29 Burst results for "Galapagos Islands"

Galapagos Island Shark Population In Danger From Overfishing

Environment: NPR

03:57 min | 2 months ago

Galapagos Island Shark Population In Danger From Overfishing

"Sharks in the Galapagos Islands are being decimated by fleets of fishing vessels many of them Chinese and that's bringing these vital creatures to the brink of extinction. Turn is a professor of biology at the. San Francisco Kiko in Ecuador and he's advocating for an expansion of protected waters in the area to save the sharks and he joins us now professor her welcome to the program. Thank you. It's great to be here. I understand fleets of international ships many of them. Chinese. Come to these waters every year and they're they're now what brings them. Well the waters off Galapagos and just in this region of very, very productive Galapagos islands are in a big obstacle in the middle of the ocean. So there's a deep cold water current that's flowing from the West and when it hits, the abacus platform is diverted at the surface and that creates a lot of productivity. So we get very rich fishing grounds and also fantastic biodiversity. How many ships are there? How many sharks are there? And you know what is this situation? Exactly as it stands at the moment, will galapagos is home to about thirty odd species of sharks, and some of those are critically endangered such as the scalloped hammerhead shark, and some of those are also highly migratory, the scalloped hammerhead, the Silky Shark, the whale shark, they all leave the borders of the marine reserve, and then they're subject to different levels of threat. So these vessels come into these waters and while they're fishing for other species, they catch these sharks in their nets. Yes depending on the method of fishing the longliners perhaps the vessels that we would be concerned about these are extensively fishing for tuna, but they will also catch several endangered shark species. During their fishing. And we know that if they do catch these species than they will retain them and keep them on board. So. These vessels though we should be clear aren't doing anything illegal they are allowed to fish with fishing. So why exactly are shark populations still taking a hit right? These vessels operating in international waters and depending on the fleet, they'll be operating under a regional fisheries organisations. The problem is that the species that we're trying to protect in Galapagos don't understand any of that. They go whether they WANNA go. As the problem is that once they leave the protective waters of the marine reserve, they're immediately under threat. There are hammerhead foraging grounds out in international waters and numbers have declined. There was a study cocoa sign, which is our neighbor in Galapagos, and they found that hammerhead sharks have declined by about forty five percent since the creation of the marine reserve, which is not the result you would hope for. So what you're advocating for an expansion of Ecuador's marine reserves, right that would help protect these areas of marine diversity and also. The. Shark. Species. I'm advocating on several levels I think first of all, we need to expand our reserve and this is something that we can do as a nation within our jurisdiction but I think we also need to play a more prominent role in the development of the Biodiversity Beyond National Jurisdiction Agreement that is currently in the works, and this will allow for better protection for these species. Once they're in the high seas, it will even allow for the creation of open water or high seas, marine protected areas. So I think we to work on several levels. The international waters needs to be considered in a more conservation perspective than they have been until now. Alex. is a professor of biology at the. San Francisco, they keep in Ecuador Professor Arun. Thank you very much. Thank you.

Sharks Galapagos Galapagos Islands Professor Ecuador San Francisco Alex.
A Tale of Two Spams

Household Name

01:05 min | 8 months ago

A Tale of Two Spams

"I guess you won't be surprised to hear that I don't really know a lot about spam. I just always thought it was kind of a mystery meat. And it's not something I've really had so yeah in the continental. Us A lot of people. See it that way but the really fascinating thing about spam is that in Hawaii. It's totally different. It's a lot like Darwin's finches Darwin. Yes Darwin realized that these finches on the Galapagos Islands had all come from the same original bird but they'd actually adopted the different environments on the different islands. That's just like spam on the continental. Us Spam has had this rollercoaster journey from love to hate it too trendy food to laughing stock of the country but meanwhile in Hawaii in the middle of the Pacific on these islands spam has had a straight upward trajectory. So I'm going to tell you. The story of spam twice first on the mainland. Us and then in Hawaii okay. A tale of two spams take it away from

Hawaii Galapagos Islands Pacific
Sailing Successes: Tania Aebi & Sarah Dekker

Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

06:03 min | 9 months ago

Sailing Successes: Tania Aebi & Sarah Dekker

"Forward slash bedtime. History a big. Thank you to those. Who donated already. Have you ever seen a sailboat? A sailboat is different from a motorized boat because instead of a motor it uses wind pushing the sales to move it across the water sailboats. Have been around for a very long time but people still use sailboats today to sail in places all over the ocean. Some new just for fun others do it as a race. Many world records have been set by people who've sailed boats around the entire world. Tonight we're going to learn about two women who went on at mazing adventures sailboats. Our story begins in Nineteen eighty-four with Tanya Ebi. A young sixteen year old girl. Who was living with her father when he decided to sail his boat all the way across the Atlantic Ocean with Tanya and her siblings even though they knew little about sailing they sailed from England to Spain to Portugal to Morocco. The Canary Islands the Caribbean and back to New York City after finishing high school. Tanya wasn't sure what to do with their life. It was time to go to college but she didn't feel ready for it and didn't know what else to do. Her father gave her two choices he could pay for college or she could use the money to buy a boat and sail around the world. It was a big challenge in. Tanya made the choice to start sailing. She thought she could go on it with her friends and just have a good time. No her father said you have to go on the boat alone and you have to make the voyage by yourself. He knew was a chance for her to grow on her own. So in May nineteen eighty five Tanya and her little black cat named Tarzan set sail from New York in her boat which they named the Varuna. Many people said it was too dangerous for to go but she went anyway. Tanya started the trip thinking should only sell the Bermuda then. Once she was there she headed to the next point. Which was the island of Saint Thomas in the Caribbean as she went she learned more about sailing because she had very little experience before she left. She had lots of quiet time to herself. She said was very good for her. It gave her chance to think about her life to read to play with her cat and to focus on getting to the next point of Edge sometimes. She played her guitar other time. She wrote letters one day. It began to rain and a storm surrounded her boat. We've crashed against the side of the boat and water splashed into it. She was scared and didn't know if she could continue on but she realized the only way she could survive was to keep going and she did just that for two and a half years. Tanya continued her voyage through the Great Barrier Reef Past Australia than up through the Indian Ocean the Mediterranean and finally through the Atlantic Ocean until she returned home to New York Tanya became the first woman in a very young when at that to circle the entire world on a sailboat. When the news found out about her trip people all over the world were talking about her amazing voyage. The president at the time Ronald Reagan sent her a message. Which said you set your energy in youth against an ancient challenge on the ageless sees and you triumphed twenty. Five years later a woman named Laura. Dekker wanted to break. Tania's record and be the youngest woman to circle the globe by boat. She was sixteen years old at the time Laura was born in New Zealand during a seven year sailing trip by her parents. That's right she was born during a sailing trip. The decker family was Dutch which means they were from the Netherlands. Laura spent the first five years of her life at sea and continued sailing with her father afterward. She received her first boat on her sixth birthday. And named it the Guppy. At this time she also learned how to sail the boat on her own. She would often sale by herself with her father following nearby while windsurfing when Laura was eight she received a book for her birthday called the maiden voyage written by Tanya. Happy who we learned about earlier in the story her adventures Got Laura. Thinking about making the same long trip around the earth. During the following years Laura continued to practice. She went on smaller ships by herself and continue to improve her skills see until she felt ready to circumnavigate the globe. This means to go entirely around the earth in two thousand and ten Laura finally set off. She faced many issues with the law which said she shouldn't be able to do it by herself. Many people in her country believed it wasn't safe and she shouldn't do it alone but finally she was given permission to go. She left Gibraltar in August. Two thousand ten then made a few stops until she arrived in the Canary Islands. There she waited for a hurricane to pass then she continued to cross the Atlantic Saint Martins and other islands in the Caribbean during her trip unlike Tanya. She had a gps so her parents and others were able to follow exactly where she was during her voyage. She was also much better prepared than Tanya to make the trip from the Caribbean. She then passed through the Panama Canal then the Galapagos Islands and Tonga Fiji the non to Australia next she passed the Cape of Good Hope in Africa then finally completed trip at Saint Martin. She had traveled sixty four hundred miles in one hundred twenty three days at the age of sixteen during the voyage. Laura wrote about her experiences and the news followed. What she was doing. A movie has been made about her experience called maiden trip and she wrote a book called one girl one dream. It's pretty amazing. What people can accomplish

