutions I found after much trial and error are as follows. Don't let yourself get frustrated find ways and means to take care of your needs and desires and communicate that this is what you're doing with your partner. Also, let your partner know regularly that you find them attractive and desirable that confidence boost can work wonders in May help to lift more than his mood don't do ways that will come off as a sex passed. I love sex sex. So funny and affectionate pick on an adorable body part and state what you love about it. Be Patient with your lover as they explore their emotions and endeavour to create a safe space for them to communicate with you without judgment or you trying to fix it just listen and empathize not only will they feel more accepted and welcome but it will help you both to create habits, which will see you through almost all of life's trials together I, hope this has helped gives you some comfort in these crazy tabs. Great. Thank you so much queen for coming through with hot tips to make love last. Yes. Again, we we are to unlicensed comedians. COMEDIANS remorsely sex negative. For you. Okay very neutral. I'm the Switzerland of SACHSE. Neutral, not in any way in doing. So and I I like clockwork. You guys. By the way if you want to call in and ask your questions or send US perhaps sex answers. To advice questions. You can dm us. On twitter or Instagram, and you can also call in..

partner Meghan Ganz Naomi Meghan Humphries writer Andy Tony Humphrey Philadelphia twitter Switzerland SACHSE NBC Instagram American Auto
America's economy just had its worst quarter on record

Morning Edition

02:10 min | 3 months ago

America's economy just had its worst quarter on record

"Contracted grotesquely, as measured by the gross domestic product figures out just now. It fell in an annualized rate of nearly 33% in the April to June pandemic quarter, the worst at the worst of the 2008 financial crisis. That drop was 8.4%. Meanwhile, another 1.4 million people signed up for state unemployment benefits in the last week, the second week in a row where that number went up. Democrats and Republicans appear no closer to reaching a deal on a Corona virus relief bill. The extra $600 a week in unemployment supplement officially ends tomorrow. Federal Reserve chair Jerome Powell is among those urging Congress to act. Marketplaces Nancy Marshall Ganz ER was on the Federal Reserve's video conference yesterday. What did Mr Powell say about this? Well, he held a news conference yesterday at the end of the Fed's two day meeting, and they decided to keep interest rates near zero by the way. But even in his opening statement, Powell said the Fed doesn't make grants. It can only loan money. And sometimes loans aren't the answer. He said several times that fiscal support that is what Congress does is needed. Now did Powell specify what type of congressional spending he was talking about? Powell said. It's going to take a while for the hardest hit parts of the economy to recover so businesses that rely on people being together in public spaces, places like restaurants and hotels. They may not be able to hire everyone back. There just won't be enough jobs and palace says That's where Congress comes in. I think those people are going to need support. I can't say what the exact level should be. It's not our role, but they're going to need support if they're to be able to pay their bills to continue spending money to remain in their current Rental house or your apartment or house if they own it, so I think there will be a need. You heard there that pal wouldn't talk specifically about the $600 a week unemployment supplement that's expiring, but it's clear he is worried about how people who've lost their jobs are going to support themselves. Marketplaces. Nancy Marshall, Guns are covering Washington. Thank you very much. You're

Jerome Powell Federal Reserve Congress Nancy Marshall Ganz Er Nancy Marshall Washington
GANs Can Be Interpretable

Data Skeptic

06:17 min | 3 months ago

GANs Can Be Interpretable

"My name is Eric Cadigan a master student at Visual Computing Group in Aalto University in Finland, and I recently did an internship with adobe research, and this papers also in collaboration with them very neat wire to begin with. Tell me a little bit about your graduate studies. What types of problems are you interested in rats I've been involved in computer. Graphics Allot so physically. Physically based rendering recently during my internship I also started working with generative model so I'm still a masterson finishing up my studies so i. don't have a vast experience in the field, but I'm getting started on this really interesting problem so eager to work on this in the future, one of the drawbacks to this being an audio podcast is that people can't enjoy. Enjoy some of the amazing visual aspects of your work. I will be sure to include a link to to the youtube videos in the show notes for this, but for those you, maybe the the visually impaired. Can you give us a quick description of what are some of the in my own opinion, rather stunning effects, you can produce with the research you've been doing. Doing right so generative adversarial network organs in general, they've really skyrocketed in image quality, so we can generate human faces are other photos of landscapes are objects that can look almost photo realistic. It might be hard to realize that they're actually generated by a computer, but it's hard to control. These models with our method were really giving the controls to the user to. To like change the identity of the post and the expression of human face, or the apparent gender or the hairstyle, or maybe move around car, rotate a car in a C- In our move a dog around make it bigger smaller change background on the clouds in the sky, and so on one of the first exposures I had to. These ideas was when Google released. Released deep dream which I. Guess is sort of primitive here. It's some of the earliest work that lead in directions like this, even though I'm not sure if they use Ganz or not, that was not gambling. Their results were always kind of trippy like maybe they'd be good for a music video or something seems like the results were seeing now the state of Of the art are much more photo realistic. Are you aware our car companies using some of these technologies or anything like that that you've heard of or do you think we're not close enough for that? Maybe I think for car commercials specifically. We're not quite yet there. Because the image quality expected in a commercially super super high, but I think for some of these. These more creative fields, where for example, if you're designing clothes or shoes or artwork digital artwork, it might make sense to kind of prototype and look at new possible products are paintings or stuff like that image quality is really improving steadily steel so one day I can see against being used in stock, photography and stuff like that, and maybe even in commercials i. I know you've looked at a lot of these. You've produce them, so maybe we can assume your eye is better trained than the public. Do you think you have a talent for spotting gins or spotting the output of I guess? I should say there's a few giveaways usually. If you're looking at for example face, the background is often not quite consistent or realistic might. Might be too simple or there might be patterns that Don look quite right and I think in general practitioners in the field know how to spot some of these typical features or artifacts, but I really think a few years down the line. It's not gonna be possible anymore, so most of my experience playing around with these myself somewhat limited certainly compared to your. Your experience, but it's that the again I might want use I've trained it up or I've acquired it from somewhere. Maybe extended it and I want to transform images. It's kind of a throw of the dice for me. You know I can tweak some things randomly, just kind of guessing and flipping weights here and there and I'll get some interesting results, but I feel. Feel like I'm the dark and I'm blind. Just reaching around has that historically been what style transfer and techniques that have been like before? Some of the research you've been involved in was getting, too. I would say hey. There's been a few different approaches to controlling generative adversarial networks, so one approach might be just label a bunch of your training data that you. You feed to the model during the trading face. You're looking at training data, and you're finding some attributes that you consider to be important, and then you label your date until the model. Hey, police, learn these things because this is what I consider to be important, and recently some research has shown that even just labeling one percent of your trading day might be enough. Enough to get a muddle where you can change some aspect in a meaningful way, but you still have to retrain your model, which is a very custody thing to do, and also just it's very time consuming manual label the data also, you're kind of limited by what you expect. Your data said to contain if you have some abstract data set where you're not. Not Quite sure what the important directions of change our it might be hard to label, and then the second approach would be detained pre-trade generator, and then just hope that he tasks learned something interesting, and then you have a hypothesis that maybe has learned about the post of the head or something like that, and then you can verify this by generating a bunch of. Of Images and then labeling them and try to identify a direction in the input space that this effect, but again you're kind of limited by your own imagination on what you can come up with, and you could even use an existing attribute detector that knows how to identify the gender expression face, but you're relying on something that someone has made before you so. Really just is more exploratory and we ask the model to show us what he has learnt. So we the other way around instead of verifying policies, we add the model to show us. The largest are the most important directions of change, and then from these we can extract controls, so that's really the difference, or we're not looking for anything in particular we're. We're just asking the model to show us what there is, and it turns out that there's lots of interesting sliders to find in this space. Yeah, it's break into those sliders. A little bits I before reading. The paper didn't necessarily have a bias either way. It could have been in my mind that the ways in which the model learn things were exotic. I've done some principal components analysis in my past and similar to like burt vectors or any other embedding. They're just numbers that happened to work really well. I can't explain why it's thirty seven minus seventy year. Whatever these numbers are so I wasn't sure what again was gonNA. Give us in that way. What did you guys find? Are they're kind of human interpreted parameters in there? Yes, so in general PCA, orders the components at fines orders them by the various that they explain so if there's some aspect, the various a lot in the generated images that's going to be explained by the first few principal components, and in general, we find interesting behavior where the principal. Principal components have a style content separation in data sets. Where if we have a data set to where there's a lot of geometric change that change is going to be captured by the first few components, and then the components after that because they're orthogonal, they're going to contain that information, and then instead they're gonNA explain some other variants, so the first few components are really quite geometrics. Head might be rotating. The dog might be moving left to right or up and down or zooming. Then the later components might explain more style properties of the image, so you might get different color, slight morphing of the geometry, but nothing major us in the first few components.

Principal Youtube Aalto University Finland Masterson Eric Cadigan Adobe Google Visual Computing Group Ganz DON
Edwards' Katie Szyman on Medtech's Accelerating Changes

MedTech Talk Podcast

06:52 min | 3 months ago

Edwards' Katie Szyman on Medtech's Accelerating Changes

"Katie has had a fascinating career both at Edwards, but also at medtronic where she was president their diabetes business. In addition to that she served on the board of numerous start up companies that are each having a huge impact on their various specialties companies like Inari. Inspire tourney a welcome Katie. Thank gap. It's great to be here. Thanks so much for joining us in. We have a lot of things to cover today, so I'm really excited to have the opportunity at beyond the podcast of let's start with Edwards in critical care and i. a lot of people don't realize that critical care is a seven hundred million dollar business within Edwards. Could you give our listeners an overview of critical care and really what the core of the Edwards offering is? The core initial started Edward. critical care started with the Swan Ganz Catheter, that was actually invented out of Cedar. Sinai and many people know the kind of the story. That invention was just that It was sitting on the beach and said Hey. How do I get a good reading of a patient's pulmonary artery pressure, and it's really hard to do unless you're inside the heart, and it's really hard to get to that pulmonary artery position and figured out that if you took a you know, think about how sailboats work. If you blow up a balloon and let it flow really through the body like a sailboat. Sailboat it would land in the pulmonary position, and that was invented almost fifty years ago. by a Jeremy Swan Ganz out of Cedar. Sinai. That was the beginning of our business. And since then we've really expanded and focused on advanced Chemo, dynamic monitoring, really in patients in the ICU or in high risk surgeries whether cardiac surgeries or high risk, non cardiac surgeries that may be four patients that are very thick and that have surgery greater than three hours, so are being screw from the beginning with the Swan. Ganz Catheters, and now we do you know all kinds of pressure? Monitoring Technologies really focused on making sure patients. Are Stable. That's great actually didn't know the the history of the slum Ganz Catheters so that's fascinating. One one of the things that must be having a huge impact on your business is the current crisis were facing in vid. How has that Changed Your Business in in? How are you seeing? Critical care evolve through this crisis. It's an interesting I. Think for us. We always assumed so much of our business was in the ICU and out with the with Kobe hitting. We've seen it hit in various degrees, so for example in the UK They realized that they had a significant shortage of ICU. And so they came through and ordered like one point, two million DP or pressure sensors from us to stock up so that they could build out there I see us other countries like Germany or the US had adequate ice, you beds in different parts of the country of the US. We've seen some regional spike, but overall I think we've found in the US. We had enough ice. You better than in Germany. They have enough, but then kind of across the rest of Europe. They found significant shortages so. So, we've seen some spikes in demand, related to building I, you capacity, and then we've seen just various spikes in demand like regionally for example in New York and New Jersey. Of course we've seen some higher demand there, but on the flip side, probably fifty percent of our revenues come from high risk surgery, and so with the cancellation of surgeries, really across the US and the world we've seen the kind of downward demand or downward revenues for about half the business for the high risk of our procedures. Interesting. I didn't realize it cut both. Ways. I think the the the building of stockpiles are expanding capacity is interesting dilemma that I think a lot of companies are are facing because on the one hand, it's great from the near term business side on the other hand you wonder. What will purchasing look like in the future with these SORTA stockpiles? How do you deal with that are a that? Is that something that? You see is. Concerned going forward. Yeah absolutely like so. It's been interesting journey for lot of our products manufactured of the Dominican Republic and in the Dr. Reduction of human you know of of human capital in terms of the workers, because many of the workers that were over age sixty were no longer able to come to the work that reduced our capacity by about eighty percent, and meanwhile then we had this bike demand. So now. We're sort of getting back to a steady state where you know, people are able to come back to work, but it's been a really interesting short-term. And there's also the concern as you said like. We've had this surge in demand, so we've had to work double. You know three shifts, and through the weekend to meet kind of these spikes in demand building capacity, but we all recognize that that's not going to be sustainable, and it's going to go back to a normal state afterwards so mostly. We're just hiring. And trying to use extra shifts as a way to kind of manage it so that we don't all become over capacity by ourselves right permanently. Yeah, yeah, no, that I mean you think of the. A lot of people think about what's happening on the front lines as they should, but the ripple effect through your business through your supply chain is, it's incredible. Just think how complex our businesses have become. And little changes in the overall environment can impact the you know the whole supply chain. It's it is amazing like for supply chain in particular, because we've also seen the regulatory bodies whether it's in Europe or in the US being flexible to try to approve product quicker just to kind of provide for the emergency situation, so you know for example we had excess capacity of our Asia sensors, and so we were able to quickly get those approved into Europe so that they could actually get to their patients in Europe almost on a temporary basis. Basis so I. You know I think the one summary of what's happening is very unpredictable and I think there's some really good permanent changes in terms of realizing that we can all work together globally better whether it's regulatory bodies whether it's manufacturing whether it's you know distribution channels as you're talking about shipping channels. All of that I think is all going to be permanently changed, and hopefully some of the changes will be for the better I really believe that.

