35 Burst results for "Galapagos"

What's the Largest Lake in the World?

BrainStuff

05:09 min | 2 months ago

What's the Largest Lake in the World?

"Siberia's Lake Cal is not your average. Lake. At forty, nine miles wide by three hundred and ninety, five miles long that seventy, nine by six, hundred and thirty, five kilometers. It's the world's largest freshwater lake and with history that dates back twenty, five, million years it's also Earth's oldest. But size and age aren't the only things that make this. Lake. Special. Lake by cow is also home to more than three thousand, seven, hundred different species, many of which are only found in the Baikal region. That's why by cows often considered the Galapagos of Russia. No in case it's bio-diversity doesn't dazzle you here's another but Julia fact. Lake by cow has its own version of the Loch ness monster. Its name translates to water dragon master and it's described as a giant sturgeon with a prominent stout, an armored plating along the back. The monsters history goes back centuries with ancient carvings depicting this terrifying creature. Interest peaked we thought. So here's a starter guide to this ancient beautiful and mysterious late, which is by the way a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Lake Baikal is located in southern Russia near the border of Mongolia, its depth of five thousand, three, hundred feet about one thousand, six, hundred meters makes it the world's deepest lake about five hundred feet or two hundred meters it's also famous for its clarity of water and ice. When the lake is frozen, you can see dozens of meters or hundreds of feet down. And as we said at the top, it's also the world's largest lake that size twelve, thousand, two, hundred, square miles, or thirty one, thousand, six, hundred square kilometers makes it comparable in volume to the entire Amazon Basin? A first scale? It reportedly takes about three hundred and thirty years for single water molecule to flow from inlet to inlet. So. How did like by cow get so massive About twenty, five, million ago lake by CAL formed through fractures and shifting within Earth's crust. It wasn't Lake Baikal as we know it. Now, though experts believe it was a series of lakes similar to the Great Lakes in the United States while scientists aren't positive how lake by CAL went for many lakes to the behemoth. It is today they do have theories. It could have been sinking earth erosion earthquakes or increased water from melting glaciers although it's likely a mix of these factors and more. That unifying change took place in the pleasing epoch about five point three to two point five million years ago. But this lake isn't finished growing. It's expanding at a rate of about point seven inches to centimeters every year at the same speed at which Africa in South America are drifting apart. At this speed, some scientists believe lake by Baikal is actually an ocean in the making. The lake boasts twenty-seven islands, the largest of which spans two, hundred, eighty square miles or seven, hundred, twenty, five square kilometers and has its own lake mountains and the population of fifteen hundred residents. The locals connected to power van underwater cable in two, thousand and five, and we're connected to the Internet shortly after. Some Call Lake by Cao, the Galapagos of Russia not only because it has an impressive array of those nearly four thousand species but also because eighty percent of those animals are found nowhere else. One reason for this unique biodiversity is the lakes. Array of hydrothermal vents which are commonly found in oceans but lake by cow is the only freshwater lake known to have them. Cold water from the lake enters cracks in the Earth's crust through these hydrothermal vents. When the water reaches magma, it heats up, then returns resurfacing with minerals and heat. These rich minerals are probably the reason some of the lakes most unusual species were able to develop including several unique fish and the nerpa seal species, which is the only exclusively freshwater seal species in the world and its evolution is mysterious and some scientists believe it arrived by a prehistoric river from the Arctic But beyond seals fish other common animals found in the forests and mountains surrounding Lake Baikal include. Elk. Reindeer links wild-boar, and of course, the lakes frequently reported water dragon master. And this ancient lake has another air of mystery about it. UFO sightings. Many locals have reported strange lights and alien spacecraft throughout the years and several Soviet era documents mention ufo instance in sightings around Earth's largest lake. However for all of its natural wonder, amazing wildlife end stranger sides for lake cows one hundred, thousand permanent residents it's simply home. Made, occupations are forestry agriculture, fisheries, hunting, and tourism though that's currently on hold due to covid nineteen. Here's hoping they opened back up soon.

Call Lake Lake Baikal Lake Cal Russia Galapagos Unesco World Heritage Site Siberia CAL Julia Great Lakes Loch Ness Monster Amazon Basin Mongolia South America United States Africa
Galapagos Island Shark Population In Danger From Overfishing

