20 Burst results for "Gale Crater"

Mars Curiosity Rover - NASA's Mars Exploration Program

Innovation Now

01:08 min | 1 year ago

Mars Curiosity Rover - NASA's Mars Exploration Program

"Nassar's curiosity Mars Rover has seen a lot since it I first, it's wheels inside gale crater on August fifth two, thousand, twelve, a self portrait taken on Seoul Twenty Eighty two showed how Martian dust storm had significantly reduced visibility and sunlight at the rovers location on. Seoul. Two thousand five, hundred, fifty, five curiosity used its telephoto. Lens. To Capture Mount Sharp in the morning light in a panorama composed of forty four individual images stitch together scientists have seen win sculpted. Ripples on the top of Martian sand dunes unlike anything seen on earth curiosity occasionally studies clouds to learn about the Martian atmosphere, which is only one percent as dense as earth's air. Still the black and white navigation cameras show that water ice clouds do sometimes form over the past eight years. Curiosity has journeyed more than fourteen miles and shared images that reveal ancient Mars was indeed suitable life and the data curiosity continues to send home have scientists anxiously waiting to see what perseverance might discover as well

Seoul Nassar Gale Crater Mount Sharp Rovers
Mars Curiosity Celebrates  Eight Years on Red Planet

Innovation Now

01:22 min | 1 year ago

Mars Curiosity Celebrates Eight Years on Red Planet

"As perseverance speeds towards Mars curiosity celebrates eight years on the Red Planet. This is innovation. Now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future Nassar's curiosity. Mars rover. Has Seen a lot since it I first. It's wheels inside gale crater on August fifth two, thousand, twelve, a self portrait taken on Seoul Twenty Eighty two showed how Martian dust storm had significantly reduced visibility and sunlight at the rovers location on Seoul two, thousand five, hundred, fifty, five curiosity used its telephoto Lens to capture mount sharp in the morning light in a panorama composed of forty four individual images stitch together scientists have seen win sculpted. Ripples on the top of Martian sand dunes unlike anything seen on earth curiosity occasionally studies clouds to learn about the Martian atmosphere, which is only one percent as dense as earth's air. Still the black and white navigation cameras show that water ice clouds do sometimes form over the past eight years. Curiosity has journeyed more than fourteen miles and shared images that reveal ancient. Mars was indeed suitable life and the data curiosity continues to send home have scientists anxiously waiting to see what perseverance might discover as well for innovation. Now, I'm Jennifer police

Seoul Nassar Gale Crater Rovers Mount Sharp Jennifer
"gale crater" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

07:58 min | 1 year ago

"gale crater" Discussed on 600 WREC

"8777331011 The question of whether or not Mars harbors extent, life has been pondered for a long time We talked about the ancients earlier we're talking about ancient civilizations sido Nia Possible civilizations living on Mars Coming here. Giovanni Scheper Ellie personal goal all catalyzing widespread speculation that Mars that sentient life Modern scientific community does reminded us that biological life on Mars so far, this is not exist and focus shifts about 60 years ago to the possibility of extra microbial life by hypothesis that microbial life may exist in modern Martian regularly. Is tested during the Viking missions. The results of the Viking biology experiments were said to be vague and some aspects of the results were consistent with what would be expected Investment life were present in the samples, but other results were not that's allowing for Multiple interpretations again. Never straight answer, but that's what we got. But of course, Times are changing, and we have to ask ourselves what are we spending all this money for? To send a rocket to Mars that is a payload is supposed to explore an area that may be teeming with microbes alive. It stands to reason that the secret is trying to get out with scientists at NASA again, Never a straight answer. This comes to biological life. They just want to, you know, kind of put it up, put up, put up. The poster always moved. Well, Justus fast. We came the latest slow roll disclosure about UFOs and aliens in The New York Times, which in the words of the tech bloggers, Moto casually drops another story about how aliens air probably riel, and they're even reports that the Pentagon is a pain vehicles or parts of vehicles not made of this earth. Though former Secretary of Majority A former Senate majority leader, Harry Reid was either misquoted confirming the story or walk back on his comments. Who knows? But again, it all depends on who you listen to, or what you believe The bus alone is hard to keep up with, because well, the story is unfolding so fast. And stories fly like bats. A twilight. Well, Tonight we want to get the story from the real deal from the man who I was talking about earlier his book Ah, the monuments of Mars City on the edge of forever. Richard C. Hoagland, principal investigator and founded the Enterprise Mission, as well as the vision and voice of the other side of midnight. He's recipient of the Angstrom Metal, the former science advisor to CBS News and Walter Cronkite. And author of best selling books. Like I said the Mannion of Mars and Dark Mission. The Secret History of NASA, together with Carl Sagan Hogan Co. Created the Pioneer plaque and predicted life on Europa and is groundbreaking paper. The Europa proposal published 37 years ago, our schools like 37 years before NASA announced the possibility of life on Europa. His vision has inspired a whole new generation of pioneers of thought and form and open the way for citizen scientists around the globe. Richard C. Hoagland, the other side of midnight airs live Saturday and Sunday Midnight. 23 A. M. Eastern 9 p.m. To midnight Pacific. Welcome Richard Hoagland, Ground zero. Richard Good to hear from you again. Hi there, Clyde. What a hell of a day. This is It's crazy. This is the beginning of the end game. How slow Just read is NASA Pavel? Um okay. Tell me about the national problem because everybody else has been saying the same thing. Never a straight answer. That's what NASA stands. Force will give us why they're not giving us a straight answer. First you don't want revealed a big reveal, and so it's revealed. Look, Um, 2021 is going to be extraordinary year in the history of humanity. See you were going to find and have announced by official government sources, not one government. But maybe to. Ah, there's life on Mars. There's like everywhere out there were part of a huge family. And we need to get on with it. This is what we've been working for for 50. 40 30 years and counting. So you're officially saying Pacific evidence? You're you're officially saying the 2021 Is going to be the year of disclosure completely. Yep, Yep. Okay. All right. So I was looking all the dots. All right, You know, there's all kinds of dots. It's just they're all Emily Dickinson dot Remember Emily Dickinson's Great line from one of her poems. Tell all the truth. But tell it slant. Yes, they're all telling it Slant. I'll tell you why. I know 2021 beginning February 18th is going to be the year after all these decades of working and waiting and Finding all kinds of extraordinary evidence in the public databases of NASA that they just quietly ignore. The Chinese government launched their own mission to Mars 34 days ago. Member on the anniversary of the Apollo 11 landing. D'oh. 51 years ago. Exactly They put out and I had were producer. Find a copy. I hope he did, Um, they put up a poster where they have a picture of their lander and Rover on the surface of wires. But when you look at it quickly looks like artwork, right? Yeah. If it's not artwork, what they've done is borrowed a NASA image from the Curiosity Rover currently on Mars. At gale crater and in that image in the background or a stunning set of ancient Martian artificial ruins. Yeah, I think I saw them. Yeah, exactly. I can see that. So they're telling us. I mean, we got thousands of images from curiosity showing the same thing. When we bring him to the agency's attention, they just go. Who are you? Who are you again? They if you stonewall was the last four years have taught everyone if you're stonewall, consistently tell lies. Eventually, no one will believe anything. You know, no one knows what to believe. Right? Official sources, government sources, science sources, politicians. You know the kid on the block could everyone knows what to believe anymore? Could that be the reason why we're having such a I don't know, I would say ah, pretty mundane, if not apathetic view of what The New York Times has been reporting lately. Which thing is the time's been reporting about the will The Tic Tacs for one Oh, yeah, then And then the reason story so fed up with Everyone's on overload. Everyone is totally maxed out there. They're they're crashing. There's they can't absorb one more data bite of information. There's just too much noise. And trying to spend, you know energy to figure out who is telling the truth. And who isn't has become impossible for most people write because most people don't go through process they depend on sources that depend on who do you trust? And now we don't trust anybody. Which means you could have the most extraordinary revelation. You know, immortality for every human being on the planet, and people would say. Okay. What's Ah Kardashian doing tonight? I mean, it's just a relief. We need desperately relief. So we launched this mission to Mars right this morning. I mean, starting from the get go. This is a coded mission One. Here's something fun. You know how big I am on 19.5? Yes, the secret of the physics of member dimensional torch infield physics reeled Ryzik ce of how the universe works exactly. Okay. NASA launch percenters this morning at 19.5. Exactly. Exactly by design. That's why they had the half hour coasting period so they could in the parking orbit coast halfway around the earth and fire the engine to go to Mars. They had to launch when at the Cape. It was 7:50 a.m. Now you know, a lot of it's right. But a what That's veterans at 7 50 is also on a military.

