35 Burst results for "Galileo"

Scientific Serendipity

Your Brain on Facts

03:52 min | 5 months ago

Scientific Serendipity

"Plastic the material of a thousand uses the blessing and curse of our modern world. All the conveniences you could wish for was udalls of monkey's paw style consequences substances that could be classified as plastics have been in use for thousands of years from rubber balls made from tree sap in central america to the protective coating shellac which is made from the secretions of the lack beetle. They did their jobs. But you know not great. The raw materials were usually difficult to obtain or process which meant they were expensive so the products made from them were rare and only accessible to a select few tended to have short useful lives or were susceptible to temperature changes and humidity the industrial revolution. You may have heard of it. It was in all the papers created huge demand for new materials both natural and synthetic like celluloid made from plant cellulose and camphor and galileo if made of milk protein and formaldehyde then along came belgian chemist leo bake land in nineteen o seven bake land. Already had a wildly successful product under his belt the first fiber based photographic paper and he was on a mission to create a replacement for shellac. Shellac requires going to the trees where swarms of little red lack beatles are laying eggs and sucking sap until they burst. I'm barely being hyperbolic here. Indigenous people call it the feast of death as the beatles. Excrete the leavings of the sap. It forms a coating over the entire swarm which is scraped up bugs and all and taken for refining in addition to obvious things like woodworking. Shellac is also used even in the modern day in candy making so my vegan kosher and halal friends. Beware in bacon attempt to improve upon nature. He heated a mixture of formaldehyde and phenyle or coal tar a waste product which will appear in the script later rather than making a lacquer he inadvertently created a polymer that didn't melt under heat and stress. He applied for a patent for his new compound. Poly oxy benzyl methyl and glide colon hydride and yes. I got that in one take not i take but still one take that counts or your voice over services today at moxie bouche dot com bake bacon. Humbly named this new product bake lite. This new thermo setting plastic went like a house on fire. It could be and was used for everything from phones to dinner plates to toys to jewelry it was also a boon to the emerging on and electrical industries because it was an effective insulator apart from being the first proper modern plastic it is also the first synthetic material to lean into being a synthetic material rather than trying to look or act like a natural product it was lightweight durable and could be molded into nearly any shape. You could think of in nearly any color or pattern you wanted. It also looked sleek and modern the apple aesthetic of its day bake lite introduced plastics to the fashion world to be followed by nylon polyester spandex. Send more these. Plastics have inspired fashion designers to do more with less more choices creativity and durability with less material. wait wrinkles and expense

Central America Apple
'We come from the stars': Indigenous astronomy, astronauts, and star stories

Unreserved

05:05 min | 7 months ago

'We come from the stars': Indigenous astronomy, astronauts, and star stories

"When you think about the night sky what constellations come to mind. Chances are they're rooted in western astronomy but indigenous. Astronomy and scientific knowledge have been here for millennia. It's just not taught in schools or considered important within universities. My next guest is working to change. That nielsen is mick ma. And he's a professor in the department of astronomy and astrophysics at the university of toronto. Helping welcome thank you for having me. So how would you describe the way. Astronomy is typically taught in university course university of toronto's famous having a an astronomy course fifteen hundred students in it in that course generally starts from the early greek and roman astronomy aristotle type of plato pythagoras and they will channel through european astronomy with newton and cabrera hey and yohannes kepler and galileo of course the modern enshrinement is just one linear path from the romans to essentially neil degrasse tyson and today scientists. It's very very centered in the european model. And how have you been incorporating indigenous knowledge in your courses. I've been trying to do that little bit here. And there are courses tend to be quite full of material so adding new materials always a challenge. But i always want to make sure students come in and the first thing they see is not there. Expect a constellation. I don't him see a bear with the tail lakers major. I want them to see the constellation view. I nor a constellation of the bear or a punish shining relation that please and to recognize that these constellations reflect landover on i for in toronto or in new magi or anywhere and what is indigenous astronomy. And how do you define it. How is it or how old. I define indigenous astronomy. As being the the knowledge of the peoples of the land so and since burnett Nation state of canada would find it as the astronomers of the people that were here before settlers in colonizers so strongly of the astronomy of first nations big cree on astronaut and so on across across rhode island and every nation has their own perspective of the night skydrone interpretation in knowledge of it and so these indigenous astronomers speak to connection to the land and and to the people and that knowledge has been here as long as the people have been here and so is there a star story that comes to mind for you that gives an understanding of indigenous astronomy. Great story was the story of noon on the seven bird hunters which is a story so close your eyes and you're looking morni- guy and you see what we call the less the big dipper. And if you're looking at the big dipper couple of hours before dawn in spring you're gonna see the big dipper pointing downwards so the four stars make up the bear kind of facing downwards detail is climbing higher in the sky the four stars of the big dipper in the bull our immune the bear and then pours. What would be the handle. The big dipper are at the bird hunters and you go on those three stars to another four to get the seven hunters and the story starts by while you have to get up early in the morning a couple of hours before dawn to this constellation when we observe it at that time in the morning and we observed every day we can see the constellation circle around the sky. The constellation circles around sky every night as well. So we see the two different timescales in play but if we start in the spring at that to ask for dumb the bowl. The big dipper the bears pointing downwards. And that's when the bears waking up from tiber nation and decides hungry needs to go gather food as the bear leaves. The cave i robin spies upon the bear grabs it's bone arrow and size to chase it from hunt and the story continues through the summer when muniz running across the land so the constellations kinda flat across the sky and the birger chasing it as we get towards fall newness getting tired and stands likes to fight back so the constellations on one side again. Some of the birds have fallen below the horizon and must track the hunt but immune you and stands back robin fires. It's era a striking the immune in the heart killing it. Blood gets everywhere. All of robinhood flies into the tree shakes off the blood separate one stain on his chest. The leaves are now allred as a result. Chickeny joins robin. And they begin a celebration to cook the cook. The bear and to celebrate the feast harvest as we approach winter the constellation as the bears on his back again and reflecting the spirit of the baron sky and waiting for spring to come as part of the next cycle. So we see lots of different kinds. We have knowledge of the year as a calendar have knowledge of ritual and ceremony and we have connection with nature. So it's not just a shawny story. It's it's part of. It's a story that people in story of how to be.

Mick Ma Department Of Astronomy And As University Course University O Yohannes Kepler Neil Degrasse University Of Toronto Nielsen Cabrera Galileo Newton Lakers Rhode Island Toronto Robin Canada Muniz Allred
Acoma Hospital Cuts, Navajo Marijuana Crackdown, and Tribal Transportation Improvements

Native America Calling

03:59 min | 9 months ago

Acoma Hospital Cuts, Navajo Marijuana Crackdown, and Tribal Transportation Improvements

"This is national native news. I'm antonio gonzalez. The governor of the pueblo of aca in new mexico is concerned about the health and wellbeing of the people of alabama as a reduction of health services takes place amid the pandemic governor. Brian is reaching out to us. Lawmakers for legislative relief in funding after a hospital on academic lands no longer full-service able to offer emergency services or critical care congress and urgent and decisive. Requests were received uninterrupted Healthcare an emergency medical service food services at the canyon. Cto laguna service. Unit have moved to primary and urgent care due to inadequate staffing as a number of staff have decided to leave after being notified of a redesign of indian health. Service care for the area. The hospital located off interstate. Forty west of albuquerque has provided services since the nineteen seventy s to the public of aca and laguna and navajo community in july the tribes were notified of potential changes due to an agreement with the pueblo of laguna a majority shareholder in the hospital. At forty seven percent the navajo community moved its allocation for its own facility in two thousand sixteen in september laguna health corporation entered into an agreement with ihs to open a new facility. In february removing it shares from the facility the agreement started the process of the redesign including notifying employees and establishing a working group via says aca did not expect changes in service until early next year and is calling on the indian health service for immediate resolution option it could allocate funding from the one point three billion dollars from of that and we are five hundred million dollars specifically designated provider relief fund all of these funds intended to address the pandemic. And all that meant to deal with just the situation. We are faced with the indian health service director. Michael we ocoee says they're consulting with all three tribes involved we ocoee says. Ihs supports tribal self determination and self governance to assume health services for their own communities. And he says the ihs has committed to the retain services at aecom a- mitigating To the extent possible any negative consequences as a result and making. There's just a smooth transition. As possible is the goal and we are looking at every available resource whether that's coronavirus funding Any other emergency funds. That may be available to after your. We're looking at all resources available to the agency can make. There's just a smooth transition possible. Make sure that nobody else for the galileo estimates the funding needs the aca. Hospital is around five to six million dollars. He says alabama has received support from state leaders lawmakers and some members of congress a multi-agency operation took place on navajo lands last week in an effort to put an end to marijuana operations. In the shiprock new mexico area federal state local and tribal officers led the raid on twenty one farms and two residences where marijuana was housed in more than one thousand grow houses about two hundred and sixty thousand plants were radically agents also found nineteen trash bags filled with processed marijuana in baggies about one thousand pounds the navajo nation is on board to crack down on what it says is illegal hemp and marijuana operations in the area more than seven million. Federal transit dollars have been awarded to twenty-five tribal governments for improvement projects on tribal lands. The us department of transportation announced tuesday the projects range from storage to maintenance facilities to helping tribes of an appointment to improve transportation services. The funding supports projects operating costs planning activities. I'm antonio gonzalez.

Antonio Gonzalez Pueblo Of Aca Pueblo Of Laguna Laguna Health Corporation IHS New Mexico Alabama Congress Albuquerque Brian Aecom Galileo Michael Us Department Of Transportatio
In Depth With Carlo Rovelli

After The Fact

06:41 min | 10 months ago

In Depth With Carlo Rovelli

"Carlo Ravelli thank you so much for being with us today. Thank you for having me you. are a physicist who I must say writes like a poet and your book the seven brief lessons on physics has has sold Is If something like forty languages around the world and it ends with this most amazing line that I would like to to start our conversation with if you don't mind you say on the edge of what we know in contact with the oceans of the unknown. Shines the mystery and beauty of the world. Is that science is that the pursuit of science for you? Yes. Definitely. because science. Starts I think both historically and in the life of each scientists a with a wonder and with the mystery. And in fact, I think the nature of science is to realize that we do not know things and therefore we're curious to go and try to. Find out and the nature of of scientists also the based on the discovery that we can find out things. We can discover things that we did not know there is a methodology to to science, but the scientific method is both something that leads us forward but also makes I. Pause makes us go take two steps back, reevaluate its science it seems despite methodology. Is Not Linear people talk about the scientific method. But I would say those less of a scientific method. Than what one usually think? It's like painting. Of course, there is a method painting you go to school and they teach you how to paint. But then the painter is the guy who does does not follow what is being taught to invent something else. and. In fact, in science, it has happened all over again. In the in the history of science that what was considered the the good mattered before it turned out to be insufficient and new things were found found out. Of course, there are many aspect of science which are. Pretty stable and that give it strength. Checking. Not Trusting ideas unless you find a way to confirm them. Try To base your information on actual data and and looking at the world observing measuring checking. Putting in doubt not believing the things you you believe him there's a beautiful line in by actor Galileo in the play in which a at the end in which in the play there's Galileo the one of the inventors of science so to say. With one of his young assistant and they got an idea in the assistant says. Now. Let's do everything possible to show. That is right and Galileo says, no, no no, let's do it. Everything possible to show that it is wrong. And if it is survives, we start believing it. fascinate yes. So you know. We are speaking at a time when the world of course is facing this terrible pandemic. And scientific research about this unfolding before our eyes are there lessons for us all in in what we're learning how this is unfolding as you say We we have learned things that we think are right about the virus and then something changes in our we have to we have to adjust our thinking how we can counteract it. It gets it gets up again to the point of Galileo right how do we prove ourselves? Wrong? We sued you tried of where find out where we were right I. Think Yeah. I. Think there are lessons and then and in fact it's it's it's an opportunity seeing how science works the first thing we all notice is that we don't know anything we are in the dark and that's a that's often the starting point of science. The second thing is we're not completely dark. The reason we are. Searching for a way to heal this. Virus and for a vaccines is because we have wasted ill illnesses that are extraordinary effective on the one hand we see the limits of science on the other hand we see the power of signs. Let me put in this way. Few generations ago not many maybe two centuries ago the average expected live the life expectancy of people where several decades decades shorter than today this is because there was a scientific method or some sort to that helped us learn how to deal with with illness and that's what is being used. The second point is that we see that scientists look in different directions, right one search, one methods, another search, another methods, and of course, each scientists of tries to believe or sort of believe be confident in the way he's going, but we don't know a priori who is right. However those convergence and that's the point. There are always being convergence in scientific. Debates in uncertainty so after the debate after the searcher. The knowledge that is acquired is definitely knowledge so it will take time, but it will come out. Perhaps. The last comment is that we all see how science is crucial I. Mean if there's anything that can save us for a lot of pain, the situation is knowledge. I chose science as my. As, the field where I hope I can in my in my info humidity and in my little. Being small contribute to the overall discussion but I have not chosen signs as the only prisoner from which to look at the world I. Think we should. We should use problems. We should look at the world through literature through our to politics too our leaves. So I think it's a coming together of perspectives. I went into sign slater in my life to come directly question only at some point. I stumbled innocence upon science and I fell in love with. It was a non rational choice. It was an emotional choice I started to study at school. Modern physics. Relativity quantum mechanics. All that and I said, wow, this is incredibly beautiful I. WanNa I. WanNa work this and then I realized that I was good in it and so I said okay this is this is what I do in my life.

Galileo Carlo Ravelli Physicist Slater
Repent or Perish (Luke 13:15)

Pray the Word with David Platt

05:21 min | 1 year ago

Repent or Perish (Luke 13:15)

"Luke chapter thirteen versus one through five. They were some president that very time who told Jesus about the gallon whose blood pilot and mingled with their sacrifices. And he answered them. Do. You think that these gala liens were worse centers and all the other Galileo because they suffered in this way? No I tell you. But unless you repent, you will all likewise perish. Or. Those eighteen on whom the tower and Salaam fell and killed them. Do, you think the day were worse offenders and all the other lived in Jerusalem. No I tell you. But unless you repent, you will all likewise perish. There's so much in the short passage, but to summarize it. You have people who are asking Jesus. About. Basically, an instance of moral evil, an instance of natural evil. This instance of moral evil the Galley ensues blood piloted mingled with their sacrifices to basically people who were offering sacrifices and were suddenly killed. Basically mass occurred in the second instance is a tower and Salaam falling all of a sudden and killing eighteen people that would be natural evil something happening not necessarily because. Someone was awesome in the first group. But here in the second group is to situation where a tower suddenly fell and killed eighteen people and you have these people coming to Jesus basically asking him like were these people worse than others and I I read this and I think about. What's happening around us? Now particularly in my country. But also around the world amidst all kinds of. Violence and moral evil on one hand. And then natural evil in the middle of a pandemic. and Jesus words he says it twice. He says, as you think about these things like don't try to determine like WHO's a worse center it's what he's telling these crowds who are asking about this like that's not the point. The point is unless you repent. You will all likewise perish. She says that twice unless you repent you all likewise perish like moral evil natural evil are reminders that we are all one day going die. And so what is most important? Every single one of our lives is that we repent while we have time today that we turn from our sin we turn mark sinful parts and we'd trust in Jesus as the savior and Lord of our lives that we live in repentance every day ready to meet Jesus like in both these groups none of these people knew that today was gonna be their last day. This tower was gonNA fall I mean they thought they were secure their offering sacrifices and all the sudden they're massacred. So. So we pray. God we we know the life is a missed. And not one of us is guaranteed tomorrow. This pandemic has certainly. Reminded us of this. That not one of us is immune to sickness and death. So God help us. To make today count. For Your glory help us to live in a continual. State, of repentance of turning from, Sin And following you entrusting you and loving you and honoring you and glorifying you got if something were to happen to me like. Two seconds from now. Pray I want my heart to be right before you I pray that over every single person who's listening right now If anybody's listening right now doesn't know US never repent turn from their sin and themselves believed in Jesus did they would do that today like right now and God you would help us to live just this constant awareness of the brevity of life and the need for repentance. We want to be right with you by your grace by your mercy at every single moment, and we want to live with urgency to make the good. News The Gospel of Repentance and belief in Jesus known all around God pray for that kind of urgency as we live in a world of moral evil and natural evil guttering pray that you would use our lives to lead other people to repent to trust in you help us to proclaim the gospel of repentance today in our lives God. Please help us not to lose sight of the brevity of life or the urgency of eternity. In Jesus. Name we pray.