Environment: NPR

03:57 min | 2 months ago

Galapagos Island Shark Population In Danger From Overfishing

"Sharks in the Galapagos Islands are being decimated by fleets of fishing vessels many of them Chinese and that's bringing these vital creatures to the brink of extinction. Turn is a professor of biology at the. San Francisco Kiko in Ecuador and he's advocating for an expansion of protected waters in the area to save the sharks and he joins us now professor her welcome to the program. Thank you. It's great to be here. I understand fleets of international ships many of them. Chinese. Come to these waters every year and they're they're now what brings them. Well the waters off Galapagos and just in this region of very, very productive Galapagos islands are in a big obstacle in the middle of the ocean. So there's a deep cold water current that's flowing from the West and when it hits, the abacus platform is diverted at the surface and that creates a lot of productivity. So we get very rich fishing grounds and also fantastic biodiversity. How many ships are there? How many sharks are there? And you know what is this situation? Exactly as it stands at the moment, will galapagos is home to about thirty odd species of sharks, and some of those are critically endangered such as the scalloped hammerhead shark, and some of those are also highly migratory, the scalloped hammerhead, the Silky Shark, the whale shark, they all leave the borders of the marine reserve, and then they're subject to different levels of threat. So these vessels come into these waters and while they're fishing for other species, they catch these sharks in their nets. Yes depending on the method of fishing the longliners perhaps the vessels that we would be concerned about these are extensively fishing for tuna, but they will also catch several endangered shark species. During their fishing. And we know that if they do catch these species than they will retain them and keep them on board. So. These vessels though we should be clear aren't doing anything illegal they are allowed to fish with fishing. So why exactly are shark populations still taking a hit right? These vessels operating in international waters and depending on the fleet, they'll be operating under a regional fisheries organisations. The problem is that the species that we're trying to protect in Galapagos don't understand any of that. They go whether they WANNA go. As the problem is that once they leave the protective waters of the marine reserve, they're immediately under threat. There are hammerhead foraging grounds out in international waters and numbers have declined. There was a study cocoa sign, which is our neighbor in Galapagos, and they found that hammerhead sharks have declined by about forty five percent since the creation of the marine reserve, which is not the result you would hope for. So what you're advocating for an expansion of Ecuador's marine reserves, right that would help protect these areas of marine diversity and also. The. Shark. Species. I'm advocating on several levels I think first of all, we need to expand our reserve and this is something that we can do as a nation within our jurisdiction but I think we also need to play a more prominent role in the development of the Biodiversity Beyond National Jurisdiction Agreement that is currently in the works, and this will allow for better protection for these species. Once they're in the high seas, it will even allow for the creation of open water or high seas, marine protected areas. So I think we to work on several levels. The international waters needs to be considered in a more conservation perspective than they have been until now. Alex. is a professor of biology at the. San Francisco, they keep in Ecuador Professor Arun. Thank you very much. Thank you.

Sharks Galapagos Galapagos Islands Professor Ecuador San Francisco Alex.
A Tech Cold War Looms