NASA Richard C. Hoagland Um Giovanni Scheper Ellie Justus official The New York Times Emily Dickinson CBS News Walter Cronkite Dark Mission Richard Good Harry Reid Ah Kardashian Senate gale crater Carl Sagan Hogan Co Chinese government
"gale crater" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

02:55 min | 1 year ago

"gale crater" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Journey of hundreds of millions of miles for perseverance to get to Mars the planet whose reddish hue caused by rust particles in the rocks and soil let the Romans to name it after their god of war today the surface of Mars is a radiation filled desert it's freezing minus eighty degrees Fahrenheit on average there wind swept sand dunes and outcroppings of rock that could easily be mistaken for parts of Arizona some of those rocks hold clues that suggest Mars may have been a lot like earth billions of years ago with lakes and rivers of water and the building blocks of life perseverance is really our first astrobiology mission to Mars where were actually searching not just for environments that may have once been habitable but for evidence of the life that may have existed there in the past Bobby Braun director of solar system exploration at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory says perseverance is designed to be the first of three missions that will be required in order to bring samples from Mars back to earth has anyone ever brought back something from Mars now it'll be the first round trip adventure to any other plan nearly eight years in two and a half billion dollars had been spent building perseverance Bobby Braun told us that if NASA misses a narrow three week window to launch that begins on July seventeenth it could cost half a billion dollars more and years of work but because of the motion of the earth and Mars about the sun you can only send a spacecraft from earth to Mars once every twenty six months and if we missed that window we would have to wait till twenty twenty two to try again you have to wait that long wow I mean there's not only a lot of time a lot of money a lot of very smart people dedicating their lives to this there's a lot of eyes on this yeah the stakes are high from a number of vantage points for previous Mars Rovers have paved the way for this mission the last rover named curiosity has been on Mars for eight years sending back images like these while exploring an area known as the gale crater but perseverance is the first rover specifically outfitted to collect retrievable samples in early January before there were any known cases a corona virus in the U. S. NASA invited us to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California where it's been building perseverance the vehicles that will bring it to Mars they were in what's called a clean room to keep them free of any dust particles or other contaminants that might jeopardize their mission you could feel a little bit of a metallic wire project manager Matt Wallace showed us how to put on the layers of protective equipment required before entering the cleanroom cameras were wiped down thoroughly we got what's called.

Arizona director NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory Bobby Braun Mars Rovers gale crater California project manager Matt Wallace
"gale crater" Discussed on Geek News Central

Geek News Central

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"gale crater" Discussed on Geek News Central

"You think about it. From a science perspective they're able to able to get that info out of that meteorite that survived all the way to Earth. Excuse me. Nasa budget cuts at Mars Threatens Crisis Free Curiosity Rover and orbiters. The curiosity may soon be forced into a difficult. Exploration decision. Budget cuts at NASA may force them to slam the brakes on the Curiosity Rover. Jess's it reaches highly anticipated homestretch. Of course curious. He landed night in a inside Mars. Ninety six mile wide hundred fifty four kilometre gale crater in August. Two thousand twelve and So it's just climbed a huge mountain essentially and they're tight on money so let me see. How much did they cut? The funding situation may make exploring the new and potential revenue revelatory region tougher and more time consuming the White House. Twenty twenty one federal budget allocates. Just four hundred million to the mission decrease a twenty percent from the rovers current funding and that current funding is thirteen set. Less than curiosity. Got them the previous year in in twenty twenty one request is passed by Congress as is curious operations would have scaled back considerably running the mission. With just forty million and twenty twenty one would leave About forty percent of the sites are would leave unused about forty percent of the saints team capability so What's going to happen here? We.

NASA Twenty twenty gale crater Jess rovers White House Congress
"gale crater" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"gale crater" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"Tanning propellers helicopter will remain encapsulated. In the Rovers Billy for the next year and will be deployed around the beginning of. May roughly two. And a half months after the rover's landing once the rovers driven a better hundred meters from the touchdown point and the helicopters undergone extensive systems checks Alexa. Cute a test flight campaign lasting up to thirty days based on the current matters curiosity rover which is exploring gale crater the one thousand and twenty five kilogram perseverance rover with such as signs of pass. Microbial life it'll counter is the planet's climate and geology. It'll collect samples for future returned to Earth and it will pave the way for human exploration of the Red Planet slated to start in just over a decade. The Mars Two thousand twenty perseverance mission has launch window running from July the seventeenth to August the fifth flying on an atlas five rocket from Space Launch Complex Forty one at the Cape Canaveral Air Force station. Florida this space time still to come. The science report and a new study is found that covered nineteen of fixed the brain and nervous system. Interact a third of all cases and reports that go to bed early and follow a consistent bedtime routine Mayo. Kids reduce the risk of becoming overweight or obese. All that and more still to come on space time and time that take another brief. Look at some of the other stories making these insights this week with a science report. A new study is found that the covert nineteen virus affects the brain and central nervous system in around a third of all cases. The findings reported in the Journal of the American Medical Association based on the Study of two hundred and fourteen patients with the curve in nineteen virus from the Wuhan Province epicenter in China where the disease began. Researches found that in more severe cases..

rovers Space Launch Complex Cape Canaveral Air Force stati gale crater Alexa Wuhan Province Florida Journal of the American Medica China
"gale crater" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

03:26 min | 2 years ago

"gale crater" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Of curiosity and the we Bob Kerrey city very successful on gale crater it's got six wheels cannot do without one from it do without six wheels into without one we'll do that maybe two wheels but they don't want that to happen what now what do you the science team bacteria does Klay if they take a photograph of the of the Rovers wheels to see how they surviving on the rough March surface well I keep track of this when I look at their downloaded roar images every day if there's pictures of the wheels I take a look and this week there was a set of pictures they talk they decided let's take a look at the wheels of it's a bunch of pictures and so what I did is I took the picture they did today and I compared it with a picture that they took back in twenty seventeen two years ago they will match one we'll at least of the damages and marked it up so that people could see the match up on behind the black in its posted there and if you look you can see that yes there has been some damage increase in the last two years in the actually no this is actually in the last year because they took a picture of the same wheel I posted a binder black last year and there would be no damage them so we had a little bit more damage in the in the last year I look at all the pictures that also indicate other damage a lot of damage no it does look like a water damage it looks to me that they've been doing this a variety processes try to medicate with will damage and I think they're succeeding but it does tell us that there is a life one is that mature above that plastic or metal alone always it's a metal it's I'm not I can't tell you the specific something's clatter something's cracked it pretty deeply here well that rocks there's two parts to this one has to do with the you can see holes and cracks in the trades metal fret of these wheels and you gotta understand is two things going on one in building this craft they can have a weight limitations so these wheels can't be made at the console the metal is made then but made to the right thickness to work well on the gravity of Mars wait a travel is protecting those real high let's go off to another or Voyager this is a light thing or what is that all right planetary society has been an ongoing project that deck of more than a decade to get a life daily in orbit to test the ability sale using some light in space to maneuver and changes have been done successfully only once before by a Japanese flight sale and actually did maneuver of course the solar system a little bit with test jet technology test well they launched their second white tail planetary society second like some of the two was launched on the falcon heavy in June and so they've been slowly bring it up to operation and they released the first pictures of from the space craft they have not yet deployed the solar sail but once you get this deployed though they're gonna then attempt to change the orbit of these cubes that using some like by itself and that will be really cool it's also can be very bright you'll be able to see it when it comes overhead it would be dramatically Bob he keeps the website behind the black I'm John bachelor this.

gale crater Bob Kerrey twenty seventeen two years two years
"gale crater" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

