19 Burst results for "Galvin Family"

"galvin family" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:46 min | 4 months ago

"galvin family" Discussed on KCRW

"More brutal where things like organ removal lobotomy zin castration. Understanding what caused the condition remained rudimentary, and there was a period when therapist blamed parents and especially mothers for contributing to the condition. The Galvin family of Colorado was one such family, Mimi don and their 12 Children were on the surface, a post war American dream. But their lives turned into a nightmare. As over the years, six out of their 10 boys develop schizophrenia. In his book called Hidden Valley Road. Inside the Mind of An American Family Award winning author Robert Kolker traces the lives of the Galvin family, how they coped with devastating loss and suffering. Searched for answers in treatments and how eventually their journey is a family helped transform the science and research into this disease. Robert Kolker. Welcome to life examined. Thank you. It's a pleasure to talk to you. Can you paint a picture of the Galvin family for us, as we would have met them in the 19 sixties, when she's when a lot of this happens? Who were they bring us into their lives a little bit. While the mother of the family Mimi cow, then always said even after the bad stuff happens that they were a model family and they really were in those early years. They Lived in Colorado Springs in the 19 fifties and sixties and had 12 Children. Dad was an instructor at the Air Force Academy and also trained the cadets in falconry, and he flew Falcons that the football games Family has a place in history because the parents in the family don and Mimi, we're the first people to suggest to the air force that they make the Falcon, the Air Force's mascot, so that's their little slice claim to fame. But then they became equally famous for having 12 Children and the 12 good looking talented. Athletic. Really, um, famous for their small community. Children on uh and 10 boys. Really? Until they were suddenly, you know? He's changed and there were two girls at the end. So the oldest were football stars, wrestling stars musicians, their mother trained them to identify operas and exotic mushrooms out in the Wild. Of course, they participated in falconry. They were assistance to their father and helped out the cadets and then flew birds on their own. They really were kind of extraordinary. At a time of intense American optimism. They kind of You know, it's not a stretch to say that they Embodied a certain American confidence and triumphalism after in the years after World War two. Yeah, that's that's an amazing description of them and When do we see? Then the first brother begin to show symptoms of schizophrenia. There's instability in the house as early as the late fifties, but it's all behind closed doors. It takes the form of a of a lot of rowdiness and then Something worse than rowdiness. A lot of violence. A lot of kids beating each other up in the parents sort of turning a blind eye to it, because they think boys will be boys and not You know, having the imagination to amount to think that this could be a sign of intense earth, severe mental illness, but the real Psychotic break. Among the first couple of sons to become mentally ill happens in the mid to late sixties, and it happens right on time. The way the clinicians say it happens, which is in your early twenties. Donald gather in the oldest 12 Children, the football star. Um He goes off to college, and he has a psychotic break East. You know, living in a Root cellar with no heat, and he's you know, he's only roommates or cats and and he is really in a crisis. But the family doesn't have many options. There are Medical options that would warehoused him and destroyed his life. And then there are therapists who would blame the parents for causing the mental illness there. There isn't allowed in the sixties to recommend Um In the way of really good mental health treatment, And so they kind of hope for the best and hope toe. Find a doctor who can Help him get enough back on his feet so that he could go back to college. And at the same time, Jim, the second born son is having his own mental health problems. He's married and has a child, but he is Drinking and then also becoming delusional and paranoid. Interestingly, the six different cases of mental illness in this family they're all called schizophrenia. But the symptoms are all slightly different, and that really Out. I think readers understand that schizophrenia is sort of a catch all term. And that there It's a syndrome with tons of different symptoms and that different people present in different way. Yeah, So if we take Donald, for example, he's in his early twenties, and you've described it. This is oftentimes when clinicians see See this manifest in different individuals. What would a psychotic break for someone like Donald's Be like It starts with small things like being kind of a stranger to your own. Emotions for your own motivations, doing things and not really realizing why you do them and being frustrated that you can't connect with others. But then the first intense psychotic break he experienced probably was when he ran into a bonfire during a pep rally. He was only you only had minor injuries. But when he went to the health center, he had no way of explaining why he bothered doing it. It wasn't necessarily to get attention. And and he really had no good explanation could qualified probably is a psychotic break and then to eliminate all doubt there were others down the line where he Tortured an animal, you know, straight hat. Then killed another cat things like that things that are just extreme and strange and things he had no explanation for amazing. Yeah, So you mentioned that We begin to see this and Donald first. But then another brother begins to show symptoms. Who is that? And how did it start to present itself? Jim was the second son and ah lot of the parent's hopes and dreams and ambitions really passed right by him and went to Donald the older son, and he was always Essential of that. Always arrival to Donald. The two of them fought and wrestled throughout their teenage years. And then once he was out of the house, he was determined to He on his own and prove that he was You know better at life really been. Donald was so while Donald was cratering in college and really having difficulties, he was married and working at a bar and having a child and really Rejecting all this success, but behind closed doors he was having Probably more difficulties than Donald was paranoid. He was delusional. At one point, he hit his head against a wall and another point, he You jumped in a lake and didn't know why. And the worst thing about this is that his wife tried to tell Theo Garden parents about it. But the garden parents were so Worried about Donald. That they didn't want to engage with the idea that there more than one of their Children might be having mental illness. Yes, it didn't really deal with both at the same time. And this makes me wonder if you're a family of the 19 sixties. If you're the all American family of the 19 sixties, how do you begin to make sense of now? Two sons and we know their arm or coming in this story. How do you begin to make sense of this erratic behavior that that's very difficult to understand. What we don't know about severe mental illness. Now you could fill a million books and it was even worse back then. And really, it was about Not only not knowing what mental illness wasps but also staying conflicting opinions everywhere you turn if they had taken Donald or Jim, too. Miracle drug and it's going toe make them a lot more manageable. But of course, we know that sort of scene isn't really a cure. It's just something that manages the.

Robert Kolker Colorado Springs Jim Donald 10 boys Mimi Mimi don two 12 Children Hidden Valley Road two girls World War two Two sons both Colorado 19 fifties six second son Mimi cow 19 sixties
"galvin family" Discussed on Family Secrets

Family Secrets

05:26 min | 6 months ago

"galvin family" Discussed on Family Secrets

"Five hundred dash five hundred. I'm going to go into q. In a function here. What does bob believe. It is the biggest obstacle to progress in the treatment of schizophrenia but there have been some strides in early intervention. And a little bit of the stigmas. Gone now so that families are blamed for the disease Their family support now. If you're lucky enough to have good health care So those have improved but for a variety of reasons it's just There's been very little movement on the pharmaceutical front. I mean i came up in. We all did in an era. Where when when you think about mental illness i thought of it as brain chemistry issue and that the idea was to to hard work and trial and error and the right therapist and psychopharmacologists. You'd find the right pill that would perhaps help you become more functional and that might be true for things like anxiety or depression but But schizophrenia is still working with the same basic drugs that the the galvin family retreated with back in the late sixties and early seventies in. That part is hard and there are a lot of reasons for that one is Some disappointing outcomes from the human genome project. Instead of finding one big genetic issue that could be zapped with drug. They've found more than one hundred potential arians that all have very limited effect size. So it's hard to know what genes zapped with a pharmaceutical drug. And then also you can't really tested on mice. You have to test it on humans. And that's risky and expensive. And then finally. The constituency can't really advocate for themselves the same way that people with a cancer can for instance so that things are sluggish and all of those fronts. I just found one. For danny that i think is really kinda great What questions would you ask your father and mother knowing what you do now. I would ask how conscious of what they were signing on for what they were doing in In going to an institute and and.

five hundred late sixties Five hundred more than one hundred potentia early seventies danny bob one one big genetic issue schizophrenia
"galvin family" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

08:31 min | 10 months ago

"galvin family" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"Your host Gabe Howard and calling into our show today we have Robert. . Caulker Robert is the author of Hidden Valley Road which was an instant number one New York Times Bestseller and Oprah's Book Club Selection He is a national magazine awards finalist who's journalism has appeared in wired and the new. . York Times. . Magazine. . Bob Welcome to the show. . Hi Gabe I'm really glad to talk to you today. . Your book is non-fiction. . It's a true story. . I'm GonNa read from Amazon Right now description the heart rendering story of a mid century American family with twelve children. . Six of them diagnosed with schizophrenia became sciences greatest hope in the quest to understand the disease. . Let's talk first about how you did the research for this book, , you met the Galvin family. . That's right. . My career really took shape at New York magazine where I've written dozens of cover stories and feature stories about everyday people going through extraordinary situations and I really am drawn to these stories of people who manage crises come through difficulties I find it inspiring and I'm always looking for a deeper issue running at the bottom of her in. . So when I met the Galvin family I was amazed, , this is a family that's been through so much. . Misfortune and also so many challenges and so much scientific mystery medical mystery I I met the two sisters they're the youngest in the family there were twelve children they're the only girls and they now are in their fifties. . But when they were children, , six of their ten brothers had been diagnosed with schizophrenia. . The family immediately became interesting to scientists and researchers were trying to get to the the genetic roots of the disease. . But before that happened, , there was tremendous amount of denial, , a lot of stigma that forced the family into the shadows, , and so it became clear that by telling their story, , maybe we could inspire the general public to sort of remove some of that stigma from mental illness particularly acute mental illness like schizophrenia, , which so many people still have difficulty talking about and to anchor this in time they were diagnosed in the seventies. . I'm horribly bad at math, but , they were diagnosed fifty years ago. So . there was even more stigma more discrimination less understanding. . It was harder to get diagnosed absolutely and also more of a reason to hide because so many people in the establishment were blaming the families themselves for the mental illness blaming bad parenting in particular, , blaming bad mothering, , and then of course, , the medical treatments, the , pharmaceutical treatments were blunter and more extreme back then and they were just coming out of the period of lobotomies in shock therapy insulin coma therapy is all sorts of drastic treatments which are now. . So questionable now the parents are dotted Mimi, , Galvin their mom and dad did mom and. Dad . Have Schizophrenia or any mental illness or was it just their children dated not have schizophrenia neither did anyone in their immediate families and I think part of the mystery of this book is how does schizophrenia get inherited because we now are certain that there is a genetic component to schizophrenia, , but we don't know exactly how it is inherited. . It's not parent to child it's not recessive. . It's not like you need to people with schizophrenia to produce a child schizophrenia it Kinda wanders it meanders through families in a very tricky way and there was a lot of hope pinned on this family that they would help shed a little light on that mystery as well. . What were some of the most surprising things that you learned about mental illness and will really schizophrenia from your time interviewing the Galvin's I was surprised by almost everything. . But my biggest surprises were that to my understanding of mental illness was that it was about brain chemistry and that great pharmaceutical drugs were coming online that through trial and error and a lot of work. . Perhaps, , we'll be able to correct your brain chemistry problem and then whatever you had whether it was anxiety or depression. . Or bipolar disorder that it would be corrected and that you would become essentially cured although cured is the wrong kind of word for like remission or recovery. . Right what I learned was that schizophrenia this isn't really true at all that the drugs that they have the antipsychotic drugs that are very popular that are prescribed so much for schizophrenia, , they are basically the same drugs that have been prescribed for fifty years. . They may have different names derived from the same classifications of typical neuroleptics or. . Narrow left ix and that these drugs are essentially symptoms suppressors. . Help a person control their hallucinations or delusions or it might make a patient less erotic and more manageable as a patient in a healthcare setting but it doesn't turn back the clock. . It doesn't necessarily add functionality. . They really are just sort of good enough in terms of controlling the population but not really the miracles that we look at when we talk about antidepressants for instance, , and that was a huge surprise it sounds like that. You . didn't know a lot about schizophrenia before you started working on this book. . Is that true? ? That's right. . I mean I knew enough to know that it didn't mean split personality multiple. . Personality which is. . Like the big misnomer that because of the way we use the words get. . So there's a Latin root skits which refers to split, , but really it was meant to mean a split between reality and one's perception of reality a person with schizophrenia tends to wall themselves off from what is commonly accepted as reality I a little bit and then a lot and sometimes that means delusion. . Sometimes that means to lose the nations and sometimes it means being catatonic sometimes, , it means being paranoid and in fact, , that was the other huge surprise for me for schizophrenia, , which was that it isn't really a disease at all it is a classification. . Syndrome. . It's a collection of symptoms that we have given a name. . And I don't mean to sound too nebulous or mystical and talking about <hes>. . There is such a thing as schizophrenia. . It's just that it may be several different things in that forty years from now, , we might have removed the word schizophrenia from our lexicon and we might have decided that it's really six different brain disorders with sixty screen types of symptoms, , and we have found ways to treat those six different conditions differently that was another huge surprise to me. . When doing your research for the book? ? Obviously, , you spoke to the family. . Did you also speak with medical doctors and schizophrenia researchers and people in the medical field? ? Yes. . Absolutely. . My initial conversations were with the family themselves who after many years of difficulty were ready to come forward and talk about everything that happened to their family in a very deep and profound way. . But of course, , in the back of my mind I was thinking well, , how specialists this family for all I know there might be thousand families with lots of kids where half of them have schizophrenia this, this , might happen all the time. . So I didn't immediate round of checking talking. . To major figures in scholarship of schizophrenia in the history of science, , but also the treatment of schizophrenia and just to say, , have you heard of this family? ? What would you say if I told you a family late this existed how typical do you think it is? ? Do you know the doctors who have treated the? ? Stanley because I knew their names as well are those doctors on the level? ? Are they quacks and everything really checked out? ? This is a family that is definitely unusual extraordinarily. . So in terms of the numbers, , they were important family to study for their time and they did help move the ball forward in a genuinely valid way an. . Way So. . There's a lot of hope in this story as well. . Are there many families that have that many children with half of them being diagnosed with really any severe and persistent mental illness or or even just. . This is a a big question that I pursue in the book itself because Linda Lee, , one of the researchers who studied this family was actually a collector of genetic material of what she called multi plex families, , which is families with more than one perhaps many instances <hes> six mental illness, , not just among siblings but maybe parents and aunts and uncles and grandparents she made it her job in the nineteen eighties. . Nineties was to collect data on as many. . Multiplex families as possible. . So they're out there but even in that World Galvin families extreme it's it's hard for anyone to think of any other family with twelve children where six of them had this diagnosis