Jesus United States President Trump Luke Jerusalem
Denial of Rebirth

5 Minute Dharma

04:48 min | 1 year ago

Denial of Rebirth

"I will argue that the Buddha taught rebirth. Now. He was either right about rebirth or he was wrong. I let us be clear about the fact that the Buddha taught rebirth. On the night of his awakening, the Buddha said I recollected my many kinds of past lives with features and details. This was the first knowledge which I achieved in the I watch of the night on quote. And just to be clear, it's wrong, too, so that he taught rebirth just for cultural and pragmatic reasons alone. The. Buddhist said quote, and what is wrong view? There is no meaning in giving sacrifice or offering. There's no fruit or result of good and bad deeds. There's no afterlife. Notice the Buddhist said that that was wrong view. There's no afterlife. The first component of the noble eightfold path is right view, and the denial of rebirth is counter to this. The teaching of rebirth rights be boaty crops out almost everywhere in the Pali Canon. And is so closely bound to a host of other doctrines that to remove it would virtually reduced the Dhamma to tatters. Was the Buddha wrong about rebirth. The Buddha has three insights on the night of his awakening the first, which we just read about was the recollection of his past lives. The second was the KARMIC death and rebirth of other beings, and the third was a complete grasp of the four noble truths. Now if we accept the four noble trues, why should we deny the other two insights? Psychologist Robert. Wright has written a book entitled why Buddhism is True. In it. He gives evidence that quote. Buddhism's diagnosis of the human predicament is fundamentally correct. And, that it's prescription is deeply valid urgently important on quote. But like so many modern people. He accepts the psychology of Buddhism while rejecting its metaphysics. I used to do this myself when I was a secular Buddhist. But. How could the Buddha be so right about human psychology and so wrong about the nature of reality? Was the Buddha right. In my opinion, it seems more probable that the Buddha was right about rebirth. But someone object. There's no solid scientific evidence for a berth. Remembering. That Buddhism teaches that we have six senses. The usual five plus the mind that respond. Scientists based on what the five senses tell us, but ignores the six sense of the mind. Without all our senses, we cannot know all of reality. It is like ignoring the sense of hearing, and then concluding that sound is not real. There's a name for this fallacy. It is scientism. Bryan appleyard defines it as the belief that science is or can be the complete and only explanation. Scientists Limited to the physical world, because it ignores consciousness it ignores are six sense. As Philip Goff states, nothing is more certain unconsciousness, and yet nothing is harder to incorporate into our scientific picture of the world. The problem of consciousness began when Galileo decided that science was not in the business of dealing with consciousness on quote. Pan, Sai Qasem tries to correct this error. Quote Pan psychics believed that consciousness is a fundamental and ubiquitous feature of the physical world on quote. Thomas Nagel argues if any two hundred pound chunk of the universe contains the material needed to construct a person, and if we deny both cycle, physical reductionism and a radical form of emergence, then everything reduced to US elements must have proto mental properties on-court. That means that consciousness is weaved into the very fabric of the cosmos. The great physicist David Bohm hypothesized that reality is incorporated. Of An explicit order and an implicit order which is unfolded. Consciousness would be part of that in folded implicit or That

Wright Pali Canon Buddhist Thomas Nagel Bryan Appleyard United States Philip Goff David Bohm Sai Qasem Physicist Robert Galileo
Isaac Newton

5 Minutes in Church History

04:19 min | 1 year ago

Isaac Newton

"On this episode five minutes in Church history. Let's talk about a scientist Sir. Isaac Newton. He was born in sixteen forty three. He died in seventeen twenty seven he was actually born in the exact same year of the death of Galileo. He was born in originally humble circumstances. His father died three months before he was born in sixteen sixty one he went off to Cambridge. He had a grasp of Latin and a very curious mind. He would pass the time sketching clocks and windmills and other kinds of gadgets. Once he got to Cambridge he studied astronomy. This was the era of Copernicus and Kepler and of course he studied the classic Philosophers Aristotle and Plato. He kept his notebooks and in one of them. He wrote amicus Plato. Amicus Aristotle's Maga's Amici Veritas. Plato is my friend. Aristotle is my friend. Truth is my best friend. And he also let Cambridge embarked on studying mathematics. In fact he would come to the way in this field he is credited for inventing the study of Calculus as he called it the calculus of infant hassles and it was also while he was at Cambridge that he studied the motion of the moon and the planets and he recognized this force. That was acting on these planets orbit. He was discovering what would come to be called the law of gravity. He would go on to publish. His books is famous book in Seventeen. O four the book called optics and in There. He puts forth his theory of colors. A very interesting a young student in the colonies at the College of Connecticut. We know it as Yale. University would get a hold of Isaac Newton's book optics and he devoured it. This of course is Jonathan Edwards. And he wrote his own little scientific paper he called of light rays and this was all from. Reading Isaac Newton and Edwards draws this corollary from just being amazed at how the actual physical human eye processes light rays. This is what Edwards had to write hence the infinite art that was exercised in the formation of the eye that has given it such an exquisite sense that it should perceive the touch of those few rays of the least fixed stars which enter the eye which all put together won't amount to the million million million million million to part of the least moat of such an exquisite sense that it should distinctly perceive an image upon the retina that it is not above the eighty million millionth part of an inch wide. That has so nicely polished the retina that it should receive so small a picture upon it when the least pro Tuba Rinse or an evenness would utterly destroy and confound it here's Edwards amazed at the human eye but far more amazed at the God who created the human eye and the God who created the universe and it was Isaac Newton who unlocked this for Edwards and it was Isaac Newton who unlocked this for so many other people as Alexander Pope. The poet has it that nature and nature's laws lay hidden by night. God said let Newton be and then there was light Newton as the father of modern science. Believed that no way would science give us less room for God or somehow make less space for God and understanding of him? In fact it was the exact opposite for Isaac Newton. The more he studied God's universe the more he was led to acknowledge and worship God. Newton once said gravity may very well explained the motion of the planets for the can't explain who set the planets in motion. God governs all things and God knows all that is or all that can be known. That's the Great Isaac Newton

Isaac Newton Jonathan Edwards Cambridge Aristotle Scientist Seventeen Kepler Yale College Of Connecticut Alexander Pope
Kristen Roupenian Reads Shirley Jackson

The New Yorker: Fiction

10:58 min | 1 year ago

Kristen Roupenian Reads Shirley Jackson

"Kristen a so you knew when we first talked about doing the podcast that you wanted to read a story by Shirley Jackson. Why was that mean? Shirley Jackson is an has been for years. One of my absolutely favorite writers came into my mind as soon as you asked and I also knew that she published a lot in the New Yorker and that there was a wider range of stories there then maybe people would not I and so. I just wish sure that the chance to diamonds the archive and find a story by her. That would be wonderful and all the ways. She's always wonderful. But maybe a little bit unexpected right. Both of my children read the lottery in sixth grade. I'm wondering how you first encountered Shirley Jackson. I was thinking about that and in fact the somewhat sideways way that I read a story by her when I was very young. Probably eight or nine In it wasn't it wasn't fiction. It wasn't excerpt from life among the savages in a humor collection that I just had bookshelf Story About One of her children who comes home from school with the story about a very bad misbehaving child in the class who spoiler alert turns out to be imaginary and then I got older into high school. Later Collagen Reggie Jackson. It took a long time before I put together that that story that I had read many many times when I was a kid also was actually also by a this woman who's Adult horror. I really love right and we do. Kind of think of Shirley Jackson as as a writer of horror mystery stories This particular story afternoon in linen. Do you think it falls into that category. I do although not on the surface right anything. It's unsettling and maybe once we get into it. I can tell you the exact word that I think makes it a horror story but like everything that she writes. I think it's very funny and it's also very scary And I think this one in particular kind of the more you look at it. The scarier becomes an horror. Something that you're interested in in in your own work. Yeah absolutely And also that line between the scary and the funny the kind of I would say sort of discomfort that surrounds writing about dark or Tabu or unsettling subjects I love exploring not sort of my favorite And interestingly the story like the nonfiction when he brought up it it explores Darkness through the eyes of children. Exactly I think that's probably a big part of why it resonated with me because it hearkens back to that first day of read by her. Yeah we'll we'll talk some more after the story and now here's Kristen. Re Pension reading afternoon in linen by Shirley Jackson afternoon in linen long cool room comfortably furnished and happily-placed with hydrangea bushes outside the large windows on their pleasant shadows on the floor. Everyone in it was wearing linen. The little girl and the pink linen dress with a wide Blue Belt Mrs Cater Anna Brown linen suit and Galileo linen hat. Mrs Lennon. Who was the little girl's grandmother in a white linen dress and Mrs Caters Little Howard in a blue linen shirt and shorts like an alice through the looking glass? The little girl thought looking at her grandmother like gentlemen all dressed in white paper. I`Ma Gentlemen all dressed in pink paper. She thought although Mrs Lenin and Mrs Cater lived on the same block each other every day. This was a formal Paul and so they were drinking tea. Howard sitting at the piano at one end of the long room in front of the biggest window. He was playing humor. Ask In careful unhurried tempo. I played that last year. The little girl thought it's g Mrs Lennon Mrs Cater were still holding their teacups listening to Howard looking at him and now and then looking at each other and smiling. I still play that if I wanted to. The little girl thought when Howard had finished playing humor ask. He slid off the piano bench and came over and gravely sat down beside the little girl waiting for his mother to tell him whether to play again or not. He's bigger than I am. She thought but I'm older. I'm ten if they asked me to play the piano for them. Now I'll say no. I think you play very nicely. Howard the little girl's grandmother said there were a few moments of leaden silence. Then Mrs Cater said Howard. Mrs Lennon's spoke to you Howard murmured and looked at his hands on his knees. I think he's coming along very well. Mrs Cater said to Mrs Lennon. He doesn't like to practice but I think he's coming along. Well Harry loves to practice. The little girl's grandmother said she sits at the piano for hours making little tunes and singing. She probably has a real talent for music. Mrs Cater said I often wonder whether Howard is getting as much out of his music as he should? Harriet Mrs Lennon said to the little girl. Won't you play for Mrs Cater? Pre One of your own little tunes. I don't know any the little girl said. Of course you do hear her. Grandmother said I'd like very much to hear a tune. You made up yourself. Harriet Mrs Cater said. I don't know any the little girl said Mrs Lennon looked at Mrs Cater and shrugged. Mrs Cater nodded mouthing By and turn to look proudly at Howard. The little girl's grandmother set her lips firmly in a tight sweet smile. Harriet dear. She said even if we don't want to play our little tunes I think we ought to tell Mrs Cater that music is not our forte. I think we ought to show her a really fine achievements in another line. Harriet she continued. Turning to Mississauga has written some poems. I'm going to ask her to recite them to you because I feel even though I may be prejudiced. She laughed modestly even though I probably am prejudiced that they show real merit well. For Heaven's sake Mrs. Gator said. She looked at Harriet pleased. Why dear I didn't know you could do anything like that. I'd really love to hear them. Recite one of your poems from Mrs Cater. Harriet the little girl looked at her grandmother at the sweet smile and it misses cater leaning forward at Howard sitting with his mouth open and a great delight growing in his eyes. Don't know any. She said Harriet. Her Grandmother said even. If you don't remember any of your poems you have some written down. I'm sure Mrs Cater will mind if you read them to her the huge merriment that had been gradually taking hold of Howard suddenly overwhelmed him poems. He said doubling up with laughter on the couch. Harriet writes poems. He'll tell all the kids on the block. The little girl thought I do believe Howard's Jealous Mrs Cater said. Aw Howard said I would write a poem that you can make me. Write a poem if you tried.

Harriet Mrs Cater Harriet Mrs Lennon Howard Mrs Cater Shirley Jackson Mrs Lennon Harriet Mrs Lenin Grandmother Kristen Anna Brown Mississauga Writer Paul Harry Mrs. Gator
Saturn's moon Titan discovered - March 25, 1655

This Day in History Class

03:09 min | 1 year ago

Saturn's moon Titan discovered - March 25, 1655

"Day was March. Twenty Fifth Sixteen fifty five Dutch astronomer Christian hyphens. I observed Saturn's largest moon Titan hike in studied law in mathematics at Leiden and at the Orange College of Gray da after that he stayed at home and pursued his scientific interests thanks to the financial support of his wealthy father. This period from sixteen fifty to sixteen sixty six was a productive time. In High Kin's life. He and his brother devoted time to developing telescopes and the early sixteen fifties. He worked on improving his telescopes by using a new way of grinding lenses. That increased clarity. Using his lenses he was better able to observe skies in sixteen fifty five. He turned his attention to Saturn. Back in sixteen ten. Galileo became the first person to observe Saturday with a telescope. Backspin there was confusion. Over Saturn's appearance Galileo saw saturn sort of three part body with the large body in the middle and two smaller lateral bodies. Astronomers thought that two handles may have been attached to Saturn. Galileo did however I observe Jupiter's moons around this time but decades later hiking's was poised to make new discoveries with his improved telescope on March Twenty Fifth Sixteen fifty five he discovered Saturn's largest moon which we now know

Galileo High Kin Orange College Of Gray
Dr. Michael Klaper - Get Off Your 'Buts'

Plant Strong

07:32 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Michael Klaper - Get Off Your 'Buts'

"All right I am here in Sedona. I'm here with Dr Clapper. We have just finished up another immersion program and once again. It's been pretty magical. It's been pretty magical wonderful. Yeah and again I wanNA thank you for being part of this team and Just helping create an experience that these people will never forget and hopefully take with them right for the for the rest of their lives. Yes and is one of the one of the the women said on on the first night. She's like you know it's going to be as far as her embracing this lifestyle. It's going to be either one day or today's Day one right and she's this day one but that's just it's amazing I find. It's amazing to me how much we as I think as teachers how much we get from the student. Oh absolutely absolutely and you probably better than anyone know that you've been doing this now for how long days for a good thirty years. Yeah sure. Yeah I mean I think that everybody on this team and I know a lot of people outside this team. Consider you a national treasure it. Yeah not truly and you you have a heart of hero and the and I think that the The journey that you've been and where you are now as far as now. Your mission is really to get this message out to to medical students. New Generation of doctors coming up we may have to have nutritionally aware physicians We can't keep practicing medicine like what. Our patients are has no effect on these diseases. That what the raiders will either sitting in front of us with all these illnesses so sure I. I'm devoting my time going to the medical schools and thinking nutritional Paul Revere and trying to wake up the the troops. There's it's the food starts with that before you get into your thousand dollar lab tests. Ask them what they ate yesterday. And everything opens up from there. Well so right. It's the food and one of the things you love saying. It's the food is the food is the food yeah And so that leads me to one of the I mean. There's so many things that you do over the course of this week with these engine to immersion. Whether it's being a lecturer weather it is you know doing your Galileo story at talent. Show night whether it's telling blood curdling tales around the Campfire. Whether it's giving us a lesson on the stars and you know the planets that is just mesmerizing. So you you bring such an amazing depth of spirit but one of the things one of your lectures was why everybody matters And and that's what I want to focus the next twenty five minutes. Sure let me start by saying you know you start this lecture by saying you know people we have to kind of we gotta get rid of our sacred cows and can you talk about that for a sec. Oh sure there are. Few things more primordial than people's taste preferences They get ingrained in US so early. Our mother literally Fed us but that loving look on her face as she spoon. The whatever into our mouths That we associate that food with love of our mother and with who we are positioned family our position in society that the that Term Comfort Food and contains a whole lot of emotional charge to it. And it's one of the major obstacle major forces. We have to take into account when we're trying to get people to change what they're eating and start eating healthier and those kind of folks and I was one of them years ago We carry a whole herd of sacred cows in our head. That I like these foods. My doctor didn't tell me that they weren't a good thing to eat. I grew up eating. These foods. Whole Foods sells these foods. How could you say these are bad and or at least that these aren't helping me and these are just some of the things we need to confront and and just putting up that slide and going down the list people laugh but there's a little ring of truth and I do believe that and it makes them Have a look their sacred cows? Name Them And Take you let him out to pasture. Hopefully yeah and we all have our sacred cow over one of them everywhere and then you follow that up immediately by saying I want you to get off your butts And what are some of the butts that people are having a hard time getting off of? Oh Yeah I bet But the food tastes good but they're cheap to To purchase but their convenience but they don't seem to be hurting me but but but everything to dig the claws in whole Lonzo to those seeking after but wholefood sells food. Chelsea's victory exactly. Yeah yeah the list is is never ending so I love how straightforward you are with people and you kind of tell them like how it is in a very straightforward manner that I think people appreciate and you know one of the things you you say and I love the way you say it is that you don't know anything to anybody. Can I hear you say that? Sure the my job in in that talk is to liberate people from the sacred cows beliefs and When you really get down into the crevices of what people hold onto and why they're afraid to make a change in something as important as their diet alive it has to do. They're afraid with what what their friends are going to say about them. Th- The ribbing they're gonNA take at the at the dinner table or at the restaurant eating that rabbit food and And where you answer. Protein all the old Cliches get trotted out. But especially for person. Who's just making this transition? Those are formidable. And it's a scary thing and so I want to help people just break down because what is it and tell them you. Heaven forbid you you get a heart attack or stroke Tony. You would hospital bed. It's not the people at work. It's not your daughter in law. It's not the people knew. Go out to dinner with its you were. You're a grown man. You're grown woman. The man what people think. Yeah at this point. You don't owe anything to anybody. You know any excuses. You know owe any apologies. You're grown men are grown woman. It's nobody's business. What you order for lunch Make decision that's best for your body and for the larger body if you have any concern at all about the animal's planet and children in the future that we can talk about that as it unfolds. But it's time to free yourself from this paper. Tiger bill going to think but it's two thousand nineteen Is Not that revolutionary idea? People know that a lot of foster trying to eat healthier and plant based diets are really a reasonable alternative. And it's It's getting easier and easier. Don't let that from fear that you may have had when you were teenager that my friends in school are going to laugh at me. Push pests tach anybody except your health? You know in the truth and it's time to act on that