SPACE NEWS POD

03:32 min | 2 years ago

"gale crater" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

"Rover is traveling around Mars right now. It's getting data. It's doing sampling in, it's doing all of this, in gale crater that Exo Mars. We'll be landing in axiom. Plenum in the Klay deposits are dated at four point one billion years old and curiosity is in the crater where it's only three point six billion years old. So excellent Mars is going to be in a place. It's much older than our curiosity is right now. So therefore it can search for life from past marks from a long time ago. You know. Another almost another billion years older than what curiosity is check in every now and that's the epoch from when Mars is surface was plentiful with liquid water systems. Exit Mars missions will be capable of securing many firsts the oldest site investigated on Mars, the first exploration of the Martian subsurface, the most accurate, geological inorganic composition determination, so far, and the best chance, yet to make bio signature detections on another planet, and the other thing than ex Amar's has going for it is that it has the longer drill. Then March twenty twenty Rover so it can dig down deeper and also get more samples from a longer period of time on the surface of Mars. So March twenty twenty is going to be a very important Rover. Exo Mars is also going to be a very impor-. Portent rover. We're not gonna have a battle about, which one is going to be more important because they're posted both important in their own specific ways. X Omar's, they want to bring stuff back to earth. So scientists on our planet here can actually do science with very, very complicated and technical specifications, on bars. You only have a certain amount of room to have scientific instrumentation and once it's there, that's all you have. And it could not, you know, it might not be the most up to date science stuff, because they build these things years in years in years before the launch, and this technology might be a little bit outdated. By the time the Mars Rover gets the cash of samples back to earth. So it's gonna come back and twenty twenty eight and by twenty twenty eight maybe technology will catch up. Maybe technology will move forward so much that the samples that we. Back, we may be able to find things that we weren't able to find when XL Mars is doing it science up there. So that being said, I'm excited about all these Landers and Rovers on Mars in the coming years. It's twenty twenty know we're launching that thing in twenty twenty so next year it has gone

XL Mars gale crater Rovers twenty twenty Amar Walden Landers Omar one billion years six billion years billion years
"gale crater" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

SPACE NEWS POD

03:32 min | 2 years ago

"gale crater" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

"In twenty twenty three Rovers one from the US want from Europe and one from China will leave earth and depart for the red planet of Mars to look for past in present life. And these Rovers are just going to go to Mars. They have in their mission directorate to bring back samples from the red planet to earth, which is going to be one of the most influential. Botches in landings in science experiments of human history. Parts of Mars directly from the regular of Mars will be returned to the planet earth. So scientists on earth with really sophisticated instruments can study, what's in the ground on Mars. So the Rovers will be sent up in twenty twenty in the land, though do science, and the cash, the, the samples for a return mission for Mars and are from Mars and the return to earth in twenty twenty eight if America in Europe come together and make the mission as success, but a project scientists on the east Rover Exo Mars that will land in twenty twenty one along with the American Chinese Rovers might be worth reconsidering, which samples would actually be the. The best valuable to send back to the scientists waiting on earth. And the scientists said Mars twenty twenty will acquire samples from the surface, where I n ising radiation is likely to have damaged any organic molecules, it is. Excellent Mars with its two meter depth drill in advance organics detection, instrumentation MoMA that has the best chance to make an import discovery regarding the possibility. The Mars may have harbored life in its distant past, if this proves to be the case, perhaps, we may need to rethink where they, we should not think of bringing back. Well selected subsurface samples rather than those collected by Mars twenty twenty in the bars twenty twenty Rover which is a NASA Rover. It has the ability to cash the samples that against, but Exo Mars does not have that capability for a return mission leader on and he goes on to say that requires a complicated. Yup. That weighs allot it would have been impossible to combine our present very capable payload with a sample caching system on the same Rover. In fact, Nasr's twenty twenty Rover his Pete a dear price to include the caching system, and that's compared to curiosities analytical firepower. So what they gave up an analytics and studying the actual surface of the planet Mars. They gained a caching system. So instead of doing the science on Mars itself, what they're doing is putting it away for a little while and they're using that space to harbor though samples, then they're going to return them to earth on the March twenty twenty Rover. And then George Vago goes on to say the point I am trying to make is that bringing back the right samples will make all the difference in this regard, Exo Mars will be super important are the samples collected at depth more interesting and better preserved. We think probably yes, in once we will have investigated this, perhaps it will be time to rethink what samples to bring back to

XL Mars gale crater Rovers twenty twenty Amar Walden Landers Omar one billion years six billion years billion years
European rover more likely to discover life than NASA's Mars 2020

SPACE NEWS POD

03:03 min | 2 years ago

European rover more likely to discover life than NASA's Mars 2020

"Rover is traveling around Mars right now. It's getting data. It's doing sampling in, it's doing all of this, in gale crater that Exo Mars. We'll be landing in axiom. Plenum in the Klay deposits are dated at four point one billion years old and curiosity is in the crater where it's only three point six billion years old. So excellent Mars is going to be in a place. It's much older than our curiosity is right now. So therefore it can search for life from past marks from a long time ago. You know. Another almost another billion years older than what curiosity is check in every now and that's the epoch from when Mars is surface was plentiful with liquid water systems. Exit Mars missions will be capable of securing many firsts the oldest site investigated on Mars, the first exploration of the Martian subsurface, the most accurate, geological inorganic composition determination, so far, and the best chance, yet to make bio signature detections on another planet, and the other thing than ex Amar's has going for it is that it has the longer drill. Then March twenty twenty Rover so it can dig down deeper and also get more samples from a longer period of time on the surface of Mars. So March twenty twenty is going to be a very important Rover. Exo Mars is also going to be a very impor-. Portent rover. We're not gonna have a battle about, which one is going to be more important because they're posted both important in their own specific ways. X Omar's, they want to bring stuff back to earth. So scientists on our planet here can actually do science with very, very complicated and technical specifications, on bars. You only have a certain amount of room to have scientific instrumentation and once it's there, that's all you have. And it could not, you know, it might not be the most up to date science stuff, because they build these things years in years in years before the launch, and this technology might be a little bit outdated. By the time the Mars Rover gets the cash of samples back to earth. So it's gonna come back and twenty twenty eight and by twenty twenty eight maybe technology will catch up. Maybe technology will move forward so much that the samples that we. Back, we may be able to find things that we weren't able to find when XL Mars is doing it science up there. So that being said, I'm excited about all these Landers and Rovers on Mars in the coming years. It's twenty twenty know we're launching that thing in twenty twenty so next year it has gone

Xl Mars Gale Crater Rovers Amar Landers Twenty Twenty Omar One Billion Years Six Billion Years Billion Years
"gale crater" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

05:17 min | 2 years ago

"gale crater" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"I'm John bachelor. This is the John Batchelor show. Bob Zimmerman keeps the website behind the black. We're onto exploration we build the rockets, we launched the rockets, we have great successes, but one of the results Bob the trace gas orbiter disappointing. Where is it? Them a Mars still an audit is now going to use mostly as a communications tool for the the Rovers that they're all going to be there. But they announced its first results after the first year plus in orbit this week, and those results there were two main takeaways from those results the first is really interesting because it contradicts our report right talked about just about a week ago. Which is that the trace gas designed to find trace gases in the Martian atmosphere, and it was very focused on specific one specific trace gas, methane would it find methane in the atmosphere, either seasonally, Aw continuously and the result is found and that contradicts recent reports from MAs express and curiosity, which confirmed the appearance of a spike in methane NIA. Gale crater on us. Specific date. That's a little bit of could not get the kind of detailed information close to the surface at the kind of resolution that curiosity in laws express apparently got so that the two data sets off contradictory could be explained simply from that. But it is a problem for the scientists because trace gas. They would've expected it to have caught something of these signals that curiosity and MAs express cut, and it didn't get anything. So methane in the atmosphere of Mars, we still don't know. It might be there and trace guests over didn't see it. It could be that. Maybe the other two spacecraft on misreading the numbers, but methane is a big deal because it doesn't last long in an atmosphere exposed to the sun it breaks up. So to see it means it's being produced on the serve in the on the planet or under the surface. And there are many ways that can happen geologically. Volcanic activity, but we don't know of any active volcano, take city on MOS or biological life. But we don't know any real evidence of biological life. So this is a mystery that needs to be on the front page of every newspaper on the planet is a picture of a black hole significant. This is a great deal of this is a cool thing. What happened is they took? They basically have upgraded almost every radio telescope in the world, and they combined them all together to take a single image which increases the resolution of radio radio waves, which are very gigantic the ways so to get a Cairo solution you've got to have a gigantic mirrors. Centrally. So they find all radio telescopes together, this is being they've been doing this since the nineteen sixties and they've been taking images of the center of galaxies for decades, and they get images that avert costs resolution that show them the beginning of the the center of. The galaxy. This was a high resolution highest resolution we have gotten. I there's been a lot of there's a lot of hyperbole about this. They've taken pictures similar to this before this is interesting because it shows the shadow of the black hole in the image. The resolution was good enough showed that makes a big deal because it does show the radio astronomy is really getting better. But if it the first picture of a black hole, I think that's a little bit of hyperbole. We need a name for the largest unnamed object in the solar system. Our drum roll, Bob what's the largest unnamed object it's seven or ten as built object that was discovered in two thousand and seven and the discoverers have the right to pick the name. But it appears that they can't make them minds. They've been probably all among themselves several years now with the long time more than a decade since they found this thing. And so they decided they came up with three names, and they've probably can't decide which one. Us as they put out a vote, and I've got the link by the black your choices. Either gung gung, Holly or view, so go and vote pick you pick the one you like guys that can't make them mind. What can I can understand why they're struggling Bob that was not choices that spring to mind, dancing, dust, devils, a few seconds? What's that? Oh, I do these pictures on behind the black of really cool things. Most of the time my images show how little changes on the surface. I came across instead of images where they're monitoring dust devils on the service, and you can see over a period of time. In fact, it's just over the list last dust devil season. The last six months how gigantic number of dust devil tracks appear very quickly in one particular spot on Mars, and they sit around and it's pretty spectacular job. Bob Zimmerman keeps the website beyond the black congratulations to best sheet. And it's team. Congratulations to SpaceX leading the way back to the planet's. I'm John Batchelor..