schizophrenia Galvin family Schizophrenia Galvin New York magazine Mimi
New book tells story of 6 brothers with schizophrenia

The Psych Central Show

08:31 min | 10 months ago

New book tells story of 6 brothers with schizophrenia

"Your host Gabe Howard and calling into our show today we have Robert. Caulker Robert is the author of Hidden Valley Road which was an instant number one New York Times Bestseller and Oprah's Book Club Selection He is a national magazine awards finalist who's journalism has appeared in wired and the new. York Times. Magazine. Bob Welcome to the show. Hi Gabe I'm really glad to talk to you today. Your book is non-fiction. It's a true story. I'm GonNa read from Amazon Right now description the heart rendering story of a mid century American family with twelve children. Six of them diagnosed with schizophrenia became sciences greatest hope in the quest to understand the disease. Let's talk first about how you did the research for this book, you met the Galvin family. That's right. My career really took shape at New York magazine where I've written dozens of cover stories and feature stories about everyday people going through extraordinary situations and I really am drawn to these stories of people who manage crises come through difficulties I find it inspiring and I'm always looking for a deeper issue running at the bottom of her in. So when I met the Galvin family I was amazed, this is a family that's been through so much. Misfortune and also so many challenges and so much scientific mystery medical mystery I I met the two sisters they're the youngest in the family there were twelve children they're the only girls and they now are in their fifties. But when they were children, six of their ten brothers had been diagnosed with schizophrenia. The family immediately became interesting to scientists and researchers were trying to get to the the genetic roots of the disease. But before that happened, there was tremendous amount of denial, a lot of stigma that forced the family into the shadows, and so it became clear that by telling their story, maybe we could inspire the general public to sort of remove some of that stigma from mental illness particularly acute mental illness like schizophrenia, which so many people still have difficulty talking about and to anchor this in time they were diagnosed in the seventies. I'm horribly bad at math, but they were diagnosed fifty years ago. So there was even more stigma more discrimination less understanding. It was harder to get diagnosed absolutely and also more of a reason to hide because so many people in the establishment were blaming the families themselves for the mental illness blaming bad parenting in particular, blaming bad mothering, and then of course, the medical treatments, the pharmaceutical treatments were blunter and more extreme back then and they were just coming out of the period of lobotomies in shock therapy insulin coma therapy is all sorts of drastic treatments which are now. So questionable now the parents are dotted Mimi, Galvin their mom and dad did mom and. Dad Have Schizophrenia or any mental illness or was it just their children dated not have schizophrenia neither did anyone in their immediate families and I think part of the mystery of this book is how does schizophrenia get inherited because we now are certain that there is a genetic component to schizophrenia, but we don't know exactly how it is inherited. It's not parent to child it's not recessive. It's not like you need to people with schizophrenia to produce a child schizophrenia it Kinda wanders it meanders through families in a very tricky way and there was a lot of hope pinned on this family that they would help shed a little light on that mystery as well. What were some of the most surprising things that you learned about mental illness and will really schizophrenia from your time interviewing the Galvin's I was surprised by almost everything. But my biggest surprises were that to my understanding of mental illness was that it was about brain chemistry and that great pharmaceutical drugs were coming online that through trial and error and a lot of work. Perhaps, we'll be able to correct your brain chemistry problem and then whatever you had whether it was anxiety or depression. Or bipolar disorder that it would be corrected and that you would become essentially cured although cured is the wrong kind of word for like remission or recovery. Right what I learned was that schizophrenia this isn't really true at all that the drugs that they have the antipsychotic drugs that are very popular that are prescribed so much for schizophrenia, they are basically the same drugs that have been prescribed for fifty years. They may have different names derived from the same classifications of typical neuroleptics or. Narrow left ix and that these drugs are essentially symptoms suppressors. Help a person control their hallucinations or delusions or it might make a patient less erotic and more manageable as a patient in a healthcare setting but it doesn't turn back the clock. It doesn't necessarily add functionality. They really are just sort of good enough in terms of controlling the population but not really the miracles that we look at when we talk about antidepressants for instance, and that was a huge surprise it sounds like that. You didn't know a lot about schizophrenia before you started working on this book. Is that true? That's right. I mean I knew enough to know that it didn't mean split personality multiple. Personality which is. Like the big misnomer that because of the way we use the words get. So there's a Latin root skits which refers to split, but really it was meant to mean a split between reality and one's perception of reality a person with schizophrenia tends to wall themselves off from what is commonly accepted as reality I a little bit and then a lot and sometimes that means delusion. Sometimes that means to lose the nations and sometimes it means being catatonic sometimes, it means being paranoid and in fact, that was the other huge surprise for me for schizophrenia, which was that it isn't really a disease at all it is a classification. Syndrome. It's a collection of symptoms that we have given a name. And I don't mean to sound too nebulous or mystical and talking about There is such a thing as schizophrenia. It's just that it may be several different things in that forty years from now, we might have removed the word schizophrenia from our lexicon and we might have decided that it's really six different brain disorders with sixty screen types of symptoms, and we have found ways to treat those six different conditions differently that was another huge surprise to me. When doing your research for the book? Obviously, you spoke to the family. Did you also speak with medical doctors and schizophrenia researchers and people in the medical field? Yes. Absolutely. My initial conversations were with the family themselves who after many years of difficulty were ready to come forward and talk about everything that happened to their family in a very deep and profound way. But of course, in the back of my mind I was thinking well, how specialists this family for all I know there might be thousand families with lots of kids where half of them have schizophrenia this, this might happen all the time. So I didn't immediate round of checking talking. To major figures in scholarship of schizophrenia in the history of science, but also the treatment of schizophrenia and just to say, have you heard of this family? What would you say if I told you a family late this existed how typical do you think it is? Do you know the doctors who have treated the? Stanley because I knew their names as well are those doctors on the level? Are they quacks and everything really checked out? This is a family that is definitely unusual extraordinarily. So in terms of the numbers, they were important family to study for their time and they did help move the ball forward in a genuinely valid way an. Way So. There's a lot of hope in this story as well. Are there many families that have that many children with half of them being diagnosed with really any severe and persistent mental illness or or even just. This is a a big question that I pursue in the book itself because Linda Lee, one of the researchers who studied this family was actually a collector of genetic material of what she called multi plex families, which is families with more than one perhaps many instances six mental illness, not just among siblings but maybe parents and aunts and uncles and grandparents she made it her job in the nineteen eighties. Nineties was to collect data on as many. Multiplex families as possible. So they're out there but even in that World Galvin families extreme it's it's hard for anyone to think of any other family with twelve children where six of them had this diagnosis

Schizophrenia Galvin Family Galvin Gabe Howard Caulker Robert New York Magazine York Times World Galvin Bob Welcome New York Times Bestseller Robert Oprah Amazon Linda Lee Mimi Stanley
"galvin family" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