Tanya Ebi Laura Caribbean New York City Atlantic Ocean Canary Islands Indian Ocean Mazing Ronald Reagan Netherlands Saint Thomas Atlantic Saint Martins Panama Canal Great Barrier Reef Africa President Trump Dekker Tania Galapagos Islands
600 gallons of oil spills off the Galápagos Islands

Doug Stephan

01:43 min | 10 months ago

600 gallons of oil spills off the Galápagos Islands

"Maybe you didn't hear about the oil spill took place off the Galapagos islands officials say crews responding to a six hundred gallon oil spill after barge overturned and this is near San Cristobal have you ever been there Jennifer San Cristobal be one of the beautiful areas and that's what gets people worked up about this the this is off the coast of Ecuador South America and the because these areas are so clean now is so when you compare I saw something as a yesterday I think it was yesterday looking at an article about how we're trying to stop pollution and at the you know how the LA river flows into the ocean here I laid there examples of that all all over the country you know of both sides and down the Gulf and so it's in the areas where the spill off runs into the ocean they have installed basically socks they have these huge is the water comes down and goes through three or four probably four four pipes on the other end of the pipe they've installed these huge socks they collect the debris that comes out of a river I had coffee filter yeah and I thought it was pretty practical actually I know I seven think about earlier it's with a lot of common sense involved in it in in capturing all these things that we're worried about rightfully so and that's the other thing walking around the taking daisy for a walk here this the neighborhood where I am which is a pretty well to do area I still am appalled by the amount of rubbish on the

San Cristobal Jennifer San Cristobal South America Gulf Galapagos Ecuador LA
Barge With 600 Gallons of Diesel Sinks Off Galápagos Islands

Orlando's Morning News

00:35 sec | 10 months ago

Barge With 600 Gallons of Diesel Sinks Off Galápagos Islands

"Clean off a cleanup effort is underway after hundreds of gallons of diesel fuel spilled into the waters of Ecuador's Galapagos islands a crane collapsed as it was unloading containers of oil from a barge causing the ship to sink this past weekend staff from the Galapagos national park in the Ecuadorean navy immediately set up containment barriers in absorption cloths near the sunken vessel to prevent further contamination and harm to near surface creatures the islands are home to some of the most exotic wildlife on the planet listed as a UNESCO world heritage site reporter linsey Davis as local leaders are looking into the cause of the

Ecuador Galapagos Galapagos National Park Ecuadorean Navy Linsey Davis Reporter
"galapagos islands" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

01:54 min | 11 months ago

"galapagos islands" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"And every computer two weeks after a deadly volcanic eruption rock New Zealand's white island rescuers have called off their search for the last two people who went missing seventeen year old Australian Winona Lankford and forty year old new Zealander heated Marshall in mentor presumes have been killed in a deadly eruption which claimed the lives of seventeen people the news comes about a week after police speculate the remains of Lankford in Marshall in men could have been swept up by the waves and taken out to sea Lankford had been visiting the island with her parents who died in the eruption and her brother who remains hospitalized Marshall in men worked as a tour guide on the island a cleanup effort underway after hundreds of gallons of diesel fuel spilled into the waters of Ecuador's Galapagos islands a crane collapse as it was unloading containers from an oil on a barge that because the ship to sink this past weekend staff from the Galapagos national park in the Ecuadorean navy immediately set up containment barriers in absorption cloths near the sunken vessel to prevent further contamination and harm to near surface creatures the islands are home to some of the most exotic wildlife on the planet listed as a UNESCO world heritage site reporter linsey Davis as local leaders are looking into the cause of the accident a you tube Instagram star known as on me and a hell cat a diamond clad exotic car enthusiast whose photos and video showcases extreme wealth has garnered millions of views but now he's also had millions in assets taken by federal authorities federal officials have also been watching and following thirty three year old bill all market has schedule as the seas millions from his bank accounts as well as more than thirty cars including three Lamborghinis and a number of Rolex watches and jewelry got a schedule does admit to owing back taxes and says that is his TV streaming business gears TV re loaded that he believes is the real focus of the fed's attention for possible copyright violations he has not yet been charged with a crime George Amir's news ninety six point five W. D. BO.