Bob John bachelor Bob Zimmerman Rovers MAs Gale crater Cairo Holly six months
"gale crater" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"gale crater" Discussed on KGO 810

"Frame, and we don't have a big enough sample. Maybe they have too many SUV's on Mars and having global warming, John, you know, fossil fuels doing it. Even then. Know, I don't really know. It's cool image though, because this is really Alliot rain. And it really look at it looks. It doesn't look like anything I recognize some earth. Bob. No, it's not going to you. And in fact, when they were sending the most holy land which unfortunately failed. I talked to one scientist in a preliminary press cups, and he said we're anticipating we get close to the ice cap. We're going to see geological formations that have no car spun on earth at all these picture shows. It is that the gravity is carbon dioxide what what I mean. It's everything is temperatures. It's fact materials dry ice rephrasing and rephrasing combination with water. You've got also the light of gravity one third of earth. You know? So it's all these things. I it follows the same laws of physics and nature, but we're in an environment. And it's going to cause things that we just don't understand. All right now close story. Needing interpretation curiosity is in gale crater and making its way towards important to rain. But it also has the ability to observe the sun and a partial eclipse of two Martian moons. One of which is Phobos it's a really cool image, Bob, which one is Phobos is at the perfectly formed one or the lumpy one of the two animations. They give Phobos is the lodge water which larger of the two moons. What what what carries is done over its life is it's done this about eight times. Now, it's taking pictures or try to take pictures of these moons of Mars as they crossed the sun..

Bob Alliot rain gale crater scientist John
"gale crater" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"gale crater" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Frame, and we don't have a big enough sample. They be they have too many SUV's on Mars and having global warming, John, you know, fossil fuels doing it. Even there, you know. I don't really know. It's cool image though, because this is really Allie of the rain, and it really looks at it looks it doesn't look like anything I recognize from earth bomb. No, it's not going to you. And in fact, when they were sending the most holy land which unfortunately failed. I talked to one scientist a pulmonary press comes and he said we're anticipating we get close to the ice cap. We're going to see geological formations that have no correspondence on earth. At all these hose, it is that the gravity is carbon dioxide what what I mean this. Yes, it's everything it's temperatures. It's affected materials dry, ice, rephrasing and rephrasing and combination with water. You've got also the light of gravity. One third of our, you know, with all these things I it follows the same laws of physics and nature, but we're in an alien environment. It's going to cause things that we just don't all right now. Close story. I'm needing interpretation curiosity is in gale crater and making its way towards important to rain. But it also has the ability to observe the sun and a partial eclipse of two Martian moons. One of which is Phobos. It's a really cool image, Bob, which ones Phobos is perfectly formed one or the lumpy one of the two animations. They give you a Phobos is the lodge water larger of the two moons of what what what is done over its life is it's done this about eight times. Now, it's taking pictures or try to take pictures of these moons of Mars as they crossed the sun..

John gale crater scientist Bob
"gale crater" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:25 min | 2 years ago

"gale crater" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is science Friday Plato later in the hour. What the devastating floods in Iowa and the Brask have done to the top soil. But first this week thousands of chemistry professionals met in Orlando. None expressly for a trip to DisneyWorld, but to discuss the research, so I probably director Charles Berkeley, attended the meeting of the American Chemical Society, and he is back to share some highlights. Welcome before we get to the meeting. There is some news out this week about chemistry. Elsewhere in our solar system Mars. That's right. So this week in the journal nature geoscience with some findings published about methane, you might remember back in twenty thirteen. The Mars Rover curiosity reported seeing increased levels of methane in the air around gale crater, the the news this week is the European space. Agency's Mars express orbiter apparently spotted methane in the same area at the same time. Time. Oh, yes. So it's an independent confirmation of that original methane, citing. But we don't know where the methane origine. Well, it's a big. That's a big issue isn't yes. And no. So the they haven't idea now of the geographic feature that they think it might have come from near the crater, but they don't know what caused it. And of course, there are both biological sources of methane and geologic sources, so it's still up in the air you'd like to think it was life. Would you is there any way to narrow this down? So there's another European spacecraft called the X Omar's trace gas orbiter that arrived at Mars in thousand seventeen it hasn't put out any data yet. So planetary scientists are really going to be keeping an eye on that one. All right. Let's get to the Chemical Society me meeting this weekend. There was something about transparent would yes, this is a little involved. But if you magic taking your regular ordinary piece of wood, it turns out that there's two main components in the weather's lignin, and their, cellulose, and lignin is the stuff that gives it most of its color, and why you can't see through it. So if you manage to wash away, the lignin, you're left with just the, cellulose, it's like these quite fibers in a network, and if you fill the space in between the fibers with some material that has the right optical properties, the fibers, essentially disappear, and you can see through the would you've made a composite material that still has a lot of the would like properties, but you can see through it. That this. That's not the news here that that was done a couple of years ago. You can actually find demos of how to do it yourself on YouTube, if you don't mind messing with a few chemicals, but what these researchers have done now from the Royal Institute of technology in Stockholm is they've found that if you take a material called a phase change material, which is something that soaks up a release a lot of heat on Meltzer, freezes you stuff that into the pores, you now have a transparent piece of wood that imagine if you made a roof panel out of it during the day, it would melt or it's would soak up some of the excess heat reduced the temperature a couple degrees and at night when it cooled it would release that energy backout and give you a little bit of extra warmth. We know anybody's building anything they're playing with it. I think it's probably not going to be in your in your roof panel anytime soon, but. Total. I remember reading years ago about another another Woody type project like that. Where would actually soaked up the heat during the day and let it go at night. But yeah, it's interesting. It's a great content because it's it's passive heating. Right. Right. You saw a VR Chem. They're also Chemla Chem lab. So this is teaching lab for students learning organic chemistry, and this is a group at North Carolina State university, and they're they they don't want to do away with Chem labs. They're not looking to do that. But this is for intended for people who may be say, they get pregnant, and they can't go into the Chem lab for safety reasons or they're in the military, and they get deployed they need some other way of finishing out the required lab. So in this you put on the goggles, and you see your hands walking around the lab, and they've filmed the imagine having the best TA in the entire university. Talking just to you explain to you how to do that thing. And what's cool is that they they broke up a class into two sections and some people used VR demo some use the actual physical regular lab. And at the end, they they graded the lab reports blindly, and they they did the same on the lab reports you weren't able to try one out. Put it on. And what did you see what I mean? It's it's it's they actually felt it's not this isn't a cartoon. This is filmed in a real lab. So it looks like they they did clean it up. So I mean, this lab you've ever been in right? But yeah, there's a lab a TA, and you can open the drawers you can pull things in touch things and pick things up, right? Yeah. You don't do it with? You're not wearing gloves or anything. It's not done with your hands. But it's you can like look at something intently, and that tells you, you know, to activate that function on the instrument or whatever I want one of those and there's some look ahead news for next week. This could be pretty exciting could be. So what's cool is the strana involved in a project called the event? Horizon telescope have announced that they're making an announcement. They've announced an announcement for next Wednesday. And we don't know what it is. But the entire purpose of that project was to try to take a picture of a black hole. So either maybe they're gonna show us a picture of black hole, or they're going to tell us that black holes don't actually exist and something like that. So if you want more information about this, we can preppy on it. There's some of an interview that we recorded a couple years ago with one lead researchers, and it'll be in our podcast feed. So you can check that out. Of course, it's a black hole is black. We won't see the whole. See the event horizon. That's why it's the event. Horizon telescope, they are so clever. Soya charles. Thank you for taking time to be with us today. Thanks, IRA sci-fi director and contributing producer. And as time to check in on the state of science. W w St Louis. Radio news local science stories of national.

