14 Burst results for "Galaxy Alexey"

"galaxy alexey" Discussed on The Glenn Beck Program

The Glenn Beck Program

07:36 min | 1 year ago

"galaxy alexey" Discussed on The Glenn Beck Program

"So. welcome back to the Glenn Beck program with stupor gear and. Pat Grace joining us as well. Nasr's actively monitoring a strange anonymous a non annum. Anomaly. Thank you in Earth's magnetic field giant region of lower magnetic intensity in the skies above the planet. This is about the polar shift thought I'd throw that in because last week and we just missed the closest the the closest asteroid. History on believably close right. They consider a close call, four million miles or million miles right this was the same distance as it is from Dallas to Boston it was eighteen hundred miles. It doesn't give me. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. It was a bad one car sized asteroid. Yeah. Doesn't really give me a lot of confidence that NASA is up on this one no. Inspire yeah. It doesn't at all. No really doesn't really doesn't. But Hey, we're not calling black holes black holes anymore, and that's what's important to being. No more. Siamese twin galaxies Alexey now stars so and have we got that yeah. But we did miss the asteroid. It almost hit us. We saw it after it went by though. So we saw like Whoa. WHOA. Man WHOA. What was that? That's That's pretty good. That's pretty good. So I'm just looking for good news. About suicide rate and Probably not good about this one. How about this one There is a new study on our dogs. And I can't find it now. There's a new study. Hall of fame is is going into Oregon. Soon curious as to I. Think it's the hardware hall of fame. Okay. That makes sense than what he's actually going into the hardware store hall of fame. Is. Okay okay. Here it is. It, they've done a study on our dogs now. and. And it's it's. You're. GonNa you're just if I more reasons not to like your neighbors so they compared Democrats to Republicans. dies dog owners. Democrats are twice as likely to spay or neuter their dogs. All right. I relation control that makes sense population control. Yeah and also they probably live in cities much more and they probably are like, oh I, don't if a burglar comes in I don't want him to rip the face off of somebody. I. Do I do so I keep all that testosterone right there in the body that dog They the company has GPS technology to tap into its database of one point six million dogs compared to voting data from the twenty sixteen election never remember all your all your information is completely private. Oh, literally Brian. So here among the findings dog names. four Democrats among the top five most popular for Democrats, Diamond Prince Princess King, and Bodey. Bodey Boat Yeah. I don't know I don't know anybody. That has diamond Princess King or boating I did have prints as a dog when I was a kid. Then with Republicans listen to the difference Brutus. Ruger. Sassy. Buckeye and baby and you know baby is not a little doll babies like the dog. That's like, yeah. Yeah. That's absolutely true. Babies the biggest dog on the block out of all of them babies the one that's GonNa kill you easiest. Republicans. Thing bigger is better. Thirteen percent more likely than Democrats have dogs weighing more than twenty five pounds twenty five pounds. It's not a dog. PADS DOG AMATEUR WEIGH FIVE POUNDS And it's a few went maybe or a rat Republicans are twenty percent more likely than Democrats have mixed breed because. Most Republicans we you know you just go out to a sheltering, get it for all the shelter talk that all the left does no, they want their purebred, they want their own the special breed. doodle Nudie pick whatever dog bit us on the way home. That's dogs. Yemenite still attached to your leg when you walk in the front door now tell me this doesn't make sense. One of the dog's name three dogs that you just don't like you would not want to own and I don't mean because of danger I just like Alan Reed Sucks. I pit bull. Pit Bull that-that's because of danger. what's the dog that you have that with the smash? Domes? Hug. I don't WANNA don't. WanNa. Pug. I don't WanNa put the rat breed. Yeah. I've got the glorified Red Okay Get a problem and. I wouldn't want a Chihuahua would wanNA choice our. Skins obviously you? Don't WanNa pug take a bulldog, but I wouldn't wanNA. Pug. Hugs are awesome. Yeah. bulldogs are pretty great. Great dogs except you feel bad for him because they're always walking around going. Oh. Yeah. That's the best, right yeah it's like. It's It's like you you on a leash that's all that. And the other one. You said it poodle yeah. No. Yeah. Democrats are six times more likely to have poodles though I believe that are poodle makes us absolutely absolute- Labrador thing is a big thing. Now that's part Labrador part poodle if I'm. Words correct and they look great when they're puppies and then he the. Horses. curly-haired. To get to adulthood you're like, okay you can go play with the neighbors. I mean, there should be a puppy exchange. They really should be Christmas puppy exchange where once the dog. First of all they have to be. potty trained but then they're given to you like in a little gift box and then every six months or so all of a sudden the dog is young again and you're like, oh, no clue small again, and it's just a service that comes in and switches the dog and you get a new puppy what happens to the old don't don't ask questions don't ask questions but. They wind up in in Southeast Asia. No No. No they go onto live. Great Live. On understanding and we just don't want to talk about kingdom because we don't want. We don't want people to record write and they will they will. So they're everything. Yeah. And final thoughts here on the on the convention tonight. Lineup, tonight tonight is What's comedy? Mom? Kamla yeah, it's commonly time. That's somebody else's. Speaking tonight as well. Of course, there are all agonizing. You know it's interesting because the Democrats today are so bad that sometimes you find yourself a little nostalgic for the Bill Clinton days. Then you see him speak and it's like, okay, that's right. That's why he was terrible right all.

WanNa Glenn Beck Nasr Pat Grace Ruger NASA Bill Clinton Alan Reed Dallas Alexey Southeast Asia Princess King Oregon testosterone Bodey Buckeye Brian
"galaxy alexey" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"galaxy alexey" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"A specially modified I Boeing seven four seven airliner astronomers combined data from Safina's faint objects infrared camera with previous images taken by NASA Spitzer space telescope scope and the European Space Agency's Herschel Space Observatory. The result is a stunningly crisp infrared panorama of the center of the Milky Way Galaxy the spanning more than six hundred light years then you image has revealed high resolution details within the dense woes of gas and dust that make up the galactic centre orbiting the door to future research into how massive stars forming. And what's fading secretaries a star the supermassive black hole at the very heart of the Milky Way Galaxy. Alexey some twenty seven thousand light years away. One of the study's authors James Risky from messes Ames research center in Silicon Valley. California says the new image showing Galactic Centre in detail missing before he says studying. This region has always been like trying to assemble jigsaw puzzle with some of the Cape Pieces Missing and and the Safiya data is filling in some of those holes pudding side significantly closer to having a complete picture. The Milky Way central regions have significantly more the dense molecular gas and dust that are the building blocks of new styles than other parts of the Galaxy yet there at ten times few massive stars born there than expected and and understanding why this discrepancy exists as being difficult because of all the gas and dust between the earth and the galactic core getting in the way that by observing in the infrared. Red Astronomers riveted pay through this gas and dust eliminating stretches indicative of starbucks near the quintuplet cluster a region with stars a million times brighter than the sun among the features coming the focus other jacking coast of the arches cost which contains the densest concentration of stars in the galaxy and newly discovered avid. Woma to near this class could be the seeds for new stars. Seeing these features and high resolution may help scientist explain how some of the most massive stars in our galaxy Lexi managed to form so close to each other in a relatively small region and despite the lowest birth rate in the surrounding space. And you images Rosette showing material that could be feeding accretion disk around the Galaxy supermassive black hole. The ring about ten light is in the amateur plays a key role in bringing it closer to the black hole all right may eventually be devoured. The origins of this ring has long puzzled scientists because it should have been depleted at the time but the Nisha data revealed several strategies striker's which could represent you bet you'll falling under the disk keeping the months the Fed. You're listening to space time.

Galactic Centre European Space Agency Herschel Space Observatory Alexey Boeing Safina starbucks California Nisha Ames research center Silicon Valley scientist James Lexi
"galaxy alexey" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

11:41 min | 1 year ago

"galaxy alexey" Discussed on Science Friday

"Yes it's all over to even increase our fun with galaxies. We're having this hour wanNA bring on another guest who studies some of the earliest galaxies that were formed just six hundred million years. Six hundred eighty million years after the Big Bang Sangita Mojo Tra is a research astrophysicist at Goddard space flight center in Greenbelt. I think that's the oldest NASA site. Walk up the Science Friday thank you. It's great to be here now. You were able to observe one of the oldest galaxies that formed right after the Big Bang. Tell us what did that galaxy look like. What features did it have such a young galaxy? It's not just one galaxy. It's three free ater so it's a group of galaxies and what's amazing unique about this This group that it's a disruptive group of galaxies. It's it's what we see is actively disrupting the gas around those group of galaxies and these are the sort of signatures we were looking for. Because because we're looking for this. This cosmic change called realization. Where most of the gas? That's in between galaxies gets disrupted opted by Like particles coming from within the galaxies. And what what does it look is. It looked like a galaxy lexi or these groups of galaxy to they look like something we would recognize in older galaxies like our own Milky Way. They're tiny and they're so far away that Ed tiny I wish I could tell you. There was a huge wave. No but we see three small dots and then We confirm those dots and and then because we see this special light called Lyman Alpha which is a hydrogen light and then we are able to seat from all of that. It's like seeing specs and inferring any everything we inferred that the gas around these galaxies has been ionized and this is the signature. We've been looking for for one. You know I want to bring all of my guests in the. Let me let me bring back elicit and Catherine y'All seem very very excited. About studying galaxies astrophysicists Sangita. You share that excitement that yes why. Why is so exciting? You Know I. I spoke to Vera Rubin many years ago when she was still here and she talked about her excitement in studying studying galaxies. Do you share that kind of excitement. Sangita oh absolutely yes I I. I gave a talk but Reuben's institute once about this these. He's very sort of searches. We are doing and she was like afterwards. She told me Sankey that. You're going to be studying these galaxies all of your life and I was like okay no problem. We'll let me let me bring in one of my favorite topics. Which is I won't talk about dark energy? I'm going to talk about bad dark matter. Because it was Vera Rubin who sort of right got all the data that sort of dark matter in all these galaxies the stuff jeff. You're discovering does it give us anymore hint even the the wave does that. Tell us anything more about dark matter. It could someday so there's yet at another student at Harvard. is named Gus being who while he was an undergraduate did some work Simulating the collision of the Sagittarius Dwarf. Tiny little galaxy colliding with the Milky Way and it makes sense. Big Waves The wavelength of what. He published his a little bit too long. So it's it's the wrong magnitude but it's kind of the right sort of phenomenon and so I I am not saying that it definitely is something having to do with dark matter but if we have the amount of dark matter during the halo or the disk of the galaxy wrong or the distribution bution of it the cow clumpy is that could ultimately have something to do with the explanation so there are hints that this probably has something to do with a collision. There are not not that we definitely need dark matter to make everything work out. mathematically but it's not nuts to think that that might have something to do with it but it's a big might I'm Gonna I'm GonNa get very geeky now and go to the phones because a lot of astrophysics geeks or see if we can understand all my audience. I can understand what they're asking Star with Line welcome to Robert in Nevada city. Let's go to yes. Yeah Hello I have a question about the harmonic series and that we experience in our everyday life especially if we're musicians yes but Does that apply to this. Wave and also do they have an idea of where the origin of the harmonic series. Good Question Crowe actually made some really good question Gus The student who I mentioned who did that. Simulation of the collision. He's mentioned already that a higher order Monica. And for those of you don't know what that means if you if you pluck a string There's one sort of major sine wave that's given by that pluck but then there's a lot of smaller vibrations. That are these so called higher order or monarchs that would also happen and so. It's possible that there's a phenomenon that happens on many scales at once. That has these harmonic in that. We're just seem one that happens to manifest in the dust in the in the gas to could be something else going on different timescales or in the stars and we're looking for all of that so the next release released from guy at Catherine maybe can talk a little bit more about that will come later this year and we'll have even more information about the velocities of stars so this this wave is seen in the gas in the dust but we don't know exactly not for all of the stars anyway. They're doing and so it's a really good question. And yes. The reason. We're so interested in collision is because that might be like plucking looking up a string like thing that was the and I don't mean superstring I don't mean that kind of strain life and now he g. string you know something that was sort of was this region of the galaxy scene had kind of an clucking. It away on the ask you. This question from our caller or caller was talking about harmonica which in music or different frequencies right. If you have found this big wave does that mean there are monarchs of it. Other smaller waves are different frequency waves. Somewhere else or maybe we haven't found them. Yeah very possibly one of the other papers in the in the meeting of meeting this week was actually talking about a much larger scale waves In the stars from guy. And so what. I'm saying that this could be could be a harmonic of something. Even barger or smaller than other. There could be a whole set of waves at different frequencies and this is just one of them. But we don't know and so we think this happened because of a collision that what you're saying the majority opinion. Catherine what would you say. Yeah I I would say. That's my favorite scenario. But it's not the only scenario so that's we need to bring all these therapist together from all over the world to figure out exactly how you form the structure and then we can start taints those questions. I have another question if I want to go to Justin in San Antonio Hi Justin. Hey how's it going. Hey there welcome I was actually just ah ask about that. Hey whether that was a structure that maybe we ran into and then charge along with us with our gravity from the the galaxy or if it was something maybe leftover you're no-man's-land material that hasn't formed into stars yet. Yes so that's a great question and so what we do know about. This structure is that it's three million solar masses three million times. The mass of our Sun and gas and about one percent of that mass is in young star so tens of thousands of young stars across the structure and so this material is a lot younger then the type of material that formed our son which is a lot older my replacer this is science. It's Friday from WNYC Studios Sangita when you study these very young stars. Do you expect to find a wave going through. Am Yet I. Visually could see that wave but more B. C. actually is one small Galaxy Alexey and These galaxies are typically one hundred the size of the Milky Way they haven't fully fledged yet and the stars at extremely young. We are looking at a few million years young stars and a whole lot of star formation star burst. He even going on in this very small small size van stars in the Universe Star that with a lot of hydrogen right. It's still the most abundant element in the universe. How how have you figured out in these young galaxies how that hydrogen sort of turned into galaxies? Well that's a very good question and that's why we serving them. I mean any any doubt. It's important to point out to your listeners that there are many many generations of stars in the universe and so the process of star formation ongoing all the time and so some stars do live for billions of years but a lot of young stars. Like the ones you really liked. The Ryan only lived for millions five years since there's been many generations of those so early galaxies have maybe the first stars but our galaxy has hundreds thousands of generations of stars while we're talking talking about Iran. I want you to weigh in on beetlejuice where do you stand in. It's going to become a Supernova or not passing that okay saying you're you're you've got the spotlight on you who you gonNA passenger. Oh I I wish it would explode. I'd love to see that in my lifetime would be. It would be as bright as the moon is that right there would be hanging thank be something during the daylight time that would be bright in the sky or only in the evening. Yes yes yes I want to see that to the little uncertainties you know but the little uncertainties when you multiply a small percentage by a really big number that turns out to be a large number of years that I'm not sure about something so unless it's some process that has to do with a gravity at extremely high masses like the black hole at the Galactic Center where the timescales those involved years. It's really hard. When the bills could be used could be tens of years hundreds of years? We're not really sure so. That's why I'm not in request such a party pooper but this this is great. I mean these as as as Some mention their stellar birth and death and all of this happens in galaxies and and the dark matter that you mentioned maintains the sort of stable place where all of this stuff the heavy elements that come out of stellar cadets. This the stick around because dot matter makes this stable place for galaxies and these guests to stick around and then they get into the next generation of does so. It's it's a lot of recycling. It's a lot of exciting stuff happening real. We have to put a little pause on her excitement. Because we've run out of time but we're talking about my one of my favorite subjects. I don't WanNa thank you. Offer delighting today. Sangita Mellow TR- As a research physicist at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt Alissa Goodman professor of astronomy at Harvard Catherine Zuckerberg astronomy. PhD Student also at Harvard. Thank you all for talking about Astrophysics Levitt. Thank you for having us. You're welcome. They have a good weekend. If you missed any part of our program you can you know hear it again. Subscribe to our podcast. You can ask your smart.