United States Edwards Ganz Catheters Europe Swan Ganz Catheter Jeremy Swan Ganz Pulmonary Artery Germany Katie Medtronic President Trump Chemo New York UK Dominican Republic New Jersey Kobe Edward.
Medtech's Accelerating Changes, Leadership Development and Having Fun

MedTech Talk Podcast

05:42 min | 3 months ago

Medtech's Accelerating Changes, Leadership Development and Having Fun

"To the Matt, tectonic podcast. This is your host Jeff Pardo, and in today's podcast I'm thrilled to have Katie Simon. Vice President Edwards Life Sciences and general manager of Global Critical Care Business. Katie has had a fascinating career both at Edwards, but also at medtronic where she was president their diabetes business. In addition to that she served on the board of numerous start up companies that are each having a huge impact on their various specialties companies like Inari. Inspire tourney a welcome Katie. Thank gap. It's great to be here. Thanks so much for joining us in. We have a lot of things to cover today, so I'm really excited to have the opportunity at beyond the podcast of let's start with Edwards in critical care and i. a lot of people don't realize that critical care is a seven hundred million dollar business within Edwards. Could you give our listeners an overview of critical care and really what the core of the Edwards offering is? The core initial started Edward. critical care started with the Swan Ganz Catheter, that was actually invented out of Cedar. Sinai and many people know the kind of the story. That invention was just that It was sitting on the beach and said Hey. How do I get a good reading of a patient's pulmonary artery pressure, and it's really hard to do unless you're inside the heart, and it's really hard to get to that pulmonary artery position and figured out that if you took a you know, think about how sailboats work. If you blow up a balloon and let it flow really through the body like a sailboat. Sailboat it would land in the pulmonary position, and that was invented almost fifty years ago. by a Jeremy Swan Ganz out of Cedar. Sinai. That was the beginning of our business. And since then we've really expanded and focused on advanced Chemo, dynamic monitoring, really in patients in the ICU or in high risk surgeries whether cardiac surgeries or high risk, non cardiac surgeries that may be four patients that are very thick and that have surgery greater than three hours, so are being screw from the beginning with the Swan. Ganz Catheters, and now we do you know all kinds of pressure? Monitoring Technologies really focused on making sure patients. Are Stable. That's great actually didn't know the the history of the slum Ganz Catheters so that's fascinating. One one of the things that must be having a huge impact on your business is the current crisis were facing in vid. How has that Changed Your Business in in? How are you seeing? Critical care evolve through this crisis. It's an interesting I. Think for us. We always assumed so much of our business was in the ICU and out with the with Kobe hitting. We've seen it hit in various degrees, so for example in the UK They realized that they had a significant shortage of ICU. And so they came through and ordered like one point, two million DP or pressure sensors from us to stock up so that they could build out there I see us other countries like Germany or the US had adequate ice, you beds in different parts of the country of the US. We've seen some regional spike, but overall I think we've found in the US. We had enough ice. You better than in Germany. They have enough, but then kind of across the rest of Europe. They found significant shortages so. So, we've seen some spikes in demand, related to building I, you capacity, and then we've seen just various spikes in demand like regionally for example in New York and New Jersey. Of course we've seen some higher demand there, but on the flip side, probably fifty percent of our revenues come from high risk surgery, and so with the cancellation of surgeries, really across the US and the world we've seen the kind of downward demand or downward revenues for about half the business for the high risk of our procedures. Interesting. I didn't realize it cut both. Ways. I think the the the building of stockpiles are expanding capacity is interesting dilemma that I think a lot of companies are are facing because on the one hand, it's great from the near term business side on the other hand you wonder. What will purchasing look like in the future with these SORTA stockpiles? How do you deal with that are a that? Is that something that? You see is. Concerned going forward. Yeah absolutely like so. It's been interesting journey for lot of our products manufactured of the Dominican Republic and in the Dr. Reduction of human you know of of human capital in terms of the workers, because many of the workers that were over age sixty were no longer able to come to the work that reduced our capacity by about eighty percent, and meanwhile then we had this bike demand. So now. We're sort of getting back to a steady state where you know, people are able to come back to work, but it's been a really interesting short-term. And there's also the concern as you said like. We've had this surge in demand, so we've had to work double. You know three shifts, and through the weekend to meet kind of these spikes in demand building capacity, but we all recognize that that's not going to be sustainable, and it's going to go back to a normal state afterwards so mostly. We're just hiring. And trying to use extra shifts as a way to kind of manage it so that we don't all become over capacity by ourselves right permanently.

Edwards United States Katie Simon General Manager Of Global Crit Ganz Catheters Swan Ganz Catheter Jeremy Swan Ganz Pulmonary Artery Edwards Life Sciences Jeff Pardo Vice President Germany Medtronic President Trump Chemo Europe New York Dominican Republic UK New Jersey
Missing Texas soldier murdered by Army specialist, woman alleges in complaint

WGN Nightside

01:08 min | 4 months ago

Missing Texas soldier murdered by Army specialist, woman alleges in complaint

"Details emerging tonight about a soldier who went missing from Port Bow, Texas Tonight there's a link to the south suburbs. Private first class Vanesa G and was last seen in April. Suspects are identified. A specialist Aaron David Robinson, from Kelly, met city and his girlfriend, 22 year old Cicely regular. According to a criminal complaint, Angular admitted Robinson told her he killed a female soldier strike here in the head with a hammer at Fort Hood and moving her body to a remote site in Texas regular saying she helped Robinson dismember and dispose of Ganz body. She's now been charged with federal conspiracy to tamper with evidence. Robinson took his own life as investigators closed in. An attorney for Ganz family says she had planned to file a harassment complaint against Robinson. Virgin reached out to a former classmate of Robinson's I was shocked. Then I was sick. And then I was mad because it was it was it was. It was a lot of mixed emotions. He was a cool guy. So far. No comment tonight from Robinson's family.

Aaron David Robinson Angular Texas Port Bow Vanesa G Ganz Fort Hood Cicely Virgin Harassment Attorney Kelly
Israel swears in new Netanyahu led Government

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

02:16 min | 5 months ago

Israel swears in new Netanyahu led Government

"And said the spread of covert nineteen is inevitable after three deadlocked in divisive elections a year and a half of political paralysis and another three day delay because of political infighting in his Likud party prime minister. Benjamin Netanyahu finally swore in his new government on Sunday. The Knesset Parliament Pasta. Vote of confidence. In Netanyahu's new administration to end over five hundred days of upheaval over the weekend both Netanyahu and his rival and partner. Benny Ganz announced their appointments for the new government. The most bloated in Israeli history with an expected thirty six cabinet ministers and sixteen deputies Netanyahu against a former military chief announce last month they would be putting their differences aside to join forces to steer the country through the corona virus crisis and its severe economic fallout. They're controversial power-sharing deal calls for Netanyahu to serve as prime minister for the government's first eighteen months before being replaced by Ganz for the next eighteen months despite the criticism. Ganz argued that teaming with Netanyahu offered the country it's only way out of the prolonged stalemate and prevented what would have been a fourth costly election in just over a year. The new position is supposed to enjoy all the trappings of the prime minister including an official residence and kief Netanyahu an exemption from a law that requires public officials who are not prime minister to resign if charged with a crime. Netanyahu has been indicted on charges of fraud breach of trust and accepting bribes in a series of scandals involving allegedly trading favors with wealthy media moguls. He denies any wrongdoing and blames. The charges on media orchestrated plot to oust him. Netanyahu also pledged to push forth with controversial plans to annex parts of the West Bank. Netanyahu's nationalist base is eager to push for annexation before the US elections in November

Benjamin Netanyahu Prime Minister Benny Ganz Likud Party Kief Netanyahu United States West Bank Partner Fraud Official
Swearing-in of new Israeli government delayed by infighting