Sedona Dr Clapper Whole Foods Raiders United States Paul Revere Lecturer Chelsea Tony
A Very Spatial Podcast

A VerySpatial Podcast

09:50 min | 1 year ago

A Very Spatial Podcast

"I'm Jesse I'm sue and this. This is frank and this week. We of course have returned to our our traditional once upon a time five years plus ago. We're going more vintage you did. And so yeah we're got some conversations about Earth Day coming up I we're GONNA kick things off with the news. I have a news. Hawaii is actually changing the maps. They use in their products to Tom. And it's kind of one of those weird legal things things but the reason is is because US band Hawaii from using Google maps. So the would rather be using Google maps but because of of the trade restrictions that are in place now in the United States Chinese manufacturer Hawaii of smartphones is not allowed to use Google maps. They've had to switch the tom-tom which just just kind of interesting that the that would drive the data choice much more so than anything else. Yeah I mean Yeah Yeah. I don't know what to to say too much about this one. Yeah I mean it's is this I think what it is is that we make a somewhat of an implicit assumption assumption. I think a lot of us. Do I certainly do that. In the geospatial realm that we can make technical decisions that are best for technical solutions and we can debate about whether whether this works best for this. Or that's for the other thing and sometimes we don't think about that. There's a complex legal infrastructure under not ended that underlies this that may make decisions for us whether we like it or not. Yeah so licensing Of course we've talked before about how China has limited who can create maps about China. But this of course is kind of the opposite where the. US is limiting. Who Google can provide map data to? I think it's a little different And hence the export controls and things like that. Yeah so so. It's it's it's just another variation of all of this where governments have levels of control over over what companies can and can't do in terms of import export Or what again with the China example. What they can do within their own countries? Yeah and actually what they were working on his are making. This is never a good idea in my opinion in technology. Not they're making their own deviant version of things like android and the Google play store because you know then they control it and you end up with these weird sort the deviant versions that. It's not always good. It's oftentimes how viruses and such get out there. But you know those get out there on the regular play store as well so yeah I don't know I mean it's not the only thing that So I think Subaru also announced that they're going to be using Tom. Tom yes and Of course we talked last time about what here was saying while they were at CS so yeah a lot of different things coming out I'm in a second part just out today but I don't have a linked to the IT came up as alert on my phone is apparently Britain has said we don't care so. In Britain they can use school matching presumably most of the EU. They can use Google match. Just fine I I'm confused about the overlapping jurisdictions distinctions. Here I. It's it's very odd. Yeah well again. It's just like whenever Google has to adapt to e you rolling things. They don't always apply those same changes in their technology and privacy settings to everywhere. Sometimes they do just because it's easier but sometimes you don't yeah looking at other nations in some data things. Of course Glonass we've talked about it in the past and I think really the last time we talked about launches for Glonass and the Constellation was back. Maybe in twenty eighteen barely twenty nineteen but recently at A in not investors meaning but Discussion to the Russia's science and Technical Council Iss Rush Nev- company. Is that right CHATEAUNEUF reshef. Okay the person who took Russian back in the day. has announced that they Have Twenty seven more GLONASS satellites to build and are hoping to double the number of launches and twenty twenty compared to twenty nineteen so This is kind of important. We're still waiting for Galileo to come completely online. I think there's still a few more satellites left to get By sorry Yeah but how online so we don't have either of those too much built into a last systems but we're seeing more and more of the newer systems uh-huh rowing those out but there's a lot of old systems that were both. GPS AND GLONASS compatible and is is great to see more interest being put into more satellites of course literally Interest and money being put into the GLONASS system well and it's interesting. I didn't realize this that Back in December the launch was for A new updated GLONASS AGLOW GLONASS M so that replaced a retired satellite. So it's sometimes because we forget that that the larvae systems have to cycle in New Hardware and new systems to keep going so. GPS courses going through was what's the current round the satellites that are going up our GPS three late Tuesday early threes a camera. Yeah and so so. This is an example. I mean they. They've got orders going out a number the years To get these twenty seven satellites You know up in the air Eventually but it's part of that process of cycling out as things. Let's get obsolete and stuff so that's really interesting. I mean I just had realize we were already. Glonass have been up in orbit long enough for for us to start cycling through through the number. I kind of weird it struck me. Is that any given time. They have about fifty satellites in various stages of production. which I I still come from an era when like it seemed like us? Satellite took years to make one in like you made one and then you didn't make one for a long time. I mean it was. He's just there so you know one off unique things that they have fifty of those sort of production level capability at that level. It it it seems odd even though I know it really shouldn't seem Hexagon has rolled out a new platform. Visualization Platform I'm not sure if it's hex St our Dr. I think it's heck still hexter definitely not going to say that wash a couple all the videos about it rally couple of things and it looks like an interesting System of course it looks a lot like some existing systems from other companies as well but of course since. It's a hexagon tool It's they're really highlighting the fact that you can bring in data from a lot of their From hexagons did you systems hardware for data capture at the ground level street level. And of course Bring an aerial imagery as well so I don't know it looks like it's going to be a really cool tool and try to play around with sometimes this year I have to say the three D. Swipe thing that they demonstrated was pretty pretty cool where he can embed models and you can actually swipe into if you've built your model with interior and exterior you could swipe in cake look at it in nc she to like in place and that was pretty cool too? So here's the thing it stuck me is is in the person's said to the hexagon the introduction of Hexter. I'M GONNA use it I knew cloud based Duh. Everything's Club now. Digital Reality Visualization Platform. Now I know what augmented reality is. I know virtual reality is and I know digital is but I don't know that I've run across digital reality those looking to go and All right they just slip that in there. Yeah I was on hold on. You didn't define your terms there. What do you mean by that? That's the way they describe it. It seems like it's it's just a I I guess digital reality is a good way to describe it but it is an interesting term. It was like we on. That's neat that's interesting. The thing that struck me in here is that they have an exclusive growing Which means you have? Apparently they get it. Three point six petted. Ah Pet abide collection of town cities landscapes on the one hand any amount of databases a lot. I mean just. It's a lot but on the other hand I feel like that's enough is going to be a lot of places right right. I was like man right. That's what you're saying Well I mean the one they show off most was Paris. They have video separately just for Paris But yeah I mean they should have some other locations as well. Yeah I was being vestiges there obviously but I mean yeah it doesn't it takes very little at this point whenever you're talking about a combination of lighter and imagery and not just aerial light are but also also land-based light. Are you know what we're talking about. The light are being captured for artistry. There there you go The LEUVEN and others Thursday. They show in the video. I mean those. Are you know gigabyte of data on their own between the imagery in and point data and the models that they're deriving from so just than scaling out that out to a whole city and then multiple cities yet three point. Six isn't going to be a lot of places

Google TOM United States Hawaii Hexagon China Paris United States Chinese Manufact Britain Frank Subaru Russia EU
UN experts demand US inquiry into Jeff Bezos Saudi hacking claims

The CyberWire

01:54 min | 1 year ago

UN experts demand US inquiry into Jeff Bezos Saudi hacking claims

"The UN has asked the US to investigate the spyware spyware incident involving the phone belonging to Amazon founder. Jeff bezos The Guardian reports motherboard has obtained a copy of F. T. I. Consulting's forensic report port on the device and notes. This conclusion Bezos is phone was compromised via tools procured by South Al Qahtani motherboard describes of South Al Qahtani as a friend and close adviser to Saudi Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman. He was also president and chairman of the Saudi Federation for cybersecurity eighty programming and drones and was known to procure offensive hacking tools on behalf of the Saudi regime among them tools made by the Italian company hacking checking team. The forensic investigation used a celebrate U. F. E. D. FOR PC ultimate and physical analyzer. To inspect the phone's contents. They apparently were not provided the encryption key some experts consulted by motherboard. Note that the investigators may not have got the root access they needed to fully Lee inspect the phone. Since good state-sponsored malware wouldn't portray itself by appearing in backup files an so groups Pegasus tool has been the usual all suspect but the basis for that conclusion while convincing too many remains largely circumstantial the forensic report doesn't say it found Pegasus it simply notes. It's that Pegasus could have been used and that. It's also possible hacking teams. Galileo might have been used as the report puts it advanced mobile spyware such as NSO oh groups Pegasus or hacking teams. Galileo can hook into legitimate applications and processes on a compromised device as a way to bypass detection and obfuscate activity in order to ultimately intercept exfiltration data the success of techniques such as these is a very likely explanation for the various spikes in traffic originating from Bezos is device

Jeff Bezos Crown Prince Mohammad Bin Salm Bezos Galileo South Al Qahtani Saudi Federation UN Amazon United States President And Chairman Founder F. T. I. Consulting LEE NSO U. F. E. D.
China launches Long March 5 rocket, paving way for more ambitious space projects

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

02:39 min | 1 year ago

China launches Long March 5 rocket, paving way for more ambitious space projects

"China's space blitz of ladies continuing with the launch of two more Bedell three navigation satellites followed by new Sino Brazilian birth observation satellite. The Belle three twenty three and twenty four navigation satellites were flooding into orbit aboard a Long March. Three B rocket from the Chiang Satellite concentre in South West than China's Sichuan Province the spacecraft are the forty third and forty fourth in the navigation satellite system the seventeenth and eighteenth of the and you bedell three navigation. Satellites and the twenty third and twenty fourth Bedell satellites placed into medium earth orbit marking the completion of the Corbett. Our three constellation the system however China plans to launch another eight bit after satellites next year as open space three intermediate obits three into inclined geosynchronous orbits and two digit stationary orbits. Meanwhile just days after the Dow Three Launch Beijing launched along fulbe rocket from its tie you and Satellite Loan Center Center in northern China's Yangtze province carrying any joy Chinese Brazilian earth. Resources satellite the CIBA's for a new probe replaced the existing CIBA's his four satellite which was launched back in two thousand fourteen and you spacecraft's equipped with three optical payloads at Chinese built wide range pancreatic multispectral camera brazilian-built zillion built Monte Spectral camera and Brazilian built wide field imager. The pro bowl clicked remote sensing data surveying land resources and environmental conditions and undertaking undertaking research into climate change. The mission also carried it small microsatellites into orbit including Ethiopia's first-ever spacecraft. The actress won a Wide Range H.. Mahdi spectral remote sensing satellite Russian Space Forces of launch the Soyuz to I'm Bay rocket carrying Glonass M navigation satellite into orbit put the Soyuz equipped with forget stage was launched from the Plesetsk cosmodrome eight hundred kilometers north of Moscow. The spacecraft was successfully deployed into a one thousand nine thousand one hundred kilometer high orbit way. It will replace an all. The satellite Glenis is a Russian satellite navigation system similar to America's GPS China's maddow and and Europe's Galileo global satellite navigation systems. The Glonass Constellation consists of twenty four satellites of three over the planes with eight satellites in age designed for a seven year life span the gloss M is a one thousand four hundred fifteen kilograms second generation navigation satellite. It's not known how many more gloss US satellites are likely to be launched as Moscow's already started flying. The newer more Advanced Third Generation Glonass K one and is expected to begin flights of even more Lord Vance K to

China Bedell Chiang Satellite Satellite Loan Center Center Advanced Third Generation Glon Ciba Moscow Sichuan Province Corbett Ethiopia Gps China Plesetsk Cosmodrome United States Lord Vance K Yangtze
"galileo" Discussed on Cautionary Tales

Cautionary Tales

10:47 min | 1 year ago

"galileo" Discussed on Cautionary Tales

"Here's the question we should be asking about that. Bizarre Dr Evening at the Oscars how is it even possible. For the distracted Accountant Brian Colon to give Warren Beatty the wrong envelope type A few minutes earlier. The envelope for best actress the envelope containing the card that read Emma Stone La La land. That envelope ELOPE had been in the hands of Leonardo DiCaprio as he stood onstage announcing her win. How could that envelope have made? Its way into the the hands of Warren Beatty. The answer it didn't there were two envelopes. Every envelope for every category had duplicate version waiting in the wings. These duplicate envelopes were there as a safety measure and that safety measure. He's what made the fiasco possible. Galileo's principal had bitten hard Charles Perrault's argument is is that when systems of both complex and tightly coupled we should expect catastrophic accidents. Does the Academy Awards ceremony fit not description it certainly tightly coupled you can't easily interrupt to live. TV spectacular in front of millions of people to ask for advice ice. The show must go on yet. The ceremony doesn't have to be complex giving an envelope to Warren Beatty doesn't have to be complex. But you can make complex if you try Brian Callanan's partner in crime that evening was Martha. Ruis like cullman element. She was a senior accountant. The pair of them carried identical briefcases with an identical set of envelopes on the day of the show. We'll get the ballots and Brian and I will go to the theater on two separate roads. He'll go one route and I'll go another route. Putz how moth Ruis helpfully flee explain things to journalists just before Oscar night. Both she and Colin had been proudly giving interviews about the foolproof system. We do that data to ensure that in case anything happens to one the other will be there on time and delivering. What's needed with the full set? We do have security measures off until where at the theater and delivering that envelope to the presenter. Just seconds before they walk on stage will be in two different locations. Brian will be on stage right and all the onstage left it all sounds sensible and in many ways it is sensible. It's also complicated. The system of twin envelopes meant that every time an envelope was opened on stage age it's duplicates in the wings had to be set aside moth Ruis stage left handed the envelope for best actress. Two Leonardo di caprio PRIO leaving. Brian Cullen stage right with a job of discarding duplicate the job. He failed to do. If that hadn't been that that set of twin envelopes Warren Beatty could never have been given the wrong one. So bad design helped caused the Oscar Kaffee Lasko. It also helped cause the accident at Three Mile Island and a complicated safety system was at the root of the Oscar Cafasso it was also at the root of the Fermi one accident but it's not just Oscars in nuclear power. I promised you a financial shaw catastrophe too. And this woman both safety systems and typography at the blame you might even start to see the banking crisis. It's a very different light in September. Two Thousand Eight at the height of the financial the crisis. An Insurance Executive named Robert William Start requested a meeting with Tim. Geithner Guidina would like to be the Treasury Secretary Retrea at the time he was the president of the New York Federal Reserve that meant he was responsible for supervising wall. Street's banks including including Lehman Brothers which was on the brink of collapse row but William Stat was the boss of an insurance company called. AIG and since A G wasn't a bank. It was far from obvious why Williamson it was kindness problem in his book too big to fail the journalist Andrew Ross sorkin reports the intimate details of this ill-fated meeting. I'm really sorry Mr Williams debt Mr Cotner. It's going to be a few minutes no problem I have time. I'm sorry I know you've been waiting a long time Mr Gardiner's on the phone to the boss Breath Lehman brothers. He's up to his eyeballs. Lehman Tim Guy was also exhausted. had been on an overnight flight from a banking conference in Switzerland. He must have felt completely overwhelmed. Who wouldn't have Baba's it sorry to keep you waiting coming William Stat. Got His moment he badly needed to be able to borrow from the Fed. Not Normally something edgy would be allowed to do. But he also didn't want to panic guide he needed to walk a tightrope to suggest that AIG could use some help but wasn't actually bankrupt. Is this critical or emergency Z.. Situation Bob will you know. Let me just say that it would be very beneficial day gene geithner. Perhaps I can beat lethal with you. William Start handed guide ner a briefing note buried deep within. It was a fast ticking time bomb the largest just firms on Wall Street were relying on. AIG to pay out insurance against financial trouble. The total sum insured was a truly ludicrous. Two thousand seven hundred billion dollars. Aig couldn't possibly pay if all all the claims came in and it was starting to look as though they might but that meant that the big Wall Street banks wouldn't get the insurance is payments they were relying on Aig was both a bigger threat to the financial system than Lehman brothers and far more surprising one if AIG I g was a safety net. It was one that wasn't going to break anyone's fall but to realize that Tim geithner would actually have to read need an absorb the information the note and he was busy really busy so instead he filed it away then turned end back to the Lehman Brothers problem. AIG would melt down a few days later. The parallels with Oscar night are uncanny for one thing guy who's no fool had no idea how to interpret what he was looking at. It was unexpected and the key information was buried the small print fading away in Warren Beatty know the feeling. Then there's Galileo's principal safety systems don't always make a safe those insurance contracts was opposed to offset risk not create it right the by now. We know that safety systems also also introduce new ways for things to go wrong. The insurance contracts that were about to destroy. Aig we're called. CREDIT DEFAULT SWAPS SWAPS. Let become popular as a way to offset risk with the blessing of regulators. They seemed smart idea. Just as the third support for for the columns seems like a smart idea and the metal filters at the FERMI reactor and the duplicate set of award envelopes but they backfired Wall Street banks were relying on these credit default swaps to keep them safe if there was trouble when it became clear that insurance companies such his. AIG couldn't possibly pay out. The banks. All scrambled to sell off their risky investments. That the exact same time for the exact same same reason. A few days after William's stance had met gainer officials and bankers worked through the weekend on the Lehman Brothers problem only only on Sunday. Evening did one of those bankers receive a request for a Treasury official to ask if she could drop everything and work on rescuing. Aig instead the surprising phone call was greeted with a response that was unsurprisingly. Unsuitable for certainly is hold on. Hold on your calling the Sunday night saying that we just spent the entire weekend on layman and now we have this. How huck did we spend the past forty eight hours on the wrong thing? How indeed for the same reason? They gave the Oscar to the wrong movie confusing confusing communication and above all a safety system that created a brand new way to fail the banking crisis crisis of two thousand and eight shook the world financial system and destroyed millions of jobs more than a decade later. We're still living with the consequences quences. It was in its way a more serious crisis than any nuclear accident. It was certainly far. Graver than a bungalow at the Oscars yet the same problems for the roots of all these accidents after the la La land shambles Vanity Fair reported. What'd the Oscars have an intense six step plan to avoid another envelope disaster? The six steps include lewd getting rid of the two accounting partners. Brian Callanan and mouth overseas and the Tweeden sets of envelopes. Instead says Vanity Fair there will be three partners. A third partner will sit in the show's control. With the producers. All three partners will have a complete set of envelopes. If having two sets coast problem having three sets is better right. I'm not don't Shaw. Galileo would agree..