Catherine Zuckerberg Vera Rubin Goddard Space Flight Center Harvard. NASA Greenbelt Lyman Alpha Ed Sankey Reuben Astrophysics Levitt Crowe PhD Student Monica Gus barger Robert WNYC Studios Justin
"galaxy alexey" Discussed on PodcastDetroit.com

PodcastDetroit.com

07:06 min | 1 year ago

"galaxy alexey" Discussed on PodcastDetroit.com

"Take from me. So why would I ever WANNA spend all this money on something that you can take away. Where if I go skydiving and actually spend that money on an experience and I'm GonNa remember forever you? You can't take that away so okay. So bring this into the way. Technology and society is going to evolve. And I've seen this is. They don't want want possessions. If I understand you correctly. They're not buying cars for example. Do you think this because of this mentality. The idea of the whole connected car the fact that Iot smart cities. He's where there's going to be. Automated travel mechanisms in place. Do you think this is gonNA force or Russian faster. The fact that they're not occur dependent the fact that they don't mind public transportation or they'd Rather Uber or lift or Alto then Alto then actually drive themselves anywhere. I mean my nephew. We debate him. We had to drag his. You know what to the DMV to get a driver's license and he's not an outlier anymore. Most kidding don't don't have most is relative term. There is a significant number of kids at sixteen. That just don't have a right of passage now it doesn't happen. I mean I. I Know Young Young adults at twenty one. That are finally getting their driver's license. Because mainly for for drinking agent getting a hotel when you travel and renting a car because now you have to have one been prior to twenty one. They didn't really see for one depending on their environment. Do you think can accelerate technology though because because of their lack of desire for permanent stuff. Do you think it's going to shift a new direction and innovation what we as boomer Jen's e or genetics of what we think of is in in a native product. Do you think the millennials are going to pivot. And why are you. Are you got uber and AIRBNB. That already showing you. I mean these are companies. That are well ahead of their time but you see the value today and originally when they came out like a lot of them are they were just crazy. Nobody saw except for these are both companies started the by millennial generation's because they they saw the new world order. I just need a place to crash for tonight. How do I find that? When I'm traveling traveling I need a hostile? We don't do hostels in the United States. How do I just find? Somebody's cow. Yeah that was the premise. How do I get a cab? That's decentralized because I'm in a town that's so small they don't really have a big cab company that's here and I just ride share And now you evolve that going forward to things where when when when I've done quite a bit in multifamily and leasing and short term rentals where you think about cell phones and you've got the big carriers there's a locking these two year contracts and we all think they're crazy wrong different and then you've got the MVP knows that are up and coming. They do month to month. Pay As you go and you look at at both both sides of the argument of why would I be locked into a contract pros and cons but at the same time. Hey I just want to pay for a month. Why can't I find somebody now? You transcend that the housing housing. I'm coming as a summer intern but yet the only housing I can get is a one year lease. Why and you're seeing this change right now? Why can't I rent month to month? You GotTa Security Deposit Trash that you're making me pay for it. So why do you care if I rent it month to month and back to the boomer perspective where I want you to stick here for a certain amount of time but that's really not my job. That's some sort of old school tribalism whereas reality the need. I'm trying to serve as I need a place to stay for four months. I'm a good person. Why wouldn't you rent from informants and if you do rent for rent went to me for four months? Why does that have to look like a blemish on my record right it's win win when you take a step back and say look? Is this a happy relationship. Because we he can still be friends and we're still gaining each other and so employers lifestyle everything is just essentially. We are transient society. We're all moving that way. And innovation and businesses are adapting. You're either going to adapt. My first employer was Kodak so I can tell you firsthand going adaption. Yeah Hey. They're coming back. Aren't they. From bankruptcy they're holding company. And there's a whole I talk about. You know what what happens when you're bored. Holds you hostage because you know the shareholders own your company and they just want returns even though as an employee of Kodak we were telling them the whole time we knew we had a ten year transition transition plan to get off. Analog analog was just so profitable and the board wouldn't let us eighty percent prophet returns on analogue versus thirty five off digital digital. Yeah the Hubble's Allah scope went up with a Kodak CCD array bringing those images back to Earth. Most people don't realize that. Oh no I didn't. Yeah I mean that we had it and that's why there's was to technologies and digital cameras. CCD and anytime. You don't see many CDs anymore because you have to pay royalties to Kodak to use that. So they've all gone seem us which is a moral standard. There's less royalties involved. But yeah the first cameras were. CCD and what does he see CD's down for too long. They were the competing technologies like Beta vs versus. VHS Date yourself are there to help the audience understand what you're talking about there. I'm kidding no I mean we talk about the tapes or coming back back baby. Oh Man alive really yes. There is a shortage right now because there's such demand I mean. Granted there's not who's demanding who demand from guardians of the galaxy. Alexey it's created nostalgia and they're the Walkman oh no air the Walkman they came out with it again. Yeah Yeah and when you think about it from producer So fun things about economics and technology allergies so when I had vinyl and when I had tape I had built in obsolescence obsolescence. Right so both media would degrade over time so you were forced to buy new once the CD came out and it was digital title. You don't ever have to buy new again it's a one and done type deal and so these nostalgia where you see. LP coming back and you see tape coming back and as crazy as it is. That's easy money Johnny. Because you're going to buy it and within a few years that copy is going to agent other than the baseball card effect. If you want another copy you're going to combine other copies even if it's Yeah Boutique. It's good business to be. Yeah I was getting into that where I would buy it on itunes and then realize I had the CD's I'm like. Oh that's okay. Yes I gotta get rid of the CD's though. Because I have no where to play him anymore but anyway. That's a week guys. We we keep going Andrew. It's this is such a fun conversation and it's kind of sobering but it's also exciting as well because there is not much change so Aaron. Do you have any other questions right now. I don't Tom Andrew I I just WanNa say thank you so much. I know we're going to keep talking and we could be here all be pessimistic so to your point is sometimes you gotTa Stop Yourself there and say there's nothing wrong it's just change your change averse but there is so much opportunity You know with change comes to especially from an entrepreneur. Entrepreneurs was in perspective is that the big companies are a little bit slower to embrace that. And that's why you're seeing back to what happened to the experts. The experts all became small business owners and entrepreneurs so we that'd be doing so. Yeah I we need to know how to hire these Dang millennials..

Kodak Iot Tom Andrew AIRBNB United States Jen MVP intern Aaron Alexey producer
"galaxy alexey" Discussed on Space Nuts