The Economist: The Intelligence

06:43 min | 5 months ago

Swearing-in of new Israeli government delayed by infighting

"As both prime minister. Benjamin Netanyahu and then head of the opposition Ganz repeatedly failed to form a coalition. The political deadlock is over tonight. The pair will inaugurate a new unity. Government Mister Netanyahu will be prime minister for eighteen months before handing over to Mr. Gaunt's swearing in late by day after America's secretary of State Mike pompeo broke a travel hiatus to fly Jerusalem and meet with both leaders there. He discussed joint efforts to counter of influence in the region campaign that we have been part of To reduce the resources that the ayatollah has to inflict harm here and Israel and all across. The world has borne fruit. It has been successful. And we're GONNA stay added. There's still work to do what wasn't publicly addressed or Israel's plans for the West Bank mister. Netanyahu campaigned on promises to annex parts of the Occupied Territories. That's just one point of contention between his Likud Party and Mister Ganz's blue and white coalition as the long-awaited government gets down to work two political rivals who've been swearing in their campaigns not to trust each not to allow each other to be prime. Minister are now basically going to guarantee each other as prime minister over the next three or four years feffer. It's our Israel correspondent reporting from Jerusalem. Any guns in the parties supported him in arranging. This government will receive an equal number of ministers in cabinet ministers of Likud and the other parties which supported and it's supposed to have equal footing INC cabinet and both their prime minister and the ultimate primates and into the our against who will have those titles and swapped those titles eighteen months. Both of them have the power veto over the government's agenda so that's the basic framework of how this is supposed to work but obviously almost any kind of government decision policy could lead to a crisis one of the things that's lingered over this question for sixteen months. Is this corruption trial of Mister? Netanyahu faces how will that work under this unity government ten days from the swearing? Elvis new government now is scheduled to Face Jerusalem District Court in three charges of fraud one charge of bribery and now of course is denying all. These charges doesn't seem that he can evade his day in court and to make sure that the court system does hold to account the Justice Ministry has been handed to one of the many guns his allies. They're saying is going to ensure that the case goes ahead but we can expand to try and find various ways to erode and undermined the case against him. We're already seeing from various Internet proxies in the media very vicious campaign against the Attorney General. Who decided on the charges against him? And this will continue to be the undercurrent to the new government's first few months so assuming that this unity government can get past the corruption trial and get back to governing. How much faith do you have in them? Being able to stick together given how much mistrust there is between these guys. Well the distrust within this new government is endemic. And there's no question about it and gets into narrow. Spent sixteen months slagging each other off so suddenly beginning to work together. Maybe have a daunting prospect. But yes I remember. That guy has in the past. Been the commander of the Israeli army underneath also. He does have a history of working well together with the Asian. The new ministers in this government will be eager to get down to work and they really sick and tired of campaigning. For the last sixteen months is really politics has been in limbo so I think that despite the distrust of there is amongst them that they will get down to governing these over the next few Muslim tried to overcome whatever obstacles and dislikes they have for each other and another big question in Israel. Recently is the plan for annexation which seems to be going ahead of the coalition agreement between the could against his blue and white party does include the clothes that the issue of annexation as it appears in the peace plan proposed by Donald Trump back in January will be brought to cabinet and the parliament from the beginning of July. So that issue there and we know that gaunt's and some of his partners are not very enthusiastic about going ahead with annexing large parts of the occupied West Bank and that certainly is a potential minefield for this new government. But the real question is is now himself really eager? To Go ahead annexation. He's used this last year or so as an issue to rally his right wing base over the election. Campaigns is very risk averse leader. Despite his gung-ho image he doesn't really like to endanger the status quo so why go ahead and jeopardize that by pushing on annexation? I think we'll hear there ten hour continuing to promise on accession to his supporters but finding reasons to delay and then lot will depend on the outcome of the provincial November if Donald Trump news is the next administration is much less supportive of annexation than it. May Well Happen and is it that accession push the tacit approval of the trump administration. The reason why America's secretary of State's Mike Pompeo was in Israel yesterday his first trip abroad in nearly two months. So according to sources in Perez enter our that's not the reason he flew halfway around the world and his first international trips since the beginning of the pandemic according to compels remarks. What we've been hearing from people both on the Israeli and the American signs were in the meetings and main issue was actually Iran and the various concerns Israel and the United States have about escalations of tensions with Iran in the region and the other issue that compared brought up quite pointedly was China and America's concerns over China's lack of cooperation regarding cove nineteen and America's reservations with various projects. That Israel is cooperating with Chinese. Big Infrastructure Programs. Won't that they'd ministration. Wants Israel to freeze choices out of putting all that together. How likely do you think that this government will serve out its term as written so I think for the next year or so as the government staying together because nobody really wants to go back to election campaign mode again? This people have really exhausted. Elections at the same time is just beginning to emerge from corona virus shutdown. So I think for these at least twelve month period now the government will somehow stick together. The real question on this government's future rises towards the end of twenty twenty one when Netanyahu gates have to swap places and gates becomes. The prime minister would only be the ultimate prime minister. I think then we'll We'll see whether they can actually contemplate relinquishing power. But probably the next year year and a half Israeli politics will be relatively

Israel Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu Mister Ganz America Donald Trump Mike Pompeo Likud Party Jerusalem Mr. Gaunt Face Jerusalem District Court Israeli Army Occupied Territories Footing Inc Justice Ministry China Attorney Commander
The surprising danger that deepfakes pose to the presidential elections

The 3:59

14:47 min | 6 months ago

The surprising danger that deepfakes pose to the presidential elections

"Deep fakes. Those digital manipulated videos. That look scary. Real pose a threat to the upcoming presidential election. Real danger will surprise you. I'm Roger Chang and this is your daily charge me reporter John Salesman. Thanks for joining me Joan. Yeah it's great to be back on the daily charge so we've all heard of deep fix but you don't think there's actually a real risk in say candid footage of Joe Biden. Donald trump actually saying something crazy and swing voters. What's real danger deep fix with this election? The Deepak experts that I talk to yes. They said that they're not most worried about a candidate depict like that like something where Donald Trump or Joe Biden is admitting to a hot button. Crime or saying something really inflammatory with. They're more concerned about are two things. One is known as the Liars Dividend. And that's this concept that as more people know that the fakes exists that there can be these completely false highly realistic out there. It gives people who are caught in the act and are guilty more credibility when they deny something when they denial legit video by saying. Oh you heard deep fix. You can't trust what you see anymore. And that just muddies the waters and makes it harder for people to understand and trust what is truth. And what is fiction? Yeah that's that sounds very dangerous because that's like it damages the credibility of basically everything right. Because if you could point to this one thing is oh see this fake. It applies to everything essentially right. Yeah it makes it harder. You know we. Our brains have been wired for so long to believe what we see. And we've learned to you. Know as Photoshop came along and as other sorts of media manipulation have come a long. We've been able to catch up and at least be more skeptical of those but because video is tricking your eyes and your ears because the AI that powers depicts is so sophisticated and so good and making things look real. That's really really deep wiring in your brain telling you all these signals like trust this. Trust this trust this and so when people start saying. Hey you can't trust that anymore. It just means that it's harder for anyone to understand what's even real and speaking of the AI aspect of things you have a nice breakdown of how deep fix work like how how are these videos created defects are created by a kind of artificial intelligence called Ganz that's short for generative adversarial networks and the the the basic way that they work is they have to neural networks. Networks are a kind of learning. That's based on how the kind of inspired by how the brain works so imagine that these two neural networks are actually an artist and an art critic and they're locked in rooms right next to each other. The artist creates a painting trying to make something that looks like a masterpiece. And he shuffles that painting into a stack of other paintings that actually are works by the go or we're in war or whatever they take that stack moving into art critics room and art critic picks out which ones he thinks are a forgeries. The ones that aren't the real masterpieces. That feedback goes back to the artists and the artists gets better and better and better at figuring out how to make a really convincing fake masterpiece up to the point where he's able to he or she is able to. This artificial neural network is able to make something that can trick the critic into thinking that what is fake is actually real. That's how these sort of artificial intelligence systems work. So I mean that sounds complicated by no love this kind of working superfast background but how easy is it for someone to actually make a deep? Do It depends what kind of deep lake we're talking about. You know there are open source tools to make the kind of celebrity face swaps the Elon. Musk sauna babies had sort of thing. They're open source tool sick at that. They're not as easy. Those aren't as easy to make us like a meam or an animated Gif. You need to have technological savvy Know How to get. You need to have a pretty powerful computer you need. Large data sets unique things. That are more difficult than like making taking a photo putting some white text on it of course so those are berry accessible with are kind of acceptable. But what we're talking about here talking about election defects now. These are the kind of things all the experts that I talked to say. You know we have a lower hurdle to suspend disbelief when we're looking at Elon. Musk space on a baby. But when you're presented with a video of a candidate for president or the president of the United States we have a luckily human beings. Have they kind of set a higher bar that you have to clear to actually believe that it's true so what that means is kind of very sophisticated high end e fix that would threaten on election? Those are really reserved for people that work at universities or research centres powerful computers or state actors that have that kind of computing power like China at their disposal. So the idea here. That Kennedy fakes are less of a risk. Like what are some of the defects? We should be worried about what people are more worried about aren't necessarily these candidates it's more an a deep lake that attacks your faith in the election rather than your trust in a candidate so instead of having what are the reasons is at the state in our political discourse where we're very divided. I think everyone agrees that we're divided and our our opinions seem more entrenched than they had before and so in that environment it's harder to convince or sway voters either way with a fake video. You know like if you were to make a video of Donald Trump's hair flying off or something like it will only solidify your beliefs if you liked on trump you'll be like that's a fake. I like Donald Trump. Even more. If you don't like him you'll be like he looks Tom. I dislike them even more. And so a more cunning way to use a deep fake to disrupt the US election would be to create a deep fake of say like an authoritative news anchor or a governor or authority. Figure who not as many people know saying things like. We're in the age of Kobe. Nineteen we have marsh. It's two days before election martial law. You cannot go to your polling place or to create like news. Anchors saying there There are you know there are some sort of you. Know armed militants some sort of supremacists or militants. That are arming themselves. Going to polling places in a specific neighborhood these kind of people need to be scared about showing up to vote and in that way you can suppress votes and you can also after the vote undermine people's faith in the result if you have an authoritative figure saying something about how we have footage of vote-switching from trump to Biden That could so this sort of distrust not only in going to the election but after the election in the results themselves. That's an interesting point because it's it's not necessarily like a defect that would make Joe Biden. Say something like I killed the spurs like this is these are actually kind of believable is right. I think that's your point like this is a lot more coming. It's lot a lot more nuance but I think. That's what makes the lila easier to swallow the fact that it is all what you're saying. It's pretty plausible sounded. Yeah and the other thing to keep in mind. Is that a candidate. Deep fake would. It's kind of like this Yin and Yang. Were like the the head of the snake is eating the tail like a candidate. D. Fake would only be successful if it basically goes viral and lots of people see it right but when it goes viral. One thing that the. Us has say what you will about the US press core. We have a robust free Press we have a robust free press entrenched in our country other countries where there are dictatorships or more emerging democracies. They don't have that quite at their disposal as much as we do. So if a candidate of the president or Joe Biden were to come out. We do have the capacity here built into our democracy to have a force of people trying quickly as possible. To debunk it. Whereas if you were somebody that wanted to make a deep fake that could actually just robbed or suppress boats. It would be more successful if it doesn't go viral if it's not something that draws the attention of an entire press corps. That's entirely focused on this on this election. And so and that way could also kind of be the most successful not going viral kind of existing on the radar enough to disrupt people in say one or two counties that are really important in a swing states. And that wouldn't draw the attention of a national press corps debunk it well defects captial of tension and headlines is really just sort of one way to manipulate the Info right like this. We're looking at it a little bit too narrow. If we're just focusing on defects is that is that the case. Yeah you know. It's it makes sense that people would be scared of depicts because you know as we talked about earlier it. It undermines the species assumption. That if I see it I can believe it. And so that's why. There's a lot of fear around deep fakes and what they could pinch the harm that could potentially cause but the reality is you know because of some of these things we talked before about. How really sophisticated deep picks are still inaccessible to a wide right of people? That's not true for like you said memes for slowing down video like the Pelosi sounding drunk video that went viral. Those are kinds of media manipulations. Sometimes people refer to them as shallow fakes or cheap. Fix that have the power of being cheap easy and still incredibly effective. And so. That's why you know. One of the Edward Snowden slayer. Aclu lawyer this comparison. He said that you know looking at election information manipulation by only looking at depict looking at it through a straw. You're just not seeing. You're seeing something really scary. But you're not seeing the much. Bigger picture of how things could be disrupted in twenty twenty oxygen. Russia played a big role in. You know clouding the two thousand sixteen elections with misinformation disinformation. And you know you talked about how it takes a lot of resources for these fakes to be effective. Obviously Russia's a country with a lot of resources like should we should we be worried about Russia antiques. Well so I talked to one expert on the national security locations of depicts his. Name's Clint Watts. He testified to Congress. He testified to senators about just the sort of thing and he says you know anything's possible but Russia and their disinformation tactics. They are more skilled at the art of this information than they are at the science of deep fakery so they although anything's possible. Russia has lots of oil money could always who knows what Russia could do. But he's more interested in the potential in China or other places China in particular as a place. Where China has you know. They have supercomputers I think Stephen Shanklin expert on nonstop. He always has that but I think they have. More supercomputers than we have in the US or whatever compute they've got lots of supercomputers which is important for making the takes no for sure beyond supercomputers they've invested heavily artificial intelligence. The one leads in the world in a appear that neural network. That's that stuff is a recipe for a lot of potential problems. Down the line. Yeah in China they have completely synthetic television personalities like deep fake news anchors so that a very authoritative anchor can report on something without actually take time out of his day to report on it The fact that a country like that if if they wanted to do that then they could They are the ones that are in the best position to create a deep fake That would disrupt global geopolitics. But you know. State actors could create other kinds of deep fakes. That could cause other kinds of problems. Those are in the world so you know it's just doomsday scenario. No matter how you look at it well that's that's glorious and very positive Just lastly I mean I think we can all figure out that Elon. Musk is not really a baby. But are there giving advice for for like how despotic fake. Or or just a you know how to be a little bit more vigilant when looking at some of the content that surfaces around the web. Yeah so I asked everyone. I talk to you all the extra Saturday. I asked this question. And there's no silver bullet like little loophole that you can find for understanding it's fake For debunking it on your own. If it's a real deep fake than your eyes won't save you like watching it. You won't be able to tell that it's like that's the whole point of a defense that it's an AI. Created where the power of this artificial intelligence outstrips like. Our brains are very attuned human faces. But they're not so fast that they can keep up with how well deep fake technology can progress. And so you know. We don't have computers in our brains that are as powerful as supercomputers at research universities So the advice for normal people that are like hey how do I even know of this fake? It really comes down to like basic hygiene about what you're exposed to if you see a video and it seems like it's so outlandish that it couldn't be true than might not be and if you see a video that is clearly something trying to appeal to some person some segments inflammatory instincts. That's also reason to be skeptical defects just mean. Everyone needs to do what we should be doing with other kinds of manipulated media slowdown. And think before you share. It's hard to do and it's even harder when we're talking about deep ix but it's just as important to act that way what you're presented with a really realistic video as you would be if you presented with a mean or like a cheap slowed down video of a drunk. Nancy Pelosi Right. Yeah well. That's good advice in general whether it's an article or D do a little bit of Homework. Thinks through what you're actually looking at