New Zealand Winona Lankford Marshall Ecuador Galapagos Galapagos national park Ecuadorean navy linsey Davis Lamborghinis fed George Amir sea Lankford reporter
"galapagos islands" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

02:35 min | 11 months ago

"galapagos islands" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"The majority of the day your bedroom is used mainly for sleeping right but there is one thing everyone's doing in the bedroom so yeah I'm doing it in the bedroom the morning for the evening just as the play news ninety six point five W. T. V. good morning I'm Laura Lee and every computer two weeks after a deadly volcanic eruption rock to new Zealand's white island rescuers have called off their search for the last two people who went missing seventy year old Australian's Winona Lankford forty year old new Zealander heated Marshall in mentor presumed to have been killed in the deadly eruption which claimed the lives of seventeen people the news comes about a week after police speculated the remains of Lankford in Marshall in men could have been swept up by the waves and taken out to sea Lankford had been visiting the island with her parents who died in the eruption and her brother who remains hospitalized Marshall in men worked as a tour guide on the island the clean up effort is underway after hundreds of gallons of diesel fuel spilled into the waters of Ecuador's Galapagos islands crane collapses it was unloading containers of oil from a barge causing the ship to sink this past weekend staff from the Galapagos national park in the Ecuadorean navy immediately set up containment barriers in absorption cloth near the sunken vessel to prevent further contamination and harm to near surface creatures the islands are home to some of the most exotic wildlife on the planet listed as a UNESCO world heritage site linsey Davis as local leaders are looking into the cause of the accident are you two been Instagram star known as I'm the in a hell cat a diamond clad exotic car through Z. as well he's got its assets taken by the feds and there's more federal officials have also been watching and following thirty three year old bill all market has schedule as the seas millions from his bank accounts as well as more than thirty cars including three Lamborghinis and a number of Rolex watches and jewelry got a schedule does admit to owing back taxes and says that is his TV streaming business gears TV re loaded that he believes is the real focus of the fed's attention for possible copyright violations he has not yet been charged with a crime George Amir's news ninety six point five W. D. BO thank you George is that six forty eight on Orlando's morning news when H. with that five day forecast brought you by U. S. heating and air conditioning we'll start off with a cloudy breezy Christmas Eve but it will clear out as we get to the afternoon hours this is the sweater day across central Florida will be dry today the high of just sixty nine for tonight partly cloudy skies will start off Christmas morning right around sixty degrees tomorrow afternoon.

George Amir U. S. Galapagos sea Lankford Winona Lankford W. T. Florida H. Orlando W. D. BO Laura Lee fed Lamborghinis linsey Davis Ecuadorean navy Galapagos national park Ecuador
Galapagos Islands battles 600-gallon oil spill that threatens environmental damage

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 11 months ago

Galapagos Islands battles 600-gallon oil spill that threatens environmental damage

"Treasured as an unparalleled location of evolution related discoveries and the soul place on earth where some species live the Galapagos islands of the west coast of South America are under environmental threat today as emergency teams work to contain a six hundred gallon oil spill from a small cargo vessel that overturned the site is Charles Darwin did the research on the Galapagos that led to his theory of evolution and tourists with restrictions can visit the islands which are part of Ecuador this bill occur word on the island of San Cristobal home to sea lions finches and to those world famous giant Galapagos tortoises

South America Charles Darwin Galapagos Ecuador San Cristobal Six Hundred Gallon
"galapagos islands" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

10 10 WINS

03:25 min | 11 months ago

"galapagos islands" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

"The heat in the box tonight hosting the wizards minus their top scorer in the opening quarter and trailing ten nine Marcus Morris out with a sore killings is Carrie Irving continue sideline nets hoping to at least have keris liver back soon over now cleared for full contact after missing twenty games with that some injury he did just about everything but contact drills at practice today early the first at Philly Rangers and flyers scoreless as are the islanders and blue jackets early in the first at the Coliseum doubles at Chicago at eight thirty here that by the radio dot com back we was once considered a top Yankees catching prospect without chance Adams joins the Royals disappointing lefty swapped for minor league infielder question corrects Daniel Jones throwing five TV's yesterday's giants with Washington Pat Shurmur today discussing whether the rookie benefited watching you lie manning while sitting out the previous two games and he got the ball off you know a little quicker in some situations which was good maybe learn some of that by watching the lie you know again that's probably better question for Dan and after holding the Steelers to ten points in yesterday's jets victory Adam gase tipping his cap to defensive coordinator Gregg Williams higher grade one for a reason and that was to you know do exactly what he's been doing and that you know put in the cultural world looking for that if you were looking for this why you were looking for exports of fifty to forty five round the clock to we Waller ten ten wins four winns used I've seven seventeen safety fencing is going up to the Verrazano narrows bridge as the rate of suicides increases there three people have jumped from this band just this month the latest the thirty four year old man on Friday the FDA says it will complete the installation of two fifty foot sections of stainless steel prototype fencing on the Staten Island side by the end of the year then comes an evaluation on how will the Berrier stand up to the weather particularly the high winds before the agency takes bids on fencing the rest of the longest suspension bridge in North America Boeing one of the nation's largest manufacturers as in just grounded its troubled seven thirty seven MAX aircraft to a clip the wings of the bowling balls problems involving the troubled seven thirty seven MAX aircraft have forced the resignation of Boeing CEO Boeing's board says Dennis Mollen burgers stepping down immediately current board chairman David Calhoun will become president and CEO in January thirteenth the board says a change in leadership is needed to restore confidence in the company as it works to repair relationships with regulators and stakeholders Calhoun is a strong believer in the seven thirty seven Max the match was grounded worldwide in March after the second of two crashes that killed a combined total of three hundred forty six people I'm I counted which do some seven eighteen treasured as an unparalleled location of evolution related discoveries and the soul place on earth where some species live the Galapagos islands of the west coast of South America are under environmental threat today as emergency teams work to contain a six hundred gallon oil spill from a small cargo vessel that overturned the site is Charles Darwin did the research on the Galapagos that led to his theory of evolution and tourists with restrictions can visit the islands which are part of Ecuador this bill occur word on the island of San Cristobal home to sea lions finches and to those world famous giant Galapagos tortoises wins news time seven nineteen.

What Is the Humboldt Ocean Current?

BrainStuff

06:03 min | 1 year ago

What Is the Humboldt Ocean Current?