Horizon telescope director TA Chem labs VR Chem gale crater American Chemical Society Chemla Chem Iowa Mars Orlando Chemical Society Charles Berkeley North Carolina State universit Soya charles YouTube Omar Royal Institute of technology
"gale crater" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:09 min | 2 years ago

"gale crater" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Orlando nine expressly for trip to DisneyWorld. But discuss the research side director, Charles Burke, was attended the meeting of the American Chemical sanctity, and he has backed share some highlights. Welcome. Before we get to the meeting. There is some news out this week about chemistry. Elsewhere in our solar system ours. That's right. So this week in the journal nature. Geoscience was some findings published about methane you might remember back in twenty thirteen. The Mars Rover curiosity reported seeing increased levels of methane in the air around gale crater, the the news this week is that the European Space Agency's Mars express orbiter apparently spotted methane in the same area at the same time. Oh, yes. So it's an independent confirmation of that original methane, citing. But we don't know where the methane origine. Well, it's a big. That's a big issue isn't yes. And no. So the they haven't idea now of the geographic feature that they think it might have come from near the crater, but they don't know what caused it. And of course, there are both biological sources of methane and geologic sources, so it's still up in the air you'd like to think it was life. Would you is there any way to narrow? This down. So there's another European spacecraft called the X Omar's trace gas orbiter that arrived at Mars in twenty seventeen. It hasn't put out any data yet. So planetary scientists are really going to be keeping an eye on that one. All right. Let's get to the Chemical Society mean meeting this weekend. There was something about transparent would yes, this is a little involved. But if you magic taking your regular ordinary piece of wood, it turns out that there's two main components in the weather's lignin, and their, cellulose, and lignin is the stuff that gives it most of its color, and while you can't see through it. So if you manage to wash away, the lignin, you're left with just the, cellulose, it's like these quite fibers in a network, and if you fill the space in between the fibers with some material that has the right optical properties, the fibers, essentially disappear, and you can see through the would you've made a composite material that still has a lot of the would like properties, but you can see through it. That this. That's not not the news here that that was done a couple years ago. You can actually find demos of how to do it yourself on YouTube, if you don't mind messing with a few chemicals, but what these researchers have done now from the Royal Institute of technology in Stockholm is they found that if you take a material phase change material, which is something that soaks up releases a lot of heat when it melts, freezes you stuff that into the pores, you a transparent piece of wood that imagine if you made a roof panel out of it during the day, it would melt would soak up some of the excess heat reduce the temperature a couple degrees and at night when it cooled it would release that energy backout and give you a little bit of extra warmth, as we know van buddies building anything they're playing with it. I think it's probably not going to be in your in your roof panel anytime soon, but. I remember reading years ago about another another Woody type project like that would actually soaked up the heat during the day and let it go at night. Yeah, it's interesting. And it's a it's a great content because it's it's passive heating. Right. Right. You saw a VR Chem. They're also Chemla Chem lab. So this is a teaching lab for students learning organic chemistry, and this is a group at North Carolina State university. And they're they emphasize that they don't want to do away with Chem labs not looking to do that. But this is four intended for people who may be. Say they get pregnant, and they can't go into the Chem lab right on can't for safety reasons or they're in the military, and they get deployed they need some other way of finishing out the required lab. So in this you put on the goggles, and you see your hands walking around the lab, and they've filmed the imagine having the best TA in the entire university. Talking just to you to explain to you how to do that thing. And what's cool is that they they broke up a class into two sections and some people use VR demo some use the actual physical regular lab. And at the end, they they graded the lab reports blindly, and they did the same on the lab reports you're able to try out. I put it on. And did you see what I mean? It's it's it's they actually felt no it's not this isn't a cartoon. This is filmed in a real lab. So it looks like they they did clean it up. So it's this lab you've ever been in right? But yeah, there's a lab ta and you can open the drawers, you can pull things and touch things and pick things right. Yeah. You don't do it with your wearing gloves or anything? It's not done with your hands. But it's you can like look at something intently, and that tells you, you know, to activate that function on the instrument or whatever I want one of those and there's some look ahead news for next week. This could be pretty exciting could be. So what's cool is the astronomers involved in a project called the event? Horizon telescope have announced that they're making an announcement. They've announced an announcement for next Wednesday. And we don't know what it is. But the entire purpose of that project was to try to take a picture of a black hole. So either. Maybe they're gonna show us the picture of black hole, or they're gonna tell us that black holes don't actually exist and something like that. So if you want more information about this, we can preppy on it. There's some an interview that we recorded a couple years ago with one lead researchers, and it'll be in our podcast feed. So you can check that out. Of course, black hole is black. We won't see the whole the event horizon. That's why the event horizon telescope, they are so clever. Soya Charles thank you for taking time to be with us today. Thanks, restaurant's director, and contributing producer and has time to check in on the state of science. W.

Chem lab director VR Chem Chemla Chem gale crater Chem labs Orlando Charles Burke European Space Agency Chemical Society Horizon telescope North Carolina State universit YouTube Soya Charles Omar Royal Institute of technology TA Stockholm
"gale crater" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

04:53 min | 2 years ago

"gale crater" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Methane. Well, it's been said before the methane has been on the planet, and no one is it's been dismissed. But now everybody's wondering why the methane comes back. It's still exists. They say, oh, it's a bewildering, Mr.. But for me. I know exactly why methane is there because that would mean that there are life forms on the planet that are dying and when they die they methane or win an animal that makes waste or a creature that makes waste they put out methane. Now. That's what happens here on earth. But here we go. I mean, we don't know why there is methane being detected on Mars. This may indicate and I believe does indicate and I've been saying this for the very beginning that present day Mars has Martian microbes living in the rocks below the surface where the water is. Again, it was reported in nature. Geoscience scientists working with the European space. Agency's Mars express orbiter reported that in the summer of twenty thirteen the space craft the Mars express detected methane within the gale crater about ninety six mile wide depression near the Martian equator. This is noteworthy because Nastase curiosity Rover. It's been exploring that region since two thousand eleven and in the summer of two thousand thirteen it too measured a marked rise of methane in the air that lasted at least two months. Okay. Now, we have now this is the European Space Agency. Okay. This is not NASA. I've said before and I'll say it again. The other space agencies or revealing little by little maybe even more. So than NASA that there is or there could be life elsewhere in the universe or life. Elsewhere in the solar system in they're talking about Mars having water underground, and now they're detecting amounts of methane, which once again, similar to the war of the worlds of the eighteen hundreds with H G wells talking about the very same thing. And in the nineteen thirty eight version, which was a prank a kind of a hoax. It was being talked about by Orson Welles and the mercury theatre when they broadcast the war of the worlds in Halloween in the nineteen thirties is an interesting how this type of thing for structured and this goes. One thousand nine hundred eighty four structuring what we're experiencing now. So if you want to read what it says in nature geoscience, scientists working with the European Space Agency's Mars express orbiter 2013 the spacecraft detected methane within the gale crater. That's right near the Martian equator. Nasa's curiosity Rover detect the same thing, but you nasty doesn't jump to conclusions. I guess or they say that they don't they don't want you to jump to conclusions either. But dammit, I'm gonna jump to conclusions because I know of the record and the record is always indicated the possibility of either fossilized bacteria in life forms. We talked about the fungus the other day that was detected people say, oh, it's not funguses something else. Okay. Fine. It can be whatever you want it to be. But out of European Space Agency as saying, hey. This was going on. And I just find the parallels. Interesting between what war of the worlds was telling us in the eighteen hundreds wore the world's told us in the nineteen thirties. And that were the world's is going to be a major television event produced by the BBC, probably airing on FOX. And it is a television series based to the eighteen hundreds talk about some of the theories and sciences the day that led to possibilities of alien life forms being talked about well into the turn of the twentieth century. Now here we are on the twenty-first century again looking back and saying, well, there's a lot of things that indicated there's life on Mars and the science of our day now is having some greater synchronicity to that of an earlier science fiction prank. But actually created some panic at the time. Have you remember because I I did a television special, and it was actually it aired in England before. Aired here in the United States it aired on net flicks. And maybe if I find it I'll put it up on Facebook. So you watch against amazing special. I I was actually flown out to growers mill New Jersey. Where allegedly the martians landed in the nineteen thirties. It's beautiful town beautiful area near Princeton. Does your blink your eyes is like a postage stamp? And I also went to the there was a coffee place there. An amazing coffee place..