AIG Warren Beatty Oscar Lehman Brothers Lehman Tim Guy Brian Callanan Galileo Leonardo DiCaprio Emma Stone La La William Stat Robert William Brian Colon Brian Cullen Oscar Kaffee Lasko Brian Tim geithner
"galileo" Discussed on Cautionary Tales

Cautionary Tales

10:45 min | 1 year ago

"galileo" Discussed on Cautionary Tales

"The question we should be asking about bizarre evening at the. Oscars how is it even possible for the distracted accountant? Brian Callanan to give Warren Beatty the wrong envelope a few minutes earlier. The envelope for best actress the envelope containing the card that read Emma Stone. La La land. That envelope had been in the hands of Leonardo DiCaprio as he stood onstage announcing her win. How could that envelope have made? Its Way into the hands of Warren Beatty. The answer it didn't there were two envelopes every envelope. Every category had a duplicate version waiting in the wings these duplicate envelopes with that as a safety measure and that safety measure is what made the fiasco possible. Galileo's principal had bitten Harlem Charles Perrault's argument is that when systems of both complex and tightly coupled we should expect catastrophic accidents. Does the Academy Awards ceremony fit that description it certainly tightly coupled you can't easily interrupt a live? Tv SPECTACULAR IN FRONT OF MILLIONS OF PEOPLE TO. Ask for advice. The show must go on. The ceremony doesn't have to be complex. Giving an envelope to Warren Beatty doesn't have to be complex but you can make complex if you try. Brian Collins Partner in crime that evening was Martha. Ruis like Callanan. She was a senior accountant. The pair of them carried identical briefcases with an identical set of envelopes on the day of the show. We'll get the ballots and Brian and I will go to the theater on two separate roads. He'll go one route and I'll go another route. Putz how math ruis helpfully explain things to journalists just before Oscar night both she and Cullen had been proudly. Giving interviews about the foolproof system. We do that to ensure that encased anything happens to one the other will be there on time and delivering. What's needed with the full set? We do have security measures up until we're at the theater and delivering that envelope to the presenter just seconds before they walk. Onstage will be in two different locations. Brian will be on stage right and I'll be on onstage left. It all sounds sensible and in many ways it is sensible. It's also complicated. The system of twin envelopes meant that every time an envelope was opened on stage. It's duplicates in the wings had to be set. Aside Martha Ruis Stage. Left handed the envelope for best actress. Two Leonardo di caprio leaving Brian Callanan stage right with job of discarding. The duplicate the job. He failed to do. If that hadn't been that set of twin envelopes Warren Beatty could never have been given the wrong one. So bad design helped cause the Oscar fiasco it also helped cause the accident at Three Mile Island and a complicated safety system was at the root of the Oscar Foss it was also at the root of the Fermi worn accident. But it's not just Oscars nuclear power. I promised you a financial catastrophe to an this one. Both safety systems and bad typography to blame you might even start to see the banking crisis in a very different light in September. Two Thousand and eight at the height of the financial crisis an insurance executive named Robert Willemstad requested meeting with Tim. Geithner Guidina would be the treasury secretary at the time. He was the president of the New York Federal Reserve. That meant he was responsible for supervising wall. Street's banks including Lehman Brothers which was on the brink of collapse Robert William Stat. Was the boss of an insurance company called. Aig AND SINCE AIG wasn't a bank it was far from obvious why was guidance problem in his book. Too Big to fail the journalist Andrew Ross sorkin reports the intimate details of this ill-fated meeting. I'm really sorry Mr Williams debt. Mr Is going to be a few minutes no problem I have time. I'm sorry I know you've been waiting a long time Mr Gardner's on the phone to the boss of Lehman Brothers he's up to his eyeballs and Lehman Geithner was also exhausted. He'd been on an overnight flight from a banking conference in Switzerland. He must have felt completely overwhelmed. Who wouldn't have Baba's sorry to keep you waiting coming. Willemstad got his moment he badly needed to be able to borrow from the Fed. Not Normally something. Aig would be allowed to do but he also didn't want to panic Guidina he needed to walk a tightrope to suggest that AIG could use some help but wasn't actually bankrupt. Is this critical or emergency situation. Bob Well you know. Let me just say that. It would be very beneficial. Id Mr Geithner can leave this with you. William Start Handed Gardner a briefing note. Buried deep within. It was a fast. Ticking time bomb the largest firms on Wall Street were relying on a I G to pay out on insurance against financial trouble. The total sum insured was a truly ludicrous. Two thousand seven hundred billion dollars. Ahe couldn't possibly pay if all the claims came in and it was starting to look as though they might but that meant that the big Wall Street banks wouldn't get the insurance payments. They were relying on a I. G was both a big threat to the financial system than Lehman brothers and a far more surprising one if aig was a safety net. It was warm that wasn't going to break anyone's fall but to realize that Tim Geithner actually have to read and absorb the information in the note and he was busy really busy so instead he filed it away then turned back to the Lehman Brothers problem. Aig was down a few days later. The parallels with Oscar night are UNCANNY for one thing guidance. Who's no fool had no idea how to interpret what he was looking at? It was unexpected. And the key information was buried in the small print Faye Dunaway in Warren beatty feeling. Then there's Galileo's principal safety systems. Don't always make a safe. Those insurance contracts were supposed to offset risk not created right by now we know that safety systems also introduce new ways for things to go wrong. The insurance contracts that were about to destroy AIG. We're called credit. Default swaps that become popular is a way to set risk with the blessing regulators. They seem smart idea. Just as third support for the columns seems like a smart idea and the metal filters at the FERMI and the duplicate set of award envelopes but backfired Wall Street banks were relying on these credit default swaps to keep them safe if there was trouble when it became clear that insurance companies such as AIG couldn't possibly pay out. The banks all scrambled to sell off their risky investments. The exact same time for the exact same reason a few days after Williams had met gainer officials and bankers works through the weekend on the Lehman Brothers problem only on Sunday evening. Did one of those bankers receive request for a Treasury official to ask if she could drop everything and work on rescuing. Aig instead the surprising phone call was greeted with a response. That was unsurprisingly. Unsuitable for family is hold on. Hold on you're calling me Sunday. Night thing that we just spent the entire weekend on layman and now we have this. How the fuck did we spend the past forty eight hours on the wrong thing? How indeed for the same reason? They gave the Oscar to the wrong movie confusing communication and above all a safety system that created a brand new way to fail the banking crisis of two thousand eight shook the world financial system and destroyed millions of jobs more than a decade later. We're still living with the consequences. It was in its way a more serious crisis than any nuclear accident. It was certainly far graver than a bungle the Oscars yet the same problems for the roots of all these accidents after the law Lan Shambles Vanity. Fair reported the Oscars have an intense step plan to avoid another envelope disaster. The six steps include getting rid of the two accounting pompous Brian Callanan and mouth res and the Tweeden sets of envelopes instead says Vanity Fair. There will be three partners. Third Partner will sit in. The show's control room. With the producers. All three partners will have a complete set of envelopes. Having two sets caused the problem having three sets is better right. I'M NOT SURE. Galileo would agree..

Aig Oscars Warren Beatty Lehman Brothers Brian Callanan Lehman Geithner Leonardo DiCaprio Brian Galileo Martha Ruis Mr Williams principal Mr Gardner Emma Stone Partner La La land Robert Willemstad Charles Perrault accountant
How Does Venus Work?

BrainStuff

06:13 min | 1 year ago

How Does Venus Work?

"After the moon the Venus is the second brightest natural object in the night sky partially because this planet is covered by reflective clouds that make it is an optical telescopes can't penetrate eight with the Venetian surface hidden from view generations of fiction writers used to speculate wild about the mysterious terrain beneath those clouds for example Tarzan Creator Edgar Rice burroughs portrayed Venus as a world with lush forests in our boreal cities in a nineteen eighty-four pulp novel but then science intervened B eight at Venus's habitable pretty much imploded during the Cold War in Nineteen fifty-six Radio Telescope observations showed that the planet had surfaced temperatures in excess of six hundred and eight eighteen degrees Fahrenheit that's three hundred twenty six degrees Celsius and believe it or not those readings were kind of low we now know the average surface temperature on Nisa blistering eight hundred sixty four degrees Fahrenheit or four hundred sixty two Celsius it's the hottest planet in our solar system even though mercury is closer to the Sun on the face of Venus the atmospheric pressure is crushingly extreme and lead would melt into a puddle but as hellish as this place sounds actually has in common with Earth the two worlds are quite similar in size if you were to stuff venus inside our planet matric doll style it would occupy roughly eighty six percent end of earth total volume Venus has earth beaten in some key regards though earth displays a slight midsection bulge being wider around its equator than it is from one pole to the other conversely Venus is almost a perfect sphere what gives well when a massive celestial body like a star or planet spins quickly around its axis centrifugal force will give it a more dramatic bulge around its equator however Venus has an ultra slow rotation speed it takes the equivalent of two hundred and forty-three earth days for Venus to complete one full rotation around its axis and only two hundred twenty five earth days to finish a new lap around the Sun so in other words a day on Venus lasts longer than Vanesian year does and get this from our self centered perspective Venus spins backward word most of the planets in the solar system rotate from west to east Uranus and Venus Buck that trend on those two worlds the sun appears to rise in the West and set in the East nobody knows how that came to pass. Astronomers think Venus us to move in a counterclockwise direction like Earth but at some point it's been I have reversed alternatively perhaps the sun's Gravitational influence or a collision with a large object caused the entire planet to flip upside down in December of nineteen sixty two Venus became the first planet to get a fly by visit from a manmade spacecraft exploiting brief window of opportunity NASA's Mariner two probes studied this world up close from distances as near as twenty one thousand miles that's about thirty four thousand kilometers onboard instruments taught us a great deal mariner two firms that Venus does not have an earth like magnetic field and it recorded surface temperatures within the expected range a young Carl Sagan helped design the mariner to probe yes successfully lobbied to have the space craft fitted with a camera because close up pictures of Venus might quote answer questions that we were too dumb to even pose by the time Mariner to launched scientists already knew that there were high levels of carbon dioxide in the vision atmosphere and that composition should give us pause carbon dockside makes up a whopping ninety six percent of Venus's atmosphere scientists attribute this to a runaway greenhouse effect theoretically the planet used to have a more temperate climate that could have remained stable for billions of years back then oceans of liquid water may have covered its surface though we don't know for sure things changed as are growing son became hotter any oceans would have evaporated during this time astronomers think much of the carbon dioxide invasion rocks leached out and traveled guy word while the atmosphere changed it got better at trapping heat creating a vicious cycle that worsens the problem inevitably temperatures spiked and stayed since our own planet has a major greenhouse gas problem Venus could offer us important insights regarding climate change but sending probes to explore it has always presented major challenges on Venus the surface gravity is comparable to what you and I experience on earth what's not comparable is that atmospheric Asher which is ninety two times greater on the face of Venus than it is here faced with extreme temperatures and high pressure it's no wonder that manmade objects don't last long long in the planet's environment when the Soviet venire thirteen probe landed on Venus in Nineteen eighty-two it stayed intact for record setting one hundred and twenty seven minutes before it was destroyed mind you this wasn't the USSR's first Rodeo previous Venero spacecraft's successfully visited the planet's atmosphere and touched down on its outer crest brief though their visits were these probes captured the first ever photographs of the Venetian surface Nasr's Magellan spacecraft provided further insights has it mapped ninety eight percent of the planet's face all in all Venus boasts more than sixteen thousand volcanoes and volcanic features but we don't know of any these are still active highland plateaus deep canyons and meteorite impact craters have also been discovered there although Venus's about four point six billion years old crest is thought to be much younger with an estimated age of just three hundred to six hundred million years Venus lacks tectonic plates as we know them on earth nonetheless Sunday August think that upwelling magma occasionally recycle sections of the crust long before it was an object scientific study or of Edgar Rice burroughs. goals Venus mesmerized our ancestors bright and beautiful the cloud adorned planet derives its name from the Roman Goddess of love into mathematicians mapped it's progress across the sky and Galileo took detailed notes about its moon like phases somehow knowing that Venus is a stifling hot house doesn't diminish its allure with every new discovery inspires curiosity aw

Edgar Rice Burroughs Radio Telescope Nisa Eight Hundred Sixty Four Degre Three Hundred Twenty Six Degre Eight Eighteen Degrees Fahrenh Thirty Four Thousand Kilometer Six Hundred Million Years Ninety Eight Percent Twenty Seven Minutes Eighty Six Percent Ninety Six Percent Six Billion Years One Pole
At the Races With Nick Tammaro

Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

12:45 min | 2 years ago

At the Races With Nick Tammaro

"Churchill getting started would bind with they're the first really too big weekends they also course got the international later in the meet later in the fall and and that brings in some international shippers this woodbine mile just the mile either northern dancer the more you look at it. I thought was was was intriguing and there's plenty of other a lot of stars on the card including Holy Khaleda and pink Loyd. WHO's I I for a horse? That's one like twenty seven in a row. Nobody seems the talk about him or pay much attention to him. Bob Tillers streaking sprinter and here's a streaking sprinter victim Rio depends on where the sprint destination is. I think might Tapei at times but shop racing form a yes to the windows. Definitely Pink Floyd is is really sort of a marvel in terms of how he's performed well routinely I of course needed him to at least be third in this race last year in the contest and finished fifth so the pink floyd stop it will be nowhere near Wreck Stale Ontario and so his chances tomorrow we'll probably increase exponentially. He's in the early. They put the bold venture early on the card actually in fact when I went to the stakes together and put them up Derby Trail Oh. I didn't even look that that early on the card so I didn't even have to go back in fact I don't know if I did go back and put it up but there are a couple couple of very nice horses here including Carlin's honor the Jack Oxley Breezy York good old Yordan approaching half a million dollars for a chiefs would and Stewart Simon you know a lot of your a lot of your local players in the sprint scene but pink Cloyd is now twenty one twenty six and it really was late last year September October that he started to show some some frings signs of tiring and Kinda sputtered out at the end of the year could. Could he be beaten in here. I don't think so no it looks like he's he's back where he needs to be and I don't really know I guess other than Caroline's honor who's supposed to be particularly big threat to him in the spot so he he should get the job done. I mean it's always nice to see good. Horses do Well York than obviously was in much better form coming into this last year having run a good second pink Floyd Royd individual and and that was also during a period of time where pink floyd was having a really hard time getting out of the gate so he's a little ornery for a seven year old gelding and he had a little bit gate trouble really about four or five races in a row going into last year's bold venture he he's not he still not they really particularly the obedient or when it comes to getting out of the gate or being trained for it but he's definitely a little bit better spot with that right now so I think given that he's he's inform and should be sitting right off of the of the pace. If you worked in may be line to the front end. I think he should be okay before we talk about the Canadian the end the grade to which does start the cross country and will incorporate the pebbles and the nightcap at Belmont Nixon thoughts about last week at Belmont. We talked about this Jockey Club Derby and oaks and the Grand Prix. I talked to Andy on Tuesday. The Grand Prix was oddly contest than I thought but some some quick hits on opening the opening salvos at Belmont. I guess guess I'll try and keep it as charitable as possible. Given I took my shots at it last week but I think they played out largely. How we expected decide thought was a pretty impressive winner of the Jockey Club oaks overcoming? I think by all counsel was a pretty negative pace setup and winning is much the best running down Wonderman who I thought probably got a little bit more the run of the race and the American contingent as we expected in that race as well as the Jockey Club Derby were pretty much no shows and it could also be that the American continuing is pretty thin out by now. We'll talk about the pebbles and a little bit but the pebbles is going to be the ninth race for one hundred thousand dollars or more for three year olds fillies on turf going back to June sixth six and that's insane so the ranks of American horses that are ready to go a mile and three eighths early in September. We're really not very not very robust and and that proved out on the lady side and I thought Spanish mission I I actually thought he was totally out of position and thought that he was about to have a Jamie Spencer Special before he was able to overcome it and get the job done so a little bit. I know that the horse was capable of overcoming his writer. I I would imagine he he should be one of the better distant sources that we could potentially see over here next year given that he's going to be off now until the spring and there's just obviously connections that have problems shipping over the Grand Prix North American Jockey Club invitational brought to you by whatever most pretentious name of all time that was one of the most oddly run races I've ever seen first of all. I don't know how the hell everybody knew. Marconi was winning that race for fun and then to watch the riders of both realm and roaming union gather a hold of their horses so strongly almost as if they were waiting for Marconi to catch up and take the lead after he blew the break so that he could go one sixteen flat it was basically sort of the epitome of what we complain about left and right about American American dirt racing right now and you know in this day and age of sort of turf occasion of American racing where everybody points to turf races races are run like turf races. It's almost as if one horse makes the lead all the other guys say okay well. They're the pacesetter we're just GONNA go ahead and sit back and wait for them to come back to us and the majority of the time on the dirt that just doesn't happen even so shockingly Marconi was able to set a pedestrian pace and and went on with it and I I obviously would not have been a big fan of his at the price he went off often. We talked about how it looked like a bit more competitive race on paper the other todd pletcher trainee your to blame. I thought ran pretty well. He was able to stop the pace on the inside but you know I don't y horse like roaming union was in there if he wasn't GonNa GonNa contest the pace especially given that he's from connections like Michelle Navin who generally have a pretty decent idea how to win dirt racist so that was is a little bit of a head scratcher. you know look my personal opinion is that if there's any thought given to this turf triple. I really hope that same amount of money is committed to a dirt program and trying trying to incentivize horsemen to get there and run on dirt more frequently really try and build up the claiming ranks again because it's kind of embarrassing through the first three days of racing. I'm I'm sorry through the first three days of Racing Belmont there were seventy eight horses total entered to run on dirt and there are over seventy eight horses enter to run dirt in the first day at Churchill so I if the same number number of races and and that's that's not good. That's a big big problem that creates a big problem in the winter so that's my hope for it as it is. I guess we'll see probably a little bit better from Spanish mission in the Diese Lisa next year well we turn to Belmont today and into the weekend a couple of very good maiden races actually as part of that card and maybe we'll touch on them but let's let's look at the cross country pick five and it is comprised of of the three three of the stakes would bind the Canadian the mile and the northern dancer that you know you the top of your head. You wouldn't have thought it the three of them were as complex as actually I think they are and then the pebbles and the turf sprint claiming nightcap the eleventh at Belmont so let's start with the Canadian you know this is an interesting field the and really they'll competition. Idea should probably go off a pretty solid favorite. I don't really see how tactically you could make a real stand with her and she's a horseshoe. Obviously needs to lay back and make one run and you know those types generally at the mercy of the pace and this race does not look like it's going to have really any pace speak of so so she's going to have to overcome that now. I will say that you'll Rosario getting back on board to me feels like a very good thing. It does seem like she's just a little bit better horse when he's John Her but now the flip side of that is that we know Joel style. He's GonNa take her back and let her make one run so I mean they're they're going to. There's going to have to be some pace in here that you can't really foresee and I guess the hope is that Dixie moon and or starship do believe maybe show a little bit more speed than they have before. That's if you're back competition of ideas with any great fervor because obviously what this is shaping up as a situation where Holy Helena has a big tactical advantage on the other favorite and and she's been effective at Woodbine in the past. You look good winning the dance smartly last time Jimmy was giving a little bit of time since and I think she's a horse that that will really get the run of the race and and that's GonNa make her toffee. This could be a situation where on your your pick five. You're really leaning on those two pretty heavily and maybe you could give a little bit of a nod holy Helena on one one more additional ticket. I did want to try and make a case for to Riga and my hope is the Tyler Galileo. Maybe a little bit more aggressive with her than Johnny. Velazquez was was last time he finished just length and a half behind the competition of ideas did get into a little bit of trouble amazingly. She got into trouble in the three-horse rates which it happens of course and with a little bit cleaner run maybe second off the off the layoff off the ship in we can see some improvement grim oceans been a little the little laid back with her she she ran on July twentieth didn't work until August thirty first but might be one of those horses that can stay fit without doing that. I I'm always very very in tune and was looking at his horses in these kind of scenarios as they they generally overperform relative to their odds so I'm GonNa go ahead and include Theresa's well the and will include could starship jubilee more than likely those two has backups because I think they each offers some appeal at what should be better prices than the two chalks should note that ah Jimmy Jerkins after sending Holy Elena opt for the dance smartly basically is as left her there and oh my Gosh the stronach trainer but my Woodbine what is yes thank you Mike Doyle. Mike Doyle has been handling and Jimmy is on TV with seth deny after after precision is one and he told the story about Jimmy said he got the notification is it is stable mail all that Holy Helena had worked Labor Day weekend and so gets the notice he opens it up and Airy Jerry Sees Holy Elena six longs one eleven and three Jimmy said got on the phone to this is Mike what's going on up there and he said I really don't worry though or she did it easy. Did it easy the track was the polly was slick. It was cold or whatever yeah what eleven at three and you know what I did. I brought up with Jimmy that great story that is his father told about Bo purple and going out to Hawthorn for the Hawthorne Gold Cup on Tuesday the race as was Saturday and on Tuesday he gets a call from a Chicago sportswriter and said Jerkins. I wanted to ask you for comment about outvote purples work and said what about it. He says well he he he went a mile in one thirty. Two and three Korea broke the track record or mile. I think he went to violent at eight and broke the track record. What what forty seven forty six shades or something and and and Jerkin said you know? I'm sure he'll be fine and sure enough. He went out and won the Gold Cup but that was funny. One one eleven and three

Belmont Jimmy Jerkins Pink Floyd Jockey Club Derby Marconi Grand Prix Churchill Grand Prix North American Jock Belmont Nixon Bob Tillers Mike Doyle Tapei Jockey Club Oaks Jamie Spencer RIO Well York Caroline York Wreck Stale Ontario
London's National Gallery plans major Artemisia Gentileschi show

The Art Newspaper Weekly

13:01 min | 2 years ago

London's National Gallery plans major Artemisia Gentileschi show

"Returned to Artemis Magenta Leschi in two thousand eighteen the National Gallery in London announced that it had bought Genta Leschi self-portrait to sink Catherine of Alexandria that work has just been on a tour of unusual British venues from Glasgow Women's library to a doctor's surgery in Yorkshire a Catholic High School in Newcastle and a prison in send Surrey Tori is now back at the National Gallery ahead of a survey of gentlest work that opens at the Gallery in twenty twenty in January nineteen. I was joined by not at Travis the National Gallery's curator of later Italian Spanish and French seventeenth century paintings to talk about Artemisia and that remarkable new acquisition the teacher. Can you tell me I more we're about Artemisia. Gentle Leschi the woman and the artist. She's obviously a name now that many people have heard of not just people sort of in the art world or interested in art and I'd I'd say that's quite a recent occurrence <hes>. She was really sort of rediscovered in a way <hes> in the nineteen seventies. She featured an exhibition in L._A.. On women artists artists and a number of her works exhibited then and so she sort of came to the fore then and number of feminist historians focused on her and her work <hes> throughout the latter part of the twentieth century but it's only really since she started being the subject of shows monographic show in two thousand and one in New York and then more recent exhibitions that I think she really came to wider public. I think now she is not necessarily a household name but I think people have heard of her a third of her as an artist but also her life story and I think a lot of the interest around her sort of people's view of her as a kind of empowered women derives from her biography rather like carbohydrate zone biographical stories somewhat somewhat sort of overshadows the art but I think Artemis as an artist now is coming to the fore and I think that's I'm looking forward to working on this show in two hundred twenty because I think it's very much focusing on her. As a painter ops you can't ignore what was happening in her life and the big events that the that obviously influenced that's how life in Harare but it is very much artistic abilities. Can you tell us something of that biography then before we get into into the to the painting the nationals occurred. Uh ultimately has seen very much as a sort of exception. I think it's important say she was quite exceptional that she wasn't the only woman autism the seventeenth century. I mean there had been other successful artists before her. Aha but she was born in Rome to Aratu gentlest who was a well established painter in Rome and a lady prudence and Artemis mother died when she was just twelve so she was actually brought up in a male household so brutal by her father and she had three brothers she was in fact one of five to two died <hes> and the brothers and Artemis rule trained by rats here in his own workshop but it's clear that she was the one that he saw had greater talent than than the brothers <hes> and a and sort of everything changed when she was raped by Agostino. Tassie Passy was <hes> an extremely successful painter of SORTA Trompe l'oeil architecture and who was working at that time without C._E._o.. On a large project the casino limousine he was brought in to teach Artemisia Perspective and he raped her <hes> and they Taylor have sexual relations for some months and then he was brought to trial buyouts and this is very famous as perhaps the most famous episode in Artemis Life because remarkably all the trial documents actually survivor a large portion of survive so you can actually read optimizes own words in the witness box and you read the accusations against us. It's quite extraordinary to have that kind of sort of documentary evidence still survive from the seventeenth century and he's effectively found guilty of de flowering her because what what is bringing against Casey is the fact that not only did he rape his daughter but he didn't do the honorable thing and marry her afterwards and this is sort of idea the lack of honor the the so dishonor on his family. That's very much motivating the trial so he's found guilty although his punishments never enforced and Artemis married off two days as later to the brother of her defense lawyer and with him moves to Florence and obviously this episode was obviously a great tragedy in her life when she describes in in her own words is really violent attack on her. It is quite harrowing but I think if that had never happened. Her life would have been very different. She would have carried John. Working probably in her father's studio in Rome but as a result herbs sort of enforced moved Florence really was the making of her and it's incredible things that how she turned the situation around and really I mean I like to think in Florence. You really became Artemisia. She found her own sort of autistic voice and it's why she really gained independence in Florence and she's there for about seven years and then she comes back to Rome very different sort of person she's very much in demand very successful and we know this from letters says from her husband that survived saying you know they've got cardinals and princes around the house all the time. She after music doesn't even have time to eat. She's so busy and then in sixteen thirty she settles also in Naples where she lives till the end of her life at least sort of twenty five years and runs a very successful workshop. I says you pretty much stays in Italy except for a brief trip to London in the late. Sixteenth extent thirties which in itself is quite unusual for women to be traveling internationally. Elaine indeed just one thing about the biography that makes her have a certain currency. Today is as you say in those documents around the trial. It's clear that she is being put on trial. In the trial and and in fact is is is tortured a- as as part of that process I mean laws be made of that and I think there's been a very much more measured reading of those documents in a wider sort of frame. If you like particularly particularly <hes> one social historian Elizabeth Cohen quite a lot of work on actually the documents relating to the trials of young virgins in Roman that period and it seems as a sort of standard way of leading these trials and actually it falls quite within that I wouldn't call it a pattern but within that but if you really read carefully the words mean she was tortured by using the which were these ropes tightened around her fingers while she was in the box but the judge also beforehand is it will right if we do this and it's clear if if you really read the the original Italian it is clear that it's in a way that they're asking if they can torch her to in a way prove her innocence in a sense sort of <hes> just to make sure that what she's saying is actually true and and it is while she's the torturing her with a C._B._S.. That she says you know it's true. It's true it's true. She repeats the what she says is true and so I think in a way it was sort of in supportive her innocence in this situation. I think you can already read in the language. That's used that. It's in a way away to catch tassie out right now. The the making of her in artistically say was was her moved to Florence say something about her experience there what kind coin of Education for instance did she did. She have there and will she in another painter studio straight away. No I think the really remarkable thing is that she sets up independently. She was trained in her father's studio. You know these sort of kind of family workshop tradition existed since the Renaissance and not just in Italy but it was often a father to Assan workshop so it's quite new female members of the family would be involved but as I say after means is not the first loving Fontana. Her father was very successful. So do you know in a way has sort of training. Rome wasn't unusual as perhaps be unusual because she was a woman but the whole learning from your father your trade from your father wasn't unusual the fact of her moving moving to Florence and having to set up independently is the thing that really made her. I think we have no real indication of having a student with with pupils assault. She worked effectively from her has junior. It wasn't her home. Her husband was apparently a painter but very sort of modest kind of renown. She was the very first female MEL member of the Academy in Florence. She was member from sixteen sixteen so you know she. She arrived in around sixteen thirteen within two three years. She's already really established herself. That's a really shows incredible determination but also kind of recognition of her skill and I think it's partly to do with her resilience. I think it will start to do with who she came into contact with in Florence. Not you say how education but also the circles. She moved in one of her great sort of protect us. There was Michelangelo Buonarroti younger who is the great nephew of Great Michelangelo and Artemis is only documented picture in Florence is in the ceiling of one hundred thirty still today and there she is alongside other Florentine artists of her of her time so she seems to have integrators of quite quickly and Florence <hes> and one of her close friends was Christopher. No Laurie won the greatest painters in the seventeenth century in Florence who is also godfather to her son Christopher so she clearly immediately set us you know sort of entered into autistic circles intellectual circles because she was a friend of Galileo and she worked for the MEDICI and did did she carry her Caravan Jasko style that she would have learned in Rome with her two phones or did she very much incorporate new styles and influences from her surrounding same sex. It's such a hot topic. That's so discussed because she has been called a chameleon and and I think as a result of this now many pictures get attributed to her that aren't necessarily by her because you can still use it as a dolphin well. She's communiqu. She changes all the time I think in the kind of broad sense she is quite community. She can adopt US style but it's part of her sort of business strategy. I think so you know she spent twenty five years. Working in Naples pictures look look really neapolitan but of course they would. She's been living in Naples. She's working for Nipples and patrons and I think when she moved to Florence. I think actually more than Caravaggio it is her father is rats. Here's pictures and rats. Here's handling of paint that's most of present in her mind and in the picture the the National Gary bought <hes> <hes> you know the thing that became very clear as as the pitcher was being cleaned as just that technically the way she paints the flash and so on. It's very ratu still very present in her mind. I think we'll sure influences. She's looking at these Florida artists. She's frequenting. She's using Carter analogy that you see in Florentine painting at that time she's also painting pictures for Medici tastes so that it also makes sense but when she comes back to Rome in sixteen twenty that's when Carava Chisholm off to Caravaggio is death ten years after is when cartridges is really the height of its popularity and I think there is definitely a renewed interest in this heightened naturalism start lighting and you can see that in the pictures of the sixteen twenty s can can you say more about the circumstances in which he would have created the specific work which the national now has well. The conservations been really interesting because you know I think a lot of living has been spilt on Artemis but not a huge amount of being written about her technique and I think this is actually played such an important role in actually understanding after media. It's been a lot written about you know dating's and attributions and also sort of the Mall gender-specific interpretation of her pictures in the iconography but I think had technique is absolutely fundamental understanding astounding to me. It's not Jason. Weeding out the pictures that aren't by her that are currently sort of sitting in this sort of limbo so during the conservation the National Gallery painting. We noticed similarities with obviously rats. Here's painting technique we notice differences. The pictures very closely related to two paintings one. That's in Hartford <hes> Connecticut at the Wadsworth which shows is a self portrait of her playing the lute and the other is a sin Catherine in New Jersey and the the suit of similarity between these pictures is not just sort of superficial fullness similarities but she's taken direct borrowings from one and the other. This is almost kind of amalgamation of these two other pictures which she knows sheds. It's light on her practice. You know how did she did. She transfer these designs to choose tracings. I mean we know how far the rats here uses tracings a lot <hes> did she have these three pictures which is in the studio once <hes> did the pro sort of composition evolve in the national painting. Does she know exactly what she was doing. From the very beginning I mean there are certain technical aspects of the pitcher the suggest it did evolve into Katherine. I'm perhaps didn't start its life as Catherine so I'm very interested also in how she uses her own image so the picture in halt that is clearly a self portrait very characterized face and all is a little bit idealized and I think there's been too much discussion in the post about whether picture easel isn't a self reporter. I think there's a kind of disguise self portraiture in a lot of her works where <hes> she would clear have expected people to kind of vaguely recognize her features a note. It was painting by women of a woman who looked like Artemisia but it doesn't necessarily have to be a self Putin a very literal sense. I think that's that's a really interesting aspect isn't it because how much of it is in that is almost like an advocate for for her capabilities and also for for her personality for her strength or strength of character and it's very easy easy to read biography into it isn't it because it's such a striking image and we know about this history of hers. Yes I mean I've had inquiries from the public. Since we announced the acquisition was saying you know other you know signs of torture on her fingers.