Joe Biden Donald Trump United States China Russia Elon Nancy Pelosi President Trump D. Fake Roger Chang Liars Dividend Joan Tricking Photoshop John Salesman Reporter
Coronavirus scammers are seeking to profit off the deadly virus

Ric Edelman

03:19 min | 7 months ago

Coronavirus scammers are seeking to profit off the deadly virus

"Let me shift now to Washington DC and fin St that's the financial crimes enforcement network FinCEN is warning consumers of scams as a result of cuvee at nineteen imposter scams people who attempt to solicit donations from you wore to steal your personal information or in certain malware into your computers how do they do it by in person meeting employees of the CDC or the world health organization or other health care organizations so be on the lookout for imposter scams also be wary of investment scams outfits were individuals were falsely claiming that they've got products or services that can prevent detect or cure coronavirus also the FTC and the FDA are warning about products Ganz unapproved or misbranded products that make false health claims from treatments of the virus to the effectiveness of face masks and finally insider trading since M. reports suspected cases of insider trading related to covert nineteen if you happen to have inside information of a company that is making a product or providing services regarding the virus it is illegal to trade on non public material information it is also illegal to share that information with others who later trade on that information if in doubt don't do it meanwhile the A. A. R. P. says almost half of Americans say they've been targeted by one of those imposter scams one of eleven have been hit with the grandparents scam where somebody calls on the phone claiming to be your grand child don't tell mom and dad I'm in trouble but can you quicksand money to everything from bailing them out of jail to fix some broken down car in a remote location almost ten percent of Americans have been hit with that scam also fifty percent of those using dating websites say they've seen a red flag of romance fraud twenty five percent say they were told by their love interest that they worked in another state or country or had a very busy schedule made it difficult to meet in person nowadays are able to say I can't see you in person because of cove it were all required to stay home meanwhile twenty percent say they've been asked by their love interest to send the money with promises all repair you specially with covert now I'm out of work I need money I have to buy food hi medicine pay my rent twenty percent say they've had warnings of this type and then there's the government employee scam as I just mentioned from sin from fence and four in ten say they've been hit with that scam and only three in ten say they're aware of the new census scam because it is a census season and people are running around the country claiming to be with the census and therefore want you please give me your social security number so you need to be very careful of all of these scams in the midst of our efforts to help them care for our

Washington
Israel: third time lucky?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

06:35 min | 8 months ago

Israel: third time lucky?

"There is possibly good news. At least four Israeli voters wearied of the regular trudge to the polling stations. They might not be obliged to vote for the fourth time in a year or so. This week's general election the third in eleven months appears to have been slightly more decisive than its two predecessors while nobody has an outright majority in the Knesset Prime Minister. Benjamin Netanyahu's conservative block on not far short of one failure to assemble a governing. Coalition from here would require rancor and chaos remarkable even by the standards of Israeli politics. This is also obviously provisionally. Good news for Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu inasmuch as it looks like Benjamin Netanyahu will get to carry on being Israel's prime minister a job. He has already done longer than anyone else. In the country's history Netanyahu's Likud party won more votes than in September or in April last year. And turnout was actually up on the last couple of elections as for the bad news. There's a fair bit to go round breaking news to bring to Israel's attorney. General has indicted the prime minister. Benjamin Netanyahu on multiple corruption charges varies the extremely imminent potential political and legal complication of a serving prime minister standing trial as things stand. Netanyahu is due before the beak in Jerusalem on March seventeenth to begin answering charges of fraud. Bribery and breach of trust go tonight. We are witnessing an attempted. Coup against a serving prime minister based on fabrications and a tainted biased investigative process in this tainted process. They weren't after the truth. They were after me. The investigators didn't pressure the witnesses. To tell the truth they crush them with threatening extortion to tell a lie above sutan biscuit. W meme Sheku. He may apply for a delay citing the imperative of forming a new government. But even if he gets one it likely won't be for long. Israel's judiciary is not known for its difference to politicians within the last decade one former Prime Minister Ehud Olmert and one former president Mashi Katzav have served prison sentences after being convicted of various offenses. There appears to be also the further recession of any possibility anytime soon of a meaningful peace agreement with Israel Palestinian neighbors notwithstanding the diligent labours of US president. Donald Trump's son-in-law for a moment imagine a new reality in the Middle East imagine a bustling commercial and tourist centre in Gaza in the West Bank for international businesses. Come together and thrive whose vision for the region unveiled earlier. This year seems already to be regarded by all concerned as a sort of high-spirited indiscretion which everyone has agreed. It is best to discreetly. Forget the name of the Momma Nittany Univer me and my whole name but flew up naming the name today. I am announcing to apply with the formation of the next government Israeli sovereignty on the Jordan Valley and the northern dancy. Manila Netanyahu's latest election campaign. Bet Big on further Israeli expansion into the West Bank days before polls opened. He announced his intention to assume a plan. Long buried by international condemnation for three and a half thousand new settlers homes which would effectively connect the West Bank settlement of Malaya Dem- with Jerusalem. He may now also feel emboldened to act on previous threats to formally annex portions of Palestinian land and it is obviously a grim result for Israeli opposition to Benjamin Netanyahu and its present principal figurehead retired general and foam Israel. Defense Forces. Chief. Bennigan's is I told you one year ago I into politics because I feel for our internal unit reach prevail over every enemy time and time again by sticking together was being torn apart if an opposition cannot in three quick fire attempts finish off a tired belligerent and entitled Prime Minister Facing Serious Criminal charges a long and unflinching look in the mirror is probably overdue ahead of Netanyahu now lies the horse. Trading arm twisting and carrot dangling necessary to get his block from the fifty eight Knesset seats. It has to the sixty one. It needs to govern. He will probably find this possible. Even Benny Ganz has conceded that neither he nor anyone else in Israel fancies yet another trip to the polls indeed. It's not altogether impossible. That members of Gansters Liberal Cavan alliance or even Gansu himself may perceive long-term mileage in being seen to prioritize ability and agree to Netanyahu up in the short term in the immediate aftermath of this latest election defeat dance failed to reiterate his previous ironclad objection to serving a prime minister under indictment. However vidor Lieberman leader of the nationalist Yisrael Beiteinu party remains the potentially crucial kingmaker. And though he also says he doesn't want another election he doesn't want Netanyahu either Another possibly significant Straw in the wind a strong showing for the joint list an alliance principally representing Israel's Arab citizens the joint list. One Fifteen Knesset seats on Monday up to from September more than half a million Israelis voted for them including according to Joint Lewis Chairman. I'm an odor many Jews depressed. By Netanyahu's bellicose and nationalistic conservatism. Demagogues and populists often accidentally contrived to energize their opponents and catalyze new kinds of opposition. It's a long way off and may indeed never happen. But it would be something. If Benjamin Netanyahu's real legacy turned out to be a strengthened Israeli left united across sectarian lines

Prime Minister Benjamin Netany Prime Minister Israel Knesset Prime Minister Ehud Olmert Jerusalem Joint Lewis Chairman Donald Trump Bribery United States Extortion Jordan Valley Middle East General West Bank Gaza President Trump
Z Flip's 'Ultra Thin Glass' display