"Today's episode is brought to you by gravity blankets. They make weighted blankets these blankets that contain fine grade glass. Beads to weigh them down when you curl up under one it's supposed to simulate the feeling of being gently held her hugged. They sent me want to try out. And I genuinely love this thing it is so comforting and relaxing. It puts me in the mood to sleep right away. The microphone duvet cover is incredibly soft, and has these ingenious little internal clasps to keep it in place if you'd like to try a gravity blanket for yourself. Let them know that we sent you and get fifteen percent off your order by entering the code brain stuff at checkout. It's one word. That's gravity. Blankets dot com. Promo code brain stuff. Welcome to brain stuff. A production of I heart radio. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren Vogel bomb here in December eighteen o two small sailing. Ship called the casino set sail from Peru northward along the South American coastline toward Gua quill in present-day Ecuador, a trip of about seven hundred miles or about one thousand one hundred kilometers one of the ship's. Passengers was thirty three year old Prussian aristocrat Alexander von Humboldt. A mining engineer by training Humboldt had an insatiable curiosity about nature that led him to roam the planet studying plants and animals as well as phenomena ranging from magnetic rocks to river systems in ocean currents fresh from studying the value of bat guano as minority because y'all humble used the sailing trip to investigate a powerful cold current that flowed from the tip of Chile to northern Peru ranging from just offshore to about six hundred miles off the coast. That's just under a thousand kilometers the current existence had been known for centuries to sailors and fishermen, but no scientists had ever systematically studied the flow Humboldt carefully measured the water temperature. The speed and continued on his journey, which eventually would lead him to Mexico. Humbles work was the beginning of scientific understanding of what's now known as the Humboldt current or the Peru current the current helps hold warm moist air off the coast keeping the climate cool. It also pulls plankton rich water from deep in the Pacific to the surface. Feeding a vast number and variety efficient birds and creating the richest marine ecosystem on the planet. It's fishing grounds. Provide about six percent of the world's catch and the Humboldt Kerns nutrients support the marine food chain of the Galapagos islands and influence its climate as well, it has helped make possible the archipelago's incredible bio-diversity in that sense. The Humboldt current also helped shape the development of evolutionary theory, the Galapagos provided the living laboratory for another nineteenth century scientist, Charles Darwin, who's paradigm shift and work on the origin of the species was published in eighteen fifty nine the year of humbled death. Darwin himself was inspired by the work of Humboldt who might be the most important scientists that we don't care much about the early to mid eighteen hundreds though, he might have been the most renowned researcher on the planet. I'm what was the first to investigate the relationship between mean temperature in elevating and came up with the concept of maps with isotherm aligns the delineate areas with the same temperature at a given time he did important early work on the origin of tropical storms. Most importantly Humboldt altered the way that scientists see the natural world by finding interconnections. This scientists invented the concept of a web of life. What he called this great chain of causes and effects some consider him to be the first to college issed. He was a head of the curve on understanding environmental problems such as deforestation and its effect upon climate, which he I observed around lake Lancia in Venezuela back in eighteen hundred Humboldt was also predecessor to Albert Einstein as a scientist with a strong interest in social Justice. He was a critic of colonialism and supported revolution. Mary movements in South America. And also criticized the US a country, he otherwise admired for its institution of slavery. We spoke by Email with Aaron Sachs history, professor at Cornell University and author of the Humboldt current nineteenth century exploration. And the roots of American environmentalism he thinks that rather than focusing on humbled scientific discoveries. It's more important to look the insights and approaches to the work that we're based upon his research and observations he said to me his version of ecology was significant not just because he stressed interconnection. But because he combined it with a social and ethical perspective. The fact of interconnection had certain implications with regard to human responsibilities toward each other and the environment. It was a cosmopolitan open minded ecology. Today's episode was written by Patrick j tiger and participate. Tyler claim brain stuff is production of iheartradio's. How stuff works for more on this and lots of other interconnected, topics? Visit our home planet has stuff works dot com. In for more podcast, my heart radio, I heart radio app, apple podcasts, or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Hi there. It's me Josh Clark. And if you love the beautiful musical score that point Lobo created for the end of the world of Josh Clark. Then you can rejoice. It's now available as the original soundtrack album sixteen tracks selected and remastered by point logo capture the highs the imagination and the far out of the series, and they all come together to make really great album. It's like the spirit of the series now in a convenient capsule. You can get the end of the world with Josh Clark original soundtrack album everywhere. You get music online apple music, I tunes iheartradio Spotify. Amazon everywhere. Could check it out today.

Humboldt Scientist Alexander Von Humboldt Humboldt Kerns Josh Clark Peru Iheartradio Galapagos Apple Lauren Vogel South America Ecuador Charles Darwin United States Aaron Sachs Gua Quill Mexico
Dozens Of Nonnative Marine Species Have Invaded The Galapagos Islands

All Things Considered

02:52 min | 1 year ago

Dozens Of Nonnative Marine Species Have Invaded The Galapagos Islands

"Cornish. The Galapagos islands are like a biological arc in the eastern Pacific Ocean. There giant tortoises and swimming iguanas and numerous creatures found nowhere else is one of the world's most protected places. But scientists have discovered that dozens of exotic species have invaded the Galapagos underwater NPR's Christopher Joyce reports on this unexpected finding marine biologists James Carlton remembers when he first got to thinking that the Galapagos islands may not be as pristine as people thought on my first visit to the Galapagos collected some samples from both bottom barnacles sponges and other hitchhikers that was nineteen eighty-seven Carlton didn't know if those creatures he found were native or not so four years ago he and a team of scientists decided to return and take a closer. Look, we didn't know quite what to do. Expect what they did know was that on land. There were lots of invasive species species that are not native to the islands, but in the surrounding ocean. Scientists only knew of five invaders everything else presumably was native when Carlton's team looked underwater. However, they found a hoard of invaders and now we have fifty three which is a rather stunning increase marine biologist. Gregory Ruiz says they found exotic species on pilings docks and mangrove roots. They hung plastic plates underwater in all sorts of alien invertebrates latched onto them at the Smithsonian environmental research center in Maryland, where he works Ruiz shows me, the invasions lab, researchers here track invasive species around the world, this is a organism that we've found in the Galapagos tuna could also known as a sea squirt a tiny tube-like animal. He has more invaders in glass bowls filled with alcohol barnacle. Nls LG, CNN enemies. They're described in the journal aquatic invasions recess rising tourism in the Galapagos means more boats, docks, pilings, transportation and homes. For invasive, these organisms aren't just footnotes in the biology. Text zebra mussels invaded the Great Lakes and caused havoc the tiny parasite called MS X has killed millions of choice tres in the Chesapeake Bay on the east coast James Carlton now, professor emeritus at Williams. College says tracking invaders helps authorities stem they're spread he expects other tropical areas or heavily invaded as well. And in a protected place. Let the Galapagos he says their presence means something's been lost. We value a world that we think represents nature before we began altering it before we began removing species, Abby species and changing the abundance of species, even in the Galapagos that were. World is

Galapagos James Carlton Cornish. The Galapagos Gregory Ruiz Pacific Ocean Williams Christopher Joyce Smithsonian Environmental Rese Great Lakes Maryland Chesapeake Bay NPR LG CNN Professor Four Years
Galapagos discussed on Gary and Shannon

Gary and Shannon

00:14 sec | 1 year ago

Galapagos discussed on Gary and Shannon

"Generations and a giant tortoise spotted this week in the Galapagos islands belongs to a species not seen in more than a century. The Fernandina giant tortoise was thought to be extinct. A tortoise expert on the island say the females all, but most importantly,