Florence Artemis Rome National Gallery Naples Artemis Magenta Leschi Tassie Passy Italy London Harare Caravaggio Artemis Life Travis The National Gallery L._A Alexandria Newcastle New York Genta Leschi
NASA ScienceCast 299: The Lasting Impacts of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9

NASA ScienceCasts

03:59 min | 2 years ago

NASA ScienceCast 299: The Lasting Impacts of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9

"In the lasting impacts of Comet Shoemaker Levy nine presented by science at NASA at the close the last century a comet captured into orbit around a planet traveled to close and was shredded by gravity into multiple pieces some as large as half a mile or one-kilometer-long those fragments would plunge engine to the planets atmosphere in a series of impacts. Would the impacts be spectacular or would the comet fragments disappear without a trace in July nineteen ninety-four astronomers around the world watched with bated. Breath as the fragments of Comet Shoemaker Levy nine slammed into the planet Jupiter Dr Kelly fast was one of the impacts observers and is now manager of Nasr's near Earth Object Observations Program. It was just incredible to watch such an impact event had never before been witnessed. Let alone studied ground based telescopes around the world and spacecraft like Nasr's Hubble Space Telescope and even the Galileo orbiter on route to Jupiter were used to to observe the impacts the discovery of the comment by Caroline Jeans Shoemaker and David Levy gave us about a year at a plan observations. The impacts proved to be impressive the fragments some twenty one in all plunged plunged into Jupiter's atmosphere over the course of six days at impact. They were travelling at a speed of about thirty seven miles per second or sixty kilometers per second heating the atmosphere to at least fifty three thousand degrees Fahrenheit. Fahrenheit or thirty thousand degrees Celsius like the splash from throwing a rock into a pond the impacts created giant plumes of material from Jupiter's lower atmosphere which rose as high as nineteen hundred miles or three three thousand kilometers above the cloud tops into the stratosphere in the aftermath the Plume Splash Bax scarred Jupiter's atmosphere with dark clouds of impact abry which could be seen for months as they were gradually dispersed by Jupiter's was wins so what scientists able to learn about Jupiter itself as a result of the impacts for one thing those dark clouds of impact debris acted as tracers of the winds in Jupiter stratosphere and by following their motion over. Over time scientists could measure those high altitude wins temporary changes in the Aurora on Jupiter showed scientists at Jupiter's magnetosphere was influenced by particles from the impacts. We are still able to see changes changes in Jupiter's atmosphere that resulted from the impacts when the fragments of shoemaker leaving nine slammed into Jupiter they deposited their own chemical compounds. The impact processes produced some and others were exhumed from the lower atmosphere here. Some molecules like ammonia were destroyed by sunlight in the weeks and months after the impacts but others like hydrogen cyanide and water are still seeing today all of that tells scientists about how chemistry works in Jupiter's bidders atmosphere come at shoemaker leaving nine showed us at large impacts still happened in the solar system and were a factor in NASA developing programs to address the impact risk to Earth from comet science to Jupiter.

Jupiter Comet Shoemaker Levy Caroline Jeans Shoemaker Nasa Nasr Dr Kelly Hubble Space Telescope Galileo Fifty Three Thousand Degrees F Thirty Thousand Degrees Celsiu Three Three Thousand Kilometer Sixty Kilometers One-Kilometer Six Days
Keeping Secrets Makes Life Harder, Emotions Change Your Perception of Time

Curiosity Daily

07:10 min | 2 years ago

Keeping Secrets Makes Life Harder, Emotions Change Your Perception of Time

"Today. You'll learn how keeping secrets can literally weigh you down. How we knew the earth rotates before we had space travel, and how your emotions can alter your perception of time with satisfy some curiosity. Do you have a secret? Here's a fun fact, according to a two thousand seventeen study the average person has around thirteen secrets and five of them will never come out to anyone. The researchers say that it isn't the number of secrets you keep that really matters, though, it's the burden of those secrets and the real effects. They have on you. Glad I don't have to deal with this. You don't have any secrets or do. I you'll never know. Do you know, I I feel like I need to have more secrets if you like that would be good for me to just like stop telling people everything, according to this research that may not be the case this study out of Columbia business school showed that when a subject thought about their secrets they actually acted as if they were burdened by physical wait this happened. Even on the subject wasn't hiding a particular secret at that moment. There's more research to back this up a twenty twelve study showed that quote, people who recalled were preoccupied with or suppressed an important secret estimated hills to be steeper perceived distances to be farther indicated that physical tasks would require more effort and were less likely to help others with physical tasks, unquote. So even if you're not actively hiding a secret everything could be harder just by thinking about it. The recent paper notes that our minds are constantly trying to resolve issues or reach goals that we haven't achieved yet. But. Here's the thing. A secret is a goal that can never be accomplished that leaves one solution. Just don't think about your secret. Hopefully, someday in the near future, researchers will figure out the secret to doing just that we know the earth rotates, but if you've ever wondered how we figured that out before space travel, you can thank a thirty two year old med school dropout from France. See it turns that you can accomplish great things. Even if you like Ashley, and you can't handle the sight of blood, right? That's why he dropped out of medical school. And he didn't have any formal science training. He's basically my mail French twin from a couple of hundred years ago, I'm talking about John Bernard Leone Fuko he was born in Paris in eighteen nineteen and after he left med school. He got a job as a lab assistant and did some pretty cool science stuff. But his biggest accomplishment might have been figuring out. How to prove that the earth rotates? Now rotation wasn't a brand new idea over the centuries Galileo and a lot of other scientists had proposed the idea that the. The earth was rotating not the heavens, but they were typically put to death or imprisoned for their heretical views. Fortunately, most educated people cited with Galileo and his ilk by the time Fuko was around and in January of eighteen fifty one Phooko figured out how to show the effects of the earth's rotation the Fuko pendulum. Here's how it works. Imagine. You're standing on the North Pole, and you have a super tall pendulum swinging from side to side tracing its path in a pile of sand as the earth turns beneath the pendulum the pendulum will keep swinging in its original direction, irrespective of the ground beneath it that means that over the course of a twenty four hour day, the path of the pendulum would look like it's shifting bit by bit until it had drawn a line at every degree of three hundred sixty degrees circle the pendulum swinging side to side, it's the earth that's moving beneath it that proves that the earth rotates who co calculated the sign law to figure out how many degrees the pendulum would rotate in. Twenty four hour period in different places in the world, including Paris where it would turn two hundred seventy degrees in one day. I first demonstration to the public. He hung a sixty two pound brass Bob from two hundred twenty foot long wire and let it swing through a thin layer of sand on the marble floor of the Paris observatory today, you can see full-scale Fuko pendulums at museums and universities all over the world there a great reminder of how a little curiosity and confidence can lead to earth turning discoveries. Speaking of rotation. Today's episode is sponsored by MOVA Globes spelt, M O VA their Globes that rotate by themselves MOVA, Globes rotate using technology. That's the first of its kind no batteries. No cords, just rotating Globes. Powered by ambient light. I have a MOVA globe of Mars on my desk at work and it just fascinates everybody. Who walks by? It's definitely moving. I love looking in the corner of my eye your desk and just seeing. Yes, there is a constantly rotate. Getting globe. You certainly don't need to cope pendulum to measures rotation. I don't have to turn it on or off. It just doesn't thing. And the outer space collection features graphics provided by NASA and JPL he can get Globes of planets moons, asteroids and even constellation designs. You on musk legit tweeted a picture of his Mars MOVA globe. That's how accurate and how seriously cool. They are. There are forty different designs. And they're not all about space. You've got world maps and even famous works. We have an exciting offer for curiosity. Daily listeners. You can get fifteen percent off of your purchase. Please. Visit MOVA Globes dot com slash curiosity and use coupon code curiosity for fifteen percents off your purchase to get fifteen percent off of your purchase. Visit MOVA Globes dot com slash curiosity and use coupon code curiosity that we got a question from one of our patrons many blaze. He asked why does time seemed to slow down during certain events the clock. Always seems to run slower when I'm staring at it. And recently we had a magnitude four. Point four earthquake. That felt like it lasted forever greed question. Many. Here's the short answer MRI based research suggests that time isn't tracked by just one part of our brain. Instead the job is shared across a large network of neural areas. That might explain why so many different things can change. How we experience time passing by? There are a few things that make time fly. And if you things that make time crawl so here, a few examples, we all know, the time flies when you're having fun. But time also flies when you're in the zone. There's a thing in positive psychology called flow state, which is when you're fully engaged in doing something with a complete focus and maximum energy. This could be if you're an artist painter or musician or writer, but it can also apply to anything you're passionate about. Whether it's coding accounting. Cooking, hyper, focus is a more passive version of flow state. And that's something has your attention. But it doesn't demand. A lot of effort thinks zoning out in front of your TV. It doesn't feel as good but time still flies now. Now, a few things might make time stand still one is when you're awestruck a twenty twelve study showed that watching an inspiring video made time feel like it was going slower than when people watched a happy video and Aw inspiring experience of being in nature can also slow time like walking in a forest versus walking in a major city. One more thing. That's lowest downtime is fear. Participants in twenty eleven study experienced time as slower even after they had finished watching a scene from the shining with Jack Nicholson, maybe take a horror flick on your next vacation and see what

Mova Globes John Bernard Leone Fuko Paris Columbia Business School Paris Observatory Jack Nicholson France North Pole Nasa Writer Ashley Mova Galileo Med School Musk VA Phooko
"galileo" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"galileo" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Wish TV's. Feed here on Facebook Air Force One currently landing at Indianapolis airport here, by the way is the pilot's seat in Air Force One called chair force one. I've always wondered that one more time for one more one more. Are you okay? With this hair hard to imagine Wayne's world famous scene and Wayne's world bohemian rhapsody that senior in there in the car sing along with bohemian rhapsody from Queen. Oh, yeah. Mike myers. Had to fight for that in the scene because the studio wanted guns and roses imagine that scene where they're all single. Dana Carvey, Mike Myers and all this donors in the back that the blue car and is an iconic classic scene. But the studio originally wanted a guns and roses song and not bohemian rhapsody, by the way. Mike Myers is playing queens manager in the new movie that hits that new biopic. It hits theaters this weekend. Here's a Mike Meyers on using Baheen rhapsody in Wayne's world bohemian rhapsody came on and my brother pulled over. And then from that moment on each of us had a Galileo took somebody's Galileo Galileo Galilei, you got beat up, you know, basically or you're assigned one of the four Galileo's. Yeah. And then I had a chance to write and be in a movie Wayne's world, you know? And I was like oh my God. I would love that to be the song and the studio now. What do you mean? No. And then they said we want guns and roses who I love. But it wasn't something. I grew up with. So I really fought hard for that to be the song. I don't want to be in the movie of that's in Lauren Michaels. Just like let me get this straight. You've never been in move. You're not likely to be in a movie. And now, you're not going to be. Are you okay with Mike Myers telling the studio producers back in the day how to do their jobs? Yes. Because he was right. That's seen that bohemian rhapsody introduced that song to a whole new generation. It was charting on billboard. After Wayne's world came out. It was being played on the radio again. And everybody was doing the same thing. They did in Wayne's world singing along slamming their heads in the car. Absolutely. He did the right thing there, man. That was awesome. I can't imagine guns N roses or anything else taking its place coming up next. Lindsey Marie are Powell. The political pundit is going to join us. And we're also counting down the minutes until beer sample Friday. Lindsey Marie joins us next. Real news,.

Wayne Mike myers Galileo Galileo Galilei Lindsey Marie Mike Meyers Galileo Facebook Dana Carvey Indianapolis Lauren Michaels Queen Baheen
"galileo" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

05:00 min | 3 years ago

"galileo" Discussed on Historical Figures

"He stated that previously quote, I was undecided and regarded the two opinions, those of Ptolemy and Copernicus as disputable because either the one or the other could be true in nature. But after the said, decision assured by the prudence of the authorities, all my uncertainty stopped and I held as I still hold as most true an indisputable, Ptolemies opinion, namely the stability of the earth and the motion of the sun and quote. Unfortunately, the inquisitions judges didn't believe him on June twenty. Second sixteen thirty three seven out of the ten cardinal. Judges signed a document, convicting Galileo of heresy for promoting heliocentric universe. His book dialogue concerning the two chief world systems was banned, and he was prohibited from publishing any new books. Galileo was initially sentenced to imprisonment in Rome, but Galileo's allies convinced pope urban to commute the sentence to house arrest. Galileo's daughter, Maria was thrilled at the news. She wrote to her father on December tenth, sixteen thirty three. After she learned he was coming home. She wrote quote, my sudden joy was as great as it was unexpected, nor are your daughters alone in our rejoicing. But all these nuns by their grace give signs of true happiness just as so many of them have sympathized with me and my suffering. We're awaiting your arrival with great longing and we cheer ourselves to see how the weather has cleared for your journey and quote in sixteen thirty four Galileo, moved to a house near. His daughter's convent in our Chettri to live out the rest of his days. Despite his house arrest, friends continued to visit him and support him financially. He visited his beloved daughter, Maria Celeste almost every day at her convent, sadly Maria died of dysentery on April second. Sixteen thirty four just a few short months after her father's arrival. She was only thirty three and Galileo was devastated by the loss of his eldest child. As he had in the past Galileo eventually dove into his work to distract himself from his grief. He wrote a new book the discourses and mathematical demonstrations relating to two new sciences. The discourses essentially recapped the mathematical and scientific theories he had developed over the decades, the couldn't get it published in Italy due to the inquisitions ban on his writings, but he was able to get the book published in Holland in sixteen thirty eight. It was the last book he would ever right. By sixteen forty one seventy six year old. Galileo was blind and his health was failing. He died in his sleep year. Later at age, seventy seven, despite his ill treatment at the hands of the Catholic church and his scientific findings Galileo maintained his faith in God through the end of his life. He wrote in a letter, whatever the course of our lives, we should receive them as the highest gift from the hand of God in which equally repose, the power to do nothing, whatever for us. Indeed, we should accept misfortune. Not only in thanks but an infinite gratitude to providence, which by such means detaches us from an excessive love for earthly things and elevates our minds to the celestial and divine and quote, Galileo's friend for demand, the second Duke of Tuscany wanted to give him a grand burial at the basilica of Santa Croce and have Galileo laid to rest with his ancestors. But pope urban was still furious with Galileo even after his death. He insisted that as a heretic, Galileo shouldn't get such an honorable burial. So Galileo is interred in a small insignificant room in the basilica near the novice chapel a hundred years later in seventeen thirty seven. Galileo was finally recognized for his scientific genius Italians built a monument for Galileo at the basilica. Then dug up and buried Galileo's body. There Galileo's cherished, eldest daughter. Maria Celeste was buried with him. Three of Galileo, skeletal fingers were taken from his remains when his body was moved. His middle finger is now on display at the Galileo museum in Florence. It almost feels like a post mortem retort to the inquisition Galileo's contributions to our understanding of strana me, physics and mathematics are legendary and in nineteen eighty nine NASA name. MD, an unmanned spacecraft Galileo to honor the venerable Italian scientist from nineteen eighty nine to two thousand three. These spacecraft studied Jupiter and its moons making impressive discoveries about the planet and its atmosphere. We can only assume that Galileo who spent his life studying the heavens would have been proud of his namesake..