Space Nuts

14:19 min | 1 year ago

"galaxy alexey" Discussed on Space Nuts

"There are protections which are more or less effective depending on you the local circumstances just like to go back a little bit to talk about spectroscopy again and specifically ask you about your role well in developing multi object spectroscopy. I had never. I know what that is. Please explain an executive order it. Does this marvelous marvelous technique invented by William Huggins effectively the idea of using a spectroscopy for a spectrum graph which records the spectrum originally it was photographic now hold on electrically to workout. What's going on in the heavens? That became very much stock in trade astronomers during the first seventy years of the twentieth century. Words up until the nineteen eighties. It still is but the a big change happened in the early nineteen eighties. Because in the early days you had to meet your observations one star at the time. It was the only way a telescope under spectograph combination could work then in the late one thousand nine hundred seventy s a man with us absolutely delightful name Roger Angell who looked to the heavens German Brit. He works at the University of Arizona Eh. He's retired now. Still one of American astronomer astronomy very favorite strenuous Roger. Angell thought well outside outside the box in terms of how you could use technology to to you know improve astronomy and he got mixed up with fiber optics now fiber optics were until nineteen seventy. Were essentially an entertaining diversion. What what they are is stones of glass very fine strands of what we now use for fines and yes? That's right exactly. It's actually not quite a few silica which is classy. Material material drawn into these fines strands seldom more than a tenth of a millimeter diameter with the hair. It's it's yes that's about twice the width of very very fine. And they have the property that like put light in at one end and it will come out of the the other now they were known back in the nineteen fifties lava lamp lava lamp different ones. And the Yes. That's right all right. Yeah go sorry for my aside. There they were known back in the nineteen fifties these fiber optics but it was only in nineteen seventy that the corning glass works in the United States manage to draw fibers. Because that's how you make them start off with a block of glass and then you melt it and pull it out into these strengths. And they manage to draw fibers with extremely low losses by that. It means that if you put light in at one end most of it comes out the other disruption eruption. Well it's it's attenuation is. The technical is a reduction in the amount of light absorbed by the fiber before that you put light in at one into not tiny dribble came out of the but from nine hundred seventy with these what were called low loss optical fibers that's when they became a potential chill for the communications industry and so Calling it it allows sound and light to pass through it does allow any other it allows. There's light to pass through it. You Can put light in at one end and it will come out the other if you want to transmit sound through it. You've got to turn that sound signal into light clever modulating citing a light source you imprint. A sound wave on through and and that transmit through the fiber comes out the other end. You need decode and you get the sound route. So that's how communications work but astronomers and Roger Angell in particular. He thought well. These things are brilliant because astronomers are always jealously regarding the amount of light that they receive because it is so faint usually we're talking about single photons. Individual particles light so can can we use these newfangled optical fibers and in fact he's first idea was to have many many telescopes smallish telescopes all coupled together with optical fibers. So Oh you gather the light from all these telescopes and bring it back to a single place and you cannot do all the light together on one single object or one single object. That's right but then he turned the idea on its head and realized that with one big telescope which is looking at an area of sky instead of just taking one star or Galaxy Alexey from within that field of view you can actually use these optical fibers to line per fiber on many many objects simultaneously. So let me get this right. We have a field of sky. We have maybe a planet or is that too close. We don't bother with planets looking at enough galaxies and fire off stars and we could have fifteen or twenty items in sky and we could be looking at all of them and getting this barcode information from the stars Civil Tony's because you you can put a fiber on each one and in fact the first one I built actually had thirty nine optical fibers which by the standards of the day were quite quite large means thirty thirty nine objects simultaneously. So what what Roger Angell duty you got a PhD student. By the name of John Hill to work on this build something called Medusa which Medusa head thank you and that had think twenty-five fibers and they tried it out on a telescope in Arizona at the Steward Observatory and it worked. It was a technique that worked really well L. But then astronomers Australia got hold of the idea and in particular an engineer at the Angle Shirley Telescope by the name of Peter Gray. He worked out that you could engineer this thing. In a far more effective way the Medusa I worked with Peter. He was working with the anglo-australian telescope. I worked with a small telescope telescope called the United Kingdom Schmidt telescope which has a very wide field of view and together we produced a kind of workable optical tickle fiber systems for these two telescopes which kind of took the lead in the world on this science. Could you tell us the names of these. Well Peter Peterbilt you built the. What was it called fiber optic coupler psychot- remember the name but it turned into fo cap that was the acronym I built? Something called the fiber linked array imagery for matter which was flare then flare worse built in the early nineteen eighties. It was the first multi-fibre telescope spectroscopy system that coupled telescope to a spectrum graph which was actually stationary in the dome. Now that sounds weird an esoteric but what it meant was the spectrum of which is a very delicate piece of equipment was not riding around on the back of the telescope. It was fixed on the floor and was incredibly stable. And that's so we were the first to do that. So flair was the pioneer. Then I built a second version. Because flair had certain inadequacies the second one was the panoramic area coverage with higher efficiency. which was panache panache? A Well what clearly came next finesse. Until one of my colleagues said Venus stands for fails to interest nearly everyone saves spectrograph engineers engineers well. She called it flat to then evolved to a robotic system with more boring name of sixty F- with one one hundred fifty fibers that was commissioned in two thousand one and now a building an amazing machine called Taipan which uses things called starbucks so each optical fiber sixty had robot a single robot move the fibers around but with Taipan h fiber dopey. Three hundred in the end has its own micro robot round meanwhile anglo-australian telescope back in one thousand nine hundred ninety six built something called to death to the F. stands for two degree field. That's the amount of sky the thing sees in two F. Four hundred fibers but after tell you the aero which now stands for Australian astronomical optics used to be the Australian Astronomical Observatory. Hey always building. A system with more than four hundred fibers for telescope in Europe a European European telescope straight cuts way up doesn't it. It really does punch above its weight with regards to -nology develops right. That's why Australian astronomers Jonas have had such an given where small country because we have this equipment that we build it probably more effectively than anywhere else Somebody said we should call ourselves. Fibers are us. Because that's what we do. We do optical fibers the tech. The technique technique is in use around the world but many of the ones that are used elsewhere ones that have been built started struggling anticipate so just keeping bring on technology. Same here I heard Margaret Atwood before papal. She's the person that wrote. The Maidens Tail Modem Handmaiden handmaidens and. She comment was that old. Technologies have got good use a bad use and stupid. I use that we never considered and just thinking about lights and particularly with astronomy. What would you think the good the bad and the stupid well look for optical astronomy that's visible light astronomy not now talking about radio astronomers rexroad strong because these these are all different disciplines? Although we're all looking at the same things in a different way and often those results all piece together optical astronomers and and they're talking trades light so they are obsessed with light a more especially obsessed with with actually getting the very the best information from lies so the good is what we learn from from the from from the sky by Sifting light through the spectrum and other types of interest yep yep the baddies light pollution. So that's when light. which is it's been used for completely innocent purpose but gets out of hand in particularly in the light plumes of cities and and really goes back to the early twentieth century when councils putting lights with really no regard to what that was doing tonight sky because we simply simply never thought about it was becoming a problem by the time of the Second World War? It's really interesting. Is that in Los Angeles which is very next very very near the Mount Wilson Observatory in fact exceed Los Angeles from Mount Wilson. Where at the time? The biggest telescope in the world was during the second world. War centuries had had blackouts in order to to mitigate the possibility of invasion and during that time huge astronomical discoveries as were made because the the night sky koby seeing properly from moments again So it was inadvertent. So that's the bad side just on that I. I've attended some conferences in the U. K.. And one of the issues that they have when they talk about. Trying to mitigate light pollution the K.. Is that if you start talking to pay pooped in that sort of generation of about turning of streetlights and they feel like it's taking them back to that so I just like the blackout out to do that in blackout. Yes or no. I remember people saying that's true but it's not a blackout. I mean what we're talking about now is good lighting eh because this been huge progress in the last twenty years with understanding the ills of light pollution and not just for astronomers where the where the least least important in many ways of of the consequences of Bob Lighting. I again when I talk to groups about pollution. I often or haven't often and but I have been asked by people worldwide. Do we have to keep the lights down for the astronomers. When you've got a whole heaven stars you know? Why can't they study the start of the left or the brightest star or whatever and I think in some ways we lost that argument where we talked thirty years ago when when the International Dark Sky Association started and it was astronomers saying are we losing our night sky that that story was lost on the general public? I didn't understand the information that you're getting about heaven. That's probably true thing I'm most people think an astronomer is middle age bald man with a white coat. Who's got a long spindly telescope? And just spend his nights looking through uh-huh nothing could be further from the truth. It's all about you know. Well directed a scientific problems. We're trying to understand the universe because that understanding my actually actually turn out to be really useful to us one day and it's it's conducted in a very very progressive ways. Not just looking mistake. The sake of looking were studying and of course. The great thing is that it's no longer and more pulled middle aged man we we are. How far more diverse? So that's the good in a bed. Yeah stupid stupid. Use of technology that maybes. He's come through astronomy through light and and I know of things you talked about. Doppler effect isn't so I actually almost Lump the fiber optics work that I was talking about into their it certainly quirky. Because in you know I in one thousand nine hundred seventy. Nobody had thaw in this direction. It was Roger Angell towards the end of the nineteen seventies. We're thinking outside the box or this to what you could use these technologies for and I do remember number when I started working on this in one thousand..

Roger Angell United Kingdom Schmidt telesco Angle Shirley Telescope University of Arizona Eh William Huggins International Dark Sky Associa executive United States starbucks engineer Europe Margaret Atwood Steward Observatory Australian Astronomical Observ Los Angeles Galaxy Alexey Peter Peterbilt Australia Peter
"galaxy alexey" Discussed on Lights Camera Barstool