Android Central Podcast

08:32 min | 8 months ago

Z Flip's 'Ultra Thin Glass' display

"The Galaxy. Flip a glass phone. Yes or no yes but not the part you touch. Why and what how is it has Samsung calls it? Ultra thin glass and they've trademarked it and they call. I think they actually call it. Samsung Ultra thin glass but it is made by a third party. Company in eight is actually very very thin flexible glass. But it is so thin and so- dainty delicate that you have to cover it with a polymer sheet. It's the exact same polymer sheet that they use on the fold so the part. You're touching with your finger isn't glass after all. It's glass underneath that right. Okay so the question here is why would Samsung cover a glass screen? Which would extensively be more resistant to scratches than plastic? Why would they cover it with a what amounts to a screen protector? Yup well got everybody's gotta remember to. This is all speculation because Samsung is not gonNA go out on and say why they did this. They're going to tell you that it's still really great and a lot of people I've talked to that are using the phone. Now agree that it. It does somehow feel better than the fold That may be the construction or whatever but the glass itself is so thin that if you dang it it's GonNa literally just shatter and fall out and it's GonNa be a mess that nobody would want to deal with. There's just no way you can release a product that could even potentially dangerous right so it's Samsung is hedging. Here right. Yeah they're saying this glasses thirty microns in diameter which is basically. It's it's a thinner than a human hair right For for those of you who still have human hair and it's. It's likely not to be scratched as badly when you run your finger or you know You know put it in a in a pocket or something with keys or your clothes. That's not actually the concern here but like say you can't really scratch it as easily as a as a plastic screen but it's easily punctured because it is just literally so thin. Yup So let's install a plastic protector over it. Let's then shield the edges of that screen protector with a massive basil so that no dust can get under it the way that it did initially on the galaxy s or the galaxy fold and people won't mistake it for a screen protector you can remove and then let's market the phone as covered with glass and they're not say that there is a plastic screen protector on it until somebody tears and down and finds it which they had to know that somebody was instantly gonna find out it was plastic. That's the part that puzzles me. As did they really think they were? GonNa get away with you. Know calling in glass phone I I mean here's the thing right. What other option did they have none? That's I don't know I can't blame them for what they did They they used glass. Maybe just so they could say they used glass. Or maybe they WANNA see how this works as a trial for their next idea but there really is no way they could release that phone without the plastic on on the top right and then if you decide to you can go to a break fix store and get a another screw protector professionally. Installed on top of the existing one rush. I think is pretty hilarious. So then you'd have a glass screen under who plastic screen protectors. Yeah obscure the the thing that I find really funny about it. Is that aside from scratch protection? Glass is clear. I mean the reason we use glass on phones is because of its its clarity and the fact that it passes electrical signal through really well. It's it's nice and conductive it's just. It's a perfect material for phones other than the fact that it can shatter because really I don't think scratches are a problem on current day phones right like you could scratch phones. You can gouge them but not in the way that you can. Scratch her gadget. Plastic screen right. Everybody listening if you could look at your phone in the right light right now. It's got a lot of super to really tiny scratches in it but nothing that you can even see. It's not like things used to be. So they've got glass down pretty good. You know the the companies that make it big names like corning and And it it feels good. Let's let's not forget that part it. It feels good to use glass. If you've got a touchscreen et unit your car that has a a plastic covered crappy display touch display on it. You know you hate that thing but your phone feels good. Because it's capacity of glass display exactly and by now we just take it for granted. We don't think about it you. We we recommend screen protectors for people who tend to drop their phones right and it's not necessarily because of scratches it's because you know the the trade off that corning has to make every time it designs a new gorilla. Glass is do we emphasize scratch resistance or do we emphasize drop protection and shatter resistance absolutely. It's really hard to balance those things and right now with gorilla glass six. I think we're we're we're at the emphasis on drop protection over scratch resistance yea. I'm sure that it's still a lot more scratch resistant than phones of ten years ago. But I do know enough from just talking to people at corning that it is actually a set of balance beams the harder you make it to scratch the more brittle it is and it will easy more easily break. So that's that's what they just like. You said they have to balance that out because a the thing I guess it's a chemical treatment they do. It's it's proprietary smart on them but You know whatever they do to make it more scratch resistant also makes it more brittle so it's tough and again. This is not Samsung's fault. I applaud Samsung for going so confidently into its second generation. A foldable phones right. There's no other company that is using ultra thin glass right now not Ganz. The the Motorola Razor is a shining example of kind of relying on An overly complicated design but not focusing on the fundamentals to kind of ruin the experience. And you know. I'm not saying that as somebody who spent a lot of time with the phone but the people that have reviewed the Motorola Razor. I trust and most of them say that. It's just not a good experience from the creaky hinge to the plastic display to you. Know the just the the design that they had to design around the fact that it was foldable. And they you know they maybe didn't do as good a job as they could just to keep it thin and and and relatively light. Yep I agree with you. The people I've talked to the one great thing about it is the the wow factor. Everybody wants to look at it but day to day used. It's just not a great phone

Samsung Corning Motorola Ganz
The VW Beetle: An Evil Origin Story

Past Gas

09:09 min | 9 months ago

The VW Beetle: An Evil Origin Story

"Germany was looking for a true people's car literally translated as Volkswagen in one thousand nine hundred. Thirty one. One writer from DOS volks auto basically summed up the struggle for making people's those car perfectly quotes the van and be too heavy into expensive to produce the Hausa ill-suited in traffic an unstable in purpose but is needed is a car. Awed designed for the street offering maximum comfort but a minimum of luxury Ferdinand. Porsche realized this as well and at the age of fifty five decided to open a business himself an attempt to accomplish such a monumental task. He assembled a team of the best German. Speaking designers engineers an opened his own company in Stuttgart Germany while he didn't have much capital. He was globally known as an automotive genius so he was able to accomplish this with clouds alone own. GotTa have that clout. Yeah cloud is basically my number one currency. Yeah I think I can speak for everyone in this room. We wouldn't be where we are today without without our cloud for your appearance on two broke girls channel wouldn't exist. It does get a little though. 'cause I remember last week went to lunch and I covered you you and I was like hey. Can you hear me like thirteen dollars. Like I haven't paid for a meal since one thousand nine Hundred Ninety six on April Twenty Fifth Nineteen thirty one the company. I entered the official registry as the doctor Professor Porsche Company for the Assembly consultation and design of automobiles wheels and engines. We've wanted to call Dr Pepper but that's hardly taken. Ferdinand Porsche had made a name for himself in racing. The creation of a people's car was always a personal passion of his. It wasn't long until Porsche began drawing up designs for the first Volkswagen in nineteen thirty. He Won. He was commissioned by Private Motorcycle Company and began working on the project twelve motorcycle sales are going down and this company wanted to diversify hi there portfolio a little bit product. Twelve was the first project ever for Porsche. That was neither a small luxury wagon or a small racing car designs immediately we took on the familiar beetle-shaped and it was powered by five cylinder. One thousand. CC radial engine. That may twenty five horsepower. Radial engine like like like an airplane. Like an airplane yeah the first prototypes were road. Tested in nineteen thirty two. Despite the cars functionality the company that hired Porsche Chak cancelled the contract. As motorcycle. Sales had begin to pick up again in the entire endeavor just like they broke up with their long-term. Yeah way friend and Porsche was like finally you know we're going to get to be together and they're like. Oh Yeah Yeah. Yeah it's always been you then and turns out Dave's back. Oh cool no good for you guys so happy for you know all right so that whole thing was okay for Porsche the motorcycle manufacturer. Ns you another company immediately. swooped in to take their place at the time. Germany held the largest motorcycle market in the world but people wanted cars and Msu that they begin flirting with the idea of building true through automobiles it's crazy that Nebraska State University started out as a motorcycle manufacturer in Germany. It's incredible and then we can. It makes much more money in academia. This new project was dubbed project. Thirty two as it began in the year. Nineteen thirty two a pattern was beginning to form though and ns you started to stay purely in the motorcycle market and bailed on the project the factor. Ns you pulled out. Didn't hinder porsches spirits. It's though he seemed like a pretty a Kinda Guy Project thirty two had allowed him to alternate innovate his previous designs. Bring him one step closer to the future Volkswagen and he had been dreaming of and just a year and a half working for himself he already. He had already made more progress on designing his dream. People's car then he had made in the previous ten so overall he was pretty stoked meanwhile on February eleventh nineteen thirty three less than two weeks after coming to office Chancellor Adolf off Hitler did something no other German chancellor had ever done he attended the Berlin auto show. It was no accident that the theme of the show that year was the will to motorization cassation which now that read it aloud. Sounds very forboding and evil. Okay so Hitler had a plan quote. The motor vehicle has become come next to the airplane. One of humanity's most ingenious means of transportation the German nation can be proud and knowing is played a major part in the design and development of of this great instrument he immediately punctuated that remark by saying that Germany had fallen behind in the market. And now of course his time to fix it was actually at this auto show that one. Joseph Dan's appeared with his own prototype. Volkswagen the Standard Superior Ganz is especially unique in the story because his designs over the five years before the show helped influence both Ferdinand Porsche. And many others. With their attempted Volkswagen's Hitler himself expressed serious interest tryst in the prototype vehicle during the shell despite providing revolutionary designs contributed to all future. Volkswagen beetles just Ganz's name is almost completely absent from any history books. Due to his Jewish Heritage Ganz was arrested persecuted and forced to flee the country of Germany while his name was scrubbed from basically all records and was forbidden from being associated with the term Volkswagen altogether so porsche basically stole the design at the following auto show one year later. Hitler announced two major policies that would be enacted immediately. He called for the mass construction of roads and and highways as well as for car to be built that can finally be owned and driven by the common man quote. No country can be strong transportation as week to help push forward his dream of a mobilized Germany he promised tax relief for auto companies more money for racing more resources for motoring events less interference from state governments on the ownership ownership and production of cars. Course this was not just for the People's benefit but for militancy. Yes now this this is what kicked are like the. US's highway system into high gear to they're like. Oh we need to get you know missiles across the country chief we need to an arson. Attack on the Reichstag allowed Hitler to make a sweeping power grab. He officially made himself Germany's fuhrer he. Hurried hurried changes and transportation and pass the rash automotive law in the summer of nineteen thirty three removing German states of any responsibilities concerning the ownership and and production of automobiles and soon after the construction of the first autobahn began. So he's the site. I'm a dictator. Yeah Yeah it's like turns out. Yeah I'm king to again public support. The idea of national progress was tied directly to the innovation in transportation. It's hard to understand. Just how big the Autobahn project was. But the pure scale of road. Construction was unprecedented unprecedented at the time. Four thousand thirty four miles of road was planned for construction over the next seven years but like so many characteristics characteristics of the Nazi party it was the idea that mattered. Most the Nazi spoke with these roads. As M- court monuments in fact one announcement titled Not Roads But Works Works of art read quote. Nothing is to cramp or delay you in your swing from one horizon. To the other the highways will spark like stone an artfully rot. Ring ring the construction of these roads was essential for Nazis to gain the power. They wanted but they needed the public support behind. We'll be right back with more of this story. Okay but I learned from our sponsors. It should be obvious that the roads were really intended for an advantage during wartime but people were too busy Z.. To really think about that for a while Germany was actually looking really nice as long as he didn't look any deeper than the surface level. Surprisingly of all Hitler's rhetoric. The Volkswagen was the one that carmakers feared the most they all loved the idea of mass producing a car that literally everyone will want to buy or even better working with the governments to enforce the necessity to buy them after all who doesn't love being both supply and demand but they wanted the cars they mass-produced to be cheap like a three wheeled covered in motorcycle or something. Truly cheap manufacturers hated the idea of building a car just as good as the upper level cars for the price of an entry level car they wanted to make money and Hitler's Volkswagen plan left no room for people to even need to purchase high end models. Not only did they think selling a good car. So cheap was texting technologically logically impossible. They also feared the long term impact of direct government involvement in the automotive

Porsche Volkswagen Hitler Germany Ferdinand Porsche Private Motorcycle Company Stuttgart Doctor Professor Porsche Compa Writer Joseph Dan Dr Pepper United States Jewish Heritage Ganz Dave Arson MSU Ganz
Trump says he expects to release Middle East peace plan by Tuesday | TheHill - The Hill

KYW 24 Hour News

00:38 sec | 9 months ago

Trump says he expects to release Middle East peace plan by Tuesday | TheHill - The Hill

"President trump wants to get them behind his Middle East peace plan Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu and his main challenger Benny Ganz will hold campaigning and come here to the White House next Tuesday they will discuss the peace plan for the Middle East president trump has long touted leaving a lot of it up to son in law Jared Kushner on airforce one the president told reporters about the Palestinians who are not invited quote I'm sure they maybe will react negatively at first but it's actually very positive for them he said the administration is spoken with Palestinian representatives briefly about the plan he expects to be unveiled before the Tuesday meeting Mister from concluded it's a plan that really

Donald Trump Benjamin Netanyahu Benny Ganz White House Jared Kushner President Trump Middle East Prime Minister
Trump says he'll release Middle East peace plan soon

Bloomberg Law

00:36 sec | 9 months ago

Trump says he'll release Middle East peace plan soon

"Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu and his main challenger Benny Ganz will hold campaigning and come here to the White House next Tuesday they will discuss the peace plan for the Middle East president trump has long touted leaving a lot of it up to son in law Jared Kushner on airforce one the president told reporters about the Palestinians who are not invited quote I'm sure they maybe will react negatively at first but it's actually very positive for them he said the administration is spoken with Palestinian representatives briefly about the plan he expects to be unveiled before the Tuesday meeting Mister from concluded it's a plan that really would work but Constantini the