European Space Agency NASA gale crater Mars Orson Welles Princeton Facebook United States New Jersey FOX BBC England H G two months mill
"gale crater" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"gale crater" Discussed on KCRW

"NPR news. There is a three mile tall mountain in the middle of crater on Mars and scientists have been debating how it got there. A new study suggests the mountains largely made from just dust and sand to get the data for that conclusion. The researchers macgyver a navigation instrument on the NASA Rover called curiosity. NPR science. Correspondent Joe palca has the story. How do you know what a planet is made of well, you can learn a lot about the geology of a planet by measuring subtle changes in its gravity, high density rocks, give us stronger, gravity signal, then low-density rocks but to make gravity measurements. You usually have to have an instrument called a graviton, and it kind of frustrated me that we didn't have a surface Gervin meter on Mars. Kevin Lewis is a planetary scientist at Johns Hopkins University and a member of the curiosity Rover science team one day. Lewis started thinking about something that popped up regularly on the Rovers daily activity. Schedule turns out every day. We don't drive with the Rover. There's this little five minute activity called the sap rim. You did a collection activity the rim. You is a navigational device and the sap remunerated activity tells engineers, the Rovers precise orientation on the planet surface inside the rim. You are three accelerometers and accelerometers measure acceleration, duh. You actually have accelerometers inside your smartphone that measure your movements. Anyway, thinking about these accelerometers in the rim you Kevin Lewis had a kind of epiphany. We don't have a GRA visitor on the surface of Mars, but we have accelerometers and gravity is just an acceleration. You may not think of gravity that way. But you can and scientists do so by adjusting the way the data from the rim, you were handled Lewis now had his grandma, and he knew just what he wanted to do with it. Try to figure out how fifteen thousand foot tall mountain could form in the middle of gale crater the crater curiosity. Landed in. It's a question. Many scientists have puzzled over there have been two different schools of thought MacKenzie day is a planetary scientist at UCLA craters are fundamentally big holes in the ground to they're really good place to accumulate things to accumulate sediment, accumulate dust and sand day says the question is was gale crater once filled to the rim with sediment, and then most of that material eroded away leaving behind what's now called mount sharp or his mount sharp something that developed in the middle of the crater as sort of a stacking of material in the crater center from winds coming down the sides of the crater rim could blowing sand and dust really packed together to build a three mile tall mountain possibly although Kevin Lewis says it runs against our expectations. We don't normally see mountains just growing up as a haystack on the earth. If the haystack model is right? The rocks at the base of mount sharp wouldn't be very dense. And as he and his colleagues. Report in the journal science what we found in the study is that the rocks are surprisingly low density. So the haystack theory may be right Lewis says he plans to keep collecting data from his macgyver instrument as curiosity climbs up. Mount sharp to see if the initial results hold up. Joe.

Kevin Lewis gale crater Mount sharp Joe palca Rovers NPR scientist Johns Hopkins University MacKenzie UCLA fifteen thousand foot five minute one day
"gale crater" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"gale crater" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"From NPR news. There is a three mile tall mountain in the middle of a crater on Mars and scientists have been debating how it got there. A new study suggests the mountain is largely made from just dust and sand to get the data for that conclusion. The researchers macgyver a navigation instrument on the NASA Rover called curiosity. NPR science. Correspondent Joe palca has the story. How do you know what a planet is made of well, you can learn a lot about the geology of planet by measuring subtle changes in its gravity high density rocks give a stronger, gravity signal than low density rocks but to make gravity measurements. You usually have to have an instrument called a gravity Madore. And it kind of frustrated me that we didn't have a surface groove meter or on Mars. Kevin Lewis is a planetary scientist at Johns Hopkins University and a member of the curiosity Rover science team one day. Lewis started thinking about something that popped up regularly on the Rovers daily activity. Schedule turns out every day. We don't drive with. The rover. There's this little five minute activity called the sap rim. You did a collection activity the rim. You is a navigational device and the sap remote data activity tells engineers, the Rovers precise orientation on the planet surface inside the rim. You are three accelerometers and accelerometers measure acceleration. You actually have accelerometers inside your smartphone that measure your movements. Anyway, thinking about these accelerometers in the rim, you Kevin Lewis had a kind of Epifani. We don't have a GRA visitor on the surface of Mars, but we have accelerometers and gravity is just an acceleration. You may not think of gravity that way. But you can and scientists do so by adjusting the way the data from the rim you were handled Lewis now had his gravity Madore. And he knew just what he wanted to do with it. Try to figure out how a fifteen thousand foot tall mountain could form in the middle of gale crater, the crater cure. Positi landed in. It's a question. Many scientists have puzzled over there sort of have been two different schools of thought MacKenzie day is a planetary scientist at UCLA craters are fundamentally big holes in the ground to they're really good place to accumulate things to accumulate sediment, accumulate dust and sand day says the question is was gale crater once filled to the rim with sediment, and then most of that material eroded away leaving behind what's now called mount sharp or his mount sharp something that developed in the middle of the crater as sort of a stacking of material in the crater center from winds coming down the sides of the crater rim could blowing sand and dust really packed together to build a three mile tall mountain possibly although Kevin Lewis says it runs against our expectations. We don't normally see mountains just growing up as a haystack on the earth. If the haystack model is right? The rocks at the base of mount sharp wouldn't be very dense. And is he and his? Colleagues report in the journal science what we found in the study is that the rocks are surprisingly low density. So the haystack theory may be right Lewis says he plans to keep collecting data from his macgyver instrument as curiosity climbs up. Mount sharp to see if the initial results hold up..

Kevin Lewis gale crater Mount sharp Rovers NPR scientist Joe palca Positi Johns Hopkins University Epifani MacKenzie UCLA fifteen thousand foot five minute one day
"gale crater" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