Lights Camera Barstool

14:14 min | 1 year ago

"galaxy alexey" Discussed on Lights Camera Barstool

"Here's the best gift but again a celebration of people like teasing them. You like first movie. You worked with Tim Allen Sigourney Weaver Alan Rickman and Sam Rockwell among others. Antimony thought was they both roles. I really want to know if you watch a really carefully. You'll see the uniform got a little younger. Yeah I got really lucky I mean I see the irony is like now I didn't know who Sam Rockwell was the time I had heard his name and all the but he's the guy on set that I got because we were closest in age and he really took me under his wing and I started hanging out. You know we started hanging out. Socially we became really good friends. But I at the time was excited to be around sigourney weaver and Rickman and these guys but but most of my stuff was with Acasuso. It was to Melania and and the kids in the movie but Salmon I became. Yeah that's to me. That was the big that was the best gift from that movie was getting close pretty away to start. That should be your. You should do a a speaking engagement. And you're like yeah recipe sound rick if you can be in a movie with everyone of the other people for your first time. That's what you should do advice. Lofty goal yeah. Rickman was fucking great to have classy. Funny just funny like he was so dry that and he would never ever you know people will say something kind of snarky and dry and and then they almost immediately followed up with like he was so funny and confident Senate that he wouldn't would never follow it up but you knew he was kidding he would say these Kinda like and you get a taste of that in. The documentary was nice to see his. There's some behind the scenes footage of him like teasing the director and stuff and and he had just the tiniest glint glimmer in his I. This is like lint like kind of like Don rickles would have like Don Don rickles would say the most like acerbic like aggressive insult. And but you knew that was coming from a place of warmth and love and Rickman habit. He was just ars from earlier. This Week I get a little K- we'll get a little bit. Don rickles I he. I was fortunate enough to be insulted by him once Oh it was just about with Sam with Rockwell and he goes and it was mean it was mean but like great and affectionate. That's how we would show affect. I can't repeat it I actually. I didn't realize that that Damon Lindelof documentaries. Well 'cause he pretty star Trek. Yes Oh and he he in fact is one of the ones that says. Yeah this is this is a star which we were currently we. Just we're in this exact studio L.. Really couple doing our watchman recap he's doing watch. HP It's great. It's so I no Laurie. I knew that Friday's watchmen. I just I had. It was the most shocked ever been last last night's episode episode episode most Chug. I've ever been watching. TV show. He's a fucking genius. Oh Wow I can't wait the director of this Dan Scheckter we had been watching manned. Lauren like nearly texting each other about episode. And we're but he said he's kind of giving up on Laurien and in favor of watchmen. He's like I can't stop watching it. It's I like I'm not speeches. 'cause watch-watches not like I talked myself out I can't even say anymore Our first interview funny enough was Rawson. Thurber we Rawson Marshall. You'd show Yeah Yeah. Great Interesting Taylor always laughs because we my when he first said his name for I thought he thought he had said his name is Roulston so for for. I like month on dodgeball. I was calling Ross and directed I was I was calling him Roulston. But it's so close to Ross accent or something like what's up with the weird catch it. Interesting Taylor cuts she goes. She's what are you calling him. I said when you're like beginning. Somebody's name panics. But I constantly roster his his name Ralston Roulston Rawson. I thought she was. 'cause she's really plenty. I thought you ain't joking with you. And he was like no. It's Ross and I said well why don't you correct him. He's I haven't noticed that. See that's where you're going into defense mode Connecticut. Accent wouldn't get it so we add els in every deal actually our on boarding skit. We did like a skit with me. I got signed on to Barcelona or opening. Skit was the dodgeball scene with the money. And it was just US accepting money to go. Go from Indiana. PODCAST has gone really. Yeah I say we have our old office ever now but I remember it being a really small yes yes it wasn't. We interviewed Roth. Urban Really Shitty Room decline custodians clauses basically yes But that movie that say coming on Samba in the same sense with galaxy for just a ton of people but in a much different Gal Costa comedy but obviously very different movies. What they chose to our? Yeah but still ones that people I mean dodgeball is people will reference and still relevant poultry different ages too. I get a lot of Got Another really fun but at the time knew how lucky. I had new how lucky I was to be cast in that movie and has an indirect connection to galaxy quest. Which of course led to a TV series? Ed and there was an episode of that. I did that. Ralston Saul watched and really and that's why he fought out from for that part they wanted to old for that part. Just in Redmond was the thankfully you have. Those boys looks right. Yeah and the big hero jammed era. We need a bushy-eyebrowed young media. I WanNa see that guy phase that sounds like the plot of a very bizarre net flicks movie where you walk around here life. People think you're just a Boston being tim. Our Guy walked by families and Apple. Just Bark at me twenty. We are actually doing a review of the Santa Claus for our next Edward you like nostalgia. Views are Christmas one. You've never ever seen it. I can't wait to be. I still enjoy my dad hates. It's only factor that in their movies like that people get incredulous by the the fact that you haven't seen absolutely. Oh yeah pretty woman. I've never seen one like the clamp seen. That's the one thing I know that Santa Santa Claus I would like I feel like it's usually godfather in star wars like those. Are the ones where you people will get angry. What's your father? Yeah the wire there was like that for a while and I meant to see you know. It's one of those breaking bad for awhile. I finally saw you. Haven't all thrones was like that for thrones. Yes it's finished I up haven't seen that's kind of cool with that. I love that I would say. Jump over. Game of thrones get to get the watch ask S. go. HBO Pantheon Goes Probably Their Succession. Is Right around there too. Bad here really star Wars Fan. 'CAUSE we're huge doors people the pride themselves if they haven't seen SARS and Bragman Star Wars as okay that's cool that's like saying I got no money I'm like okay. Great your loss sure. This is something we read and I just want to confirm it. Did you actually turned down the role of Stephen Blue's clues. No this isn't a live well. L. It's close to the truth. I it's I didn't get it I didn't get it. Yeah well this is how I got an agent I was I. I was in school at the time needed to make extra money. Financial situation wasn't great so I started going on these open calls and I went in for one doc neglect for blue's clues and when in for a series of them They call them cattle calls. You know 'cause they kinda like break and after four four five of those auditions where they get progressively nicer and more respectful. I was offered a holding deal to. I guess I was going to replace Steve Steve in the current house and so they gave me the holding the which was basically three months. I couldn't do. I couldn't do anything I can and audition for anything I was like. Yeah it's great. I cannot auditions for anything anyway. I don't have an agent and we're GONNA pay me fifteen thousand dollars those three months. which at the time was I was delivering pizzas? I know it sounds kind of Nice to do nothing and I. I was having a tough time with the bill so it was like the best gift from God and they said you just need an agent helped negotiate the contract. And that's how I got. What agent once you once they hear? Oh there's money involved like okay risk will sign you now and so I got an agent from that and once ID agent. I was so eager to yeah. I knew how lucky and rare that was. I was so eager to go out on auditions that I turned down the deal and my agent at the time was one of the nicest. The people I've to this day Chris Barbara. She left to become a kindergarten teacher. She loves is that something nice she wasn't she was okay with me turning them the deal classically. You WanNa be a very nice nice person. If you're an agent you want to be a shark that helps a lot look for kindergarten adjacent kindergarten teachers kindergarten. One of your most most recognizable things came. I feel like not long after that. And that was a commercial series that you did. Yeah which actually be nickname is the Mac guy you mean so's Galaxy Alexey quest. You play you play Nerdier character and then you play honestly probably one of the mean people commercial history that even though even though he he comes off very nice I mean. You're you're a Dick. That was that was a constant challenge. was like the the the point of the commercials is to be brags. I'm better than you like. How do you say that without sounding apple? Free Air player. But I feel like you you. You have to be mildly irresponsible because I think even back then like I think growing up and even in elementary middle school. I'm twenty eight I feel like macworld MAC and fucking weird they get this big colorful weird laptop directly responsible for local. We're working on right now where you been working on a PC. It's funny. I saw him last night. John Hodgman is still still one of my closest friends is so funny rate twitter. Larry so that you don't fall. Yes any an instagram. To is really funny on social just a smart great if I could be and we were together a lot during those we shot him for four years and we were. There's a lot of downtime. We working out that the executives were working out the spots and we we just had each other and I was always jealous of him because he got to do like you said I was playing. The Dick and apple was aware of that I think so they to appoint they knew that they knew the underlying they knew the point of the commercials. was that like. I'm present I'm better idea. And so they he had all the fun stuff he got to look like the buffoon. And the but as an actor as a hammy comedic actor. That's the stuff that I wanted to be doing. But but I they limited limited what I what I did because they wanted to. They wanted to give him all the heavy lifting every time. I watched that when I was a kid I was quite. Why is Tim Allen? Hate so much coach Dick to Joe. I don't think he got the point but Tim Allen his asshole asshole Tim Allen Loves Fan. I'm just saying if if if Tim Cook's down you should be like. Excuse me folks. I believe I have the right to run this company. It was Steve achieved. It was it was really flattering that they wanted me to do because it was Steve Jobs. Who Thought I was like? You said I've been playing. I haven't been playing cool. You know certainly haven't done that guy. I've been playing a lot like nerdy awkward characters. But I guess but I think Steve Jobs saw something some movie where he felt I was I could I do it could be. I could be cool or his version of cool. Whatever that again looking back I always just Amina? You beat the shit out of them. Yeah Yeah Stupid I suit suit Dick Age. Yeah I know the irony was I love John and I was. I was jealous that he got to be doing stuff he was doing so it was a lot of that. was just throwing away as much as possible. You know not not amplifying how much better I thought I was in here so like I remember. They wanted me to read when we did the first first day on that. And we're supposed to be just a one off we're GONNA do a couple commercials and that was it. And they kept. I kept Phil Morrison who directed. It was a great record to the movie. June in Bug Phil kept getting the note from the executives that they when I say they said when he says I'm a Mac we wanted to be proud and yeah hello. I'm a MAC really like sell it like really like introduce yourself with with confidence and and it just felt I was so afraid eight of being I think being Dushi pitch man sure people listening early well fears were realized but but I that I kept. Don't I kept trying to undercut that. The the inherent sales sales media aspect of it that I I would throw it away and I and I never for do this. I get a note I do the note but I remember Dr Phil was still giving me the note like I'm so sorry. They need this. They want this but I knew that if I did it once they would probably use that and it would be extra Dushi. Hello I'm a MAC and the MAC proud of and and this guy what's up loser loser asshole. I'd just didn't felt wrong. Yeah one more the thing or person I want to touch on that you worked before we kind of wrap up on after classes. Kevin Smith. Yeah Works Kevin Smith Kevin Smith was unreal for for a bunch of comic book stores. Hours near it's fun to talk very shy doesn't talk very get stuff you want to talk star is now I'd rather not. I'd rather not talk about my said..

Alan Rickman Tim Allen Sam Rockwell Don Don rickles Ralston Roulston Rawson Apple director Steve Steve Kevin Smith Ross John Hodgman Dick Age Steve Jobs sigourney weaver Taylor Senate Melania Damon Lindelof
"galaxy alexey" Discussed on Nuff Said: The Marvel, Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D, and Comics Fan Podcast

Nuff Said: The Marvel, Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D, and Comics Fan Podcast

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"galaxy alexey" Discussed on Nuff Said: The Marvel, Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D, and Comics Fan Podcast

"Reason why so much so many I bet you drove very susceptible to go live in the modern world. GotTa be in these desert worlds. I mean they're all they're like. Don't get what California's GonNa have the droids. I this is not earth. This is a galaxy. Alexey far far away. I don't get that and be with her Anyway but yeah. But that's star wars There that I think one of the best selling point of Of Disney suspect Laurean is most interesting mandal. Lawyering is not on a schedule. No no like I think the first one dropped the first day down. This time dropped on Thursday. Oh Thursday I thought uh thought it came off Friday again. Okay no yeah. 'CAUSE I I actually might even come out Wednesday night low and they basically what they said is just dropping them whenever oh be on a regular pattern Maybe maybe to keep everyone on their toes. Maybe maybe maybe okay. Yeah Donovan gets an okay yeah. 'cause I'm looking on the APP I have for my TV shows. Yeah episode four Sane six days episode five in thirteen days. So it's gone. Looks like seven seven then episode six twenty days but then between six and seven hill like there's only like five days in between you're the first thing they're doing something with that but I wonder if you take Oh between episodes seven and eight looks like Sir like nine days or something so there might be a little bit of a break between episodes seven and eight could nine days. Maybe a little over a week. Now I mean that's cool You know so. I don't know what that service for me. But that's their make up. Maybe maybe maybe to try to keep people on there all the taught you know. Well Yeah you know. Keep keep you guessing you know. Have you made me explore other stuff. Well you just come back. Come back every Friday. We could drop this. Who never exactly?.