06:19 min | 10 months ago

"galvin family" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"Six of them diagnosed with schizophrenia became sciences greatest hope in the quest to understand the disease. Let's talk first about how you did the research for this book, you met the Galvin family. That's right. My career really took shape at New York magazine where I've written dozens of cover stories and feature stories about everyday people going through extraordinary situations and I really am drawn to these stories of people who manage crises come through difficulties I find it inspiring and I'm always looking for a deeper issue running at the bottom of her in. So when I met the Galvin family I was amazed, this is a family that's been through so much. Misfortune and also so many challenges and so much scientific mystery medical mystery I I met the two sisters they're the youngest in the family there were twelve children they're the only girls and they now are in their fifties. But when they were children, six of their ten brothers had been diagnosed with schizophrenia. The family immediately became interesting to scientists and researchers were trying to get to the the genetic roots of the disease. But before that happened, there was tremendous amount of denial, a lot of stigma that forced the family into the shadows, and so it became clear that by telling their story, maybe we could inspire the general public to sort of remove some of that stigma from mental illness particularly acute mental illness like schizophrenia, which so many people still have difficulty talking about and to anchor this in time they were diagnosed in the seventies. I'm horribly bad at math, but they were diagnosed fifty years ago. So there was even more stigma more discrimination less understanding. It was harder to get diagnosed absolutely and also more of a reason to hide because so many people in the establishment were blaming the families themselves for the mental illness blaming bad parenting in particular, blaming bad mothering, and then of course, the medical treatments, the pharmaceutical treatments were blunter and more extreme back then and they were just coming out of the period of lobotomies in shock therapy insulin coma therapy is all sorts of drastic treatments which are now. So questionable now the parents are dotted Mimi, Galvin their mom and dad did mom and. Dad Have Schizophrenia or any mental illness or was it just their children dated not have schizophrenia neither did anyone in their immediate families and I think part of the mystery of this book is how does schizophrenia get inherited because we now are certain that there is a genetic component to schizophrenia, but we don't know exactly how it is inherited. It's not parent to child it's not recessive. It's not like you need to people with schizophrenia to produce a child schizophrenia it Kinda wanders it meanders through families in a very tricky way and there was a lot of hope pinned on this family that they would help shed a little light on that mystery as well. What were some of the most surprising things that you learned about mental illness and will really schizophrenia from your time interviewing the Galvin's I was surprised by almost everything. But my biggest surprises were that to my understanding of mental illness was that it was about brain chemistry and that great pharmaceutical drugs were coming online that through trial and error and a lot of work. Perhaps, we'll be able to correct your brain chemistry problem and then whatever you had whether it was anxiety or depression. Or bipolar disorder that it would be corrected and that you would become essentially cured although cured is the wrong kind of word for like remission or recovery. Right what I learned was that schizophrenia this isn't really true at all that the drugs that they have the antipsychotic drugs that are very popular that are prescribed so much for schizophrenia, they are basically the same drugs that have been prescribed for fifty years. They may have different names derived from the same classifications of typical neuroleptics or. Narrow left ix and that these drugs are essentially symptoms suppressors. Help a person control their hallucinations or delusions or it might make a patient less erotic and more manageable as a patient in a healthcare setting but it doesn't turn back the clock. It doesn't necessarily add functionality. They really are just sort of good enough in terms of controlling the population but not really the miracles that we look at when we talk about antidepressants for instance, and that was a huge surprise it sounds like that. You didn't know a lot about schizophrenia before you started working on this book. Is that true? That's right. I mean I knew enough to know that it didn't mean split personality multiple. Personality which is. Like the big misnomer that because of the way we use the words get. So there's a Latin root skits which refers to split, but really it was meant to mean a split between reality and one's perception of reality a person with schizophrenia tends to wall themselves off from what is commonly accepted as reality I a little bit and then a lot and sometimes that means delusion. Sometimes that means to lose the nations and sometimes it means being catatonic sometimes, it means being paranoid and in fact, that was the other huge surprise for me for schizophrenia, which was that it isn't really a disease at all it is a classification. Syndrome. It's a collection of symptoms that we have given a name. And I don't mean to sound too nebulous or mystical and talking about There is such a thing as schizophrenia. It's just that it may be several different things in that forty years from now, we might have removed the word schizophrenia from our lexicon and we might have decided that it's really six different brain disorders with sixty screen types of symptoms, and we have found ways to treat those six different conditions differently that was another huge surprise to me. When doing your research for the book? Obviously, you spoke to the family. Did you also speak with medical doctors and schizophrenia researchers and people in the medical field? Yes. Absolutely. My initial conversations were with the family themselves who after many years of difficulty were ready to come forward and talk about everything that happened to their family in a very deep and profound way. But of course, in the back of my mind I was thinking well, how specialists this family for all I know there might be thousand families with lots of kids where half of them have schizophrenia this, this might happen all the time..

schizophrenia Galvin family Schizophrenia Galvin New York magazine Mimi
"galvin family" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

06:24 min | 11 months ago

"galvin family" Discussed on WGN Radio

"The ground once once remember number 51 to your side. It was the last time you heard this song performed by Bob Kolker is a New York Times best selling author for his previous books, Lost Girls and now for Hidden Valley Road. In this book, Bob writes about the Galvin family whose lives were rocked by schizophrenia, paranoia and physical disputes. Bob tells us what he learned about mental health. And psychological disorders in his research for his book, Hidden Valley Road, So I've got this book. It's called Hidden Valley Road. I just finished it the other day inside the mind. Inside the mind. It's such a good way to put it of an American family. It's by a guy named Robert Kolker, who was on our show. Not that long ago. Story of Mimi and Don Galvin. He served in World War two and after the war, they settled into Colorado. They had 10 kids. No. They had 12 kids, 10 boys and then two girls. Was a Catholic military family and Mimi, the mother was really the strict disciplinarian. All of the boys were altar boys. In fact, at one point each of them took a day of the week to serve mass. You have a Galvan boy Sunday and then Monday and then Tuesday they played hockey. Four of them were on a state championship hockey team. The father had a promising and successful military career. And in fact introduced the Falcon is the mascot if the United States Air Force Academy Six of the 12 kids were paranoid schizophrenic. In fact, six of the 10 boys were paranoid. The first and the second and then sort of interspersed for more. Bob Corker's on a phone line. Welcome back to WG and Radio Bob. Thanks for joining us. It's great to be back. I'm so glad you like the book. Was fascinated by the amount of work it must have taken because not only do you tell this family story, but then you go deep into the weeds on the history of how we treat mental illness. This just must have been maybe more work than you realized you were going to get into when you started. I need to be one huge challenge of making sure to tell a story where we could get all the character straight, given them their 12 kids to parents, and you want to get everybody's point of view. And then there's that second challenge of the science that you know. The best way to understand a really complicated subject, like signs of schizophrenia is storytelling. So I was hopeful that I'd be ableto. Pain that you gotta get it clear? Well, some of the anecdotes some of the story, some of the scenes that you paint are just heartbreaking. You open with the oldest son Don and the youngest or second youngest daughter. And he is standing there with the disheveled weird clothes. Did he have any clothes on and the daughter's in the room with him? And she's worried about being in the company of her brothers. She would rightly so for the rest of her life. And that's the opening scene on it was weird, not only for the family and obviously it was tragic for the six sons, but then it was also imagine it how devastating it was for the other six kids who weren't paranoid to have to live in and manage a life. Like that. It was just it was stunning. Yes. For the well. Children they not only are are upset by what's happening to the six siblings. But they also are words that will be next. They go to bed every night, wondering if it's gonna happen to them because there wasn't a lot of riel. Certainty about exactly why this is happening back in the late sixties and early seventies happens to psychiatrists for blaming bad mothering and the other half Were you trying to medicate it? So you know, the family was checking the drinking water. Nobody knew what was happening, and they were trying to keep it secret from the world because of the stigma And so you have things like that opening scene where the little girl the seven the youngest in the family is ashamed of her brother and afraid of her brother. In a twist. Brother doesn't hurt her in that scene at all. In fact, he loved her. And it's her. He has to suddenly, you know, deal but her stops and feeling from the whole situation and the expense a lot of time talking about how how she and the other Well, something's really come around over the years on DH change their point of view about what's happening that maybe what's happening isn't a monster movie immediate something scientific. That we can put in the perspective for others. Yeah, we'll get to that point in a minute. But I'm sure folks when they find out about this, their first question is why did they have all of those kids? Then, if the first this paranoid schizophrenic the second one is a paranoid schizophrenic and meets a tragic end? Then why? Why did they have the other 10? Other in general attorney on set is in one's early 20. So they had all 12 kids by the time the first one started having serious problems. Now today, perhaps it might be a little different because early intervention it's really the norm now and so perhaps, of your teenagers behaving strangely, they might flag it at the You know, Trey leads to something more serious. But that wasn't the case here. Here, there was just boys being boys behaving strangely. And then the actual Donald, the oldest From two or 23 to really become a serious mental health issues. They were advised not to have that many kids anyway. And you wonder why does anybody have 12 kids, Catholic or otherwise? But when she after 10 or 11, they said, you might not survive another childbirth. But she wanted to have they wanted to have those kids, didn't they? Yes, I think..

Bob Don Galvin Mimi Bob Kolker hockey Bob Corker Galvin family Robert Kolker New York Times United States Air Force Academ Colorado Trey Donald general attorney
"galvin family" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

07:17 min | 11 months ago

"galvin family" Discussed on WGN Radio

"The skin you live in is a great book for families for kids that you illustrated. It was written by your friend Michael Tyler. And it's obviously about our races and equality. It's a good book for these days. Let's talk about that next time, but thanks for doing what you're doing, David and keep it up. Thank you so much on and, um, here. Here's to, um once and sunshine and and really getting close to the weekend. When you go through his Facebook page, you'll see a picture of me and my dog, Daisy, you can color us to Bob Kolker is a New York Times best selling author for his previous book, Lost Girls. And now for Hidden Valley Road. In this book, Bob writes about the Galvin family whose lives were rocked by schizophrenia, paranoia and physical disputes. Bob tells us what he learned about mental health. And psychological disorders in his research for his book, Hidden Valley Road, So I've got this book. It's called Hidden Valley Road. I just finished it the other day inside the mind. Inside the mind. It's such a good way to put it of an American family. It's by a guy named Robert Coker, who was on our show. Not that long ago. The story of me, Me and Don Galvin. He served in World War two and after the war, they settled into Colorado. They had 10 kids. No, they had 12 kids. 10 boys and then two girls. Was a Catholic military family. And Mimi the mother was really the strict, too disciplinarian. All of the boys were altar boys. In fact, at one point each of them took a day of the week to serve mass. You have a Galvan boy Sunday and then Monday and then Tuesday they played hockey. Four of them were on a state championship hockey team. The father had a promising and successful military career. And in fact introduced the Falcon is the mascot if the United States Air Force Academy Six of the 12 kids were paranoid schizophrenic. In fact, six of the 10 boys were paranoid. The first and the second and then sort of interspersed for more. Bob Corker's on a phone line. Welcome back to WG and Radio Bob. Thanks for joining us. It's great to be back. I'm so glad you like the book. Was fascinated by the amount of work it must have taken because not only do you tell this family story, but then you go deep into the weeds on the history of how we treat mental illness. This just must have been maybe more work than you realized You were going to get into and you started. I I need to be one huge challenge of making sure to tell a story where you could get all the character straight, given them their 12 kids to parents, and you want to get everybody's point of view. And then there's that second challenge of the science that you know. The best way to understand a really complicated subject. Like the scientist. Schizophrenia is storytelling, So I'm hopeful that I'll be ableto. Pain that you gotta get it clear? Well, some of the anecdotes some of the story, some of the scenes that you paint are just heartbreaking. You open with the oldest son Don and the youngest or second youngest daughter. And he is standing there with the disheveled weird clothes. Did he have any clothes on and the daughter's in the room with him? And she's worried about being in the company of her brothers. She would rightly so for the rest of her life. And that's the opening scene on it was weird, not only for the family and obviously it was tragic for the six sons, but then it was also imagine it how devastating it was for the other six kids who weren't paranoid to have to live in and manage a life. Like that. It was just it was stunning. Yes. For the well. Children they not only are are upset by what's happening to the six siblings. But they also are words that will be next. They go to bed every night, wondering if it's going to happen to them because there wasn't a lot of riel. Certainty about exactly why this is happening back in the late sixties and early seventies happen psychiatrists for blaming bad mothering and the other half Were you trying to medicated? You know, the family was checking the drinking water. Nobody knew what was happening and trying to keep it secret from the world because of the stigma And so you have things like that opening scene where the little girl the seven the youngest in the family is ashamed of her brother and afraid of her brother. But in a twist Brother doesn't hurt her in that scene at all. In fact, he loved her. And it's her. He has to suddenly, you know, deal that but her thoughts and feelings from the whole situation, and the book spends a lot of time talking about how how she and the other well. Siblings certainly have come around over the years on DH change their point of view about what's happening that maybe what's happening isn't a monster movie immediate something scientific. That we can put into perspective for others. Yeah, we'll get to that point in a minute. But I'm sure folks when they find out about this, their first question is why did they have all of those kids? Then? If the first this paranoid schizophrenic the second one Is paranoid schizophrenic and meets a tragic end. Then why? Why did they have the other 10? In general attorney on set is in one's early 20. So they had all 12 kids by the time the first one started having serious problems. Now today, perhaps it might be a little different because early intervention is really the norm now and so perhaps, of your teenagers behaving strangely, they might flag it at the You know, Trade leads to something more serious. But that wasn't the case here. Here, there was just boys being boys behaving strangely. And then the Little Donald, the oldest From two or 23 to really become a serious mental health issues. They were advised not to have that many kids anyway. And you wonder, why does anybody have 12 kids, Catholic or otherwise? But when she after 10 or 11, they said, you might not survive another childbirth. But she wanted to have they wanted to have those kids, didn't they? Yes, I think. At one region. What they still haven't had a girl. But then they went ahead and had 1/12 child after one of your girls, So they ended up with two girls. I think they liked has the distinctiveness of having a large family. I've a mother in particular. Like Creating a new story for herself because she had some unpleasant mission early in her life that she was trying to race and start start fresh. And and there was a little bit of, um, issues between the mother and the father trying to keep the father involved in the family. He was sort of a distant Figure in the household so that their number of reasons why they had so many kids and the dad was ambitious. Maybe had his own emotional issues, but he wasn't around all the time. The mother was she was along with the father, but really, she was wearing the pants in the family raising and organizing. 12 kids and not just 12 kids, but 12 sometimes beyond unruly kids, abusive kids..