Benjamin Netanyahu Benny Ganz White House Jared Kushner President Trump Constantini Prime Minister Middle East
Fooling Computer Vision

Data Skeptic

04:33 min | 9 months ago

Fooling Computer Vision

"By now I have to assume. Most listeners are aware of deep fakes. Not just because we've covered deep fakes on this show before but if you show an interest for anything anything related to data and or skepticism you must know about the advances in technology that have been pretty impressive in creating videos that were not actual captures. There's a reality. Most people's first introduction to this idea was the video with comedian Jordan peele effectively puppeteer in the then president Barack Obama talking about out the dangers of deep fake technology. Maybe for some of you your first introduction was a bit more. NSF W and with the advent of any technology like doc deep fakes which just to be totally clear as the ability to kind of mask a different face onto a body. That doesn't belong to that face. Or just otherwise edit the content of identity a photo will these technologies are very much coming of age. Interestingly you never hear too much about the let's say positive or anonymity angle of this. You know someone who wants to release something to the world but not have their face identified could look like a real person person but obscure it in some way or let's go directly to the princess lay appearance in the recent star wars films deep fakes or not all bad even though they can like anything certainly be used maliciously so with any malicious tool the first questions. Really well can. We detect usage of that tool. Is there a categorical way. We can identify video. US fake or not fake and like all good questions. The answer is maybe I read good deal research on ways of detecting this one of the ways is it was sort of interesting to me. Initially was a researcher that in the case of very high fidelity cameras was able to detect blood pressure in the images by really amplifying amplifying certain parts of the signal you could notice subtle changes related to I guess the temperature of the human body. You're just things were we radiate as beings and and the deep fake systems you know these things developed based on generative adversarial networks things that have a discriminator in generator that our adversary competing competing to see who can make the best forgeries and who can spot the forgeries will these systems. They sometimes take a bit of a shortcut. They don't notice things like the subtle presence of blood pressure or as we covered on the show last year. That something interesting like the blinking of a face was not something Ganz out of box did and that on the surface surface that seems like a great detection technology as my guest in that episode will remind. You only took a little bit of time until the forgers were able to incorporate that into their systems and start producing deep fakes. which in fact did blink ultimately the detection of deep fake seems to be sort of maybe a bit of an asymptotically failed strategy? Gee if I went outside right now and I don't know set fire to my neighbor's house. If you filmed me doing that you would have a video of me setting fire into my neighbor's house which I'm sure why me jail Wednesday. That video was just a collection of bits of information in computers are getting quite good at generating very specialized sequences of bits of information. Seeing is no longer believing at least when you're seeing is delivered on Youtube or an MP before file or the equivalent and that's why video and images have always been a little bit curious to me. There is such a wide potential space of possible images in videos. That could be shown. We're going to talk a lot this season about gant's and fooling images and all these sorts of topics especially as they relate to our general theme. You of model interpret ability but I thought the best way to kick this off might be to talk about what fighting chances we have. If I'm right in fighting faces an asymptotically Alex's losing battle well we might not yet be at the point of inflection. So while they're still chance in the spirit of Sarah Connor maybe we can fight back a little bit against. It's the machines. Welcome to Davis skeptic interpret ability podcast asked about machine learning fooling images and the right to be ignored at least by an algorithm my guest today is vp Van rance today in our main segment sygmunt. We discussed the ways in which US mere mortals the non algorithms might develop techniques which we can subvert or fool image recognition systems. He's not just in an academic paper but actually in the real world

United States Sarah Connor Jordan Peele Barack Obama Youtube Ganz Researcher Van Rance Gant Davis President Trump VP Alex
AWS announces DeepComposer, a machine-learning keyboard for developers

Daily Tech News Show

00:58 sec | 11 months ago

AWS announces DeepComposer, a machine-learning keyboard for developers

"Amazon announced deep composer as a thirty two key to octave keyboard for developers to use to learn generative. Adversarial networks are Ganz. It comes with pre-trains models or you can develop your own Ganz are worked by having two different neural networks. Play off each other in sort of adversarial row to learn whatever it is you WANNA learn. In this case with deep composer they learned to compose new and original digital works based on sample inputs developers can can create music based on a model tweak it in the deep composer console which happens in the aws cloud then generate music. Compositions can be shared on soundcloud if you want. This joins deep lens which is used for photography and deep racer which is used to make a faster cars which also teach machine. Learning developers interested in using deep composer can sign up for a preview. Whenever it's available you'll get notified? It's not there yet though.

Ganz Amazon
"ganz" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"ganz" Discussed on WJR 760

"Said turn now overrule them broadly speaking that's good news for the big blocks likely could which is Mr Netanyahu's party Benny Ganz is blue and white because it the that means that there's a higher threshold of numbers should numbers of voters that the smaller parties add me to get past in order to counteract told ya who is seeking a fourth consecutive term in office multiple reports say Iran is being held responsible for the drone attack on the oil fields in Saudi Arabia in Saudi Arabia here's correspondent nic Robertson I what the Saudis have said for it so far is that they cannot yet it's. may not this is their official position that they continue the investigation but they will take an appropriate response that they have the capacity of the will to respond to to respond forcefully to this type of aggression if that's what they say determine today crude oil prices have been skyrocketing the last couple of days and now they have fallen back somewhat Alex Rebeca suffered a setback in his fight with pancreatic cancer Rebecca says he's undergoing a second round of chemotherapy telling Good Morning America he's not giving up well the thing I suppose that gives me the most optimism is that Hey I'm still here and I don't feel. terrible are you now figuring out that your little tougher maybe you thought you were no no no I'm still a little bit of the worst because there are moments when for no reason at all I feel this surge of sadness depression doesn't last very long but it just takes over my whole being for a short period of time and I understand it more now broadcast political commentator Cokie Roberts has died from breast cancer she was seventy five WJR news time eleven thirty four..

Mr Netanyahu Benny Ganz Iran Saudi Arabia Alex Rebeca Rebecca Good Morning America Cokie Roberts nic Robertson official
"ganz" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"ganz" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"His former chief of staff Benny Ganz. This is Fox News. The top stories are next after traffic and weather together. Minor delays due to construction over on the far east side of town. If you're heading eastbound on tenure Ackerman, there's some delays back to W W white. And if you're travelling westbound on the north loop sixteen four between gold canyon and bidders. Give yourself an extra two to three minutes to pass through. I'm Shannon Samson. Newsradio twelve hundred w. Away. Wednesday well up into the nineties, perhaps an back to more seasonable levels gradually at the end of the week might be some Saturday. Thunderstorms to kick off the weekend. Clear skies into sunrise lows in the low sixty sunny, windy and hot on Wednesday, high of ninety six southlands at twenty to thirty miles an hour. I'm meteorologist Mark sibito. From the Weather Channel on San Antonio official weather station. Newsradio twelve hundred w away. I. Dallas county school chairman Larry Duncan is getting house arrest for Texas Asia federal judge handed out six months sentence yesterday. Which also includes three years of probation Duncan admitted to not paying around forty eight thousand dollars in taxes for money that he had received from the ownership of technology company Dunkin claims to the money was campaign contributions, but actually spent most of it on personal expenses. I used to freeway is back. The animal waste spill textile had to shut down most all northbound I sixty nine lanes in Sugarland yesterday morning. Eighteen Wheeler Trump pig parts on the road. It's not known what caused the product is spill on the road. A candlelight vigil was held last night in San Antonio rapper nipsy hustle. Facebook post.

Larry Duncan Benny Ganz San Antonio Fox News Shannon Samson chief of staff gold canyon Facebook Ackerman Mark sibito Dallas county school Sugarland Dunkin chairman Texas Asia official twelve hundred w
"ganz" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

05:38 min | 2 years ago

"ganz" Discussed on From Scratch

"Called sesame workshop. The sesame workshop created Sesame Street. What did Sesame Street look like in nineteen sixty nine? It was slower. I, it was accused of been too fast paced, but when I look at the early shows they same. Perry slow to me. We've changed it a lot. Now, Elmo was not on early shows and became the superstar when we were about the super superstar when we were about twenty years into it, and he now greatly is far more popular than big bird. But big bird is I contact say his held up like a crucifix vampires in the congress. Every time they threatened cut us success. Amee street took off immediately in the United States. When did it start to go? Global will. The Germans came to me within a year and asked if they could do a co-production for Germany, and they're big bird was a bear and Burton Ernie are a huge sense in Germany, and I've always been. And then the next thing that happened was that Latin America wanted version and we ended up doing that in Mexico for all of Latin America except Brazil. And then it began spreading to the Netherlands, Canada, which took the American show, but makes Canadian inserts Canadian films and they made it. It's called Sesame Street north while stralia the English speaking countries like a stray and Canada wanted pretty quickly except for England's of for England just wanted them up. But pieces did not want Sesame Street because they did not want Americans teaching English children. Now, of course, we're in Bangladesh. Were in South Africa with an aids, positive muppet, and we're working in Pakistan and we're starting to Afghanstan version. And how is that perceived by society and Afghantistan which tends to be conservative, how do you make judgments accordingly, we work with their people and their educators, and they choose what they wanna emphasize. They may not want to emphasize letters and numbers. They may want to emphasize the values of of mutual respect and understanding which is a big value in our foreign productions nurse. One version in north Northern Ireland, which emphasizes mutual respect and understand. We're in Israel and Palestine with different versions we wanted, we had hoped to have more unity, but it didn't work out and there are characters that remain the same throughout all the countries like is Oscar the grouch in all these? No. No Oskar is and big bird or the same puppeteer. No, they, for example, Israel's big bird or the conic muppet is a porcupine tough on the outside soft on the inside. One Israeli said it should be the reverse. Your whole life has been focused on children's education through entertainment yet you don't have any children of your own. How come? Well, I wanted children and that just didn't happen. And I really was deeply disappointed in my first marriage that that didn't happen, but it didn't. I ended up with five step children and nine grandchildren. So children are very much in my life now and have been for many years, many many, many of the greatest artists of writers playwrights book writers of children's television of children's material have never married and don't have children. MAURICE sendak is one that's never married and has no children. He's aware the wild things are. Yeah. So as the author of. Allison wonderland, I believe, I don't know. It's a very many, many men. Many single men are big artists and writers of children's material. I can't be sure, but I would suggest it's because they, they still have the child in them for whatever reasons. Do you feel like you have a an inner child or child within you. Yes, I do. Unfortunately. But the grownup has come has conquered and those those, those that keep the child stay creative. And those that have the grownup conquers become the executives darn. I have this theory that we're all sort of a combination of our fathers and mothers, and that my father triumphed. Finally in me because much may was very satisfied with being an executive of bringing order out of chaos and being the boss, I really loved being the boss. I made up an aphorism that was in Forbes magazine, which is I've been bossed and I've been boss and believe me being bosses better. Thank you very much for joining us. Thank you very much for having made. It was a pleasure. My guest has been Joan Ganz, Cooney co-founder of children's television workshop and one of the founders of Sesame Street. I'm Jessica Harris. This is from scratch..