Alexey California Disney Donovan
"galaxy alexey" Discussed on Snarf Talk

Snarf Talk

15:31 min | 2 years ago

"galaxy alexey" Discussed on Snarf Talk

"You'd fly off the West Coast and you'd see campfires. Pop Up is like an as soon as we'd see those campfires. He's he's like we're just flying around at night. We could do whatever we want. He's like I was in charge. We could do whatever he's like an. I'd see a campfire and he's like all right. We're going to go over there. He's the pilot so he's I'd kick it down to idle is like an idle air silent by so many thousand all the way back. He's think we're basically are gliding there gliding. There silent we're gliding. There's no sound he's like an I would I would coast down to. I can't remember how many feet he said but but we would coast. I'm above him. He's like we get directly above him. He's like an all of a sudden. I'd pull it up as hard as I could and kick it in all the way to afterburners earners like as hard as you could go loud thing in the world right. He's like I kick in afterburners huge flames. Shoot out the back of the plane is like an. I'd go straight up in the air. He's like and then turn it off. Yeah he's like as soon as I would do that when I get back to the get back to base or back to the ship or whatnot. UFO setting there'd be like ten different people reporting UFO sightings so so when he said that you know this was all before he ever saw any foes we did that shit on purpose. And I'm sure there's a lot of that and I'm sure ninety percent of everything they see and he said he's like 'cause joe asked awesome. He's like he's like Oh yeah absolutely he's like. was there anybody else. He's like. Oh I know of a lot of people everybody wouldn't you. I mean you have the capability. Let me it's funny. It only cost the American taxpayer one hundred million dollars to do that. But it doesn't affect no any of my own the apparent when you start religious. Anyway go ahead. Yeah I don't want to get into the government really when you really you start to look at it like objectively without any bias without any like. Oh it's ridiculous yeah and you start looking at and you're like okay. There's a lot of people and there's a lot of accounts that have nothing to gain. And also like this whole tic TAC thing like they've got like tic attack vehicle UFO sightings going back like hundreds of years in the League so in the episode. They talk about that and they talk about different things and this this is what I thought was weird is that Jeremy Guy said in the episode. He's like there's a written account of Columbus Christopher Columbus abyss seeing a UFO. Something in the sky flying. Now I'm going to say I'M GONNA call bullshit on this us and say like it could have been a meteor coming through the sky and those people at the time would think that's a Ufo by you could get ready tanker smarter than them absolutely. You're smarter than Christopher Columbus one hundred percent he circumnavigated the Atlantic Ocean. Scum do that you just use the stars. Here's the new worlds a star chart those all the time. The stars let him know about meteors. No they wouldn't. You don't think they knew about meteors in fourteen hundred and ninety two no I don't when Columbus sailed the ocean blue. I don't you're I don't think they did and and I think the dude was a racist. You know what that's debunked by the way. WHOA first of all do we need to get in this? Because I got into the other day debunked. He didn't find the world for civil. Nobody said that he did quit acting like you know. But he did Basically lead to the finding and settling of this new land. Yeah Oh yeah. There were other Europeans. That had come here before correct. They believed that there was other Africans that have actually sailed before this continent okay. There are people of African heritage that they believe sailed from Africa Africa South America. And maybe even to the Caribbean So I'm not saying it's the first person here but this whole like pylon it like a liberal roll like Columbus was horrible evil human being that I think the time though it was okay. It's not true though that's not true. There's no concert Zor. 'cause I listened to Neil degrasse Tyson to do a no. He did the research and he did a whole thing on it. Speech on it. I hi can give a speech on anything to okay. I'm saying that he researched it and he tells the actual truth. Do you WanNa hear the truth but how you don't. Here's the thing is like how do you know it's the actual truth from a actual writings of the time. So this whole idea that he he was a monster. That's here like there's not any basis for fact of that in the actual historical record of the time. There is one piece of written literature that talks about how he was a horrible person. One one it was written by his political rival at the time politics and it always comes down and it wasn't even because he was a politician or something and it wasn't even that bad but what happened is so somebody started spreading. Whatever they wanted to say about him Chris Dick but then the net so that guy writes about the next guy writes an article about the guys article? Okay now. The third guy writes an article about an article about an article. Do you think it's just as name. No I just the name. It's rumor hearsay so people. Here's something they repeat it and then it's like the game of telephone. I agree and then the next thing you know people are saying. We shouldn't soul by Columbus Day. It's been huge this year. It's ridiculous leading to listen to this deal to grasp Tyson. He maintains Neil degrasse Tyson. Who I think is genius by the way? Well I mean it's that Christopher Columbus coming to the new world is the single greatest achievement and human history. He thinks that single act had the greatest impact on the human beings as a species than ever. Before you want to know I said I'd do okay during When when humans were young and we were migrating all human beings started in Africa right and they started walking so what happened is during during after the Ice Age? The glaciers formed up. There is a land bridge the Bering Strait coming from Russia to Alaska so from Asia that came over and they started populating the North American Central American South America so I see John's ice melts land. Land Bridge gone down. Come up we have to deviated species like Septum Septum. We have two branches of the human species still the same species but separated Septum Over time they would have deviated in two complete different species which happens all the time with animals. Sure what happened was with with Christopher and you know yes. There were vikings that came to the new world first but they didn't leave any sort of impact bull genetically or in any sort of away. They just kind of came and went for the most part got A. I've got a good story about a viking. Christopher Columbus was the first and well he was the first person to connect that continental land mass with this continent landmass and introduced re SPEC- ABC Ation of the two branches of the human species. But I thought the whole story was that somebody else before him had done that. You're talking about like a Amerigo VESPUCCI. Or whatever his name I don't know I I mean other people had been here but nobody had the fact that Christopher Columbus it at the time he came here he opened that route he went back was a political advocate for that he came back and forth. He didn't know kinds of things. I mean it was a big deal I I agree with you it it began he also had a UFO saying. Can we get back the aliens. Yeah Ah Digress. Teasing about Christopher Columbus and if you're walking around spouting ignorant ignorant information about Christopher Columbus the jury is in formula so I just said that because I don't think he actually saw UFO. Okay well no I should say he probably did see a UFO ofo an unidentified flying object. But I don't think it was a spacecraft okay. Well let's get back to that we're talking about. So what blew me away is is that this guy was a the whole Christopher Columbus thing but this guy was saying that so so many other people had seen the exact same thing that he did prior to him seeing it but once he saw that's when they said Oh yeah we've noticed with those yeah we've noticed those things offshore and a lot of them have come from the east coast. I believe he was on the West Coast at the time though when he he wasn't on the West Coast. Yeah he saw his but on the east coast. Apparently a lot of these things were what they said was coming out at the ocean which is incredible to me right so I mean that that brings the next dimension to it so I believe this guy I believe the a story I believe some of the things they say about story. I believe now that the government admits that real. So that's happening and to me. It doesn't seem like a CA possibly be a human and technology because it would have been exploited by now. So where's that what what we. Where do we go from here? It leaves you with. I wonder aliens. Yeah I mean that seems like the Muslim thing to me something else however I do and I've always kind of felt this this way right. I feel like if there are aliens that have visited this planet or are visiting this planet actively then it it'd be doing a damn good job of not letting people know about it but the thing is when you start really looking past like the a double standard of people thinking it's ridiculous because there's a lot of frigging looney tunes that believe in the UFO stuff when you start looking past that at some of the real you'll like people on the real evidence and stuff like that you're like Oh maybe people do know this and we're just the ones that are like thinking it's all maybe we're ignorant to that knowledge. I guess if we are the vast majority of people. I'm sure I think that's possible but I mean let's it's beyond the scope of reality it's definitely a UFO. I mean you foes exist. I'm sold on your I. Do you a step it back. Do you believe there is extraterrestrial life so in the galaxy. Let's start there so before I really listened to this podcast I I would have said no I think to a point I think I would have of sudden. Oh Yeah I. I really think I would've why though because I didn't take it I didn't didn't take any of the The sightings as real like it none of it's not talking about on earth. I'm talking in the Galaxy Alexey. I don't believe there's any extra I know that I didn't think of it. In in that in that in that context before I really never really thought of it in that context before for because any of the sightings on earth I always thought of as somewhat fictional somewhat like and certainly most are like just just just grandiose stories of things people have seen. But I hadn't heard somebody like this guy I just I really didn't and that's why okay text. Edu as soon as I go in depth on the couple from the fifties or sixties that had the deduction story. Now they're an interracial couple from the fifties so they had nothing to gain from doing this and they were both abducted and then separately experimented on and then returned turned and it was quite extraordinary. They had basically the same stories of all the events but told multiple times over their entire lives live separately and to all different context and had nothing to gain from laser destroyed by it. It was that was an interesting case. It's one sided a lot but anyway I've always been of the feeling without I'm with almost one hundred percent sure in my mind that there's extra terrestrial life life. I mean so now I would agree. I think there has to be. I mean the reality though is. I don't know how couldn't be is almost zero chance. Whatever the statistics of the chances are that there's not extra we're the only planet galaxy that has had any sort of life? Life is so beyond near zero. That's almost incalculably. Small right so the universe is almost infinite. Think they've already proven proven that there's life on other planets I don't think they've ever proven that definitively they've proven that there's the building blocks of life. There's no doubt about that. There's well of course I mean there's there's only so many elements that make up our cal our universe and they found those yes so so I mean the point is I don't know how to if if the universe is is so almost near infinite right yeah. I don't think people necessarily can wrap their head around. How check I mean big? That is so if you look up. You'll have a hard time doing that. Trillions of say trillions billions whatever billions millions of stars that you can see right and billions more. You can't right right. Every one of them is a son with planets around it. Yes that's what's and that's only the small. What is that a one one hundredth of one percent of a sliver that you can even see getting hit so infinite so so event you you know a lot of physicists? Believe that the universe is so massive that that we exist in every form possible like like everything exists like every decision that you make branches off like if there is another part of this galaxy where there's two people cool named Jerry and Chris Standing here doing this podcast..

Christopher Columbus Columbus Neil degrasse Tyson West Coast Africa Land Bridge Columbus Day Jeremy Guy Septum Septum Atlantic Ocean joe Chris Dick Amerigo VESPUCCI Alaska Galaxy Alexey Bering Strait Asia North American Central America
"galaxy alexey" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

10:41 min | 2 years ago

"galaxy alexey" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"A staff thrown thrown out of the galaxy by black hole increasing signs of the next solar cycle and Iran claims. It's about the launch another spaceflight as it accelerates accelerates its missile and nuclear programs all that and more coming up on space time. Welcome to space time. We'd Stewart Gary Astronomers of the ticket a style that's being flung out of the Milky Way Galaxy Alexey at a record breaking speed of six million kilometers per hour by the supermassive black hole at the Galactic Centre a report in the monthly notices the Roll Economical Society claims. The unfortunate star was sent on its course through gravitational dads with secretaries ace tax more than five million years ago the style which is now some twenty nine thousand light years from Earth is traveling some ten times faster the most stars in the Milky Way including the son in fact. It's moving so fast. I believe the Milky Way in about one hundred million years never to return one of the study's authors emeritus professor Gary that cost us from the Australian National University. Says is the stars encounter with a black hole occurred at a time when humans were first learning to Walk Upright. He says in astronomical terms star will be leaving galaxy fairly sued and will likely travel through the emptiness of intergalactic space for eternity the Milky Way central supermassive black hole secretaries a star has some four four point three million times the mass of our Sun. It's located some twenty six thousand light years away in the direction of the Constellation secretaries authors discovered discovered this hapless style while using the three point nine meter anglo-australian telescope at the siding Spring Observatory to search for the shorted remains of small galaxies orbiting. The Milky Way is part of the southern Stella Stream Spectroscopy survey follow up observations within made with the A and US two point three minute telescope confirming the stars. Extreme speed did the customer and colleagues then trace the Star's journey back to its point of origin in the Galactic Center. It's this must have originally been in a binary system with a companion star and this system ventured too close to the black hole secretaries ace ta which then captured one of the Stars Too Close Orbit or sling shutting the other one out of the system custom and very high speed. DACOSTA says it's great to be able to confirm thirty or prediction. That stars really can be flying out of a galaxy by the supermassive black hole at the Galactic Center. I'm part of it. The national team that is using the anglo-australian telescope to get philosophies and abundances for stars in stellar streams the stuff streams Remnants of small galaxies have been ripped apart as they fall into is advertised on potential and by studying them we can learn about the distribution of doc mattering our galaxy for example but for every field. We don't necessarily have a complete set of targets for the thought so we used the other spare fathers to look at potentially other stars of interest and we found this stuff. That's has a velocity moving away from us as over a thousand cuomo specific and that was very unexpected and exciting discovery. Picked your interest in other words very much so Particularly the stars brought enough that the European Guy Satellite Commissioner a very accurate promotion. The motion in the plight of the sky is distinct from emotional life on us when we combine that with the observed. A lot of thoughts. Lusty you can trace Ashley Orbit back in time. And the orbit. Effect Exactly intersects with the center of the Galaxy. So we're very sure that this does being flung long out of the standard of the galaxy matches a prediction for a long time. Now that's been massive. Black Holes will blackouts. Generally I guess under the right circumstances weren't gobble Lapa Adventures too close but will in fact fling it out. That's right. There was a piper written first by Jack Hills in not an idea actually before four the Central Collin Galaxy was really well established in which he predicted it. If a binary star got too close to the central by call one of the stars would be absorbed in towards the blackhall. The other one would get a lot of energy be flung out of the center of the Galaxy and bicycling escape from galaxy completely. And that's what we're saying here. This really is the the first time that we've been definitively established that this high-velocity star doesn't affect have its origin at the center of the Galaxy. What do you know about this star? Well we know that it's Relatively young it's about two and a half times the mess of some. It's likely to be quite rich in chemical elements because the Santa Pod Aug- Aleksey is where the overall about this is about effective two times higher than it is in the local neighborhood so it's caught rich but With a massive about two and a half times orange the lofty that is traveling at its guide to escape from the Galaxy and hit off into it elected spice which is a very empty place. What does one cool is star in integrated space? I know if we have a planet outside our solar system. It's a rogue planet but what what is it aerobic style. I guess you'd call. It is a collective star. The the volume of spice outside of galaxies is very very empty. So you know you have a very small population of stars walk. These escaped from galaxies and and They'd be very hard to find. It's not the first high-speed contended that has been detected that appears to be living galaxy. Isn't no that's right nine for some Almost addicted I guess that there are these high-velocity stars that appear to be skyping galaxy in fraction of which appear to be coming from the center of the Galaxy. But this is the very first one where we've got precise enough to seminar of the top of the star to absolutely verify that it's coming from the center of the Galaxy hasn't been given head log number yet or a name. It has the rather prosaic name S. five because as five is the Stream survey project we're involved with And then it's it should be s one high-velocity star number one. I guess with the expectation that we might find more to me about the survey that you guys have been doing. This is really exciting. Isn't it looking at. The shredded remains a small galaxies opening the Milky Way. That's right It's actually a very good example of international collaboration. There's a team in the US that uses what's called the doc energy like camera on the former telescope in Chile. But let's you image lodge areas in the sky and they've infect done quite deep suv. I of the Southern Hemisphere Scott and in that imaging serve I I discovered of order a dozen of these streams where we believe these a AH small galaxies. That have been disrupted but you need to take spectroscopy of the stock is to get the philosophies in the abundances and the anglo-australian telescope with its two degree field spectograph spectograph lets you observe up to four hundred dollars at a time and that is a unique facility in terms of its field of view. A numbers fathers in the astronomical world so the US imaging imaging people have collaborated with star stone of his experts in fava spectroscopy to measure that. He's sort of these streams and You know serendipity can sometimes what can you fight or wait. Found this This particular stop by studying these still streams. This must be telling you a lot about the origins of the Milky Way Galaxy itself and how it's grown over Giga Giga us. Yes you're exactly right The the standard Theory of how the Milky Way is come into existence as had lots of galaxies Small galaxies full in get disrupted and then contribute. This does to the highlands of the disk of the galaxy in that process. We can try and map out. What the distribution of mass in our galaxy is by understanding the orbits of these streams in the galaxy get disrupted some of the stars get energy energy and move ahead than some of the stars lose energy in full behind? That's probably the other way around And so you. The whole thing gets strung out as a string of beat effectively and by studying the motions of streams we can actually see things like the influence of the lodge measuring like cloud as it comes by our galaxy. It's extra gravity. It disturbs the orbits of streams. and Are we seeing a lot of stuff from secretaries to office will run the other side that well it's been gobbled up. Now's well isn't it. That's that's right. I mean. The Sagittarius Stream was the first example of this Process with off. Galaxies falling in and being disrupted I guess it's Probably twenty. He's ago I guess it was in twenty five years since it was discovered and that is the archetypal example. The core of the galaxy is near the center of a Galaxy Galaxy. There's a stream of stars advice that goes across the hall. Scott now Sagittarius is was originally much more massive system than the small systems. That are just being disrupted the streams of West studying but it does just show that this process goes on Sagittarius. What in fact its own set of costs that guide to be added to the Hanover? The galaxy wants to sides of terrorists. System is completely disrupted with globular clusters. Can you tell the difference between a glove class. Sta and the center of a shredded galaxy. See that's very good question There are a few Gobert. COST IS GONNA cost is have constant abundance of elements it's like on and calcium Others but there are a few classes like a Centauri which is readily visible in the summer sky where there was a big range inch in the chemical elements like Nelson on from star to star. And it's certainly been suggested that Those cover costs as well. You see a heavy element abundance range by well obtained the former nucleus off galaxies. Pain disrupted our listeners are way normally globular cluster. oster is a tight ball of thousands if not millions of stars which originally formed together at the same time in the same molecular gas and dust cloud but when you see globular clusters crossed with stars of very different MILICIA's very different compositions. That's the telltale sign you're talking about. Exactly yes yes. In fact we have an example inside serious various the The there's a classical m fifty four which is a very luminous go cost which is right at the center secretaries and in fact does have a Ryan the elephants. So that's almost smoking guns or the Saudi. That's emeritus professor Gary Dacosta from the Australian nationally diversity and this is space time..