Galapagos
Andros Unexplored Blue Holes

Curiosity Daily

03:04 min | 1 year ago

Andros Unexplored Blue Holes

"You've probably heard of the Galapagos islands. That's where Charles Darwin was inspired to develop the theory of evolution. And it's home to a huge number of species that you won't find anywhere else on earth. What you may not know is there's a spot in the Bahamas that may also have a startling variety of life. But we don't know because we've barely scratched the surface exploring it. I'm talking about Andros the largest island in the Bahamas. You one. Listen up if you like diving or snorkeling snorkeling is really cool. Actually, I went snorkeling and believes for the first time a few months ago, and I was really surprised how much I loved it. I've never done it. That sounds great. It's like you're spying on another universe. All the life down there and millions of little fishes, and you're just like. Wow, too big world awesome. Yeah. So underwater adventures listen up the thing about Andrews is that it's home to more than two hundred blue holes there underwater, cave systems that go as deep as almost a thousand feet. Blue holes are home to ancient limestone, caves carved into the ocean floor during the ice ages glacial runoff a road the limestone earth in that formed elaborate cave systems once the glaciers melted. The sea levels rose and the caves flooded. And that's what created the mysterious. Blue sinkholes that exist today when these blue holes are found out in the oceans their appropriately named for their indigo centers and light blue perimeters. They follow the rules of the ocean. Subject to tides and home to the same species found in the surrounding area. But while these offshore blue holes are visually. The most familiar Andrews has more than one hundred seventy five inland. Blue holes there tucked away in wooded parts of the island, and they're very different from offshore blue holes, and quite frankly anything else on earth. They look black. Thanks to the accumulation of dead bacteria from fallen trees and leaves from the surface. They look just like swamps. But what lies beneath is incredible see because of the reduced title flow. These blue holes are sharply stratified by a thin layer of freshwater on the surface that stops oxygen from reaching the dense saltwater below the result is an ecological anomaly, you end up with an underwater world of prehistoric species that are still capable of surviving in an oxygen free environment. Like that of early earth instead of oxygen the wa. Is chock full of another gas called hydrogen sulfide, which potentially fatal to humans until recently. Very few people have dived in these dangerous inland blue holes, but as of late scientists have started investigating just how other-worldly they actually are in twenty eleven biologists performed DNA analyses of microbes across five different Bahamian, blue holes and found absolutely no shared species, thousands of experienced divers flock to Andrews every year to get a taste for these underwater Marvel's, but snorkeling the surface is also a popular activity dive in and you may find some clues to the

Andrews Bahamas Charles Darwin Andros Thousand Feet
Lost ‘Darwinia’ islands could be origin of species in the Galapagos

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

00:27 sec | 2 years ago

Lost ‘Darwinia’ islands could be origin of species in the Galapagos

"Galapagos islands or another example of this though, there there have been at least disputed claims of Inca artifacts found on the Galapagos islands perhaps due to Incas sailors being blown off course, the Seychelles in the Indian Ocean are another example of islands that were unhappy with through most of recorded history, though, they may have been visited by early seafarers as well. Depend on who you talk to. But with Christmas Island, I found no such thing and not even a crackpot

Galapagos Indian Ocean Seychelles Christmas Island
"galapagos islands" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

03:30 min | 2 years ago

"galapagos islands" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"The. Mercedes, Benz of plano news center a federal drug trial underway in Sherman, it's a sixty seven million dollar cocaine smuggling case. Involving a ship that was bound for Hong Kong the US attorney for the eastern district of Texas. Agreed, to take the case which started with a drug seizure two years ago. West, of the Galapagos islands five people have already entered guilty pleas but. The Chinese captain of the. Ship, and another member of the crew are, facing drug-smuggling charges in Sherman the morning news reports the trial is expected to, lay, out among other things the way drugs are, smuggled from Colombia to the United States now the heat has been a major issue, in North Texas this. Summer and the alerts have been posted the electron signs you've, seen them on the highway warning people. Not to leave. Children and pets in an. Unattended vehicle well a, new survey is just out. At Fein's overwhelming Jordy of parents are still unaware or refuse to. Believe that there are susceptible to forgetting a child in the car airy Finkelstein is with Kars for Kids dot, org joins us, on the KRLD Newsline no. One believes that it could actually happen, to them that's what we found in the survey only about sixteen percent of parents are actually concerned that it can happen to. Them the numbers are amazing that I mean sixteen percent. Concern that can happen to them fifteen percent even taking precautions. And, the reaction that the other part that was so interesting was the, reaction of people in the survey, when it happens. To someone else reaction is that you know people should be put in jail or someone apparent you. Know, who who suffers a loss from such a tragedy You know is is maybe even call the murderer or or on. Fit to be parent they never should have had kids in. The first place those reactions tell you how people view these things and they don't, look at, it as something research shows is a memory lapse, that can, really can happen, to anybody this happens to people for the most part who who are who made a mistake exactly all the stories. You know they just seem so identical, teach our they just keep repeating each other. All right now the campaign is called it can happen. So what are you trying to get across to people what are you trying to get them to understand and how can. They work to be better at it, so we're trying to get them to understand, that it, can happen to them and it can happen to good parents and hopefully when they recognize that they'll take the simple precautions there's plenty of things you can do to try to prevent this simple things like you know people suggest leaving, a something like a teddy bear you know in your car In your car seat. When the child is not there and then whenever the child is very you put that in the front seat people. Recommend leaving maybe your phone in the backseat there are. Apps we developed an app a few number of years ago a free app that people could download that reminds you and there's many other so apps on the market. And it was just training yourself to always remember when you leave the car just look. Before you lock. It's something, that you could just train your your, your brain to do and and. Then you know such things will never, happen hopefully and. We hope that you know next year will run the? Same survey and hopefully the numbers will be very different and you know a lot more people will have? The reaction that yeah this is something that that that I'm worried about can happen and I do take precautions to. Stop it well the numbers are startling but also you have. The information what's the website cars.