Schizophrenia Don Galvin Bob hockey Galvin family Bob Corker Michael Tyler Bob Kolker Facebook Robert Coker New York Times David Colorado United States Air Force Academ Daisy Mimi scientist general attorney
"galvin family" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

07:08 min | 11 months ago

"galvin family" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Idea laid out what's gonna go down and may be what you ask someone, but he never quite sure how they're going to go about it with alligators in the same way, sometimes catching the fishing rod. Sometimes they're not in upon their upon somebody's front porch. Or in their pole or in the garage or in there in a bathroom somewhere in an elevator. Who knows? It happens a little bit differently every time and the way the animal acts towards you is different each time. Some of these animals have been caught before or been messed with their entire life for situations like chance where someone was trying to catch him for a week before I got there, and he didn't want nothing to do with anybody. She had to go with different approaches to kind of bring them out and get them to see you. It's Catch catch 99% of mine the fishing rod, but which is probably probably true. Just depends. Well, Frank, we look forward to day when you can return up here and we get to see again and, you know, just stay in touch with us. All right? And thank you for calling for sure. I appreciate ma'am. Thank you for having me. Can you even remember when that seemed like a big deal on alligator in a pond? Oh, so scary. I manage Atlantis and that was Alligator OB here on W g N cz weekend showcase more coming up. Bob Kolker is a New York Times best selling author for his previous books, Lost Girls. And now for Hidden Valley Road. In this book, Bob writes about the Galvin family whose lives were rocked by schizophrenia, paranoia and physical disputes. Bob tells us what he learned about mental health. And psychological disorders in his research for his book, Hidden Valley Road, So I've got this book. It's called Hidden Valley Road. I just finished it the other day inside the mind. Inside the mind. It's such a good way to put it of an American family. It's by a guy named Robert Kolker, who was on our show. Not that long ago. It's the story of me. Me and Don Galvin. He served in World War two and after the war, they settled into Colorado. They had 10 kids. No. They had 12 kids, 10 boys and then two girls. Was a Catholic military family and Mimi, the mother was really the strict disciplinarian. All of the boys were altar boys. In fact, at one point each of them took a day of the week to serve mass. You have a Galvan boy Sunday and then Monday and then Tuesday they played hockey. Four of them were on the state championship hockey team. The father had a promising and successful military career. And in fact introduced the Falcon is the mascot if the United States Air Force Academy Six of the 12 kids were paranoid schizophrenic. In fact, six of the 10 boys were paranoid. The first and the second and then sort of interspersed for more. Bob Corker's on a phone line. Welcome back to WG and Radio Bob. Thanks for joining us. It's great to be back. I'm so glad you like the book. Was fascinated by the amount of work it must have taken because not only do you tell this family story, but then you go deep into the weeds on the history of how we treat mental illness. This just must have been maybe more work than you realized You were going to get into and you started. I I need to be one huge challenge of making sure to tell a story where we could get all the character straight, given them their 12 kids to parents, and you want to get everybody's point of view. And then there's that second challenge of the science that you know. The best way to understand a really complicated subject, like the science of Schizophrenia is storytelling, So I'm hopeful that I'll be ableto. Pain that you get it get it clear Well, some of the anecdotes some of the story, some of the scenes that you paint are just heartbreaking. You open with the oldest son Don and the youngest or second youngest daughter. And he is standing there with disheveled weird clothes. Did he have any clothes on and the daughter's in the room with him? And she's worried about being in the company of her brothers. She would rightly so for the rest of her life. And that's the opening scene on it was weird, not only for the family and obviously it was tragic for the six sons, but then it was also imagine it how devastating it was for the other six kids who weren't paranoid to have to live in and manage of life. Like that. It was just stunning. Yes. For the well. Children they not only are are upset by what's happening to the six siblings. But they also are words that will be next. They go to bed every night, wondering if it's gonna happen to them because there wasn't a lot of riel certainty about exactly why this is happening back in the late sixties and early seventies, happened the psychiatrist for blaming bad mothering and the other half. Were you trying to medicated? You know, the family was checking the drinking water. Nobody knew what was happening. And they were trying to keep it secret from the world because of the ST MMA, And so you have things like that opening scene Where the little girl the seven the youngest in the family is ashamed of her brother. And afraid of her brother. But in a twist, the brother doesn't hurt her in that scene at all. In fact, he loved her. And it's her. He has to doubling the deal, but her stops and feeling from the whole situation and the expense a lot of time talking about how how she and the other Well, something's really come around over the years on DH change their point of view about what's happening that maybe what's happening isn't a monster of the immediate something scientific. That we can put in the perspective for others. Yeah, we'll get to that point in a minute. But I'm sure folks when they find out about this, their first question is why did they have all of those kids? Then? If the first this paranoid schizophrenic the second one Is paranoid schizophrenic and meets a tragic end. Then why? Why did they have the other 10? In generally good attorney, Dion said, is in one's early 20. So they had all 12 kids by the time the first one started having serious problems. Now today, perhaps it might be a little different because early intervention it's really the norm now and so perhaps, of your teenagers hitting strangely, they might flag it as a You know, Trade leads to something more serious. But that wasn't the case here. Here, there was just boys being boys behaving strangely, And then it's actual Donald, the oldest From two or 23 to really become a serious mental health issues. They were advised not to have that many kids anyway. And you wonder why does anybody have 12 kids, Catholic or otherwise? But when she after 10 or 11, they said, you might not survive another childbirth. But she wanted to have they wanted to have those kids, didn't they? Yes, I think. One reason what they still haven't had a girl. But then they went ahead and had 1/12 child after having your girl so they ended up with two girls. I think they liked has the distinctive mist of having a.

Don Galvin Schizophrenia Bob hockey Bob Corker Bob Kolker Alligator OB Robert Kolker Galvin family Frank New York Times Colorado United States Air Force Academ Mimi Donald ST MMA attorney Dion
"galvin family" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

08:06 min | 1 year ago

"galvin family" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Radio dot com. Bob Kolker is a New York Times best selling author for his previous book, Lost Girls. And now for Hidden Valley Road. In this book, Bob writes about the Galvin family whose lives were rocked by schizophrenia, paranoia and physical disputes. Bob tells us what he learned about mental health. And psychological disorders in his research for his book, Hidden Valley Road, So I've got this book. It's called Hidden Valley Road. I just finished it the other day inside the mind. Inside the mind. It's such a good way to put it of an American family. It's by a guy named Robert Kolker, who was on our show. Not that long ago. Story of Mimi and Don Galvin. He served in World War two, and after the war, they settled into Colorado. They had 10 kids. No. They had 12 kids, 10 boys and then two girls. Was a Catholic military family. And Mimi the mother was really the strict, too disciplinarian. All of the boys were altar boys. In fact, at one point each of them took a day of the week to serve mass. You'd have a Galvan boy Sunday and then Monday and then Tuesday they played hockey. Four of them were on the state championship hockey team. The father had a promising and successful military career. And in fact introduced the Falcon is the mascot at the United States Air Force Academy. Six of the 12 kids were paranoid schizophrenic. In fact, six of the 10 boys were paranoid. The first and the second and then sort of interspersed for more. Bob Corker's on a phone line. Welcome back to WG and Radio Bob. Thanks for joining us. It's great to be back. I'm so glad you like the book. Was fascinated by the amount of work it must have taken because not only do you tell this family story, but then you go deep into the weeds on the history of how we treat mental illness. This just must have been maybe more work than you realized You were going to get into and you started. I I need to be one huge challenge of making sure to tell a story where we could get all the character straight, given them their 12 kids to parents, and you want to get everybody's point of view. And then there's that second challenge of the science that you know. The best way to understand a really complicated subject, like the science of Schizophrenia is storytelling, so I was hopeful that I'd be ableto. Tame it. Get it, Get it clear! Well, some of the anecdotes some of the story, some of the scenes that you paint are just heartbreaking. You open with the oldest son Don and the youngest or second youngest daughter. And he is standing there with disheveled weird clothes. Did he have any clothes on and the daughter's in the room with him? And she's worried about being in the company of her brothers. She would rightly so for the rest of her life. And that's the opening scene on it was weird, not only for the family and obviously it was tragic for the six sons, but then it was also imagine it how devastating it was for the other six kids who weren't paranoid to have to live in and manage a life. Like that. It was just it was stunning. Yes. For the well. Children they not only are are upset by what's happening to the six siblings. But they also are words that will be next. They go to bed every night, wondering if it's gonna happen to them because there wasn't a lot of riel. Certainty about exactly why this is happening back in the late sixties and early seventies happen psychiatrists for blaming bad mothering and the other half Were you trying to medicated? You know, the family was checking the drinking water. Nobody knew what was happening. And they were trying to keep it secret from the world because of the stigma, And so you have things like that opening scene where the little girl the seven the youngest in the family is ashamed of her brother. And afraid of her brother by in a twist, the brother doesn't hurt her in that scene at all. In fact, he loved her. And it's her. He has to suddenly, you know, deal that but her stops and feeling from the whole situation and the expense a lot of time talking about how how she and the other well. Siblings really have come around over the years on DH change their point of view about what's happening that maybe what's happening isn't a monster movie immediate something scientific. That we can put in the perspective for others. Yeah, we'll get to that point in a minute. But I'm sure folks when they find out about this, their first question is why did they have all of those kids? Then, if the first this paranoid schizophrenic the 2nd 1 is a paranoid schizophrenic and meets a tragic end? Then why? Why did they have the other 10? In generally schizophrenia. The onset is in one's early 20 So they had all 12 kids by the time the 1st 1 started having serious problems. Now today, perhaps it might be a little different because early intervention it's really the norm now and so perhaps, of your teenagers behaving strangely, they might flag it at the You know, prelude to something more serious. But that wasn't the case here. Here, there was just boys being boys behaving strangely. And then the Little Donald, the oldest From Taylor, 23 to really become a serious mental health issues. They were advised not to have that many kids anyway. And you wonder why does anybody have 12 kids, Catholic or otherwise? But when she after 10 or 11 they said, you might not survive another childbirth. But she wanted to have they wanted to have those kids, didn't they? Yes, I think. At one region. What they still haven't had a girl. But then they went ahead and had a 12 child after having your girl so they ended up with two girls. I think they like it has a distinctive mist of having a large family. I've a mother in particular. Like Creating a new story for herself because she had some unpleasant mission early in her life that she was tryingto race and start start fresh and and there was a little bit of bomb issues between the mother and the father trying to keep the father involved in the family. He was sort of a distant Figure in the household so that their number of reasons why they had so many kids and the dad was ambitious. Maybe had his own emotional issues, but he wasn't around all the time. The mother was she was along with the father, but really, she was wearing the pants in the family raising and organizing. 12 kids and not just 12 kids, but 12 sometimes beyond unruly kids, abusive kids. I mean, you know how boys fight these boys would fight and punch each other and break their eye sockets. I'm John Williams. And that was an interview with Bob Kolker, a New York Times best selling author. His book, Hidden Valley Road is just terrific. It's the story of the Galvin and family. Wisconsin was just added to the list of hot spots for Corona virus from which visitors Must quarantine themselves for 14 days. We asked the Illinois A C L U executive Director Colin Connell if it's legal for the governor to find people who don't follow the Corona virus rules. 10 10. Here's a Mame working its way around Scott, You know the sort of 19 fifties man, a pencil drawing of him winking at you. Maybe he's sipping a cup of coffee. He's got some wisdom for you. The main Reed's new rule. If it is safe to male tax refunds, Social security checks, stimulus checks, draft registrations, prescription drugs, passports, your driver's license or an actual idea that you used to vote. Then it is safe for you to vote by mail. Talked a little bit about that yesterday. Today's Today our eyes are a little bit on the.