Central Collin Galaxy US Gary Dacosta professor Galactic Center Spring Observatory Australian National University Galactic Centre DACOSTA Iran Roll Economical Society cuomo Stella Stream Lapa Adventures Commissioner Pain
This star moving at hyperdrive-speeds was spat out from our black hole

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

09:56 min | 2 years ago

This star moving at hyperdrive-speeds was spat out from our black hole

"Of the ticket a style that's being flung out of the Milky Way Galaxy Alexey at a record breaking speed of six million kilometers per hour by the supermassive black hole at the Galactic Centre a report in the monthly notices the Roll Economical Society claims. The unfortunate star was sent on its course through gravitational dads with secretaries ace tax more than five million years ago the style which is now some twenty nine thousand light years from Earth is traveling some ten times faster the most stars in the Milky Way including the son in fact. It's moving so fast. I believe the Milky Way in about one hundred million years never to return one of the study's authors emeritus professor Gary that cost us from the Australian National University. Says is the stars encounter with a black hole occurred at a time when humans were first learning to Walk Upright. He says in astronomical terms star will be leaving galaxy fairly sued and will likely travel through the emptiness of intergalactic space for eternity the Milky Way central supermassive black hole secretaries a star has some four four point three million times the mass of our Sun. It's located some twenty six thousand light years away in the direction of the Constellation secretaries authors discovered discovered this hapless style while using the three point nine meter anglo-australian telescope at the siding Spring Observatory to search for the shorted remains of small galaxies orbiting. The Milky Way is part of the southern Stella Stream Spectroscopy survey follow up observations within made with the A and US two point three minute telescope confirming the stars. Extreme speed did the customer and colleagues then trace the Star's journey back to its point of origin in the Galactic Center. It's this must have originally been in a binary system with a companion star and this system ventured too close to the black hole secretaries ace ta which then captured one of the Stars Too Close Orbit or sling shutting the other one out of the system custom and very high speed. DACOSTA says it's great to be able to confirm thirty or prediction. That stars really can be flying out of a galaxy by the supermassive black hole at the Galactic Center. I'm part of it. The national team that is using the anglo-australian telescope to get philosophies and abundances for stars in stellar streams the stuff streams Remnants of small galaxies have been ripped apart as they fall into is advertised on potential and by studying them we can learn about the distribution of doc mattering our galaxy for example but for every field. We don't necessarily have a complete set of targets for the thought so we used the other spare fathers to look at potentially other stars of interest and we found this stuff. That's has a velocity moving away from us as over a thousand cuomo specific and that was very unexpected and exciting discovery. Picked your interest in other words very much so Particularly the stars brought enough that the European Guy Satellite Commissioner a very accurate promotion. The motion in the plight of the sky is distinct from emotional life on us when we combine that with the observed. A lot of thoughts. Lusty you can trace Ashley Orbit back in time. And the orbit. Effect Exactly intersects with the center of the Galaxy. So we're very sure that this does being flung long out of the standard of the galaxy matches a prediction for a long time. Now that's been massive. Black Holes will blackouts. Generally I guess under the right circumstances weren't gobble Lapa Adventures too close but will in fact fling it out. That's right. There was a piper written first by Jack Hills in not an idea actually before four the Central Collin Galaxy was really well established in which he predicted it. If a binary star got too close to the central by call one of the stars would be absorbed in towards the blackhall. The other one would get a lot of energy be flung out of the center of the Galaxy and bicycling escape from galaxy completely. And that's what we're saying here. This really is the the first time that we've been definitively established that this high-velocity star doesn't affect have its origin at the center of the Galaxy. What do you know about this star? Well we know that it's Relatively young it's about two and a half times the mess of some. It's likely to be quite rich in chemical elements because the Santa Pod Aug- Aleksey is where the overall about this is about effective two times higher than it is in the local neighborhood so it's caught rich but With a massive about two and a half times orange the lofty that is traveling at its guide to escape from the Galaxy and hit off into it elected spice which is a very empty place. What does one cool is star in integrated space? I know if we have a planet outside our solar system. It's a rogue planet but what what is it aerobic style. I guess you'd call. It is a collective star. The the volume of spice outside of galaxies is very very empty. So you know you have a very small population of stars walk. These escaped from galaxies and and They'd be very hard to find. It's not the first high-speed contended that has been detected that appears to be living galaxy. Isn't no that's right nine for some Almost addicted I guess that there are these high-velocity stars that appear to be skyping galaxy in fraction of which appear to be coming from the center of the Galaxy. But this is the very first one where we've got precise enough to seminar of the top of the star to absolutely verify that it's coming from the center of the Galaxy hasn't been given head log number yet or a name. It has the rather prosaic name S. five because as five is the Stream survey project we're involved with And then it's it should be s one high-velocity star number one. I guess with the expectation that we might find more to me about the survey that you guys have been doing. This is really exciting. Isn't it looking at. The shredded remains a small galaxies opening the Milky Way. That's right It's actually a very good example of international collaboration. There's a team in the US that uses what's called the doc energy like camera on the former telescope in Chile. But let's you image lodge areas in the sky and they've infect done quite deep suv. I of the Southern Hemisphere Scott and in that imaging serve I I discovered of order a dozen of these streams where we believe these a AH small galaxies. That have been disrupted but you need to take spectroscopy of the stock is to get the philosophies in the abundances and the anglo-australian telescope with its two degree field spectograph spectograph lets you observe up to four hundred dollars at a time and that is a unique facility in terms of its field of view. A numbers fathers in the astronomical world so the US imaging imaging people have collaborated with star stone of his experts in fava spectroscopy to measure that. He's sort of these streams and You know serendipity can sometimes what can you fight or wait. Found this This particular stop by studying these still streams. This must be telling you a lot about the origins of the Milky Way Galaxy itself and how it's grown over Giga Giga us. Yes you're exactly right The the standard Theory of how the Milky Way is come into existence as had lots of galaxies Small galaxies full in get disrupted and then contribute. This does to the highlands of the disk of the galaxy in that process. We can try and map out. What the distribution of mass in our galaxy is by understanding the orbits of these streams in the galaxy get disrupted some of the stars get energy energy and move ahead than some of the stars lose energy in full behind? That's probably the other way around And so you. The whole thing gets strung out as a string of beat effectively and by studying the motions of streams we can actually see things like the influence of the lodge measuring like cloud as it comes by our galaxy. It's extra gravity. It disturbs the orbits of streams. and Are we seeing a lot of stuff from secretaries to office will run the other side that well it's been gobbled up. Now's well isn't it. That's that's right. I mean. The Sagittarius Stream was the first example of this Process with off. Galaxies falling in and being disrupted I guess it's Probably twenty. He's ago I guess it was in twenty five years since it was discovered and that is the archetypal example. The core of the galaxy is near the center of a Galaxy Galaxy. There's a stream of stars advice that goes across the hall. Scott now Sagittarius is was originally much more massive system than the small systems. That are just being disrupted the streams of West studying but it does just show that this process goes on Sagittarius. What in fact its own set of costs that guide to be added to the Hanover? The galaxy wants to sides of terrorists. System is completely disrupted with globular clusters. Can you tell the difference between a glove class. Sta and the center of a shredded galaxy. See that's very good question There are a few Gobert. COST IS GONNA cost is have constant abundance of elements it's like on and calcium Others but there are a few classes like a Centauri which is readily visible in the summer sky where there was a big range inch in the chemical elements like Nelson on from star to star. And it's certainly been suggested that Those cover costs as well. You see a heavy element abundance range by well obtained the former nucleus off galaxies. Pain disrupted our listeners are way normally globular cluster. oster is a tight ball of thousands if not millions of stars which originally formed together at the same time in the same molecular gas and dust cloud but when you see globular clusters crossed with stars of very different MILICIA's very different compositions. That's the telltale sign you're talking about. Exactly yes yes. In fact we have an example inside serious various the The there's a classical m fifty four which is a very luminous go cost which is right at the center secretaries and in fact does have a Ryan the elephants. So that's almost smoking guns or the Saudi.