Sherman Hong Kong Galapagos US attorney Texas cocaine plano Fein Finkelstein KRLD Colombia North Texas United States sixteen percent sixty seven million dollar fifteen percent two years
"galapagos islands" Discussed on My Favorite Murder with Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark

My Favorite Murder with Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark

04:49 min | 2 years ago

"galapagos islands" Discussed on My Favorite Murder with Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark

"And when we do our research we try our best to find stories that are like to look for the stories that everyone is telling that piece together what sounds like the most plausible based on what we're telling you and so we're fucking wrong to probably so we're adding to that so but we're right always flurry on island let's start there one of the islands that make up the archipelago archipelago archipelago didn't know that word before i heard it on let me say this podcast will them archipelago great thank you to the podcast the conspirators nicer it's filling me out of that archipelago all right so here we are archipelago that makes up the galapagos islands formed by volcanic eruption it's like another little tiny cluster of islands like near ecuador that were like that you're in the middle of fucking nowhere let's see did it florida is named after one jose flores he's the first president ecuador during his administration ecuador was like you know what this galapagos islands are hours goodbye wow okay the islands are of course known for their unique and wondrous creatures like giant tortoises that are used as an inspiration for charles darwin's the origin of species that's what everyone knows knows it for you know the island some other fucking there was like all these like europeans and pirates and people who would take over this little island the floor yana then one dick was like i'm gonna play a joke and i'm going to light a little fire and ended up burning the whole fucking island down no and let's see that's not a funny joke though it's the helmsmen of the nanto wailing vessel the essex in eighteen ninety does that and the captain of the vessel swore retribution on the culprit and but the ship is rammed and sunk by sperm whale and that's when herman melville got his fucking idea to write moby dick shit yeah there's history wow you know what i mean like don't burn a fucking island down dick especially not an archipelago and archipelago up alone but the nineteen twenty s ecuador is broken they're like we need some fucking money let's let sell the islands to help with our economy so then europeans are like great let's go buy some of these islands and fucking live there it's post world war one there's an economic like crash and everyone's freaking out so that brings a wave of european settlers and they i want to buy the land and they wanna live on a tropical island paradise this idea that this is going to be paradise so two of those people are dr frederick ritter who's forty three and his lover is fifteen years younger than him dora stretch so she's a teacher and aboard fucking housewife there from germany and they had met there when dora had become a patient of dr freidrich rhetoric so they had met when dora became a patient of dr ritter he's done 'test i think and she had dora had been diagnosed with ms and all of her doctors it's incurable you can't do anything about it fucking deal with it goodbye but dr ritter was like fuck that shit he believes he was like super into nucci oh and he was like here's here's what's going to happen if he he believed in the healing power of thought he man's into her that she didn't have to submit to her illness and she fell in love with him he fell in love with her and they decided to leave their spouses for each other well he looks like steve zahn you know nice you know what i mean i love steve zone like a rugged steve's on oh like a rugged liking like gum did you ever see sunshine cleaning company no he's steve zahn in that movie is a cop okay so he's insanely yoked yes like no longer hippie steve's on he's like he's evil cop sees he's like steve's on popeye had a baby yeah and she looks like a young emma thompson okay okay that's a nice combination right so dr ritter he's an eccentric he setters he steady studies h e like any good angry hipster i wrote sure because it's like oh my god like if you went on a date with a guy was like i'm really in ichi i be like oh wait sorry really quick that's my friend over there and i would fucking run fast as i could xactly faker baker by so he's into his fills philisophical principles and advocacy for a natural.

fifteen years
"galapagos islands" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"galapagos islands" Discussed on WTMA

"Kito very high elevation yeah you need an oxygen tank sometimes when you're there as i and then of course we went to the galapagos islands which belong to ecuador and you know this is not we keep getting this argument that that oh they have to leave because everything's so terrible ecuador is not one of those countries and if these countries like honduras and guatemala are so horrible that no one in their right mind would dare stay then maybe the world could should get together maybe the united nations should you know they should they should declared a world heritage site or something like that since i go around declaring every bus stop a world heritage site these days for for some nefarious reason that i'm not entirely dialed into but i i'm marveling at the phony baloney arguments that that we get every time we have laws and and you know there are on the books you can read them we have immigration laws we have borders we have a sovereign country i would appreciate it if you'd respect those laws if that's too much to ask then we might have to deport your s because you know that's that's it all i was only dealing a little cocaine you know like this woman that did twenty years and president trump let her out of jail yesterday community sentence we have laws and the democrats have no respect for our laws and they have no respect for our borders and they have no respect for really for anything got respect for some awful terrible horrible thing for pretending that the hyde amendment doesn't exist there's one that comes from they have respect for that oh the third leg of the triple crown is coming up and i've got some bad news about that too you know the horse justify the big you know is likely to win the third race the third leg of the triple crown coming up well i've got some news about justified.

ecuador honduras guatemala united nations cocaine president trump galapagos twenty years
"galapagos islands" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"galapagos islands" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Details about the discovery were released yesterday the exact location of the three hundred year old wreck of the san jose was long considered one of history's enduring maritime mysteries the three masted galleon was carrying gold silver and emeralds worth about seventeen billion in today's dollars when it went down in seventeen o eight took a judge's intervention but a thirty year old van and upstate new york will finally leave the nest thirty year old michael rotondo refused to move out of his parent's home near syracuse new york so his parents took him to court to get him out now a judge has ruled he's got to go in court documents mark and christina rotondo claim they had given their son five written notices telling him he must leave the house immediately saying he refused to contribute to household expenses or assists with chores even offering michael eleven hundred dollars to find another place but michael said his parents demands were retaliatory and they didn't give him reasonable time to vacate the judge credited michael for his legal research search then rules he must move out linda lopez abc news harrods apparently much prouder about this guy an eighth grader from exeter new hampshire makes tomorrow's final round of the national geographic bee in washington dc through the semifinals sean chang had the highest overall score among the fifty four contestants the winner earns a fifty thousand dollars scholarship and expedition to the galapagos islands and a lifetime subscription to national geographic a censored graduation cake really happened in south carolina when kerekou sanski went online to order a cake for her honors graduate son at publix grocery store in charleston south carolina she got the message that the middle word of the latin phrase suma coom lodhi with highest honors was profane it was substituted with three hyphen cake because he's not a big pay eater we are standing there to waiting to see it and when we opened it it was a huge schoffstall of the store manager gave the woman and apology a refund and a gift card jim krasula cbs.

san jose new york harrods sean chang south carolina publix grocery store charleston michael rotondo syracuse christina rotondo exeter new hampshire washington kerekou sanski jim krasula thirty year eleven hundred dollars fifty thousand dollars three hundred year
"galapagos islands" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"galapagos islands" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"That they made to take bigger and more people cruise you can of course cargo ships and so forth right i they have we had we had fabulous lecturers aboard that were speaking about what you just mentioned in more detail and made it extremely interesting let's not forget that along the way somehow i managed to be invited to visit part of the world called the galapagos islands your love and top of my list for go ahead however that is so amazing because it was discovered oh i don't know actually who discovered it at one it was but they decided since it never had seen a human being to keep it that way and so therefore you're on strict rules and regulations about going there you actually get off the cruise ship that's ron and you go in a line and there is a barely marketable let light that you travel there is a director in the front of you hannah director behind you and you're not allowed to step off the path actually the time i was there we had a bird landed on my head i still have the picture that i in my photo albums and that was quite an experience the animals of mary came they have never been hugged or killed grandfather allowed to touch them right but you can walk by them without any fear and it's an experience i don't know how many galapagos islands we visited about six or seven and the important part was that we.