Galileo Galileo museum Maria Celeste Copernicus pope basilica of Santa Croce MD Chettri Italy Florence Catholic church Holland NASA scientist Tuscany Rome sixteen forty one seventy six hundred years
"galileo" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

04:57 min | 3 years ago

"galileo" Discussed on Historical Figures

"That you find yourself with scant peace of mind and perhaps also deprived of all bodily comforts. On the other hand, considering the need for events to reach this stage in order for the thirties to dismiss you as well as the kindness with which everyone there has treated you up till now and above all the Justice of the cause and your innocence. In this instance, I console myself and cling to the expectation of a happy and prosperous triumph with the help of blessed God to whom my heart never ceases to cry out commending you with all the love and trust it contains and quote, Maria may have believed in her father's innocence, but the inquisition wasn't about. Out to let Galileo off easily. The initial round of questioning was grueling, however, Galileo couldn't stop himself from offering some rather ri- responses to the inquisitors questions. For example, the inquisitor asked Galileo, if he would recognize his controversial book dialogue concerning the two chief world systems onsite Galileo replied, dryly quote, I hope so. I hope that if shown to me, I shall recognize it and quote, Galileo also insisted that he had tried his best to prove that the earth was stationary in his book. He told the inquisition quote, I have neither maintained nor defended in that book, the opinion that the earth moves and the sun is stationary, but rather demonstrated the opposite of the Purna can opinion and shown that the arguments of kapernick are weak and inconclusive. End quote. This was a rather odd argument for Galileo to make after all. He was on trial because his book promoted a sun centered universe over the traditional Catholic belief that the earth stood still. But Galileo was a devout Catholic and he genuinely believed that he had done the best job. He couldn't is booked to support the Catholic dogma of an earth Centric universe, but the inquisition wasn't convinced a second round of questioning took place on April. Thirtieth Galileo did have an ally in cardinal Barberini one of his ten inquisition judges. It may have been Barberini who convinced Galileo to walk back a lot of his theories supporting a sun centered universe Galileo. Now, claim that any support for the Copernican universe in his books was completely unintentional. He said, quote, my air than has been, and I confess it one van glorious ambition and of pure ignorance in inadvertance and quote. This second round of questioning was especially hard on Galileo. He returned exhausted to the house of ambassador Nicolini in Rome where he lived during his trial. The ambassador noted quote, the poor man has come back more dead than alive on may. Tenth Galileo went before the inquisition for a third round of questioning. This time he offered a written defense. He insisted that he had faithfully followed the inquisitions ruling in sixteen sixteen. He wrote, I was only told not to hold her defend Copernicus, his doctrine of the earth's motion and the sun stability, but the inquisition now insisted that he was worn back in sixteen sixteen not to teach in any way whatsoever. The opinion of the earth's motion and the sun stability. This was the crux of Galileo's defense, the original wording of the sixteen sixteen ruling never contained the broad language teach in any way whatsoever. And if the inquisition struck out that additional broad wording than gala was clearly innocent Gallileo also pleaded with the inquisitions ten judges to take pity on him. He was certain that months of harsh interrogation had taken years off of his life. He wrote. Lastly, it remains for me to pray. You take into consideration my pitiable state of bodily in disposition to which at the age of seventy years. I have been reduced by ten months of constant mental anxiety and the fatigue of long and toil. Some journey at the most inclement season together with the loss of the greater part of the years of which from my previous condition of health, I had the prospect on June sixteenth, pope urban met with the ten cardinals who had presided over Galileo's trial Galileo's pleas for leniency failed to move the pope. He wanted Galileo to be interrogated a fourth time over his reasons for writing the book. He even suggested that in quiz. For McCoy Lonnie torture, the ageing scientists. Fortunately, inquisitor macaroni determined that the nearly seventy year old Galileo wouldn't survive torture and on June twenty. First Galileo was brought in for his final interrogation. Galileo tried to act as though he believed in an earth Centric universe..

Galileo Gallileo cardinal Barberini Maria Lonnie Copernicus pope Rome seventy years seventy year ten months
"galileo" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

03:20 min | 3 years ago

"galileo" Discussed on Historical Figures

"But he recovered and pressed on with his work. He published. The essay air in sixteen twenty three expanding on many of his arguments about scientific methodology. Galileo essentially believed that math was the key to understanding the workings of the universe. Galileo wrote quote, philosophy is written in this grand book, the universe, which stands continually open to our gaze, but the book cannot be understood unless one I learns to comprehend the language and read the letters in which it is composed. It is written in the language of mathematics and its characters are triangles circles and other geometric figures without which it is humanly impossible to understand a single word of it and quote in sixteen twenty three Galileo's friend Mathias Barberini was appointed as pope urban the eight. He was a fan of Galileo's work and gave him permission to write a book about his son centered theories of the universe. However, the new pope ask. Galileo to include urban zone beliefs in the Aristoteles universe where the planets and sun orbited the earth Galileo promised he would. But when Galileo published this new book dialogue concerning the two chief world systems, nine years later in sixteen thirty two, the pope was furious. Galileo's book included three protagonists, Salvatti Sagredo and simplicity. Oh, Salvatti was an intelligent character who argued in favor of a sun centered universe SimpliSafe oh, was a foolish man who argued in favor of Aristotle's earth centered universe and Sagredo was a sort of audience stand in judging the validity of both philosophers theories what got Galileo in trouble was the character, simplicity? Oh, who supported the same views as the pope? The name, simplicity. Oh, was likely a play on the Italian word force and Bill. In other words, simplicity. Oh, was supposed to be an athlete named simpleton for believing in an earth Centric universe. Unfortunately, for Galileo, pope urban caught onto the fact that Galileo was essentially calling him an idiot for believing in an earth Centric universe in his anger, the pope transformed from Galileo's most powerful ally into his most dangerous enemy in sixteen thirty three pope urban summoned sixty-nine year-old Galileo to Rome to be questioned by the ruthless Italian inquisitor Vincenzo mecca Lonnie on April twelve. Galileo faced an initial round of questioning. He stood accused of promoting a son Centric universe and violating the inquisitions ruling in sixteen sixteen that forbade him from promoting heliocentric them. The trial was difficult for Galileo to endure, but his daughter, Maria Celeste was a source of comfort and support. She may have been a devout Catholic. None, but she fully supported his scientific writings and firmly believed in his innocence. Maria wrote to her father on April. Twentieth sixteen thirty three just a week after his trial began quote, this gives me great distress convinced as I am.

Galileo pope Maria Celeste Salvatti Sagredo Vincenzo mecca Lonnie Aristoteles Aristotle Mathias Barberini Salvatti Rome sixty-nine year nine years
"galileo" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

05:07 min | 3 years ago

"galileo" Discussed on Historical Figures

"The inquisitions goal was to put a halt to anything and anyone it deemed heretical by sixteen fifteen. Galileo was in the inquisitions crosshairs. In sixteen fifteen fifty one year old Galileo scientific evidence in favor of a heliocentric universe came under the scrutiny of the Roman inquisition. The heliocentric model directly contradicted the church supported theory that the universe revolved around the earth and that all of the planets, the stars, the sun and the moon were perfect, heavenly spheres Galileo argued to the inquisition that his research wasn't heresy since he was simply gathering data and not making any theological claims. Some theologians even agreed with him that supporting a heliocentric model of the universe wasn't blasphemy. Unfortunately, the inquisition ruled against Galileo and forbade him from promoting the heliocentric model in sixteen sixteen. That was the same year that has daughter Virginia. Now fifteen took her vows at the San Mateo convent Livia dawn the veil a year later in sixteen seventy. Eighteen when she was fifteen. Libya's new religious name at the convent became arcangelo while Virginia picked Maria Celeste as you may have guessed. Celeste was a reference to her father's work in a strana me as nuns. The two girls were not allowed to leave the convent at any time Virginia. Now, Maria Celeste was devoutly religious like her father and made the best of her life at the convent. She kept herself busy at the apothecary, creating remedies for her father's various illnesses. And she frequently wrote loving letters to her father, informing him of the goings on in enquiring about his work as author Davis Oberle explained, quote she alone of Galileo's three children mirrored his own brilliance industry and sensibility. In by virtue of these qualities became his confidante and quote Galileo's younger daughter Livia now are Ganj. LA was apparently unhappy at being consigned to the convent. She was much. Quieter than her sister often ill and possibly depressed. No letters from Arkangel have been saved. But historian suspect. She had a strained relationship with her father, Maria Celeste often expressed her worries about her sister's physical and mental well-being, inner letters to Galileo. She wants wrote to father to explain that she had given up the private room that she in arc. Angela had shared because her sister quote often finds interaction with others unbearable beyond that arc Angela's nature being very different from mine and rather eccentric. It pays for me to acquiesce to her in many things in order to be able to live in the kind of peace and unity befitting, the intense love. We bury other end quote, Galileo's daughters lived in extreme poverty at the convent after giving up the private room to her sister, Maria Celeste slept in a group dormitory. Her food was often scarce or rotten and her health was poor. Galileo helped out where he. Could and often sent Maria food and money along with his letters while his daughter struggled with life at their Catholic monastery. Galileo refused to let the Catholic churches inquisition halters efforts to better understand the universe and in sixteen eighteen fifty four year old Galileo got into a heated exchange with a Jesuit math professor named a Rossio Grassi over three comments that had appeared in the sky Grassi insisted the comets orbited the earth in a circle. Galileo refuted Grassi arguments in a series of papers. He also insulted many leading Jesuit scientists and angered a sizable contingent of Jesuit math and science professors, but not everyone was angry at Galileo in sixteen nineteen Galileo's friend, the Duke of Tuscany agreed to the gym is the scientists thirteen year old son. The boy now officially named Vincenzo Galilee decided to follow in the footsteps of his. Grandfather and namesake by pursuing a career as a lute player. Tragedy struck again when Galileo's younger sister, Virginia land do Chee died in sixteen twenty three Galileo's eldest daughter, Maria Celeste wrote tenderly to him from her convent. In our Chatree quote, we are terribly saddened by the death of your cherished sister, our dear aunt, but our sorrow at losing her is as nothing compared to our concern for your sake because your suffering will be all the greater sire as truly you have no one else left in your world now that she who could not have been more precious to you has departed, and therefore we can only imagine how you sustain the severity of such a sudden and completely unexpected blow and quote, Joe Leo himself became seriously ill in the summer of sixteen twenty three. When he was fifty nine, worrying Maria deeply..

Galileo Maria Celeste San Mateo convent Livia Virginia Angela Rossio Grassi Vincenzo Galilee Arkangel Davis Oberle Libya Livia Joe Leo LA Chatree Tuscany Grassi Chee Catholic monastery professor sixteen eighteen fifty four ye
"galileo" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:47 min | 3 years ago

"galileo" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Galileo's partner marina died in patois. Galileo wasn't prepared to shoulder sole responsibility for his two daughters, twelve year old Virginia, and eleven year old Livia. He also feared his daughters would never find suitable husbands when they came of age. This was partially because Galileo didn't have money for their dowries. But the main reason for Galileo's concern was the fact that he had never married the girl's mother, Virginia and Libya were considered illegitimate. And this would make it nearly impossible for them to marry into respectable Italian families. Forty eight year old. Galileo concluded that the best option for his girls was to put them in a nunnery in sixteen. Thirteen. He decided to send them to the San Mateo convent and our Chettri only a couple of miles away from Florence. It was against the rules for two biological sisters to gain admittance into the same convent. But Galileo petitioned the sisters of Saint Clair to make an exception. Author Davis Sobel theorized that Galileo feared for the wellbeing of his sickly moody, youngest daughter, Livia. He wanted his trusted eldest daughter, Virginia to watch over her Galileo successfully persuaded the San Mateo convent to admit both sisters Galileo continued with his astronomy experiments after sending his daughters to the convent. He looked through his telescope on a cloudy day and observed spots on the sun. This offered further evidence that the sun wasn't a perfect celestial body that existed without bumps and blemishes angering many Catholics German Jesuit astronomer named Christoph Scheiner insisted the Galileo that the spots on the sun. We're not spots at all. Shiner believed that the spots were moons that were orbiting the sun. This was an attempt to reinforce the idea that the sun was a perfectly smooth flawless. Celestial body created by God, but in sixteen thirteen Galileo revealed. This counter argument was wrong by measuring the speed at which the sunspots moved across the surface of the sun as it rotated. His measurements proved that the spots had to be on the surface of the sun. There was no way they could be moons by this point gal laya was having trouble reconciling specific passages in the bible with a theory that the earth revolved around the sun in sixteen thirteen. He sent a letter to a student Benedetto Castelli discussing his concerns on. Fortunately, the letter ended up in the wrong hands and it was soon shown to the inquisition in Rome. The Catholic church had been concerned by the rise of new Protestant religions throughout Europe in the fifteen. Hundreds and instigated the Roman inquisition in the sixteenth century..

Galileo Virginia Livia San Mateo Benedetto Castelli partner laya Christoph Scheiner Catholic church blemishes Libya Florence Europe Davis Sobel Shiner Saint Clair Rome Forty eight year eleven year twelve year
"galileo" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

04:48 min | 3 years ago

"galileo" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Specifically, he spoke of his realization that there wasn't a connection between the length of the arc of a pendulum swing and the length of time. It took to make that swing happen. Instead each swing of a pendulum took exactly the same amount of time as every other swing. That's a good thing. He's owned out in those boring university lectures as a student, or we might not have had accurate time pieces for another few hundred years in sixteen o six marina and Galileo welcomed their third child, a son named Vincenzo after Galileo's father, Galileo. Also continued work on his experiments with pendulums in the early sixteen hundreds by sixteen o nine at age forty five. Galileo was ready to create a mathematical experiment about gravity that built on his leaning tower of PISA experiment. He already suspected that all objects fell at the same speed regardless of weight and height because gravity pulled everything to the earth at a consistent rate of acceleration, he called this the law of fall, but now he needed the math to prove it. So Galileo further buttress his leaning tower of PISA experiment by providing mathematical proof that supported his original experiment, he dropped various objects, then used the distance that the objects fell and the time it took for them to hit the ground to calculate their rates of acceleration in every instance, each acquaint yield at the same exceleron rate of nine point, eight meters per second squared. It didn't matter how much an object weight or how. How far it fell. The rate of acceleration was the same. This mathematical evidence further dismantled Aristotle's theories on physics and Galileo's findings angered his colleagues in the spring of sixteen o nine. Go lay, oh, became fascinated with a new invention known as the telescope, which magnified objects by reflecting light through glass lenses after taking one apart and analyzing it, Galileo realized that he could bend light more effectively with thicker convex lenses, Galileo's version of the telescope magnified objects more than twice as much as the original device in the summer of sixteen nine forty five year old Galileo showed his new telescope to the Venetian Senate and greatly impressed. The senators Galileo was offered tenure and an increased salary at the university of Padua where he worked Galileo continued to refine his telescope by December of sixteen nine. Galileo had a. Telescope that was capable of magnifying objects up to twenty times their original sizes. This enabled Galileo to study the moon in ways that astronomers before him were never able to do Galileo used his telescope to document the moon's phases. His improved lenses also enabled him to observe that the surface of the moon was rocky and cratered in some parts loose observation may not seem groundbreaking today, but in Galileo's time, the moon was seen by the Catholic church as a perfect work of art crafted by God by observing that the moon was not actually a perfectly smooth ball in the sky. Galileo was putting himself in danger of being accused of heresy in January of sixteen ten Galileo's telescope continued to yield new discoveries Galileo found that Jupiter had four moons and that there were stars so far away from the earth that no one had even known of their. Existence before Galileo's new telescope gel AO wrote up his findings in a book called Sidereus nuncius or starry messenger. He dedicated the book to his former math student Cosmo the second of the Medici family. Now the influential Grand Duke of Tuscany Galileo. Also name the moons of Jupiter, the Medici in stars to honor the Medici family. He hoped his flattery of the wealthy Medici family would inspire them to help his career. Galileo's ploy worked Cosimo. The second was won over by his former tutors dedication and appointed Galileo, the mathematician and philosopher of the great Duke of Tuscany, which was a huge step up from his previous position as a moderately paid professor, but Galileo's discovery of Jupiter's moons challenged another well established theory introduced by the Greek philosopher Aristotle and Ptolemy, the Greek philosophers believed that the earth was the center of the universe. And celestial objects, rotated imperfect circles around it. And yet Galileo had observed Jupiter's moons orbiting around Jupiter. This proved that not all celestial bodies orbited around the earth..