United States Central Collin Galaxy Galactic Center Spring Observatory Stella Stream Australian National University Galactic Centre Roll Economical Society Dacosta Cuomo Gary Professor Lapa Adventures Commissioner Pain Jack Hills
"galaxy alexey" Discussed on Collider Movie Talk

Collider Movie Talk

06:10 min | 2 years ago

"galaxy alexey" Discussed on Collider Movie Talk

"We know what those can turn out to be and that's not a superhero movies so I do want you know I defend these comic book films that are coming out and paying hang attention to all the aspects of filmmaking and also Scorsese's says something about not connecting with characters and actors being given things to work with on a deep level and I completely lately disagree because I bawled like a baby at the end of game not even being a huge fan and I can make your face and stuff like that and that's fine but I had not known through every MC movie that I was so attached to these characters and seeing it all come around and game. I was like wow okay. They've literally program me and like you know hooked me into these characters character. That actually make me care about something. Yeah I share that feeling I think I agree with Scorsese's comments in so far that I would describe them as as theme parks rise. I have in many of my reviews but I mean that as a compliment as a good thing and I typically apply that kind of scripture to a movie when you know something truly has this me on. The edge of my seat takes my breath away. I just described Ford v Ferrari like that too so I actually think that's a compliment here and I would describe marvel movies as has theme parks in the sense but when it comes to that last line about it isn't the cinema of human beings trying to convey emotional psychological experiences to another human being bad bad. I'm like well. Also you know I think about one of my favorite marvel cinematic universe movies and it's guardians of the Galaxy Alexey in the transformation that the characters go through in that like yes it is an out of this world kind of experience something that we can't relate to in every single respect but it's it's about a group of misfits who need to find a family and do and I think everybody can relate to that on a very human ground level in a certain respect I mean that one shot of basically drax and rocket and drags on puts his hand on rockets head and it's like that hits me so hard and yes. It's an alien and a raccoon that shoots weapons having having like an intimate moment but again I can connect with that because that's the storytelling they've developed all right Jeff. Go ahead jacket now. Take down smirk first of all. I didn't mean to to to Poop on your end game reaction because I've cried at the end of the movies. It's totally legitimate. I don't know that it was balling at like a baby that wasn't wasn't Manchester by the sea but but I get your connected to to Robert Downey junior and these characters for twenty two movies. I have come down somewhere in the middle. I think what Scorsese is trying to say here. Is that these movies some of them. At least some of the mirror and some of them are just corporate product. Some of them are paycheck movies. I do think Scorsese. I think that his views are honestly more complicated then. They're coming across in this interview. I know his name isn't on the joker but his louis producing partner Emma Tiller Kostov is so it's like do you think that he goes into the office and Amazon working on this movie for the last two years and he's like yeah. That's it's not cinema Emma like. I don't think that he views it like that again. This is like his right hand person so it's almost as I was actually surprised at the end of the credits. Wednesdays's named wasn't there so I thought he was going to take an EP credit. I guess he was just too busy with Irishman. Basically Emma runs this company. He's company basically made so I think that this kind of reduces the argument and it is a little elitist elitist even coming from me but you're so self aware beyond very very aware everywhere with the audience thanks to me but yeah I mean he's also earned the right talk like some. Some of these aren't cinema some of them. Are some of them really do advance the art form even something like Aquaman which that was horrible. That's like a home movie set underwater her credit for that yeah no absolutely when I look at this to an considering the fact that you're on the table today Jeff. I think a lot about a collider. FDIC and how how a comment like this might you know make waves throughout the academy. Many others might hold this. I don't think and nobody cares because you. They're talking to their peers at these cocktail parties receptions if they really were like Martin really think that they have a chance to converse elaborate. I'm not even necessarily though that his specific comments could change somebody else's mind but is this further proof that that mentality still exists and could maybe shut the door a little more so than we once thought to vendors interest at the Academy Awards this year who'll yes all right and also this is an internet headline. Let's remember this is an interview. Put out there to get clicks to get attention and you lose a lot of nuance in that where I'm sure there was a much larger conversation. He had that might have given more information and background and things of that nature. I long for that conversation. I wish I could hear him just elaborate on this and the state of cinema I mean especially because he's making this comment after giving net flicks a three and a half half hour movie with Cindy aging technology a significant amount of makeup effects so we don't know what he tries it. I don't see them. I I tried you know well. What did he try. Where did he start. He start with the humidity here. Ironman was great so he went to go see ironman two and then three and it was like forget this. You know there's a lot of nuance missing. Black Panther and he was like to watch walked out. I don't think he hates marvel movies specifically. I don't think he's calling them out specifically but he did make that comment and now we have to take it for what it is. You're right. You're right where worth discussing not worth you know like etching in stone or anything but hopefully one day someone follows up on these comments. Just because I'm curious I would like to know more about them. Changes might be people are allowed to do all the time you could change your mind on a movie you see today and and then change your mind on it in a week from now vessels on there's nothing wrong with that whatsoever all right before we move on over to our third topic of the day. I got to remind remind you that we're taking your life. Check questions at the end of the show so get creative have some fun. It's Friday and start sending them in right now and oh. We've got some stuff to tease on the quieter video youtube channel. Here's some promos for you. Everyone John Rocca.

Scorsese Emma Tiller Jeff FDIC Manchester Academy Awards John Rocca drax Robert Downey Ford partner Martin Cindy Amazon Ferrari two years one day
"galaxy alexey" Discussed on ExtraTime

ExtraTime

09:22 min | 2 years ago

"galaxy alexey" Discussed on ExtraTime

"Worried for mark anthony gay because this would have been the second game in a row where you're like oh man. He's just not upload it almost in a certain way. It showed that they aren't. I don't wanna say that how how much they lack talent right. A lot of people say there's so much better than everyone else that first twenty minutes. You're like no other not right market. The nikkei could not cope teeth blessing to us to showed food why he's just a twenty two year old. They were totally overwhelmed. You talk about the differences in quality is a play. The first thing players always say is the speed of play. That was one of those examples. That's why it's so hard to judge players moving up levels. Could you just never know how they're going to cope with the speed of play in pretty much. Was it four meeting so far that this team has had against the galaxy. I guess the one this year in the one last year where they they lost they could not set up to it. It really took twenty minutes for those three. It'd be able to deal with the speed of play but my god when they did. How good is this like it was it was it was almost like we saw those three players. Take a step up in their careers right in front of us around the twentieth minute mark they deal with the pressure they could make sense of the game and bob loves the line fine. We had to find the football right all teams that play the play l. a._f._c. Their first goal is to destroy whatever a._f._c. wanted to you. Then have to make peace with that chaos and you get the if soccer's largely. How fast can you process images in your brain. You have to start to processors images faster if you can do that and you can see the pictures in your head to make sense of what's going went on to instill your ideas and your way of plane into the chaos into those faster images. You will win and l. a._f._c. Figure that out and if that wasn't the last hurdle for them i i don't know what was the last hurdle would have been getting that fourth goal jerk but like coming out of this a like. I'm seeing a lot of galaxy fans talking and like it's understandable because they have yet to lose to l. e._s._e. And they have slot on who's a match-winner all on his own and pavan apparently can be a match-winner all on his own but if i was a galaxy alexey fan i would be terrified of meeting l. a._f._c. In the playoffs because blessing at in k- know how to do it now they know how to like this. This was it and like if if vela doesn't come off injured at the sixtieth minute this one ends five assay by the way they're going to baby that hamstring and make sure that he is there for the playoff. I don't know if he he was feeling it the whole game though because he wasn't himself the entire game before we get carlos villa. Can i add one more soccer apart from this on what did to adjust and why bob bradley still ahead of everyone else the number one thing that galaxy did tactically was compact their lines horizontally when we think about how elliot z. score on teams the picture comes to your mind carlos veil and diego rossi splitting the outside back in the center back. It happens a million times a season. The galaxy were so tight horizontally so what happened around that thirty five forty minute mark carlos villain dago rossi started to hold their run so now mark anthony k picks up his head instead of trying to split what does he do. He just plays outside. This is how they got that third goal. They did a few times so it wasn't affected. They figured there is also thinking going on throughout the game a little detail again that separates us team how many teams in the thirty fifth minute would've figured out adjusted okay onto the and also oh and then you look at case based dribble a little bit inside which changed after rosie started to find that because it was rosie down the left side polling fell chair and then that shifts that that entire backline he had one play where he came on the right wing and magda player cutback in lays off and i just started to someone else. I hate canada right players so he's so much fun to. I just want to say that he also got put under by pavone in this game too yeah. These guys were going back and forth but again by the thirty fifth fortieth minute it was it was one way traffic and legit even said it after the game dominated us in the second half it it could have gotten ugly for the galaxy could've is going to regulate bob bradley. No maybe but to bobby's point. He also sounded okay with it. He said we should have won this game. They dominated us and going into l. a._f._c. because everyone's going to have to go there and the playoffs. That's the mentality you need. We've seen portland do it and l. A._f._c. mentioned this week. There are arrivals on the field. That's the team worried most about and the galaxy seemed comfortable with the concept of we're just gonna go there and do whatever we have to do because we have a match winners and we can score goals which going forward is what they need in that potential playoff. Let's talk. You said he wasn't at his best. You didn't think for this match. There were a couple of moments that i would have expected them to finish in a different way. He did get his goal got up to twenty seven on the season that would season's pass tie the all time record for single season goals of course it doesn't anymore. That's thirty one for my guy joseph martinez but was it the right decision for bob bradley take because anybody who watched that broadcast anybody who reads lips or follows the l._a. Galaxy or having a lot of fun with that little oh clip of being upset being taken off thoughts. You were there my you yeah. It's the right decision no-brainer. The key is to win. M._l._s. cup and they they hope they get the galaxy in the playoffs on the way so that they can finally beat them but they win sport or shield and m._l._s. cup. It doesn't matter what happened in that game. The key was to keep him healthy. You could have have a question mark while he played ninety against san jose on wednesday which i thought was fascinating when it happened that would probably be my main one and then maybe something about the communication of happening apparently eddie cigarette came over he was kinda thrown off by it and it clearly affected the team for a minute or two although brian artery came you wanna play well. I don't know the behind that how much you're going to communicate so players like he's hurt you. Trust your coaching staff but it was the right move to velez credit one. He got really pissed off at happened which you see all of mexican meteorite now being like she passed through to about soccer and then to he went off and he got wrapped and he sat with the trainer over in the corner and then john dos santos got hurt like a few moments later and he got off the bench and went into their huddle and was talking with brian rodriguez and giving him pointers and talking with diego rosie and so with the everyone's got. I don't know how anyone can talk about throwing a physical armband. That's an obscene conversations even have but that's what you wanted to see from him right is he wanted to be in the game and when he couldn't he did everything he could to help his team win. So <hes> before we get out of here i have this thought about zoltan and over why it's done it's on. We just going to talk about for the next forty minutes robin frazier that interviewed gone. We can't do it. We'll save it for another time so then hates the playoff format but it occurs to me that the platform are formative literally the only reason that the galaxy will win any silverware this year if it was two legs at all just predict the galaxy we will if the win anything if they said pretty sure area listen back to the var on that yeah this is going to anything anything is one game as lon- perron and hanging on because good teams create chances against them. Good teams can figure them out over the course of ninety minutes my wrong silent. How many good teams are they better. That's the question that i have right now. I mean i i think san jose are are very very good but they're limited. <hes> by their talent frankly compared to these two teams and <hes> i i still i still think things that you can game plan your way out of <hes> ah beating against man marking <hes> although it will be tough for the galaxy cause lots isn't going to yeah yeah that's fair kind of hurts them yeah and then ourselves playing really well. I'm not sure that i think against any at this point if you're the galaxy against anybody except l. a._f._c. he just go in there with your chest puffed out man all right well. We'll say the conversation about hang on my hands semi air delivery startup. Sorry we'll get a child. We are getting confirmation review. It did say they'll win. That's definitely true. That's not true <hes> under was not listening yeah well. We'll do this primarily. A video of you has taken place in confound your english accent do these things for god. Let's talk hell israel. Keep it on sunday. Hell is sort of real for these teams in <hes> playoff terms because they're not gonna make it but that did not seem to matter nipper stadium mm-hmm cincinnati columbus. It was heated. There were fights inside the net. There were big moments. The crowd was into it. Both teams are into it. Don't give me this cynical. Look doyle a fight but come on. It's a sacrifice. We know those are always week. Ariza maria margarita three tax through the actually through headbutts but so come on but did not reach the did did not lay eyes off. Jesse got redemption so that was good. I mean that first. I goal the ball's coming across six. I was holding my breath. Just you know i i don't have any personal stake in jesse's artists but like i hope he finishes this because who we do talked about. What is my personal stick. He was the first person you ever told that you were going to do. I forgot about that as a connected. You celebrates it every year. Oh yeah i forgot forgot about that. Can we talk about jesse. I touch on that long ball because this was a one goal room had been playing short and this time he just booted it up field and i don't know whether or not this was scripted by by caleb porter and the crew because they had really explicitly played at short for the first twenty minutes still still hammering that right side getting harrison awful on the overlap and just go into v..