ron director galapagos islands hannah
"galapagos islands" Discussed on The Show About Science

The Show About Science

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"galapagos islands" Discussed on The Show About Science

tim tim howard editor reporter intern bhatt nate eight years
Changes in the Galapagos Islands

The Show About Science

01:44 min | 2 years ago

Changes in the Galapagos Islands

TIM Tim Howard Editor Reporter Intern Bhatt Nate Eight Years
"galapagos islands" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"galapagos islands" Discussed on KGO 810

"Know that and so that kind of propelled darwin's theories about you know evolution you know he would go back and he would notice that when he went to the galapagos islands and he saw that something's obviously somesomething lived because it had a reason to live and prosper you know and and and and something else benefited from that and would kind of protected or coexist with it you know but the things that couldn't the things that obviously were more detailed and had a higher structure were more likely to be wiped out if bad weather but the things that were more open to change lasted and dinosaurs warned the they were more of the the former than the latter then and they you know did you ever see gary larson's says the real reasons dinosaurs went extinct dinosaur smoking a cigarette but there is something about that there's something i look at this article about these crustaceans we joke about the big penis on a crab but there is something about that that you know the teachers in everything i mean you know viruses always not always but generally before they wipe out whatever did they invaded they change because they don't they're not lie viruses are weird because they're technically not alive they aren't because they can't they the thing about they don't reproduce without something else so they can't reproduce amongst themselves for the technically viruses aren't alive do not i didn't know that that was the definition of something being alive i mean i i'm alive i can't reproduce by myself but you can reproduce another person a virus can make another virus reproduce it needs a living cell to reproduce it invades anyway but so they don't kill off their hosts because it's in their deepen their genetic messaging to not do that because then they would die to but they're not alive so they really can't anyway another state has banned football not kelly no and that and that headline is the most pathetic headline ever read an explain why coming up next.

gary larson football
"galapagos islands" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"galapagos islands" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"If you think of the galapagos islands remind might jump immediately to the islands endemic species such as the giant tortoise and the marine iguana but what you might not know is it the pacific ocean archipelago also has a growing population of tens of thousands of people this ballooning human presence on the islands his presenting a unique set of challenges the islands ecosystems and for the urban designers planning for the future professor justyna caricatures from the university of melbourne in his researching house plan for the future of the kasese population while she spoke as though he ferguson about how up an isolation isn't always a positive thing may mean kenner anam her how epa underlining architecture in bringing wrecking of malcolm the galapagos islands a famous for their unique biodiversity in it's really hard to imagine them being harm to a growing human population how many people currently living there well productivity back come from census is about fifty thousand uh do you appropriation nobody knows because they see lots of people who come from the mainland ecuador equally stayed there longer so it's probably like 65 maybe even to forty thousand people on the island and what does the population growth look like well the actually mentioning that it might double in the time which is quite frightening because over to keep the designated urban areas uh smoke fair not denselypopulated so he's the way of accommodating the increase of the population that people who are coming to the island all dreams about having the on the house on the bit of lunch as he can you imagine so if that is the case that will be properly possible pretty much and it will impact the ecosystem and obviously not have to.

professor ecuador the house galapagos pacific ocean university of melbourne ferguson
"galapagos islands" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"galapagos islands" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"And sheep on a story crowned evoking the three wise men because in an effort to block controversial ads metro hasn't allowed religious once for two and a half years the archdiocese of washington argues in the new federal law those rules are unconstitutional and this ad is simply about hope and an invitation to the christmas season if the latest in a series of ongoing legal challenges to metros and policies metros accepted salvation army and yoga ads but rejected birthright israel adds among others mack smith for cbs news washington coming at president trump addresses today's north korea and launch wtmj news time three o eight all right big meeting tomorrow a huge meeting tomorrow were discussing our tripped amodu peach you and the galapagos people to sign up for the trip meetings tomorrow at six thirty to milwaukee restaurant you must iris vp to attend the only way to do that is to send me an email would you like to get more information on motchi pete you and the galapagos in our trip there next fall it's an incredible trip the inca ruins in the andes mountains the beautiful galapagos islands with all that wildlife it's your chance to get more information and to sign but you must aris vp meeting at six thirty tomorrow would you like to come to the meeting or get more information email me john mercure at wtmjcom john dot merck here at wtmjcom it's match you peach you and the galapagos islands fall 2018 of bucket list trip more nation or more lee to sign up for tomorrow 630 informational meeting you must ours vp my email john doubt mercure m e r c u r e at wtmjcom prion carol maria i'm coming congress i enter in milwaukee june before one and only carol burnett coming to milwaukee evening of laughter a reflection worthy audience as the questions and carroll gives her fun what he answers carol.

mack smith carol burnett john lee vp milwaukee galapagos president cbs washington christmas carroll galapagos islands north korea trump israel new federal law
"galapagos islands" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"galapagos islands" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"Black rock brooks automation valmonte industries puma biotech mental audit down stocks today quaker chemical will get him zoom quick teledyne and lam research form work alava ghosts a place that's on my bucket list if any of you bids to the galapagos island please email me and tell me how koulas uh i'm told i gotta do that uh uh uh help spot kaley tencourse some of the semiconductors getting iffy work day look uh uh uh they looked like breaking down today lockheed martin marietta vacations worldwide lennox international marketaccess gravity corp uh uh uh uh trump grohmann yet northrop grumman say the ten times faster and denver threes quickly rockwell automation athenahealth's nvidia bows up five in the aftermarket estline tech amazon was that was down fifteen only down three general dynamics album all rh core periscope oh man this too many credit acceptance mk us instruments united rentals asm lithography assembled ix m m and by the way that's just the fra half's gene stocks which just told zeal the internal the get the little dickey nfc here and just keep that in mind remember when you get corrections just happen he go through a few days a couple of weeks what we call deterioration were able to get on this radio show and sadio hey this group this sector that secondguess what we've been telling you about these small caps recently transports uh uh what else the overstate holes the dust realistic a gagging a little bit here new law seen that today what are you serious mm that's weird this that the other thing and whatever else thanks for being.