Germany Israel Latin America MAURICE sendak executive Perry Canada congress Forbes magazine England Jessica Harris Bangladesh United States Joan Ganz South Africa Elmo Northern Ireland Pakistan Oskar Allison wonderland
"ganz" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"ganz" Discussed on From Scratch

"But eventually he had problems that were not really manageable, but he was always supportive of what you are jailing very, you're married now to Pete Peterson of and he's the founder of the Blackstone group. Incidentally, did Pete Peterson play a role in Sesame Street at all? He did. Oddly enough. He was on the board of any tea and NAT is the was the old national production center for public broadcasting, and I wanted them to administer the workshop for the first year and a half because we didn't know if we wanted to hire lawyers and accountants and all that. What if we failed and had all these the staff to fire? So my idea was higher. Those. That we had to have and then ask any t to supply the lawyers, accountants, and administration. And in order to do that check white, who was president said, you've got to present that to my board and they've got to approve, and Pete Peterson was on the board. And he asked question after question. He was just fascinated with the idea and came up and said, this is one of the most interesting ideas I've ever heard. Well, naturally, I never forgot him, but we were both married to different people. Our lives went on and separate ways. And then we finally met again when both of us were divorced, it was very romantic. I'm Jessica Harrison. You're listening to from scratch. My guest is Joan Ganz. Cooney co, founder of the children's television workshop now.

Pete Peterson Blackstone group Joan Ganz Cooney co Jessica Harrison president
"ganz" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

05:06 min | 2 years ago

"ganz" Discussed on From Scratch

"Founder of the children's television workshop now called sesame workshop. You mentioned right from the start that the show was widely accepted. What was harder for you than you thought it would be in getting Sesame Street off the ground. What was harder? I don't know. It was. It was so much luck. We had so much luck the time in could not have been better for raising the money because at that time, government and private foundations were and then corporation for public broadcasting came onstream and public television as a big entity. They were interested. So the timing was all amazing. In the beginning, we had a hard time convincing some of the representatives of the federal government that children's television workshop entity that did not exist and it never produced children's programming headed by a woman who had never produced children's program. It was hard convincing them that that was the way to go rather than give the money to a cartoon company. And so we had to kind of battle our way through that, but eventually everybo-. Got a board even though a woman at one of the foundations. Ford said it will never be taken seriously if a woman heads it. How did you get funding for the show? Initially, you just talked about this perfect storm of the federal government and private foundations and the corporation for public broadcasting, oh, we couldn't possibly have raised it. Had it not been for the brilliance of Lloyd Morris, who at the time was the head of the Carnegie found was president of current gay, but but the driver of this particular project, he knew herald how at the department of then the office of education, but it would be the department now and that we wanted half the money from the government and got it. How much money did you raise? Initially, we raised eight million dollars originally. We reached raised four from the private foundations and see PB and four from the government be corporation of public broadcasting. Yes. Now eight million dollars in nineteen sixty. Nine, that's not an insignificant amount of money. It would be like a forty or fifty today, and people were shocked at that kind of money was being raised for a children's show when win nounce did. It was front page New York Times because it was it was unbelievable that anyone would spend that kind of money on children. And then the social purposes of the program caught the fancy of the times and other press. You mentioned the terrific response that the show got by critics, but there were still some people who were skeptical because you're using television as a medium. What were what were they saying? I had made the mistake of of San that maybe we could close the gap between the achievement of poor children, disadvantaged children and middle class, and that was picked up that within a few. You months that we certainly weren't closing the gap and that was absolutely accurate because the middle class was making gains too. So it moved everybody up, but it didn't close a gap. So that was a very unfortunate phrase. So that was criticized. Now what what was going on in your home life at the time you didn't have children, so you didn't have to focus on that. But certainly your life had had had experienced the sea change going from producer public television, and all of a sudden this storm comes of children's television workshop and Sesame Street that was much larger than you ever expected. Can you talk me through those days of working on this early on? Well, I was working all the time and I think it was hard on my husband. I don't question that that marriage ended in divorce in nineteen seventy five. And it had nothing really nothing to do with Sesame Street, but I'm sure it was hard on him. All the focus on me and I remember heading that we'd walk into a room and everyone would ignore him. So I I, you know, I, I'm sorry about it, but there was nothing I could do about it and he was interested in. He was very involved in civil rights and was very helpful to me in many ways. He was a the first feminist I ever knew. I had never met a woman who was a feminist even especially the women at the Ford Foundation. But he was a feminist so he was always pressing may to aim at being number one. He was also a very good writer and could help me when I was doing speeches and various things..

New York Times federal government writer Ford Founder Ford Foundation Lloyd Morris San producer president eight million dollars
"ganz" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"ganz" Discussed on From Scratch

"Chance? How did you come up with the idea of having the show be in a city with an urban feel? Well, we had three extraordinarily gifted producers Johnstone, Sam gibbon, and Dave Connell, all of whom had worked on captain kangaroo. Previously Johnstone was something of a genius and everybody knew it at the time, and he's the one that came up with the urban street idea. And we all said, yeah, because our mandate was to reach inner city, disadvantaged kids primarily that is if we didn't reach them would and reached everybody else, it would have been considered a failure. At what point after it started airing, did you say, wow, we have something much bigger here in her hands than we ever expected. You're right away. Actually, as soon as it went on the air, the reaction was like, Swoosh the the press. Was overwhelmingly favorable and the audience reaction was overwhelmingly favorable. There were some academic critics, but there were very few of those. And I remember every interview I did with the press, they say, how do you feel about your critics say that is? So the least of what we're dealing with here to me, it was so actually trivial compared to what was really happening out there that it was like for me, batting away flies. That's not nice to say, but that's how it felt. It was an amazing moment because women, the women's movement was coming onstream. So the press was not only deeply impressed with Sesame Street, but deeply impressed with the fact that a woman had founded it, which meant they all want to talk to me, which was I kept bringing along, Dave Connell to interviews and felt terrible that these geniuses weren't. Getting the attention they should. You launched Sesame Street in November nineteen sixty-nine throat. And that was with the help of producers like John stone who had been captain kangaroo higher. How did you meet Jim Henson, and how did that collaboration begin? Well, I had seen a real of his work and any was so admired within the industry, much less known outside that it never crossed my mind that we could get him and John stone, and Dave. And probably Sam to had worked with them. They said to me, I think we'll talk to Jim Henson producers said, and I said, Jim Henson me that was like saying, Peter, the apostle, you know, it was amazing. And I said, do you think he would do it? And they said, who knows? But they went and talked to him and he said he didn't wanna do little children shows that he would then be categorized as a little children producer and that terrified because he considered himself a family program producer like the muppet show was his ideal show. However, he went home and thought I have four children. He eventually had five and it would be something to do for them and their peers. So I knew when we captured Jim Henson, I knew we had it that we couldn't fail. And then Joe repose of the great composer musician came. To work for us. A lot of people came to you because they were driven by civil rights. They were interested in children, but but they were the idea of expressing interest in what was going on in America. The civil rights moment expressing it by trying to reach these children in need was very appealing to this group. I don't mean that they didn't weren't interested in children because they were interested in civil rights, but the two interests they had came together perfectly. I'm Jessica Harrison. You're listening to from scratch. My guest is Joan Ganz. Cooney co,.

Jim Henson Dave Connell producer Sam gibbon Johnstone John stone Jessica Harrison Joan Ganz America Joe Peter
"ganz" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

04:59 min | 2 years ago

"ganz" Discussed on From Scratch

"How did that happen to Manara were friends of of Loyd Morissette and Mary morrissett Lord was vice president of Carnegie corporation, the big foundation, and I, we were very close to my boss at channel thirteen who was very theatrical, dramatic and brilliant man. So he was there at the dinner party. Plus someone I worked with name and meant so it was six of us and Lewis, this very dramatic bossom. Mine started talking very stunning interest in compelling way about the educational potential of television. His talk. Doc sparked something and Lloyd Carnegie corporation was financing studies of how children learn child development. And so something clicked in his mind of why not us television to teach preschoolers because preschoolers were marching to the center of the stage. At that time, the government was talking about creating something that became head start. Early childhood had become more interesting to educators than it had ever been before. And so he asked me if I'd be willing to take a leave of three months from from peanut producer at thirteen I was producing adult shows talk shows and documentaries, but I was very, I was frustrated because you can do one documentary after another and have no effect on the society. And I wanted to see if television could make a real difference. I'd been had been. Haunting me. So it was a perfect moment for may. When Lloyd said, would you like to do this? And the answer is yes, I would even though my bus didn't want to. He wanted me to stay at thirteen. I took a leave from programming for three months and went all over the country talking to educators of preschool children. You wrote a paper as a result called the potential uses of television in preschool education. And what were the major findings of the paper? I met with several gifted teachers of gifted children, teachers of of preschool children who were in in pilot programs that the government was doing a precursor to head start. And if they had said, no, this would be terrible. We couldn't have done it, but they were very supportive of the idea was all yes, why not? It was. So I did a report on their reactions and then I did. Described something like sesame strayed on our day, a show that would be something like Sesame Street run by a. Corporation a nonprofit corporation, something like the children's television workshop, which is now called sesame workshop. And so you could see it on paper. And so it was very well received paper by Carnegie and Ford and the government. So as a result of this paper, you suggested the launch of the children's television workshop and you suggested that they started show which was at the time not called Sesame Street. How did you come up with a name Sesame Street? Well, we were panic stricken toward the end. We did not have a name. We had decided to put it on a street. We knew it was going to be on an inner city street. We even knew what street it was a copy of street in east Harlem and street, was it? You know, I can't remember, but it is something like east one hundred sixteenth straight up sina. It was a street that by the way, Hata mural on one of the buildings and we had that mural on Sesame Street. So once we knew we were on a street, we head to then find title. There was even a someone wanted to call at one two, three, Evan obey. And I said, that's too hip and to urban. So finally, we got a list of about sixty titles and we all decided that Sesame Street was the least bad. We, I don't know why we hated it. We because we were it was we were hip. It was the late sixties. And so that's why we Sesame Street seemed, oh, so sweet. Did nobody wanted sweet and then we all wanted sw decided sweet was better. And so that was how we got Sesame Street. Partially the head of our public information was saying, you guys are going to go in the air without any audio..

sesame Lloyd Lloyd Carnegie corporation Carnegie corporation Manara Loyd Morissette Lewis vice president Carnegie Harlem Mary morrissett Lord producer Hata Evan Ford three months
"ganz" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

04:42 min | 2 years ago

"ganz" Discussed on From Scratch

"The there was the ad lay Stevenson. Dwight Eisenhower campaign of nineteen fifty one maybe or fifty to fifty two. And I watched Ed Lee Stevenson's acceptance, speech at the convention. That was the first thing I remember. And then. It was a Cup two or three years later that the army McCarthy hearings came on and changed history. And I watched some of that. I didn't have it TV sit. So I was dependent on the kindness of neighbors to see television. You were in New York City in your twenties, what made you come to New York? I had known. I don't know. From the time I was the littlest child at, I would not live in Phoenix, and I went to the university of Arizona for college and all during that period. My best friends were people that wanted to leave Phoenix and do something. And one of them I went to Washington, so I joined her and her family in Washington after I graduated and worked for the federal government in the State Department. And then I went back to Phoenix and worked on a newspaper until I saved enough money to move to New York. But that was almost always the goal. What did you do when you came to New York? I tried to get a job at the New York Times and was eventually offered one on the women's page naturally. And that was easy for me to turn down. What I had in mind was been an intrepid reporter stories, and I had been on the women's page of the Zona Republic, but they had given me lots of broader assignments than writing about weddings, and that's an tea parties and that sort of thing. And I knew the women's page at the times would be restricted to weddings, and that was not for me. And I went into the press and public information department of RCA which on NBC. And as soon as I could, I transferred down to NBC and did publicized their soap operas and other kinds of programs that they have other programs that they had. And what was your personal life? Like at the time, I lived with a girl. I had grown up with in Phoenix and she was an actress and in Hollywood most of the time. So I had her apartment and she knew everybody in New York for a variety of reasons. Her family was in Phoenix very prominent. So they met every easterner that came out a every famous easterner. So she knew ahead of very wide circle of of prominent friends. And she very generously shared all these people with me. So I was in a life that wasn't that was very starry and that part was fun. But. I was felt not up. I'm in here. I was with no achievement at all. And I was with people who were directors of television plays and director Broadway plays and heads of production companies. And all of that and here was little me was how I felt. But eventually I left RCA and went to NBC and then left NBC because they I couldn't make enough money to live practically and went to work for the US Steel Corporation to publicize their play. That was on every two weeks on television called a US steel, our what was that about the US steel. Our it was a drama every two weeks. It alternated with someone else's another corporations drama, but ours was produced by the theatre guild, which was a very prominent production Broadway. Suction company in New York. And so I learned a lot about theater about cast in. It was in the battle days when we had a there was a list of people you couldn't cast in or whose name plays. You could not accept because they were said to have read ties, communist. Yeah. So it was an interesting period bid that you had to clear that we had to clear all names with the ever ties ING agency. How did you develop an interest in entertainment and in injured Eliza? Your dad was a Bank of your mom was a housewife from Arizona. How did you fall into that world?.