Galileo Tuscany Galileo PISA Aristotle university of Padua Catholic church professor Venetian Senate Sidereus nuncius AO Vincenzo Cosimo sixteen nine forty five year eight meters per second hundred years
"galileo" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"galileo" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Was teaching at the university of patois, he met a bright sociable young woman named marina de Andrea Gomba. The too soon fell deeply in love, but they were not considered a suitable match. This wasn't due to their age difference. Twenty two year old Marino was over a decade younger than thirty five year old Galileo, but it was common for older men to marry much younger women in the sixteenth century. The bigger. Issue was that they were from completely different social classes, but marina was so in love that she engaged in a relationship with Galileo. Anyway, the two never actually lived together, but they spent enough private time in each other's company to start a family in sixteen hundred. The pair had their first child for Jinya at age. Thirty six. Galileo was finally a father, and just one year later in sixteen o one marina gave birth to their second child Livia because Galileo and marina weren't married. He couldn't legally acknowledge his paternity marina was the only one listed on the girls. Baptismal records Delio taught his daughters to read and write. He was especially close to his firstborn. Virginia, whose intelligence rivaled her father's in sixteen o one thirty seven year old Galileo's younger sister Livia married today. Oh Galati Galileo along with his brother. Michelangelo promised to pay Galati a large dowry. Galati received half the money upfront for the dowry and the rest through a five year payment plan. This was yet another strain on Galileo's meager salary, and he had to borrow hundreds of ducats to pay his initial share of the dowry. But still he pursued his scientific interests in sixteen, o to Galileo, wrote a letter to a colleague detailing some new findings on the nature of pendulums..

Galileo marina de Andrea Gomba Galati university of patois Livia Delio Marino Michelangelo Jinya Virginia one thirty seven year thirty five year Twenty two year five year one year
"galileo" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"galileo" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Let's say you're tying an apple to an atlas. We'll call that system a for apple and atlas. Now drop system a from someplace high and watch it as it speeds towards the ground. What would you see happen in the air? If you follow Aristotle's principles, you'd exp. Checked to see the atlas fall faster than the apple. The string tying them together would be pulled tight and the atlas with Paul, the apple down with it, but system a that is the apple, the atlas, and the string all taken together is heavier than any one of its single components shouldn't the entirety of system a now that they're connected as a single object fall at a faster pace than any of the single objects it's made up of. But then why would the atlas v pulling the apple down to match its own pace? Shouldn't system a all be falling as one object together. What if you tied the apple directly to the atlas instead of keeping them on opposite sides of the string? Would it fall at a different speed? Why should it matter how the objects are connected? As long as the connection is present of these inconsistencies within the Aristoteles in model of free fine objects are what made Galileo questioned the model and ultimately disregard it to prove that objects fall at the same rate of acceleration. Even if one object is heavier than another, even if the two objects are tied together, everything descends to earth at the same rate of acceleration Galileo's bold experiment unsettled his colleagues in the sixteenth century. Aristotle was still considered one of the greatest scientific thinkers of all time and Galileo's peers didn't appreciate that. He was throwing Aerostat -als cherished principles into doubt. Golly. Oh, also pushed the administrators at the university of PISA to their breaking point with his irreverent lectures in one memorable class, he mocked the other professors at the university by comparing them to different types of alcoholic beverages. He noted quote, men are like wine flasks go to tavern. Look at the flasks before you drink red wine. Some bottles don't have much decoration on them. They're dusty and naked to the bone, but full of such wine that people rhapsodised on it, calling it glorious. And divine. Then look at the other bottles with a handsome labels. When you taste them, they're full of air or perfume or Rouge. These are bottles fit only to p into and quote on. Surprisingly, Galileo was let go from his professorship position at the university of PISA in fifteen ninety two..

apple Galileo Aristotle PISA Aristoteles Rouge Paul Aerostat
"galileo" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

04:26 min | 3 years ago

"galileo" Discussed on Historical Figures

"The actual physical existence of hell. And they had a pretty good idea of what it was like. Thanks to another Florentine back in thirteen twenty famed Florentine poet. Dante allegany. Very published, his divine comedy. Most memorable for its description of the nine circles of hell. Dante's inferno. As this part of the poem is known inspired, pretty much every modern depiction of hell. And in his hometown of Florence studying the physical structure and size of hell as Dante had written about it was a popular academe pastime. People viewed Dante's vision as fact and tried to come up with theories to explain its existence. But while Dante had definitely been a world class poet, he wasn't a scientist or a mathematician hit crafted a fictional narrative. Not an atlas in Galileo was one of the first people to point out that Dante's hell did not line up with anything about how scientists knew the world work. First off. If the physical structure of hell was laid out as it was in the books, the world would literally collapse in on itself. So it was safe to say that hell couldn't possibly exist as descr. In Dante's inferno. Second, the idea of Lucifer as an enlarged man didn't stand up to Galileo scrutiny. Scaling organisms up, requires a complete restructuring of the original design in order for things like a heart and a brain to continue working. That's why you don't see the creepy compound is of fly on larger animals, and it's why you'll never see giant bugs take over the world with the fame as well as the infamy that came from these lectures and these papers on the nature of hell. Galileo soon gained the patronage of an influential noble named Guido Baldo Del Monte with Guido Baldo Del Monte, backing him twenty five year old Galileo was able to become the chair of mathematics at the university of PISA in fifteen eighty nine. But he didn't get off to a good start the river Arno flooded and Galileo missed the first six lectures. He was meant to teach, even though the delay wasn't his fault. The university still find him for the missed classes? Galileo chafed under the strict academic rules. He couldn't stand wearing eight toga the standard gown for a university professors. He proclaimed that only idiots would wear such clothing and that he'd rather run around naked. Needless to say, the university of pieces, administrators were not amused by Galileo's, open disgust for everything connected to traditional university life, and they find him for refusing to wear a toga. Just two years after Galileo began teaching at the university, his father Vincenzo died in fifteen ninety one as the eldest son Galileo is now financially responsible for his mother and younger siblings, Galileo sister, Virginia attitudes, financial responsibilities. When she married Benedetto, Lendu, CI, sometime in fifteen ninety one the same year her father died. Landau CI was promised a large dowry. When he in Virginia, were married with his father. Dead Galileo was now responsible for Virginia's dowry payments. Galileo dealt with his grief and financial challenges by diving deeper into his mathematical experiments. One of these experiments challenged Aristotle's theory that heavier objects fell at a faster rate than lighter objects to test the validity of Aristotle's theory. Galileo dropped two balls of dr-. Lastingly different weights off of the tower of PISA. According to Aristotle's theory, the heavier object should have hit the ground much sooner than the lighter object, especially given the great height of the tower. But Galileo proved Aristotle wrong. The two balls hit the ground at the same time, demonstrating that objects in a fall, move at the same exceleron. If this sounds confusing, don't worry. You're not alone. Galileo's colleagues were confused about the result as well. So let's take a thought experiment of Galileo's to explain where he's coming from Galileo proposed connecting a heavy object to a lighter object with a string between them..

Galileo Dante allegany scientist Aristotle Guido Baldo Del Monte Virginia PISA river Arno Florence Landau CI university of pieces Benedetto chair of mathematics Vincenzo twenty five year two years
"galileo" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

05:03 min | 3 years ago

"galileo" Discussed on Historical Figures

"He wanted to understand how sound worked. He liked to experiment with the role that tension played in the sound of his instruments, strings by testing strings of various links. He had his son Galileo, help him come up with mathematically quesions to explain in just. Defy his discoveries about the nature of sound waves. And these childhood experiments fueled Galileo's love of math and science. In the early fifteen seventies eight-year-old Galileo and his family moved to Florence to be nearer to his father's relatives. His education improved by leaps and bounds. Perhaps this was because Florence was the center of the Italian Renaissance. A movement revolutionizing the development of art history culture, and most importantly, Galileo science Florence, PISA was part of the Grand Duchy of Tuscany. Both were ruled by the Medici family, a wealthy banking, family and rulers of Florence for the past. One hundred forty years. The Medici were among the most fervent patrons of the arts and sciences, and they helped make the renaissance a reality. When the Galloway family, I moved to Florence Tuscany would have been ruled by Cosimo the first the first Grand Duke of. The new duchy by the time, Galileo was about fourteen. He was ready to attend classes at Vallon Broza Abby about eighteen miles away from his home in Florence. He was a top student and did well in math, science and talian. Galileo was also a very devout Catholic. He briefly contemplated joining a religious order, but his father wanted him to study medicine. So in fifteen eighty one seventeen year old Galileo began attending the university of PISA tried to focus on medicine, but soon found himself drawn to more theoretical math and science. He ended up abandoning his major in medicine and studying math and philosophy instead Galileo's. First biographer, Vincenzo Viviana wrote that as a student Galileo became interested in the study of pendulums weights attached to strings that were able to swing freely. You've seen one if you've ever seen. One of those old grandfather clocks, the pendulum is the swinging weight inside the. Clock according to Viana Galileo's curiosity was piqued when he saw a lamp in the ceiling of the student chapel swinging in his first year or two of school, it made him wonder about how long it took for the pendulum to reach each of the peaks of its swing, and whether that was affected by how heavy the wait was, all sorts of questions occurred doom about the mathematics behind the movement. In that way. Galileo's investigation into these questions was a natural outgrowth of the sound experiments. He and his father conducted together. Galileo found his own experiments, much more interesting than his classes and his finances could not support the rest of his schooling. He dropped out of school and began to make a living teaching math to the children of wealthy nobles in Florence and Sienna. One of Galileo's students was costume. Oh, Medici. He was the son of Ferdinando the first Domenici, the Grand Duke of Tuscany Ferdinando wanted his son cost to have the best educ. Nation available and Galileo impressed both father and son with his ability to teach math in a way that felt accessible. Galileo also continued with his own scientific experiments in eighteen fifty six twenty two year old. Galileo wrote a treatise called the little balance inspired by the teachings of Archimedes the little balanced proposed the use of an innovative scale, which helped the user determine the proportion of a metal within an alloy that way jewelers and the like would know exactly how much gold or silver was in a piece they examined and could set the price or the payment. Accordingly. It was a fascinating exploration of the connection between theoretical mathematics and the physical world one that connected mass and weight to clear questions that could teach something new about how the world worked in fifteen eighty eight twenty four year old Galileo decided to apply for a professor position in mathematics at bologna. NIA university. Unfortunately, his decision to leave school before finishing his degree came back to haunt him. Bologna university didn't wanna hire a college dropout and they rejected his application. So Galileo focused on his own private teaching practice. Instead, he was gaining a venerable reputation for being able to teach math to even the most recalcitrant child. His papers on mathematics were also garnering him attention as were his lectures in fifteen eighty eight. Galileo gave a few lectures at the academia fiorentina about hell on this topic might seem a bit counterintuitive for a scientist, but it was a pretty popular idea people in deeply Catholic places like the Italian peninsula had long believed in.

Galileo Galileo science Florence Viana Galileo Florence Florence Tuscany PISA Grand Duchy of Tuscany Italian Renaissance Bologna university Vallon Broza Abby Tuscany Ferdinando Vincenzo Viviana Galloway bologna Cosimo NIA university Ferdinando scientist professor Sienna
"galileo" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"galileo" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Hi, I'm Vanessa Richardson, and those were the words of Galileo Galilei and I'm Carter, ROY, welcome to historical figures. Every other Wednesday, we discuss the different persons lasting historical impact, unique personality and impression on the world around them are audio biographies cover, big lives, but we like to focus on little known facts today. We're discussing Galileo Galilei known as the father of modern science and the man whose work proved that the earth orbits the sun. If you want to listen to any previous episodes, you can find them on your favorite podcast rectory and while you're there, we'd really appreciate if you could leave a five star review. But now let's explore the life of Galileo Galilei. Galileo's importance to modern science and astronomy, can't be overstated. He used precise mathematical equations to up end the western world understanding of the universe and prove wrong. The popular belief that the sun orbited the earth. His experiments often focused on how math could be used to help explain the physical world and physical phenomena. And he would disprove older accepted theories without a single glance backwards, but his pioneering scientific discoveries made in the enemy of the Catholic church and he became a target of the Roman inquisition. On February fifteenth, fifteen sixty four in the town of PISA, Julia. Galilee gave birth to her first child Galileo, his given name Galileo was an Italian is version of Galilee, a mountainous region, and Israel go Leo grew up in a lively household with five younger siblings. His father Vincenzo was a composer and a lute player, and his home was filled with music. Many of the Galileo children grew up playing musical instruments, both Galileo and his younger brother Michaelangelo played the lute Galileo and his father Vincenzo shared a sense of scientific curiosity. Vincenzo didn't just wanna play music..

Galileo Vincenzo Vanessa Richardson PISA Catholic church Carter ROY Michaelangelo Israel Julia Leo
"galileo" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"galileo" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Yet i'm not sure if galileo will ever be able to answer that question but remember the last galileo is very eccentric orbit so it spends most of its time very far from jupiter and every once in a while every couple of months or so it goes screaming through the planet the satellite system of jupiter suffer so that it goes by one one of the one of the main moons of jupiter it hasn't yet done that for yoga and the kind of images we've been getting of our ganymede for example which is really flew by has been spectacular and i think we will learn a lot about your opo when galileo actually does the really close fly by if they were again coming back to the likelihood of life if a hypothesis if we were to discover there is indeed microbial or even greater life under the surface of of this moon would that then would a discovery like that on europa then suggests that life is very likely or would you again suggest we've been spit trading with europa and everything else close by i find it very hard to believe that we've been trading material if we didn't find indeed fine life on europa and let me say i think it's the most likely place in the solar system to find like all right i the the arguments for a notion i think are very compelling it's wide on the hairy edge the models show some model show it could be warm ice and some models show would be liquid but if it turns out to be liquid that i think you rope is the place to really go for long but it's going to be tough because europa is covered by a sheet of ice across device how do you think it would be the estimates i've heard are are tens of miles tens of miles and it's going to be very.

galileo
"galileo" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"galileo" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Became apparent in january sixteen ten when galileo made his first round of observations through a telescope looking at jupiter so galileo also like not inventing heliocentric did not invent the telescope but what he did do was improved it he made a series of improvements to a design of the telescope that allowed him to resolve farther objects than ever before and by the time galileo got the magnification power of his telescope cranked up to twenty times he aimed at the planet jupiter and he saw something really weird knows we mentioned earlier you can see jupiter with the naked eye right yes yeah and so ancient astronomers had been seeing jupiter for a long time they're already aware of its existence but what galileo saw when he focused on jupiter was interesting he so stars he's all three stars lined up right next to jupiter almost as if strung along speier extending out through jupiter's equator so galileo made a note of this and he decided to check back on later now if those had been stars that were just in the background you know if they just happen to line up with jupiter from the star field beyond the next time you looked at jupiter they shouldn't be there right because jupiter should have moved on relative to the background star field right they shouldn't be following the planet because they would be distant objects on the planet exactly but instead the stars followed jupiter where'd you better win the spear of stars followed and they changed their positions relative to jupiter.

galileo speier
"galileo" Discussed on A Moment of Science

A Moment of Science

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"galileo" Discussed on A Moment of Science

"The low soils about patronage through flattery whoah 17th century scientist made his living galileo galloway you wanted a court appointment with those wellknown patrons of the arts the military family floors and sixty no seven where did come that prince costa motivated she was interested in magnetism galileo responded with a flattering and educational gift followed lodestone a natural magnet on a handsome base inscribed with a latin words veam fachi a more love produces strength the lodestones strength was demonstrated by two little iron anchors stuck to its polls anchors made under galileo's personal supervision by artisans in venice galileo is pressing concern now was to deliver this lodestone to the mainichi courier whose address he'd been given in time for the last sunday night dispatch from venice to florence his own letters give us a picture of galileo quite different from those serene museum portrait's the great galileo plying the canals of venice on a rainy sunday night with a surly gondolier knocking on one door after another in the dark looking for the mainichi courrier in order to deliver a lodestone the too little iron anchor stuck to it mounted on the base inscribed with a latin words for love produces strength the low stone eventually made it to florence lawrenson galileo got his appointment not so much because of a lodestone but because he named the four large moons of jupiter which he discovered the mediterranean stars the they didn't stick today recalled uber's four largest moons the galilee and satellites.

scientist venice galileo venice prince costa mainichi florence florence lawrenson galileo