Schizophrenia Don Galvin Bob Kolker Bob New York Times hockey Galvin family Robert Kolker Bob Corker Mimi United States Air Force Academ Colorado Wisconsin Illinois Corona Reed Scott executive Director Colin Connell
"galvin family" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"galvin family" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Kill. That is a cave man thing. And you know, in my own weird, little privileged worlds, you know, I'm lucky I get to marry half a dozen really great shows. And years ago, I put a studio in my apartment because I thought it would be way way more efficient and I could get more done and I wouldn't have to leave well after two months of it. I was ready to throw myself off the balcony. You know, I like getting in the car. I like driving to another place where my bed isn't going inside and saying hello to people in ordering lunch and telling sad stories about the wildebeest trying to get across the vast reaches of the parents aren Getty and then going back home, right? It's like That's inculcated in our in our DEA. I don't care what you do for money. Hard day at the office, honey. Yeah, real hard day. What was the wildebeest share? All right, By the way, it never works out for the world of Bistro. Just so you know, I never I have noticed that all right Dirty jobs. Road trip premieres tomorrow night on the Discovery Channel. And it's going to Tuesday nights for at least the next four weeks were very happy to welcome it back so you could go back and you go back to some of the stories that you told before, and we we learned where the people are now and what the evolution of that whole thing is. And thank you, micro for what you have done for them working men and women of this country. You really are a hero to all of us. But I mean, I don't include myself in that group. I'm just saying. You're a hero to all of us were telling those stories may grow things there. Thank you anytime. Appreciate reliving great moments. It's Ro Khanna, The WC and Radio weekend showcase. Bob Kolker is a New York Times best selling author for his previous book, Lost Girls. And now for Hidden Valley Road. In this book, Bob writes about the Galvin family whose lives were rocked by schizophrenia, paranoia and physical disputes. Bob tells us what he learned about mental health. And psychological disorders in his research for his book, Hidden Valley Road, So I've got this book. It's called Hidden Valley Road. I just finished it the other day inside the mind. Inside the mind..

Bob Kolker aren Getty Ro Khanna DEA Galvin family
"galvin family" Discussed on 10 Things To Tell You

10 Things To Tell You

04:45 min | 1 year ago

"galvin family" Discussed on 10 Things To Tell You

"Now, not so much a weakened read, but right in my wheelhouse, and in fact, a book that a couple of people texted me or message May that I need to pick up right away was hidden valley road by Robert Coker. This is a nonfiction book about a family with very. Deep and pronounced, mental illness, specifically schizophrenia and their twelve children in this family, ten of them boys, two of them girls, the younger to are the girls and six of those brothers are eventually diagnosed with schizophrenia and affects their family life. Of course it affects their own individual trajectories, and then how they interact with the siblings. This is a heartbreaking story. This is hard to read. Read in some parts. There's lots of trigger warnings if this is not a book that you are drawn to reading about mental health reading about complicated family memoir, this isn't memoir. Actually. This is more journalistic, but if liked educated if you liked the sound of gravel, which is one of my favorite movies of all time, if you like the Glass Castle which is also a truly. Memoir now those three that I just named educated the sound of gravel and Glass Castle. Those are all straight memoir. They are written by the women that experienced these stories, but there's a lot of mental health parts of their childhood of their parents of their siblings. The difference here is that hidden. Valley road is written by Robert Coker so. He's outside of the family I. DO think that changes the tone of the book as a whole if If you experienced it yourself versus if you're writing the story based on a series of interviews that were extensive by the way I mean it this author. Robert Coke really did a lot of research around this. And because he was a third party, he was able to also bring in the science element because the Galvin family. That's the name of the family. Where all this was occurring. They ended up being studied by scientists and actually ended up. Up being really important part of the study of schizophrenia, and how we think about it now in terms of other mental health conditions and being able to study all from one family, all from the same two parents like the genetics of that the science of that that becomes an element in the book, so some people are going to like that elements. Some people are going to wish that it was I. don't know stuck to the more of. Of the family dynamics and stuff I liked having both, but it really does make it sort of a better book than those other memoirs. I mentioned, but if you liked those, you will probably be very interested in this story, but again there's a lot of abuse. There is a lot of hard things in hidden. Valley road of this, not your cup of tea and you need to avoid it. I. Don't usually give like repeated trigger warnings..

Galvin family Robert Coker schizophrenia Glass Castle Robert Coke
"galvin family" Discussed on Nobody Told Me!

Nobody Told Me!

05:26 min | 1 year ago

"galvin family" Discussed on Nobody Told Me!

"Welcomed nobody told me I'm Laura Owens and I'm Jan Black and on this episode we're joined by Journalists Robert Coker author of the new book. Hidden Valley road inside the mind of an American family hidden. Valley road is a Number One New York Times Bestseller, which tells the heartbreaking times terrifying story of the Galvin family, a family with twelve children, six of whom were diagnosed with schizophrenia. The Galvin's were so unusual. Unusual that they were studied by the National Institute of Mental Health in an effort to learn more about the genetic origins of schizophrenia they're story is one of shame, denial, shock, trauma, and misunderstanding, as it relates to mental illness Robert. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you. Jan I'm really thrilled to be talking to you. How did you first hear about the Galvin family and decide to write their story? I'm had been looking for a new book to write I'm a journalist and author and. An old editor of mine, who also a good friend of mine put me in touch with an old high school of Friends of his, and she happened to be the youngest member of the Gallon family. She and her sister are the only two girls in the family. They do not have schizophrenia but A. Had endured some of the more trying and challenging and difficult need and tragic aspects of life in their house over the years, and they had been talking for decades about the best way to let people know about their story. They also were convinced that the family had some scientific against because scientists had been studying their families genes for decades, and so they finally decided to ask journalists to not just write about their experiences, but the whole family talked to everyone in the family and my friend thought of me because I sort of. Specialize in my career in interviewing, not news makers or politicians or or famous people, but every day people who go through extraordinary dramatic challenges in their lives, and so I'm I was just thrilled to be able to meet them and astounded by their story. Yeah and I was hearing that. When you first had the idea for the book and thought that this family might be an interesting one for you to talk about your next book, you were thinking it might be a difficult book to make in. There weren't so many surviving members of the family, but you wanted to talk to each of them to hear their story or wouldn't really be the story of the family. If you weren't able to to speak to everyone, how did that go? And how did you get to know those people? Just from a mechanical standpoint. You know to sit down in front of the blank page. Think I'm going to write the story of twelve children into parents, and even some of those childrens, children and get everybody represented well and make sure everything is fair and accurate and get everybody's point of view involved. Even the people who have passed away. It was really the challenge of. Of a career, and though the first thing I did before, even selling book to a publisher was making sure that every living Galvin. Family member was on board and interested in doing this..

Jan Black Galvin schizophrenia National Institute of Mental H New York Times Bestseller Robert Coker Laura Owens Jan publisher editor
"galvin family" Discussed on The Current

The Current

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"galvin family" Discussed on The Current

"No matter what sector a Canadian works. We're the size of company that they work. They deserve to know that their government is supporting them. Our message to Canadian workers remains the same. We have your back. First and foremost this is a health crisis. We're living through but as lockdowns drag on. The economic crisis is getting stronger. With economy shutdown millions out of work and restart planned slowly. Coming into focus will hear this morning from Canadians. But the financial toll. Taken and from economists on how. We'll get out of this also this morning. When was the last time you played a board game portrayed in diseases and researching cares? That's right it's Z. May maybe not that one time on our hands board games of bounce back especially chess we will hear why later no one has to be told how sensitive subject mental illness can be how those of us who have it in our lives or in our family is often painful to discuss with other people. The tail of the Galvin family is a remarkable one twelve children. Six of whom were diagnosed with schizophrenia. They're story and the hunt for the genetic markers that might explain. What happened is the subject of a fantastic new book called Hidden Valley Road? The author and a member of that family. Join me later this morning. We start though with a focus on the economy in freefall out. Good Morning I'm Matt Galloway..

Matt Galloway Galvin
"galvin family" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

03:03 min | 1 year ago

"galvin family" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Galvin family which consisted of twelve children half of whom were diagnosed with schizophrenia than former secretary of state Madeleine Albright's memoir hello and other destinations and wrapping up our look at some of the best selling nonfiction books according to indiebound is Tara Westover is account of growing up in the Idaho mountains and her introduction to formal education at the age of seventeen her book educated has been on best seller lists for more than two years some of these authors have appeared on book TV and you can watch them online at book TV dot org your book TV C-SPAN radio WCS be from Washington we'll hear from each event he's a historian at the White House historical association early in April she talked about her book the cabinet George Washington and the creation of American institution good afternoon welcome to White House history live my name is Stewart McLaurin and I'm the president of the White House historical association today we're going to have an exciting conversation with the head of our Rubenstein center for White House history and one of our historians on a brand new book the cabinet George Washington and the creation of an American institution ordinarily we would be doing this at the end of the carriage house at historic Decatur house which is our base of operations on Lafayette park but is we're all working from home and we're joining you in your home we're trying out this new mode of communications but it's perfectly fitting with our historic mission yes all of you know we were founded in nineteen sixty one by First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy who had the vision at such a young age of for such a short period of time as First Lady to create an organization like the White House historical association to give nonprofit nonpartisan support the work of maintaining the museum standard of the White House but also in education mission to teach and to tell the stories of the White House and its history going back to seventeen ninety two when George Washington who we're talking about today actually selected that piece of land and hardly young Irish architect James Hoban to build the White House well creating educational materials and content is a core part of our mission and that's what we do every day the wonderful books we publish our programs that we host Decatur house and around the country and our online social media content and website content and this is an example of that we're doing more more of this during this time we were all at home looking for interesting things to do I would really encourage you to check out our website White House history dot org you can find all kinds of information materials particularly a wonderful new part of our website which combines educational materials from over a hundred presidential sites across the country so we become one stop shopping for presidential and White House history at.