13:21 min | 3 years ago

"gale crater" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"John. That's greenspan's. New book is earth human shaping our planet. It is a summary. It's not about David's life growing up of Carl Sagan who was a visionary along with his colleagues of thinking of earth as a planet among plans thinking of the success of earth as not fixed thinking of human beings, taking control of earth witness the political fury of the debate of nuclear weapons back in the one thousand nine hundred Carl Sagan was a principal in that argument. The idea that we were living close to midnight. And I remember the image very vividly Carl Sagan delivering of sitting of that where we were with nuclear weapons. This is during the Cold War was a man sitting in a room with about an inch and a half of gasoline on the floor and lighting a match. That's how close we were. That's the image. I got from Carl Sagan. But here we are thirty years later, and we're looking outside the planet. We have solved to a great extent that crisis of nuclear weapons in the Cold War. But we are exploring other planets. They are. Our new moon races. David participates in all the time. The Chinese the Indians the Americans the Russians all looking the moon. We have Rovers on Mars, and we're looking for life. Now, David in looking for life. You are very cautious. We've talked for many years, and we don't get ahead of the evidence. But I want to go to an event that you flag in your book. And I think is coming back because of Mars the Mars probes there is a symmetrical methane release to texted by curiosity in gale crater these last years of gale crater, climbing mount sharp that is consistent with something. We talked about many years ago, which was the Mars the Mars orbiters picking up asymmetrical methane release perhaps seasonal that suggests David that. We're not looking for emptiness out there. We're looking for something perhaps long enough ago three four billion years ago that still there. Correct. That's the possibility of that methane. Yes. It's very. Intriguing going back to when we talked about Jim loved Bach. And and the the guy hypothesis when Lovelock was asked how to find life on Mars. He said look for disequilibrium in the atmosphere. Look for strange chemistry that shouldn't be there. Unless there was something perturbing it that could be alive. And that is what we found on Mars. Now, we found this methane that that really shouldn't be there. Now. You can't jump to the conclusion that it's alive because it's a very tiny amount of methane. And there are other ways you can make trace amounts of methane some geological chemistry that could be going on in the area of the planet. But but you have to admit one has to admit that it is possible bio signature on Mars that we've found so. You know, it's it's very exciting. And it's definitely something. We have to. Check out more with with future investigations. Even if we don't find that it's life on Mars. It's telling us something very interesting about what's going on on Mars. And that helps us learn more about the different ways that earth like planets can evolve which is something we we really need to understand for many reasons, not the least of which because we have to understand this earth like planet that we find ourselves on that is evolving and be a little bit smarter about how that works. There's the philosophical challenge for me, David in your book, are we homo sapiens, the judges or are we transitional figures are we transforming our planet in some fashion. For the future creatures. I don't think you resolve that issue in your book. Well, I don't think one honestly can resolve it. I mean, when I the phrase earth and human hands, which is the title of my book is not meant to just be self congratulatory. I do I rail against the Misanthrope he that I find innovative environmental messages, where people just want to say, oh, we're we're just horrible the world would be better off without a, you know, I I don't think people that say that have really thought it through. But it's not meant to just be seven Pretoria. It's also sort of a warning it's daunting. Do we have what it takes to hold the earth in our hands? Do we know enough? Or can we learn what we need to learn? So that we can actually handle this great responsibility. So I think one honestly has to leave the question unresolved, but there are in my view, many reasons to be optimistic in the long run. If you look at the success of our species, we are problem solvers, we are cooperators. We are. We invent our way out of dire situations we've been faced with existential threats in the past many times, and we survived by finding new ways to cooperate and invent solutions to our problems. And I think in the long run we do have what it takes. But that doesn't mean it's going to be easy or that the twenty first century is going to be a cakewalk. We clearly are up against some some very serious threats in with the changes that we're inducing to the planet and our ability to respond to those changes and even better hopefully to anticipate so that we see what's coming and do not have to merely react, but can actually take evasive maneuvers before before we hit that iceberg. You know, that is really the hallmark of of intelligence, and I think that's what we're struggling to to exhibit as a as a species. We obviously have it as individuals and are capable in small groups of acting. It's this is this wide this larger coordination this organization that on a global scale. That's sort of vexing us you point. You are a. A voracious reader of science fiction as I am. I read a little a few decades ahead of you. And so you have fresher material, I have older material, but we can agree that there are books and the one I'm seizing on his Brian Aldus is nonstop which he published in nineteen fifty eight. There are books that illustrate what I take to be the theme of your book. And this is a wonderful story for people who have not read it. So I'm going to let David tell the story of waking up on a in a in a savage world. What do we discover in? The course of the book. Yes. So this is a theme in science fiction that they're several stories that have this team. It's it's it's known as a generation ship story. And one of the best is this book nonstop by Brian Hollis that you mentioned and in these stories people have solved the problem of interstellar travel, the fundamental problem that the stars are so far away that you cannot reach them in a human lifetime at any reasonable speed with any reasonable physics. So how do we get to the stars? Well, what if you build a massive ship that many generations can live in? So that the people who ultimately are going to reach that exit planet around that other star hundreds of years in the future will be the descendants of the people who set out on that trip. This is the premise, and then what happens in these stories. There's always been something that's gone wrong. There's been a societal collapse or a mutineer malfunction, and the people have somehow forgotten that they're on a ship. That they're moving somewhere and for them the ship is just the whole world, and they've reverted to some kind of savagery or some pre technological or post technological condition. And but then in these stories, there's a protagonist our heroes. Always discover they they make a discovery they figure out the truth. You know, they they find a port hall, and they look out and they see the stars or they find the control room and they realize, hey, we're on a ship. This is actually a construct, and and we're moving somewhere together, and we have to we have to wake everybody up and tell them that the nature of our true reality. So that we can we can survive. So that we can figure out where we're going and. And deal with this new reality. And I find that to be a really interesting metaphor for our current situation where here on earth now with the scientific revolution. And with the realization of of that, we do live on a planet, and that we actually are altering that planet than in a certain sense. I reality is not what we thought it was during most of the time we were evolving, and now we can see this reality for what it is that in some sense the world is a construct that we've we're altering it, and therefore we we have to sort of wake up and figure out how to drive the thing. And that's that's the metaphor that we that we have to come to grips with our reality. And the fact that we do have this responsibility that we are at the controls currently were at the controls, but we're not in control, but that is an unstable situation. And I don't think we have the ability at this point. We don't really have the option. Much as some people would wish that we did to relinquish control and to just stop being planet changers. We don't really have that option. So therefore, we have to learn how to steer you point to the cartoonist the artist Robert crumb, who assembled panels showing the progress of civilization. I guess it's a it's twelve panels overall. But then he had an alternative ending and David you ride in your chapter their flavors of pessimism is my personality. I'm drawn to the pessimism side, and Robert crumb has an ending for our civilization, the the pattern on this spaceship earth is we're traveling that is catastrophe and European David at this point having worked through this book and having pulled all this material together have I been guided towards my affection towards the dystopia and finish because of the nature of thinking these last fifty years, did I miss the optimism. David. Well, I think yeah. I mean, our crime is a wonderful sort of underground cartoonist. And he did this short history of America where he shows every decade, the changes going from a pastoral landscape up to sort of urban health scape. Mad Max is though is the the the the exit that he. It is most affectionate. I recognize the movie. Yes. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Exactly. There's three possibility. He calls it the the worst case scenario, which is ecological disaster the fun future, which is the techno fix on the March, which is sort of we solve everything through. Nifty. Tech Jetsons Jetsons. That's the second. Yes. That's the Jetsons. And the third one is the Ecotopia solution where you know, everybody's riding around and bicycle San Francisco with them with a foreign yes Marin county, and and, you know, in my view, it's it's you know, we want to avoid the worst case scenario it's going to be some combination of techno fix and Ecotopia and solution. We're not going to relinquish tech. But we're not going to solve everything through just throwing technology at the problem. I think we're going to need some measure of restraint. We don't want to try to have a planet with one hundred billion people, but we also there are many ways in which technological breakthroughs and technological innovation. Nations can really help us to solve our problems that people talk about intense sophistication of agriculture, and you know, sort of having less of a negative imprint on the land because we concentrate our activities into smaller regions, and their technology or technological breakthroughs. That can help us do that. And obviously energy technology is is key. So as far as optimism or pessimism in my view. The there are many reasons to be optimistic in the long run. The the short run is going to be a challenge. I I'm not trying to minimize that the twenty first century is going to be difficult. It no doubt is. But I think that you know, in my view that the bad version of the twenty first century is as bad as the twentieth century. And when I say that people say, well, what do you mean the twentieth century was great? But, but of course, it wasn't for the hundreds of millions of people who died in wars and famines. And in my view that the scale of tragedy that we face if we if we make this transition in the wrong way. Is perhaps equal to that? But but one can picture the twenty second century, and we will clearly be off fossil fuels. I mean, no matter what even if we no matter what choices we make. We will not be on fossil fuels and one hundred years and likewise population is is going to stabilize all the projections show that so so we will get through to this other world. And we'll at that point. I think what we'll be doing. I think we'll actually be pulling CO two out of the atmosphere and repairing some of the damage we're doing now. So to me, it's a matter of what path we take to get from from here today. I wanna I wanna at turn to the exciting part back to Sammy's paradox, and your colleague, David Brin, his story, the great silence when we come back because all of this could turn sharply.