New York City New York Times Phoenix NBC Ed Lee Stevenson Dwight Eisenhower State Department RCA US Washington McCarthy Arizona US Steel Corporation university of Arizona Zona Republic Eliza reporter Broadway director Hollywood
"ganz" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"ganz" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"One thing you touched on earlier was generative adversarial networks again and these are a tool that you used in your voice impersonation technology that the voice of personnel paper and explaining ganz in details probably not something that's like scoped to a podcast or well you know something that you wanted to discuss over podcasts but maybe you could explain the problem domain that ganz is useful for why have i been hearing so much about generative adversarial networks i will try to explain it in one way and i'm sure that's not going to work and then i'm gonna come back to the traditional explanation so i'm trying to i way so you are an intelligence agents and you're trying to devise a strategy to beat your enemy at something or you're playing a game against an adversary and you're trying to devise an automated strategy to beat that other person's moves a typical the moves of that player in that game the strategy that hugh device would have to take into account the skills of your adversity and you and i think you will agree with me that if you start off by assuming that your advisory is s mart as you are if not smarter your strategy eventually will turn out to be much better and more effective at defeating your advisory without taking into account any strategy that you come up with based just on rules may not be as affective so if you have any situation bear you a trying to device something that you want to engineer to do something very important for you.

ganz engineer
"ganz" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"ganz" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"One thing you touched on earlier was generative adversarial networks again and these are a tool that you used in your voice impersonation technology that the voice of personnel paper and explaining ganz in details probably not something that's like scoped to a podcast or well you know something that you wanted to discuss over podcasts but maybe you could explain the problem domain that ganz is useful for why have i been hearing so much about generative adversarial networks i will try to explain it in one way and i'm sure that's not going to work and then i'm gonna come back to the traditional explanation so i'm trying to i way so you are an intelligence agents and you're trying to devise a strategy to beat your enemy at something or you're playing a game against an adversary and you're trying to devise an automated strategy to beat that other person's moves a typical the moves of that player in that game the strategy that hugh device would have to take into account the skills of your adversity and you and i think you will agree with me that if you start off by assuming that your advisory is s mart as you are if not smarter your strategy eventually will turn out to be much better and more effective at defeating your advisory without taking into account any strategy that you come up with based just on rules may not be as affective so if you have any situation bear you a trying to device something that you want to engineer to do something very important for you.

ganz engineer
"ganz" Discussed on The Starters

The Starters

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"ganz" Discussed on The Starters

"Tomorrow i mean today tuesday on tnt cats seat apm books clippers ten thirty okay cats go watch that on tnt but you gotta come back to nba tv for the starters at ten thirty pm eastern time lady got a little earlier that's what we gotta run that's our new tag cool gary lee vsbn baby baby from that sixers nuggets ganz beautiful impacting beautiful beautiful finish from right laws introduced again plumbing look at that lovely lovely finish that's what i called a very solid play solid very very solid seldom saw news we had to wedgies yeah houston rockets providing us with both of them i it's ryan lining up with three who's running back on da doing the second wedgie then passing the torch to his friend trevor we drops it as well from three point land she'll saturday and sunday wedgies from the rockets unbeliev job at thirty three but time is ticking down here just over two weeks in the regular season i still believe still believing fifty with with the the playoffs fence this is josh great game with my mom and girlfriend came back to poland a soil you when you hear it on the jones two of the season required and this is from the nba finals in a strategy game three we've alyssa alatha sophie and mike go melvin united yeah most times from the nba finals more lights soup all right that's it for us tonight morning everyone to look at it back at ten thirty pm started coming up next game time with chris griffin salmon all right thanks for joining us folks and remember this is my sleep shirt one st.

tnt sixers trevor jones mike nba houston poland chris griffin two weeks
"ganz" Discussed on The Starters

The Starters

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"ganz" Discussed on The Starters

"Tomorrow i mean today tuesday on tnt cats seat apm books clippers ten thirty okay cats go watch that on tnt but you gotta come back to nba tv for the starters at ten thirty pm eastern time lady got a little earlier that's what we gotta run that's our new tag cool gary lee vsbn baby baby from that sixers nuggets ganz beautiful impacting beautiful beautiful finish from right laws introduced again plumbing look at that lovely lovely finish that's what i called a very solid play solid very very solid seldom saw news we had to wedgies yeah houston rockets providing us with both of them i it's ryan lining up with three who's running back on da doing the second wedgie then passing the torch to his friend trevor we drops it as well from three point land she'll saturday and sunday wedgies from the rockets unbeliev job at thirty three but time is ticking down here just over two weeks in the regular season i still believe still believing fifty with with the the playoffs fence this is josh great game with my mom and girlfriend came back to poland a soil you when you hear it on the jones two of the season required and this is from the nba finals in a strategy game three we've alyssa alatha sophie and mike go melvin united yeah most times from the nba finals more lights soup all right that's it for us tonight morning everyone to look at it back at ten thirty pm started coming up next game time with chris griffin salmon all right thanks for joining us folks and remember this is my sleep shirt one st.

tnt sixers trevor jones mike nba houston poland chris griffin two weeks
"ganz" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"ganz" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"A visit to one of our ganz highly regulated both talk slabs to luna about the drugs tanturli dangerous supply chain cynthia described as what you thought this lab and a layers of security because there were many many layers of security involved in actually getting inside the lab yes so this is a fascinating state visit i've done a lot of lab tourists but nothing quite like this before and so the the essence of what they do in that research facility as they research you know potential ways they can reformulate our work with boat talks are change at me tiny changes to it and the research other neurotoxins but the beast ingredient the raw material and bow talks is the botulinum toxin and because that so highly toxic at seoul potentially lethal to mankind and could be used as a weapon of bioterrorism f it gets into the wrong hands they have a very very high level of security so when you enter the facility you have to sign a waiver and there's warnings about what could happen to you if there were ever a spell and you were to contract botulism from that that has never happened before so it's not something you need to be actively worried about but it's something that they have to guard against and warned don't you the less 'cause it's security he had a son waivers there was security after security there a glass barriers through a so so after you sign a waiver sign up to the what is the way ever say that if the talks about the medical risks in associating associated with potentially being exposed to the beach signing talks in any talks about probably some pretty pre played stuff that's required in california about warnings that what's carcinogenic and things of that nature but it goes through through those risks in terms of what could happen if you were exposed to the talks it but muscle weakness the setback the actual illness of botulism should he contracted is sort of like it paralyzes your system and.

ganz california muscle weakness supply chain cynthia seoul
"ganz" Discussed on The Tesla Show

The Tesla Show

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"ganz" Discussed on The Tesla Show

"In in matches computer science and did learning controllers for physically simulated figures so basically simulating robots in software south starting to get into the the in robotics world he then went to an internship in that summer google research doing unsupervised deep learning for videos so he was working on that project that was set a bunch of youtube videos and discovered cats spontaneously and then he went to standard for his phd in a deep learning computer vision and his advisor is a faith a lee who is incredibly well respected computer computer vision and i a person so w what's injury since this oh then after stanford he got his phd and now he had been working at open ai since 2016 focusing on reinforce reinforcement learning deep learning and and genitive model so ganz and he also squeeze in deepmine inter ship which is the company that google bought that actually worked on the alpha go project to to best the best humans at the game of go so interestingly almost no industry experience no i mean zero automotive experience zero experience at any tech company beyond internships buds are incredibly smart has written many papers then published and is extremely well respected in the artificial intelligence industry for his work on primarily on vision network so completion on rural networks for any application of detecting things inside of images and and describing them so just sort of um intriguing that he's a director of ai and i would point out to people that a director level title doesn't um.

computer science advisor stanford ganz google tech company director ai youtube artificial intelligence
"ganz" Discussed on Weekend Observations with Stu and Jr.

Weekend Observations with Stu and Jr.

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"ganz" Discussed on Weekend Observations with Stu and Jr.

"Stu ganz alabama it becoming annoy might goalie twoyear it was an ugly scene inside a hotel room by myself last night holland governing now you can fit all game for these these weekend observation six to win junior the podcast might go a junior good morning to you good morning steve grads how're you feel ended a busy night for you asked night it was a it was a very busy night i want to uh the data company at city field didn't in new york i am currently in my wife's uncle's apartment doing the show where are you this morning gulluk i am out of minnesota i am at kyle rudolph's house friend of the show minnesota vikings tied and i am in his wife's office on the move is the the east wing of their gigantic house okay a gut like mikey see who sounds worse this morning because i feel like even though i went to a dead joe and i got him a little bit late i feel like gullikson's way worse than i do this morning and number way where's but yeah he's he's got the with a bit of a coup deem voice going right for twa birdal dutia are you still drinking it listen that's that's in for us to discuss during the break is that the senior kyle rudolph's house root of i i imagine the willies married let's dye their reich i wrote off his married married has to our twin daughters that are both under the age of one so we've got we've got babies onboard we got a lot of his family in town to so it's a full house okay n dumb any sleeping right now assume right yes he is a right asleep on the same floor on the opposite side okay but he's further east far enough away from you gullick where he wear.

alabama holland new york minnesota kyle rudolph minnesota vikings mikey joe gullikson Stu ganz steve twoyear
"ganz" Discussed on The AI Podcast

The AI Podcast

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"ganz" Discussed on The AI Podcast

"Under un ganz don't really do anything to help the issues of bias and data but they might be able to help us look for and understand bias one thing that ganz do is they learn away of representing the data in terms of making a sort of imaginary map of where all the different data poets lie so on this imaginary map you might be able to take a photo of a dog and place it on the map and he would find that alaskan huskies are very near siberian huskies but they're very far from great danes or mallam mutes or something like that by using these imaginary maps where examples that are similar to each other are near each other and examples that are different from each other a very far apart we can look and see if there's one kind of data that we're over representing or under representing in our training set if one part of the map is really dense and another part of the map is very sparsely populated than we know that we are and actually capturing enough data from all the different potential sources and all the different kinds of people that we would like the machine learning system to help let me ask you about security you've you brought up the idea of medical records in so clearly privacy i is an issue there can can help us in the security space because i know there are all sorts of approaches these days he you in machine learning and deep learning to help us in cybersecurity to identify anomalous situations and and things that are essentially outta whack that hey you know raise the flag or or do something else.

ganz