Galvin family
Robert Kolker Discusses 'Hidden Valley Road'

The Book Review

08:34 min | 1 year ago

Robert Kolker Discusses 'Hidden Valley Road'

"Us about the Galvin family. Let's start with the parents. Don and Mimi there. The subject of this book Don really lived through the greatest moments of the twentieth century. He was a World War Two veteran and the two of them put down roots in Colorado after the war and raised a family and had twelve children. The twelve children's span the baby boom the. I was born in nineteen forty five and the last in nineteen sixty five and they were known in Colorado Springs. Colorado is sort of a model family. Everybody knew the Galvin's with their twelve children and the oldest was a football star and dated the general's daughter at the Air Force Academy and all of the boys were Jock simplisafe on every hockey game. They played they were sort of legends at the time but nobody really knew that privately. The family was suffering that that in the end six of the twelve children were diagnosed schizophrenia. And it was at a time in America where there was a lot of shame and stigma around mental illness. Even more than there is now where the parents were often blamed and so it was a secret for as long as they keep it a secret and that just lead to more damage and the youngest children in the family really suffered the most from living in that house full of secrets before we get into their stories. It's interesting that you say everyone knew the Galvin's in Colorado Springs. My cousin actually grew up in an air force family in Colorado Springs and had never heard of them and so it might be that. She's she's younger. She's in her forties now. But I'm curious how you came across this family and their story because you're not from Colorado Springs. Yeah their heyday was in the early years of the academy. Right after the academy opened in the mid fifties that was when the family really started to rise up so they were best known in the late fifties. I know about them because the youngest two children the only girls were friends of a friend of mine. And for years. These two sisters Margaret and Lindsey had been talking with one another about the best way to let the world know about their family but they realized they couldn't do it alone. There was a lot about their family. They didn't even know. I mean a lot of these brothers were fifteen or twenty years older than they were and then of course a lot of the medical records. They didn't have access to and a lot of the stories that their parents told they couldn't necessarily verify on their own. A lot of legends going around and in fact they some of the worst things that happened to the family had been kept from them kept secret from them because they were too young when it happened and so finally they decided to turn to an independent journalists to to cover the family independently to take the story wherever it would lead and they were confident in doing this because they felt that the there was scientific value medical value in focusing on this family and they knew that researchers had been talking to them for decades and they wanted to know what those researchers learned as. Well okay all families. Don't get along perfectly. And I imagine a family with twelve children. Probably even more so where they unanimous in their willingness to collaborate with you to answer your questions be interviewed well aside from being completely gobsmacked by the story and and really could not believe all. This happened to one family. I was pretty convinced in the beginning that there couldn't be a book about this because of medical privacy laws that all all it would take was one sibling standing up and saying what you WANNA book about this family no way and then suddenly it would get very impossible so I worked very Slowly and really took it very easy and over several months I would get on the phone. Maybe once a week with different family members saying so you know your sisters are interested in having a book about your family. How does that make you feel and sort of got took the temperature of the entire family and to my amazement everyone was interested in. Everyone was ready including Mimi. The family matriarch who had been so determined to keep everything secret for so long. She was in her nineties. Ready to talk about it too. She died in two thousand seventeen after you interviewed her. And I want to talk about that interview a little bit because as you mentioned earlier at that time schizophrenia was often blamed on mothers. Yes and and so. She was thrilled to be talking about it from a genetic perspective. You know. We're in the Arab genetics. Now so it it made her feel good to be able to say yes. Well now. We know that it couldn't have been bad parenting that it was genetics and so two that part she was happy but she was really part of her survival instinct and part of what made her so functional for so long was that she could really move past a lot of the unpleasantness in her life. So getting here to talk about unpleasant subjects was not easy and of course. I didn't WanNa get a ninety one or ninety two year old to to do anything. I didn't want to traumatize someone who was clearly in such frail health. So what proceeded was me sitting there at the kitchen table with her and her two daughters were at the table too and every time she would try to deflects the conversation. One of her daughter's would go. Oh Mom and and try to kind of cajole her gently back to talk about the unpleasant stuff and eventually she she was able to really open up about some very difficult things and I was really grateful to get that kind of clarity from her. Twelve children is difficult enough. I mean twelve children. Ten of them were boys even if they did not suffer from mental illness even during the baby boom. That's a lot of kids. Why did they have twelve children? I spent a lot of time sort of looking into that question for dom father. He was Catholic and he was looking for a distinguished life and he wanted to to stand out in some way and it made him feel good to be a pattern familias and so it pleased him to have so many children. And then Mimi who was like a lot of women in her generation a little frustrated that she couldn't intellectually really achieve dreams. She really gave up her college education and gave up and he sort of independent life to be a mother and she gave up a life of culture and sophistication moving out to the boonies which is Colorado was in the fifties to her as a sophisticated New Yorker and so she liked the being having a certain amount of notoriety and fame and accomplishment of having such a large family but more than that I think she was binging on family in a way because of a lot of the losses she had had in her life. She had lost her father when she was younger and a scandal he sort of became divorced from the family and she never really had a relationship with him. She now was in a marriage where the husband was increasingly absent. He was a career military guy who really created a life of the mind and was not an active parent like a lot of fathers in that time period and so really having so many children gave her a lot of company and I came to appreciate that aspect of it. So six of these kids. Six of the were ultimately diagnosed with schizophrenia. Which as I understand it typically emerges in adolescence or young adulthood it. Correct me if I'm wrong but we're there earlier signed. How did they first find out about the first child to be diagnosed? They suspect something was wrong. Well five of the six of them really followed that pattern. They were all twenty twenty one twenty two in late adolescence. When they had their first really visible psychotic breaks. There was one peter who was earlier he was fourteen he. There was real trauma right before that happened. He watched his father suffers stroke but the they were warning signs for for some of them for Donald. The oldest son he really was a very troubled teenager despite being out early so successful and so popular and he would do things like smashed dishes while washing the dishes out of rage or be overly almost gratuitously abusive to his younger brothers when he was left to take care of them. There are certain ways that he should have demonstrated that he wasn't connecting with the world in a traditional way in that it's almost like there is a barrier between him and others and that was very visible even in his teenage years. But it only devolved into psychosis. Once he was in college he would do things like run into a bonfire during a PEP rally or be cruel to animals. Th they were difficult moments that suddenly were wakeup calls to him. That something was really wrong and he started going to see therapists and his parents started shopping for a medical opinion. That could keep him in college and keep the family away from scandal.

Colorado Springs Colorado Galvin Family Mimi Galvin DON Schizophrenia Air Force Academy Jock Simplisafe America Hockey Football Donald Trump Margaret Lindsey
"galvin family" Discussed on a16z

a16z

14:23 min | 1 year ago

"galvin family" Discussed on a16z

"With help from the Galvin's and other families identified another genetic area called. Churn seven and turn a seven is related to the vulnerability theory of schizophrenia. Which is that. Perhaps one is over sensitive or has a sensitivity issue to stimuli. That looks schizophrenia. As a developmental disease one that really begins in utero. Even though it manifest itself much later and over the years he struggled to find a way to perhaps make the area more healthier more resilient and less vulnerable and he has a hypothesis that there actually is a safe. Nutritional Supplement Choline can strengthen brain health generally of the unborn child but also perhaps cross your fingers sixteen times perhaps many years from now prove to make the children more resilient less vulnerable to psychosis and they're doing on all studies right now using choline and if it shows any promise at all he has the Galvin's and other families like them to thank Stephan. It'd be very interesting to hear from your side of the kind of story of the Pharma Industry Attempt to manage this as well. Where would you see those attempts after sourcing? Then where did we go next? And what was the sort of industry response? Where are we today? In the past. There was a quite productive age. Where drugs like Zyprexa were developed. Where we're looking for simply animal behaviors. That were related to schizophrenia. And here is where having sort of a tool kit is quite valuable in a sense. Because if you know for example if there's some odd behavior that an animal is showing that thorazine mitigates then without even knowing the receptors involved. Perhaps you can test drugs in animals for other drugs. That mitigate those behaviors and perhaps don't have side effects so the problem of course is that rats don't get schizophrenia. They don't even have sort of the massive cortisol structures in the folding. That would be we think is where the higher processes that are affected in schizophrenia reside. So to your point about cells dish. I mean it's really a problem of models right. It's a problem of models. How do you before doing a clinical trial in humans? How do you get confidence that your drug is going to work and I think in the nineteen nineties? There were a number of very good efforts. Based on sort of synoptic studies. People have known again going back to some of the early pharmacology. That dopamine was involved. That glutamate was involved. Now we started to identify with the Human Genome Project and just molecular cloning. In general we started uncover what the molecules are that regulate glutamate and regulate dopamine and a number of clinical trials. Were done on these as well but still does stymie. The field today is if you take the overall disease what is your model. What do you tested on? That gives you confidence that you can test this safely in humans and that will have some effect. How do people even do that? I mean are there any other tools before you begin clinical trials in humans when there's a disease that really doesn't present anywhere else outside of humans? Schizophrenia tough one. It's very tough now. Nothing is easy. But for example tumors do grow animals. And you can implant. A patient derived x plan. A patient derived tumor into an animal. And perhaps test therapies there. Or you do have cancer cell lines tumors will actually cell lines will actually grow in a dish and something that kills. Those could reasonably be called to be acting on the tumor and we simply don't have that equivalent for schizophrenia. So what was the next moment where there was something that seemed on the pharmacology side like a real viable treatment that we were you know that people were getting excited about and where are we now. People were excited about Matab Petro Glutamate receptors. That's a particular type. A subtype of glutamate. Which is the main excited Tori neurotransmitter in the nervous system in humans? People were excited about sort of finer manipulations of dopamine receptors and again by reverse engineering. Some of the atypical anti psychotics. You could find out that serotonin receptors also had involvement now. Each of these is going to be a broad family of many many genes. So can you do more finer manipulations of these not every advance in drug? Therapy has to be a totally new mechanism. Schizophrenics and other CNS disorders famous for going off their medications. So if you can perhaps make a medication that is simply last longer and can be given maybe every month or even less duration under a doctor's supervision that's a significant medical advances and this is an engineering challenge. I started life as an engineer and Drug discovery is really biological engineering. I'm not saying it's easy but we do know how to make drugs last longer in the body. There's a very interesting story. In there. With nicotine the receptor that Robert Freedman in Colorado had identified with help from the Galvin family and other families like them was a nicotinic receptor and strictly speaking. That's a receptor that when medicated might actually help with focusing concentration. I mean there's a stereotype of schizophrenic patients. Getting some relief from chain smoking because it focuses their mind and there's a hypothesis related to nicotine. There was for time that if you could somehow drug this receptor a little bit to help it along that perhaps this would prevent delusions or even prevent psychotic breaks and Robert Freedman did try for a while to work on a drug for that and he reports anecdotal excellent results for many patients. But it was a drug that you had to take several times a day and that was something that the pharmaceutical companies couldn't bring through trials to make into a once a day drug so it went away so he decided to go after the nicotinic receptor in utero. You know through Coleen especially in the nineteen nineties. There was a lot of companies and a lot of academic researchers investigating nicotine nicotinic receptors. And again there did seem to be a clear linked to schizophrenia. Perhaps schizophrenics are self medicating by smoking. If so perhaps you can make a sort of sub type of nicotine that gives you some benefit or perhaps even some war benefit and again as Bob said that perhaps last long enough in the body to be practical to be taken as a drug so in this case there was a biological challenge. There no question but it became also an engineering challenge as all drug discovery. Does nicotine is quite a nonselective molecule. While everything hits is called a nicotinic receptor but your body has something like fourteen fifteen genes for individual sub units that together come together for a receptor for nicotine and they all mix and match and very unpredictable ways and ways that still are not well known so. The challenge was quite formidable. People did go ahead for technical reasons. It turned out to be easy to make. Sort of a sub form of nicotine that would only hit seven receptors. Not Easy but not impossible. Either people had good reason to think that this might work no question. It was a huge Downer for patients for the field for everybody when this entire class of drugs just sort of didn't seem to come to nothing but we learned and the negative result often is just as informative as the positive result. We do learn. Can I ask how? Incentivized is the sort of pharmaceutical industry right now to find other alternatives to things like the class of drugs that you know. Sore Zine and some others that you've mentioned I mean those do work to some extent yes to some extent so I'm not a clinician about fifty percent of the patients well to a typical psychotics. But this doesn't touch sort of the cognitive and emotional problems and one of the things one of the many things grateful to Lynn for was really taking me to visit her patients so that I could really see. There's no question something is wrong. Just sort of a very emotionless flat affect cognition is fine clearly. These people are very articulate very bright in many cases but some things badly wrong so to your question. What is the incentive for pharmaceutical companies. It's a huge incentive. I think lots of people would love to do it because schizophrenia is one percent of the population. This is across populations across cultures. So it's a huge opportunity to make therapies that help patients what is not a rare disease for what is not a rare disease and we go beyond that again as Bob's book so amply demonstrates the toll on people's lives it's far beyond that one percent. We just don't know how to do it. Not for the broad schizophrenia. There and this is where I came from my angle to sort of look at. Perhaps there might be sub types of schizophrenia defined genetics where you really would have one particular form of schizophrenia. So Stephan if you as a researcher if you could wave a magic wand right now you know you mentioned better models. What are the things that if you could wish something here tomorrow in the form of a new technology or new capability? What would that be? That would really push us forward into a new chapter all go way afield but if we could monitor the brains of a schizophrenic with sufficient resolution with high resolution right now we've got about a millimeter Vauxhall with the best bold FM experiments while they're actually having a psychotic break. The resolution is still of course could be made finer and finer. We still can't get down to the level of a single cell but now with the blood. Oxygen Level Dependent Magnetic Resonance Imaging. We can get a measure of function in somebody's brain in real time difficult to do takes. A lot of equipment takes a particular stimulus but one could perhaps hope. This will lead to more insights. Oh my gosh how fascinating that. We've never seen. We actually have no idea what's really happening. I mean consider the logistics. You can't consent somebody and get them to sit in a machine and then wait for them to have a psychotic break. Yeah what would you be looking for? We need mechanism if the field as a whole could say here is a particular area where the excitability is abnormal area of brain tissue that has abnormally excitable or a particular receptor that is abnormally excitable. That gives us a good place to start. That gives us mechanism and then perhaps we could study what to existing drugs due to that. What is missing with existing drugs? That's fascinating it almost sounds like you need like a wearable. Mri very high resolution. Silicon Valley go to it. What about things like crisper? If you do start defining some very specific narrow very entire medic causes that the possibility is so. We'll give a possibility. Say if we knew that a baby galvan or their modern day counterpart babies had a variant in a gene that we thought because families like the Galvin's that we had good reason to believe would make them develop schizophrenia. Can we get in there and change that one nuclear tied to the wild type? It's conceivable but again the challenge here is the engineering challenge. We can do it in a dish but trying to get just that one gene edited trying to get it in just that one nucleotides changed in every cell in the brain and no changes in any other nucleotides in the brain and delivering something that will actually crossed the blood brain barrier. And then doing it on an infant. How would you even test this very very difficult? Bob You describe when Lynn Delisi I met the Galvin family and you write this incredibly profound line. That really stuck out for me as she walked through the door of the house at Hidden Valley road. She couldn't help but recognize a perfect sample. This could be the most mentally ill family in America and you really dove into every element of what that meant for them into this family's innermost suffering and struggles..