bob bradley diego rosie Jesse soccer san jose l. A._f._c. l. a._f._c. mark anthony l. bob brian rodriguez carlos villa caleb porter dago rossi mark anthony k portland vela football diego rossi
"galaxy alexey" Discussed on SGGQA Podcast – SomeGadgetGuy

SGGQA Podcast – SomeGadgetGuy

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"galaxy alexey" Discussed on SGGQA Podcast – SomeGadgetGuy

"About using a samsung and especially using a samsung moving forward as the teas <hes> my fuel e bike video with the exception of the few shots of a phone in my i studio was all shot. <hes> image stabilized. I put everything to half speed so i shot at at sixty frames per second and then slowed it down to thirty frames per second and edited on the l. g. g. eight everything. It's a four cape thirty frame per second walk and talk on the go vlag style. I look at an e bike that was again with the exception of the shots that were in my studio that i saw those. I shot on my panasonic but everything else everything out in santa. Monica was shot and edited on the l g g gate. I don't think i could do that on a note. If i could do that. On a note it would require me to jump through through many many more hoops. <hes> that makes me sad that that makes me that makes me sad. I love gadgets. I love tech and i want to see this tech evolving. Get better but i'm watching samsung pivot to try and become more profitable portable like apple and that's not what i think. Competition should look like i want. If i want an iphone. I'll go get an iphone and the iphone is a better iphone than a galaxy. Alexey is so <hes> this is what's killing the premium market we saw samsung talk about a watch two different versions of the same phone with two variants for four g and five g <hes> starting price as for the larger one eleven hundred dollars so they had to cut a lot out of the smaller note ten to make that cost savings make sense for a sub thousand dollar caller note. We saw them talk about a tablet. We saw them talk about a laptop. That's apple strategy. That's not disruptive. That's not the future of mobility you see a samsung precedent and it's all about the aspirational qualities of of what we're gonna do to shake up this market and all they did was copy apple apple. The note has decks their big announcement was you can plug your phone into a p. C. and then run run decks in your p._c. But i already have a p._c. I don't need to run decks on top of my p._c. What i could use though is a laptop dock engineered by samsung's awesome laptop department. That's just a shell for running decks in three to five five hundred dollars. Territory were now my thousand dollar note with a four hundred dollar laptop. Dock is one computer that fulfills a variety of different us. It's my phone. It's a touch screen computer. I don't need to travel with a separate computing device with a separate operating system. I have one brain that is now properly supporting other other usage judge <hes> scenarios that would be disruptive and would be a lot more exciting than a folding foam. We've we've made a tablet dock so you no longer have to buy a separate lt connect the tablet and have another ten dollar charge a month on your cell phone bill or turn on tethering on your phone where some carriers still trying throttle or cap your tethering. It's all just one device. You don't have to have lt built into a separate lop laptop running. A separate operating system was separate storage. You.

samsung apple Monica l. g. panasonic Alexey santa thousand dollar one eleven hundred dollars five five hundred dollars four hundred dollar ten dollar five g four g
"galaxy alexey" Discussed on You Did What Now?

You Did What Now?

13:09 min | 2 years ago

"galaxy alexey" Discussed on You Did What Now?

"On your phone because Your Mother's Monitoring Your Glucose levels on her computer like hey quick you can't have are your blood sugar shopping. Go and stuff from that. What if what if your little R._F._I._D.? Determines that your blood sugar is too high or your blood. Pressure is too high in actually turns off your ability to buy certain things from the store you know so candy bar you had too much sugar that you've reached your recommended daily allowance sugar are you cannot purchase that now. Yeah Yeah I could totally see that happening. I think insurance companies would love the ability to regulate what we can and cannot buy based on their vitals. We'll go back to biohacking your monitors. Your your instant level. You're in school level is high and instead of doing things with it. Maybe triggers your pancreas to stop producing insulin for a little while. Here's that that way now that's true so but yes so this all of these technologies they they have some great possibilities for increasing our life stand but they do not come without some problems so with the my study they were able to show this jeans activity could prolong life's mice lifespan but it's not always possible to replicate what we've done in mice to Human D._N._A.. Our DNA is not is not exactly the same when you're trying to to edit it and so it's not been replicated in humans. This is more theoretical mice. I don't forget the doctors damage. You said it was talking about a thousand years. This seems very we're just treating symptoms. What is actually studied our life at one point? These symptoms will become an avalanche of your body is hey what's actually going there. Live a thousand years and keep us from getting one of many diseases that we don't know how to care right yeah. It's not a guarantee absolutely and it's not it's not guaranteed that this would even can be safe in humans like yeah if you're changing one aspect of Your D._N._a.. It's like a domino effect. What's the what else is going to be affected in your body that we can't even presume to foretell? We're still learning a lot about that stuff that we thought we thought we knew we mapped at all but it turns out that a lot more going on than we thought Ryan so and then there's some ethical quandary. He's you know just because we could does it mean we should <hes> Silicone Valley has a you know they kind of have a philosophy of just to move as fast as you can I and break things and then fix it later. That doesn't necessarily apply when you're talking to human health right where it shouldn't but it is always people doing stuff. We've just recently. We have that Chinese doctor. I think that genetic human babies they are now alive and living right with H._I._V.. He cured H._I._V. These babies right because their father had it or something they don't but he was on yeah. They know there was a lot of there's a lot of concern about about the yeah so he made it so that these have H._i._V. But in playing around with their D._N._A.. What else what else did he change? They can't see yet in their genetic makeup. Are they going to be vulnerable to some other sort of disease that act. Maybe their original D._N._A.. was protecting them from so yeah. Absolutely there could never say there are people that are going to do stuff for regardless of whether or not we should or not good to study what we only have to push forward to study the regardless of maybe whether we should or not at least on a smaller scale those people are going to do it anyway once as possible but we need to know right yeah just because we have certain regulations in this country doesn't mean that other countries they are going to follow them. There's definitely potentially some disastrous consequences with box treatments. There's also alarming possibilities of success. So if this does actually work we do have the ability to live increase our life fan to two hundred three hundred all the way up to one thousand years. What is that going to do to our society not to mention a strain on re strain on resources if more people are living longer and longer? Are we going to have enough resources to to support this population. No we're not ready for that none anyway right so that's one thing to think about an also who's going to be able to afford these treatments. It's GonNa be wealthy people you guys. You're going to have to spend money on all of this and and what's going to create is an ultra wealthy class of super people that can afford these treatments liver hundred years and so that's going to make a race of people who are genuinely superior to the other race of people all that cannot afford these treatments. Yes a lot of stuff. This cutting edge finds always seems to fall along the lines as we really it's going to end up strata find the classes. We really should be thinking about it and we're all aware of it. All aware of this stuff is going to be for the rich and chances are the society set up today is that they're going to become further rich foregoing to become even for her but I don't know I don't have you seen. Have you read or seen them. The netflix series over Gar carbon. I've seen a couple of episodes serves. Yes so that's basically is so the premise of ultra carbon is that they digitize consciousness. It can have a little box in the back of their spine that basically communicates with body their entire consciousness in the books. There are people that have lived there are rich wealthy well-connected the people that are for hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of years because they're rich you can afford constant backups of their consciousness so even if they die there remorse because they took a backup two days before now. They're in a new body but yeah I thought he was growing. That's their existing body so their her death assault but there were these rich they call them maths. I think a rich people at our four hundred years old that have everything they could ever want right because they've had the time to they've had the time to build their wealth to support this lifestyle that they we are just regenerating themselves and one of the things that the book is that they're typically they see themselves as better they see themselves as disconnected from the grind daily grind just lifting because they've done it all they can up. He's the one of the main characters has a telescope haven't touched like one hundred fifty years just sitting there on the last Jedi like just imagine that you walk into your house and you got like there was a book I meant to read sixty years ago just sitting there on the counter like some of that's just mind boggling and we haven't absolutely or I read this book. You know one hundred years ago. Maybe I'll go ahead and read it again. It's been awhile no matter what race you are or where you live. Death has always been the. Ultimate limiting factor that everyone it levels the playing ground right we all too but that may no longer be an issue for some people was going to happen or not. I don't know there are there are some aging experts that had the cosign an article that discounts any of these claims and says they are so far from plausibility it commands respect from the informed scientific community so there's definitely the naysayers that say this isn't going to happen but there's other people that say that really it has to happen so get all Elon Musk who he is right. Oh Yeah Bond Villain of modern times right so <hes> he's got it is he's got a company called near a link. This company is focused on developing digital implants for your brains and so his philosophy is not only should we do this we could in we should but if we don't use this is technology to enhance our cognitive abilities then artificial intelligence is just going to conquer humanity anyways so artificial intelligence <hes> concord humanity anytime soon well he seems to thanks so <hes> that this is our only way to preserve humanity is to focus on these life altering. Maybe maybe he's watching a major too many times potentially so this is either on musk so my question squad with computers not enhanced their abilities in the same way they have year limitless intelligence and mass produce theoretically they. I could just add more megabytes add more computational power. Why can our brain ever ever match with the best thing do sure sure that's true but at least computers they're not dealing with organic bodies to begin with true? Maybe that is better for them. Maybe that gives them the freedom to be the freedom to hack all our biohacking our bodies wolf. We're if we are full of digital implants everywhere then that definitely would increase the ability of artificial intelligence to hack us in some way. I don't know what the answer is Michael. I don't know what if you could get a bio hack even simple one. What would you do oh goodness? I really love the idea. This is a simple one but I loved the idea of of of a glow in the dark tattoos. That'd be cool. Yeah you will flashlight as soon as the lights go off your tattoo start going in the dark and you can't see them in the light. They just show up when it stark is that is that doable can yeah. I do that yet probably pretty close to that right. Why not you put on a I'm not I don't have any tests I don't know but could you put clothing dark income and you probably could couldn't? I don't know if that counts as a bio hack but that's just something and I really want to be that. Maybe you could turn it off or maybe you could change its color yes or maybe maybe it only glows what the full moon it'd be cool. What about you Michael? What would you get of all of these things? I think I would I would be going. I the brain scares me but I think I I I would want something that could predict. Maybe prevent headaches something whether it's pressure or muscles. I don't even know I have a headache right now. I'm prone to migraines something that could cure. That cold helps me odd if something could if I could put an implant in my head that SORTA lowered my body temperature by degree I think that would that'd be a benefit. I'm the one that's always high like. Don't turn the eat on. Yes fixing there and I'm uncomfortable like Michael Lower my body temperature by percentage. Maybe I'd just be more comfortable so how how many years before we all have these are if ideas in our hands like they do in Sweden. I'd say we're least fifteen twenty years from that. Mainly I say that because companies like apples have too much power and they don't have they want us to buy the iphone or when. When did the first iphone come out? Do you remember it was two thousand eight. I think right that's so two thousand eight. I said no way I absolutely do not. It never will need an iphone. It's too much to have a computer on me at all times and so two thousand nineteen I finally get my first iphone so it takes about ten for ten years. I haven't Galaxy Alexey phone but now I do own an actual iphone which I promise I never went but now I do so it took me about ten years to get used to the idea of of having one navy in about ten years. It'll be pretty normal people to have these or if I._D.'s implants what's in their hands yeah. I like the be able to record that <hes> that's not my like a lot of things are going cashless. A lot of things are going mobile only baseball fan. I see that community. There's a couple of minor league parks and I I think the Washington National League and are doing it where there are no tickets. Everything's on your phone but and you can do starbucks you guy your phone embarrassing. Get Your starbucks but I hate handing people might boat. I don't want to have people my phone. My phone is covered in my own germs my personal property but I just had a chip and I'm just we've handed your scanner. If you're just like waving yeah go for that so much better than this awkward exchange of let me try to scan through the the hard gorilla glass to have on your phone that reflects the laser of your scanner struggling through <hes> not only that like I wanted to be using my phone..

Michael Lower starbucks headache baseball netflix Silicone Valley Elon Musk Washington National League Ryan assault Galaxy Alexey I._D. Sweden ten years thousand years