David Brin Carl Sagan Rovers Robert crumb Pretoria gale crater principal John. Lovelock Jim Brian Aldus greenspan Brian Hollis Marin county San Francisco America Sammy
"gale crater" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

13:15 min | 3 years ago

"gale crater" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Not about David's life growing up Carl Sagan who was a visionary along with his colleague a thinking of earth. As a planet among plans thinking of the success of earth as not fixed thinking of human beings, taking control of earth witness the political fury of the debate of nuclear weapons back in one thousand nine hundred as Carl Sagan was a principal in that argument. The idea that we were living close to midnight. And I remember the image very vividly Carl Sagan delivering of sitting of that where we were with nuclear weapons. This is during the Cold War was a man sitting in a room with about an inch and a half of gasoline on the floor and lighting a match. That's how close we were. That's the image. I got from Carl Sagan. But here we are thirty years later, and we're looking outside the planet. We have solved to a great extent that crisis of nuclear weapons in the Cold War. But we are exploring other planets they are new moon races. David participates in all the time. The Chinese the Indians the Americans the Russians all looking to the moon. We have Rovers on Mars, and we're. Looking for life. Now, David in looking for life. You are very cautious. We talked for many years, and we don't get ahead of the evidence. But I want to go to an event that you flag in your book. And I think is coming back because of Mars the Mars probes there is a symmetrical methane release to tactic by curiosity in gale crater these last years of gale crater, climbing mount sharp that is consistent with something. We talked about many years ago, which was the Mars the Mars orbiters picking up asymmetrical methane release perhaps seasonal that suggests David that. We're not looking for emptiness out there. We're looking for something perhaps long enough ago three four billion years ago that still there. Correct. That's the possibility of that methane. Yes. It's very intriguing going back to when we talked about Jim love Bach. An and the the guy hypothesis when was asked how to find life on Mars. He said look for disequilibrium in the atmosphere. Look for strange chemistry that shouldn't be there. Unless there was something perturbing that could be alive. And that is what we found on Mars. Now, we found this methane that that really shouldn't be there. Now that you can't jump to the conclusion that it's alive because it's a very tiny amount of methane. And there are other ways you can make trace amounts of methane some geological chemistry that could be going on in the area of the planet. But but you have to admit one has to admit that it is possible bio signature on Mars that we've found so. It's very exciting. And it's definitely something. We have to. Check out more with future investigations, even if we don't find that it's life on Mars. It's telling us something very interesting about what's going on on Mars. And that helps us learn more about the different ways that earth like planets can evolve which is something we we really need to understand for many reasons, not the least of which because we have to understand this earth like planet that we find ourselves on that is evolving, and and be a little bit smarter about how that works. There's the philosophical challenge for me, David in your book, are we homo sapiens, the judges or are we transitional figures are we transforming our planet in some fashion for the future creatures. I don't think you resolve that issue in your book. Well, I don't think one honestly can resolve it. I mean, when I the phrase earth and human hands, which is the title of my book is not meant to just be self congratulatory. I do I rail against the Misanthrope. That I find innovative environmental messages where people just want to say, oh, we're we're just horrible. The world would be better off without us. You know, I I don't think people that say that have really thought it through. But it's not meant to just be laboratory. It's also sort of a warning it's daunting. Do we have what it takes to hold the earth in our hands? Do we know enough? Or can we learn what we need to learn? So that we can actually handle this great responsibility. So I think honestly has to leave the question unresolved, but there are in my view, many reasons to be optimistic in the long run. If you look at the success of our species, we are problem solvers, we are cooperators. We are if we invent our way out of dire situations we've been faced with existential threats in the past many times, and we survived by finding new ways to cooperate and invent solutions to to our. Problems. And I think in the long run we do have what it takes. But that doesn't mean it's going to be easy or that the twenty first century is going to be a cakewalk. We clearly are up against some some very serious threats in with the changes that we're inducing to the planet and our ability to respond to those changes, and and even better hopefully to anticipate so that we see what's coming and do not have to merely react, but can actually take evasive maneuvers before before we hit that iceberg. That is really the hallmark of of intelligence. And I think that's what we're struggling to to exhibit as a as a species, we obviously have it as individuals and are capable in small groups of acting intelligently. It's this is this wide this larger coordination this organization that on a global scale. That's sort of vexing us viewpoint. You are a voracious reader of science fiction as I am. I read. Little a few decades ahead of you. And so you have fresher material, I have older material, but we can agree that there are books and the one I'm seizing on his Brian Aldus is nonstop which he published in nineteen fifty eight. There are books that illustrate what I take to be the theme of your book. And this is a wonderful story for people who have not read it. So I'm going to let David tell the story of waking up on a in a in a savage world. What do we discover in the course of the book? Yes. So this is a theme in science fiction that they're several stories that have this team. It's it's it's known as a generation ship story. And one of the best is this book nonstop by Brian Aldus that you mentioned and in these stories people have solved the problem of interstellar travel, the fundamental problem that stars herself far away that you cannot reach them in a human lifetime at any reasonable speed with any reasonable physics. So how do we get to the stars? Well, what if you build a massive ship that many generations can live in? So that the people who ultimately are going to reach that exoplanet around that other star hundreds of years in the future will be the descendants of the people who set out on that trip. This is the premise, and then what happens in these stories. There's always been something that's gone wrong. There's been a societal collapse or a mutineer malfunction, and the people have somehow forgotten that they're on a ship that they're moving somewhere and for them the ship is just the whole world, and they've reverted to some kind of savagery or some pre technological or toast technological condition. And but then in they stories, there's the protagonist are heroes. Always discover they they make a discovery they figure out the truth. You know, they they find a port hall, and they look out and they see the stars or they find the control room and they realize, hey, we're on a ship. This is actually a construct and and we're moving somewhere together, and we have to. We have to wake everybody up and tell them that the nature of our true reality. So that we can. That we can survive. So that we can figure out where we're going and. And and deal with this new reality. And I find that to be a really interesting metaphor for our our current situation where here on earth now with the scientific revolution. And with the realization of of that, we do live on a planet, and that we actually are altering that planet. Then a certain sense. I reality is not what we thought it was during most of the time we were evolving, and now we can see this reality for what it is that in some sense the world is a construct that we've we're altering it, and therefore we have to sort of wake up and figure out how to drive the thing. And that's that's the metaphor that we that we have to come to grips with our reality. And the fact that we do have this responsibility that we are at the controls. Currently we're at the controls, but we're not in control. The dad is an unstable situation. And I don't think we have the ability at this point. We don't really have the option. Much as some people would wish that we did to relinquish control and to just stop being planet changers. We don't really have that option. So therefore, we have to learn how to steer you point to the cartoonist the artist Robert crumb, who assembled panels showing the progress of civilization. I guess it's a it's twelve panels overall. But then he had an alternative ending and David you ride in your chapter their flavors of pessimism is my personality. I'm drawn to the pessimism side and Robert crumb has an ending for our civilization, and the the pattern on this spaceship earth is we're traveling that is catastrophe and European David at this point having worked through this book and having pulled all this material together have I been guided towards my affection towards the dystopia and finish because of the nature of thinking these last fifty years, did I miss the optimism. David. Well, I think yeah. I mean, our our chrome is a wonderful sort of underground cartoonist. And he did this short history of America where he shows every decade, the changes going from a pastoral landscape up to sort of urban health scape. Mad Max is is the the the exit that he. Is most affectionate. I recognize the movie. Yes. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Exactly. So then there's three possibility he calls it the the worst case scenario, which is ecological disaster the fun future, which is the techno fix on the March, which is sort of we saw everything through nifty Jetsons the Jetsons. That's the second. Yes. That's the Jetsons. And the third one is the Ecotopia solution where you know, everybody's riding around and bicycles San Francisco with them with a forest. Yes, Marin county, and and you know, in my view, it's it's you know, if we want to avoid the worst case scenario, it's going to be some combination of the techno fix and Ecotopia and solution. We're not going to relinquish high tech. But we're not going to solve everything through just throwing technology at the problem. I think we're going to need some measure of restraint, we don't want to try to have a planet with one hundred billion people, but we also there are many ways in which technological breakthroughs and technological innovation. Can really help us to solve our problems that people talk about intensive caisson of agriculture, and you know, sort of having less of a negative imprint on the land because we concentrate our activities into smaller regions, and and there's technology or technological breakthroughs that can help us do that. And obviously energy technology is is key. So as far as optimism or pessimism in my view. The there are many reasons to be optimistic in the long run. The the short run is going to be a challenge. I I'm not trying to minimize that the twenty first century is going to be difficult. It no doubt is. But I think that you know, in my view, the bad version of the twenty first century is as bad as the twentieth century. And when I say that people say, well, what do you mean the twentieth century was great? But, but of course, it wasn't for the hundreds of millions of people who died in wars and famines, and in my view that the scale of tragedy that we face if we if we make this transition in the wrong way. Is perhaps equal to that? But but one can picture the twenty second century, and we we will clearly be off fossil fuels. I mean, no matter what even if we no matter what choices we make. We will not be on fossil fuels and a hundred years and likewise population is is going to stabilize all the projections show that so so we will get through to this other world, and we at that point. I think what will be doing. I think we'll actually be pulling CO two out of the atmosphere and repairing some of the damage we're doing now. So to me, it's a matter of what path we take to get from from here to there. I wanna I wanna I want to turn to the exciting part back to Sammy's paradox, and the colleague David brim, his story, the great silence when we come back because all of this could turn sharply in.

David brim Carl Sagan Rovers Robert crumb principal Brian Aldus gale crater Marin county San Francisco Jim Sammy America mount sharp three four billion years hundred years twenty second