schizophrenia nicotine Bob dopamine utero Galvin Stephan Robert Freedman Lynn Delisi cortisol Silicon Valley Matab Petro America Coleen engineer
"galvin family" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:55 min | 1 year ago

"galvin family" Discussed on KCRW

"What is schizophrenia really is it only a psychiatric condition or does it have its origins in something else who is more susceptible to it and why these are the questions at the heart of a new book about an extraordinary family writer Robert Kolker the bestselling author of lost girls tells the story of the Galvin family they seemed a model for baby boomer America twelve children with a military dad in a strict but religious mother growing up in Colorado in the nineteen sixties but over the years six of the boys were diagnosed with schizophrenia and now their journey is transforming the science around the mental illness the book is called hidden valley road inside the mind of an American family and Robert Kolker joins us now from his home in Brooklyn New York welcome to the program thanks a lot hello we can't get into every story line in this incredibly detailed and richly reported book but a generally tell me about the gallons and the time that they were living in well they really lived in the grandest period of the American century they were married at the end of World War two they raised a family in the fifties and sixties through the Cold War and through the American prosperity boom and their children really where the baby boom the oldest one was born in nineteen forty five and the youngest one in nineteen sixty five and there were twelve of them so they were famous wherever they lived as this very large family that outwardly seems perfect in every way let's talk about why schizophrenia has been such a mystery there was this a debate that you discuss initially a nature genetics or nurture that something in the way someone was brought up triggers schizophrenia what was the debate about well the very beginning of psychiatry most people who were giving schizophrenia named believe that it had some sort of physical quality to it and that it might be hereditary but Sigmund Freud disagreed he really believe that in mainly it was something that was inherited not inherited in a genetic sense but inherited in terms of childhood trauma and and this nature nurture debate continued for some time and in fact the nurture people the psychoanalyst's really held sway throughout the twentieth century at least in America at all suggesting that some people who had schizophrenia and lived in a world that the therapist had to penetrate and that with the right kind of therapy the problem might be solved in the person might enter reality again and this completely ignored the genetic aspect of it now we're living in a world where everything is seemingly about genetics but we're back to a nature nurture argument because we believe that schizophrenia and other complex diseases are just about genetics better about genes that are impacted or affected by the environment explained it well it's always been known to be a syndrome as opposed to a disease it's not like influenza where you can identify what it is in terms of its you know chemistry schizophrenia is really a collection of symptoms that are defined and then treated based on the symptoms sue you in the book I talk about a woman called Linda Lee C. and her work she believe that families like the Galvin's held the key to understanding schizophrenia that's right a doctor Lee C. was a pioneer at the time she was one of the top researchers at the National Institute of mental health and she became fascinated by the idea that if you started a family with a large incidence of schizophrenia and that you might be able to find some sort of genetic silver bullet inside it that could help us understand how the condition takes shape in the general population but she had went on to assemble the most numerous a collection of what she called multiplex families and to the gallons for one of those first families and they were the largest family and it was through the study of those families that with a lot of twists and turns she ended up once the human genome was sequenced to actively demonstrate how families like the gallons can help us understand the condition and how it takes shape yeah and let's talk about what was uncovered through looking at families like the goblins because it was a mystery right at the heart of this about the way the brains of schizophrenics function that's right and her belief was that this definitely was inherited that environment had nothing to do with it what they found was in fact a genetic mutation that might be unique to this family but is so vital to brain function that it might help us understand how schizophrenia works and that's really how families like the garbage can help us going forward we can look at them and their particular genetic mutation that might be at fault and while that mutation may not exist elsewhere you can help us understand the disease and how it affects others in their models for this with other diseases so possibly might be neuro developmental is is what they came to sort of believe yes in the eighties the new wisdom about schizophrenia was that it was a developmental disorder which is to say that even though so people came down with that at the age of twenty or twenty one that didn't mean that they suddenly got bitten by an insect and had schizophrenia or it meant that there was something with in their genetic makeup that they had from before they were even born that gave them a vulnerability a special sensitivity whether was the inability to filter out certain stimuli or difficulty and brain development that only manifested itself in the final stages of brain development which as we know now is adolescents you come across the gallons a mutual friend of mine and Lindsey Galvan introduced us Lindsay is the youngest of the twelve and he had known them for years and that the two sisters there ten brothers and two sisters Margaret and Lindsey and the family had been talking for years about trying to let the world know about their family stories and finally they decided they needed an outsider and independent journalist who could take the story wherever it led yeah now that their story is finally being told what do you think we should take away from what they went through well I mean these are challenging times independent of mental illness I think that this is an example of a family that really experienced not just one but two or three or four different horrors all at once and came out the other side it's about not turning inward when when the worst happens in life it's about reaching out to each other and understanding the value of family and the value of not closing yourself off to possibilities I really believe there's a lot of hope and inspiration in this story that people can take away from it independent of mental illness issues rather call government is the author of the new book hidden valley road inside the mind of an American family thank you very much thank you letter they're two world renowned musicians from two very different parts of the world Grammy Award winner Abigail Washburn plays one of the most popular instruments in Appalachian music the banjo Fay.

schizophrenia
"galvin family" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