kaley tencourse nvidia amazon general dynamics lam research galapagos island lockheed martin marietta denver united rentals asm
"galapagos islands" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"galapagos islands" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Great talking good morning yet welcome to our show number six hundred forty four originating live from the galapagos islands del graybrown got back safely from the galapagos richer i gather is home to species of birds that arching anywhere else on earth ray thanks for coming back to join us well thank you my pleasure scott and as we birdying people say let's not beat around the bush did you see the blue footed booby all we saw many blue footed bubis and also their cousins the red footed bubis withdrew just as spectacular and there were finches that darwin made famous right that's right at his time it was thought there were thirteen of these species of finches and you know he wrote his famous on the origin of species twenty eight years after he left the galapagos islands that's the the treatise that's really considered to be the foundation of evolutionary biology and this scientific theory about a natural selection but it's interesting scott because scientists now with dna studies in such have decided there are many more than thirteen species there are up to nineteen isaac at last measure and i gather you went snorkelling we will snorkeling i think five times if you're going to try and persuade me their birds who live under water i'm going to be very sceptically well there are birds that swim underwater most notably the the flightless cormorant the league's us there whose wings have evolved into these tiny little appendages so this spurred cannot fly but it can definitely swim and we did swim with them but we snorkel along with some other species it kind of might surprise you green sea turtles marini guan guavas galapagos sea lions galapagos penguins and low this is a real believe it or not to species of sharks swam underwater with you yes indeed ray ray the ideas do avoid sharks man massacres women within now you tell me but our guide assured us that we needn't be afraid so we saw these white tip reef sharks there maybe five feet long and then we saw these galapagos sharks who joined the standard a relative or a type of bull shark oh bull shark grid i told the.

galapagos scott bush galapagos islands del graybrow darwin twenty eight years five feet
"galapagos islands" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"galapagos islands" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Talking good morning welcome to our show number six hundred forty four originating live from the galapagos islands kale graybrown got back safely from the galapagos whicher i gather is home to species of birds that arching anywhere else on earth ray thanks for coming back to join us well thank you my pleasure scott and as we birdying people say let's not beat around the bush did you see the blue footed booby all we saw many blue footed bubis and also their cousins the red footed bubis which are just as spectacular and they were finches the darwin made famous right that's right at his time it was thought there were thirteen of these species of finches and you know he wrote his famous on the origin of species twenty eight years after he left the galapagos islands that's the the treatise that's really considered to be the foundation of evolutionary biology and the scientific theory about a natural selection but it's interesting scott because scientists now with dna studies in such have decided there are many more than thirteen species there are up to nineteen icy at last measure and i gather you went snorkeling we went snorkelling i think five times if you're going to try and persuade me their birds who live under water i'm going to be very sceptically well there are birds that swim underwater most notably the the flightless cormorant the league's us there whose wings have evolved into these tiny little appendages so this bird cannot fly but it can definitely swim and we did swim with them and we snorkel along with some other species it kind of might surprise you green sea turtles marini guan as galapagos sea lions galapagos penguins and low this is a real believe it or not to species of sharks swam underwater with you yes indeed ray ray the ideas do avoid sharks man massacres women within now you tell me laura you but our guide assured us that we needn't be afraid so we saw these white tip reef sharks are maybe five feet long and then we saw these galapagos sharks which i understand her a relative or a type of bull shark oh bull shark greg i told the in wouldn't be levy yeah we swim with them with snorkel with them it was quite remarkable hostile epoca's.

scott bush darwin epoca twenty eight years five feet
"galapagos islands" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"galapagos islands" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Revis talking good morning yet welcome to our show number six hundred forty four originating live from the galapagos islands gerald graybrown got back safely from the galapagos would cure i gather is home to species of birds that arching anywhere else on earth ray thanks for coming back to join us will thank you my pleasure scott and as we birdying people say let's not beat around the bush did you see the blue footed booby all we saw many blue footed bubis and also their cousins the red footed bubis with just as spectacular and there were finches the darwin make things right that's right at his time it was thought there were thirteen of the species of finches and you know he wrote his famous on the origin of species twenty eight years after he left the galapagos islands that's the the treatise that's really considered to be the foundation of evolutionary biology and the scientific theory about a natural selection but it's interesting scott because scientists now with dna studies in such have decided there are many more than thirteen species there are up to nineteen icy at last measure and i gather you went snorkeling we were snorkeling i think five times if you're going to try and persuade me their birds who live under water i'm going to be very sceptically well there are birds that swim underwater most notably the the flightless cormorant the league's us there whose wings have evolved into these tiny little appendages so this spurred cannot fly but it can definitely swim and we did swim with them but we snorkel along with some other species it kind of might surprise who green sea turtles marini guan as galapagos e lions galapagos penguins and low this is a real believe it or not to species of sharks swam underwater with you yes indeed ray ray the ideas to avoid sharks man massacres women within now you tell me lorry but our guide assured us that we needn't be afraid so we saw these white tip reef sharks are maybe five feet long and then we saw these galapagos sharks which i understand her a relative or a type of bull shark though bull shark grid isn't it i told the and when bolivia yeah we swim with them with snorkel with them it was quite remarkable hearts the galapagos.

Revis galapagos scott bush darwin bolivia gerald graybrown twenty eight years five feet
"galapagos islands" Discussed on KMJ NOW

KMJ NOW

02:48 min | 3 years ago

"galapagos islands" Discussed on KMJ NOW

"And twitter i am mary roach author journalist and your ma bonner atur four the program is now my pleasure to introduce today speaker richard harris npr science correspondent and author of the new book rigor mortis how sloppy science creates worthless cures crushes hopes hope and wastes billions richard harris is one of the nation's most liberated science journalists covering science medicine and the environment for npr for the past three decades he's a threetime winner of the american association for the advancement of science journalism award and he's cofounder of the washington dc area science writers' association and is past president of the national associate asian of science raiders richard has travelled to all seven continents for npr his reports of originated from timbuktu the south pole the galapagos islands beijing during the sars epidemic the center of greenland the amazon rainforest the foot of mount kilimanjaro and japan to cover the nuclear aftermath of the two thousand eleven tsunami before joining npr richard was a science writer for the san francisco examiner and he graduated from the university of california at santa cruz since two thousand fourteen richards focus has been biomedical research the subject of our discussion today richard says that american taxpayers spend more than thirty billion dollars every year to fund biomedical research and that half of all the studies funded cannot be replicated elsewhere he says that this biomedical research anchored in a system that often rewards the wrong behaviors is needlessly slowing the search for new treatments and cures ultimately he argues that sloppy science as dangerous consequences for all of us please welcome richard harris you richard we so often read about news about drugs that are showing great promise whether it's alzheimer's or cancer heart disease a an and then that that's the last we hear something showing great promise in in in mice and then we don't hear anything and so it's you know it while it's great news for the mouse community it's kind of disheartening so i wanted to talk a little bit about preclinical trials the mouth studies and the cell studies and what's going on why do those shut show such great promise and then end up it was at nine out of ten new drugs end up failing in clinical trials in humans and and so i thought maybe we could start by talking a little bit about mice now if well it turns out that.

richard harris npr american association president sars mount kilimanjaro writer santa cruz alzheimer mary roach washington beijing amazon japan san francisco university of california thirty billion dollars three decades