The Bone 102.5

06:46 min | 3 years ago

"galvin family" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

"So Michael rotunda. Let's do this baby. It's magic is unity Tampa Bay. Ed. We're here to capitalize on it. Feels need having a a Monday night game. That means a lot right? Oh, it's ver-. It's very exciting. It's it's good to have a game. That means something period. Because usually when in in the last what eight ten years when the bucks of played on Monday night. I think the biggest hope is let's go out there and not embarrass ourselves in the city. Right. Like, that's probably the pre-game top. They got from either coach lovey or Cocciano or the other coaches regime. What a guy get in there and try not to embarrass ourselves in the city. But tonight we have unique opportunity because fits magic can either live on or come crashing down to earth. I vote for live on. But as the Ryan fits magic doubters will tell you every year he turns back into a pumpkin in that. He he realizes. He's not a quarterback who can put up four touchdowns and four hundred yards in three consecutive weeks. Or is he do we rewrite the legend tonight? I mean, he could do it this week. Pittsburgh Steelers a team in turmoil. But then again, they thought the same thing about those bills of buffalo yesterday. And look what they did to the Vikings in a game that no one expected to be like that. This is why we watch every single week. It's we have actually no idea. What's going to happen? We think we know what's going to happen. But then we are proven to know nothing every single week. Correct. I rather enjoyed watching. They're doing a patriots get their asses handed to him yesterday. I I realized I have no more loyalty to that team. Matt Patricia so good to see him take on his former team in the lions needed a win. Yes, roy. Yeah. And the patriots are falling apart. And I I'm not mad at it at all. In fact, I I kind of like CNN mad Tom Brady. I don't mind telling you that one bit. He looks good though. Very handsome get a nice tan his haircuts. Great. He just looks great. How is that guy? Forty one years old for crimes hit every day. And and Manny still looks amazing. Our buddy Todd writes gonna come in at two thirty. So we'll talk a little bit more sports there. And we'll also talk Tiger Woods and how. I am not going to lie. I cried on my TV. And and I'm not even ashamed of it. I the guy personally is such a such a dick like there's no other way to say it. He's not nice to anybody except his charity does nice things for kids. But personally the guys just a dick yet. He is. So integral to golf that you end up rooting for the guy. We'll talk that at two thirty years want to take a guess as to where captain spontaneous and his lady friend went Friday night. The sex club. Incorrect Friday night, we my my son was spend the night of France. We had all night. And I said, let's go to the castle. And she said, okay. And we didn't end up at the castle. Oh, you went to a up a random high school football game during a strong gas because it was homecoming, and we could have spied on my son and his girlfriend. Great gasp. But no in Greg mica, you into that famous pancake house outside of Orlando that you grew up going to that's a great gas that would have involved waking up Saturday morning and going there. But I I would have done that. No sitting there at ten thirty right? And we'd had a couple of beverages on the couch. And then for some reason, she goes just go to house scream, and it was the first night of Hallo scream. So I said what the hell let's do it. Uber Busch gardens walked in the place at eleven fifteen they close at one a d you get in with your embassador pass. Here's the thing. I don't think you're supposed to but the guide baby was because it was eleven fifteen. Are you you found a flaw in the system did? Guy. Totally let me and I was well, I was gonna pay whatever it was. I mean ambassador leads me to believe that you would be eligible for all events. Correct. But it is a separately ticketed event as I found out in years past not the hard way. So I thought for sure we're going to show up and he was going to say ceremony to buy some tickets. And and they they just let me and I'll tell you. It's a scream it just a good damn time walking around. And I was very proud of myself for doing something so spontaneous. I normally don't do that how how the crowds. I mean, did you get to go into a few houses at midnight or so most of the normal people have left. So you're you're there with five minute lines ten minute lines. So went on four or five houses and enjoy them thoroughly. And there's something there for everybody just like at Halloween horror nights. I it doesn't matter what haunted attraction you go to just make sure you go to haunted attractions. I'm open to what does it scream again. Yeah. I just don't like I like having the corporate responsibility to protect my physical wellbeing. Grope you at. I like knowing that I like thinking, maybe these people are actually gonna kill me. I just wanna know. I'm not going to be touched because a corporate entity could be if they touch me and it hurts. So so I that's why I fear the scream again and the knockoff hey rides and haunted houses and whatnot. Our number is seven two seven five seven nine one zero to five and eight hundred seven seven one one zero two five is there any nice way to refuse someone's money. When they try to give it to you like a weird situation happened yesterday. I Galvin's brothers in town. And I've met him before he is one of the most physically built specimens I've ever seen in my life. I've met him before about totes. So I got him and his family into Busch gardens yesterday morning, and and I went to leave and he goes to shake my hand he put money in. Oh. Boss move, right? What a boss move. But I don't I didn't want the money, and I didn't need the money because I did it because the Galvin's a buddy of mine, you know, how much I didn't even look yet. Oh. Well, I hadn't looked at that point in time. Now, I've looked what was on top. Was it a twenty twenty was on top ten was inside of it thirty unnecessary dollars. I did not want to take that money. So I said, no, please. And he said, no take that money on a very large guy like six three probably to fifty of raw muscle power. If anybody from the Galvin family tells me to do something, I'm probably going to do it. Right. So I had to bow down get clowned. But I did not. So then I thought like how do I sneak this money back to Galvin? So it can hopefully matriculate its way back to his brother because I feel very uncomfortable taking that money. It didn't cost me anything to get their thirty s not worth trying to give it back to him. If he gave you for every ticket, and you try to give you a hundred and fifty dollars you go. This is way too much thirty bucks. It's a nice little tip. You went out of your way by your give your son. Let him take his girlfriend out you take your girlfriend out. It's thirty five. I thought it was such an overwhelmingly nice thing to do too. Nice. And I and I don't know if you're allowed to give the money back in that situation or how you do it. It's funny because the last guy you took into Bush gardens he was mad because he had to buy an extra ticket. And then Galvin's brother like he should give you money for getting his family. I did tell gal Gavin's brother that story..

Galvin patriots Michael rotunda Pittsburgh Steelers Tampa Bay Vikings Matt Patricia Tiger Woods CNN Tom Brady Cocciano Bush gardens Busch gardens lions Ryan buffalo France Manny
"galvin family" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

07:52 min | 3 years ago

"galvin family" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"And a very nice. Lady go fi? She drove all the way. From Bakersfield name's Mary Jane and she brought by eight boxes is that right eight box of ding dongs and so when I ran, downstairs to see if I can catch it because they don't let people up here. Anymore, because you know they, come up with a, baseball bat and they break the toilets and, all that yeah but I- Mary Jane if you, come back I'll go down during commercial break and personally thank you so come on back to the station you. Know where we are. And I'll. Buzz down. There on a commercial break and give you a high. Five anything. Done Mary Jane thank you, very appreciate so go. Down there. And we'll say, how. To do all right let's get into this cars cars cars. Get out let's go. Lisa in big, bear you're on with Dave coons Hey lisa Thank you. For talking. I am I heard about. A motorcycle not a triumph for Indian. Ado, potty yes it's talion I think Leno has one. Of those, got, several Well That's over here in a garage. It I don't know why this story wants to find a new home will take out. Now How much you want for it Twenty bucks just kidding How much is it, worth you, think they've you know. It's hard to say we don't. Know what it is if it's, a picture of it Yes I can how. Many cylinders do you know that No Is it a one owner? Tires Hold. On Lisa hold on, one second let me get a let's send texts or a picture of. It to our website. Or do I'm sorry for Email it's. Conway show at iheartmedia dot com Nailed it after eight years Paying attention Oh I. Nailed it. All right My guy, Hector in. Inglewood, Hector your KFI. Dave coons Conway how the. Gang, Dong with. You Hector Hey I'm I'm talking, about? Jeep renegade and I wanna know like what? What do you think. About that car car that's a good question you gotta remember GPS are, built to be capable to. Go off road but we're in southern California probably ninety. Five percent of the people who buy them don't go off road and cheats been in a great position because everyone wants. SUV's for just driving around in the, street and if. You can have a Jeep it's pretty cool the renegade probably. Comes in a bunch of different. Trim levels some are more oriented. For offroad you just gonna drive it around? Are you gonna go up in. The mountains you're going to do some off. Roading I go down to the kinda funny. And what every once in a while there you go so you want to make sure that you get the right one. Because there's different trim levels different packages, I'm not sure. The renegade has a trail rated addition because they don't do. That with all of them but. You obviously you would want to. Make sure you've got the what he's talking? About a new one or used one Yeah I would I would. Say go on some Jeep forums because Jeep enthusiasts will if you ask one question they will. Tell you everything you want to know about what you need to get and specifically what to, look for. For what you're gonna use it for his guy hector's about to be loaded he owns a home near. The new stadium in Inglewood ROY Sunday with Airbnb yeah that thing can go for two thousand parking cars in your yard Any time you're going to get a paper that that Airbnb you Badakhsah. What does she get the Grand Cherokee is in that case I mean you know what's the. High end of the Jeep the Jeep line Jeep Grand, Cherokee their biggest. One then they have, one called the track hawk and that has the, engine the hell cat engine. That Chrysler has and so seven, hundred and, seven, horsepower, in a Jeep. Oh, man it is actually quicker than the challenger because it's got all wheel drive and get all the power. Down you have to. Custom order it or I mentioned dealers probably have one maybe on a. Markup I, think the base price of eighty. Five thousand dollars so Ford Focus they're gonna, keep making but they're not gonna make the what's the, fusion the fusion will go away can you so you can get you know five? Six, seven grand. Off I I would say if you find a high volume dealer is probably what they call, cash on the hood I imagine you can you can knock several thousand dollars at least off a fusion right now you know a friend of mine said this he did this and he said. It worked but I don't believe him because he lies, a, lot but he. Said, he would he walked over to a Ford dealership in the valley And. Is on his way to the bus stop or the subway stop that he took any would notice one. Car two cars that were always there they'd never moved and he went in and, he made him a really low off from one of those. Cars like, a mustard yellow whatever you know focus and the, guy solid Thome, Yep if they, have a thing. Called floor planning you know they are financing these vehicles to have them, there on the lot right so every. Day that cars they're they're paying for that cartilage well. Yeah, I. Mean they can't they don't they aren't they smart and they move cars around so they're not always in. The same way maybe if they're smart they do they got to have a guy come wash. That guy comes out with that thanks so yeah I, mean they don't. Want him sitting there, if if you can make a deal on a, car they've had sitting around. They'll probably take it is is, it a, good, now, this also might. Be a rumor but I heard if you buy a car at the end of the month and they wanna. Make some kind of. Quote and they need to sell one or more to before you know. The nights, over at the end of the. Month is that is that true end of, the month is good I've talked a lot of people, from Edmonds and Kelley blue. Into the end of the year is fantastic and it's The end of the year he'd be November December. Thirty first Yeah and it's, not just quotas for as. You have to sell this many it's what they call allocation and now let's say you're. A high Valencia Ford dealer and you gotta a some fusions you gotta sell some Mustangs and there are special. Cars that are hard to get like the raptor pickup truck. That's that hot off road version of. The f. one fifty they, only make so many of them and if, you want them you gotta sell an overall volume of cars so you gotta numbers up to get the cars that. People, really want the ones that you can really Mark up now I. Heard, that Galvin's like, the big guy in the valley air they're they're the big either biggest in the country. Or second biggest. In the country depending on what's going on they are enormous I went to Galveston a couple of times for parts. And they, always get them like same. Day, or next day I mean they're, really good, with parts well that's a matter of warehousing to you know car, companies have, a, warehouse somewhere. Nearby to get parts to dealers, but they're they're they're over and when you get in there you know there's a lot of the one thing I don't like about buying parts is you go into an auto parts store dealership and you stand there, and the guy behind the. Counter Doesn't look at you Computer he ignores you when, you, got a gal man, they're all? Over like who's next? What, would he need Bob let me help you out that is a. Very service, oriented companies family run and I don't know if you know, the story behind it but Bert Bachmann worked for a guy named Frank Galvin when the dealership was in San Fernando and he. Worked his way up he was the hot. Salesman became sales manager when Frank Cell he said you know a worked at a deal to buy it and he, was smart enough to never change the name Galvin it already established and he said Nope it's, still Galp and. Forty opened the new location, in, nineteen sixty six where, it's still? Is on Roscoe there? Are, no Galvin family members in that was I mean I think he. Literally bought, the place in the early sixties is that of course now, they have all the luxury lines and they have Mazda and they hail and that whole area they're going to be opening a. Porsche dealership in Santa Clarita believe either late. This year Right yeah Did. Right yeah. All right let's talk to, break your then we'll come back with more of your phone. Calls for can you? Stay Dave Kunst weather's. ABC, seven. Auto specialist. Your, phone calls, may you're buying. A car you. Just bought a car you have a question about a car motorcycle whatever it. Is one eight. Hundred five zero one KFI it's Conway show on KFI more pending criminal. Charges could be filed against former USC gynecologist. Dr George Tyndall he's accused of sexual misconduct by hundreds of women who have. Filed lawsuits a wildfire in the bay area has burned thirty acres threatened some homes for some time near highway four west of Martinez Aretha.

Frank Galvin Dave coons Conway Hector Mary Jane Ford Lisa Inglewood baseball Airbnb KFI Dave Kunst Bakersfield California Dave coons Chrysler ABC Cherokee Leno Dong