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:52 min | 3 months ago

A Tech Cold War Looms

"This week Britain's minister, Boris Johnson is expected to reverse a decision. He made in January to allow the Chinese telecom giant hallway to build part of the country's five gene at work. The British public deserve to have access to the best possible. Now if people oppose one brand or not. To tell us what's the alternative. Britain has come under enormous pressure from its biggest America which sees while way as a security threat. It's not the only Chinese firm that America views with suspicion. Last week Secretary of State Mike. Pompeo told Fox. News the government was considering banning the social media. APP TIKTOK. Owned by the Chinese firm by dense. We're certainly looking at it I. Don't want to get in front of the president, but it's something we're looking at. What would you recommend that people download that APP on their phones tonight tomorrow anytime. currently Boley if you want your private information in the hands of the Chinese Communist Party. and American firms are caught to the geopolitical tensions between the world's two biggest economies. Google Microsoft and twitter all said they would stop cooperating with Hong Kong's authorities for the time being because of a sweeping new security law there imposed by Beijing. It all adds up to what's being called. A new Cold War fought on a digital battleground. For the last three or four years, people have talked about the tech. Cold War. Patrick Fouls is the economists business affairs editor. This strange thing is it's been hard to see evidence of much damage on the ground, and in fact, the companies like apple and Hallway in China. It's really been a golden era in some ways with record sales and profits over the last couple. Couple of years was become clear however in the last few weeks. Is The tech cold? War is really beginning to bite. And why is that? Why is that split becoming so much more certain now? Well I think what you can do is look at it at two speeds. The world of software and the Internet was never particularly linked up in the first place so. Chinese consumers can't use most American Internet companies and vice versa, and what we're seeing, there is the final tentacles are beginning to unwind really very quickly, and that's that's example. The TIKTOK BAN THE REFUSAL US tech companies to play ball with the new Chinese law in Hong Kong so that. World really splitting quickly. The thing that's taking more time is the heart where supply chains which are much much more rigid structures is many many hundreds of billions of dollars of equipment in the grand huge numbers of people being employed, and it's really very hard to untangle those quickly, but that does not seem to be happening as well partly, because of the American actions against Hallway, but also because China seems to be deciding okay, we're GONNA have to go alone here which means we're going to have to really ramp up investment, and so, how how prepared are the country's respective? Tech Industries to to make that split complete. Will in the wall, the softwares already in effect pretty much happened in the world of hauled where the answer is, people are beginning to get plans up and running so smick this Chinese semiconductor company not take that seriously in the past by its Western and Asian competitors, but now it's really raising very big box the ideas to supersize the production capacity and sophistication of semiconductors in China. That's a process that's underway. Similarly Wall Way in China is scrambling around to find alternative sources for the key components that it purchases from the West particularly American companies and over the next I think eighteen months will see a sense of whether that's possible. The one thing to make clear is there are some companies. Companies here which are just left in very uncomfortable positions. Apple in China makes over one hundred million dollars a day there on the simply no easy way for it to pick sides in. You know it depends on the US Amazon China similarly. TSMC, which is the huge Taiwanese semiconductor company that really dominates the industry to some degree. It depends on Chinese customers and American ones, and for those companies that are caught in the middle. There really is no simple answer to this, but if the big picture here is that each country has to build up its own set of software and hardware champions, that sounds expensive redundant I mean. How easy will it be for these countries to make those parallel systems? Well I think you can look at it in two ways. One is sort of finances of it almost an and just that you're going to have to duplicate. Supply chains to some degree and I think that could easily cost. Hundreds of billions of dollars to do is not impossible, and arguably within the scale of the overall economy is a super tolerable inefficiency. I think the other call St-, which is much harder to get to grips with is just the risk of this process spiraling out of control. And to give you two ways in which could happen, it could easily for example move from the world of tech to the world of finance with western Chinese banks subject to sudden private. BANS FREEZES OF ACTIVITY. A night could be much more destabilizing because the financial system is very sensitive to changes like that the other risk is just that this becomes the thin end of the wedge, and sooner or later we find out that suddenly American calls or Chinese toys, or a growing list of things deem to be of strategic importance I and instead of this really being an argument bat security, it just becomes an indiscriminate path of protectionism, the house, a huge economic cost, but on technology end of things that is inherently a global business. How do you think other countries are going to deal with this split as it happened? Well the assumption I think of many American policy makers is the world's default is to use Silicon Valley and one of the things that will happen is that assumption is tested a pretty painful way? It's clear that some very close American allies. Japan Australia possibly Burton will. Ultimately vast choose go with America, but I think we'll see. First of all. China's tech industry now has a very big sphere of influence that includes a lot of Asia where people will continue to use Chinese tech, and secondly that some big economies India's the obvious one may take a third off, and you know be equally hostile, friendly to America and shine. And really seek to play both sides off while developing their own indigenous capacity, so the end of the day. You're heading towards a world where America. Controls most of the world's technology, and then there's this Galapagos of China with its own systems. I think instead your heading to world, which is very fractured with the bulk of the world's population living in countries that use both systems and probably mistrust both to some degree. So. Is it sensible to ask who's likely to win the technical door? I. Think will see both superpowers do probably just find because they are huge. Sophisticated markets and the real losers will be the node countries that are sort of stuck between the two places like Taiwan Hall Sibley Career, where really it's impossible for them to pick sides, and where the own technology industry as a result is going to face a very difficult Erie. Patrick thank you very much time. Jason thanks for having me.

China America United States Patrick Chinese Communist Party. Britain Boris Johnson Tech Industries Apple Hong Kong Tsmc Boley Taiwan Hall Sibley Career President Trump Galapagos Pompeo
What's the Difference Between Turtles and Tortoises?

BrainStuff

05:07 min | 6 months ago

What's the Difference Between Turtles and Tortoises?

"COM welcome to brainstorm a production of iheartradio. Hey brain stuff lauren. Boko bomb here at some point. Let's just say around two hundred and sixty million years ago earth got turtles. They looked strange. And these our modern mammalian times when lots of things are squishy and unarmored but during the late Permian epoch. Those early turtles were dressed in all the latest fashions. A short sturdy legs bony plates and a stiff splayed crawling strapped. Shortly after turtles made their evolutionary arrival eight fairly standard earth thing happened a mass extinction event. Although mass extinctions have happened with some regularity on our planet this one was a doozy and it wiped out almost all of the life in the oceans and over two thirds of the vertebrates on land. The things that survived had to have been pretty good at survival and it turns out turtles. Were we spoke about email with Laura Smith? A research scientist who specializes in herpetology at the Jones Center each way which is an organization in Newton Georgia that promotes excellence in natural resource management and conservation. She said turtles have a really successful body form. That hasn't changed all that much over time. They retained the primitive shell. Which is a really protective safe body design. Also turtles live in a lot of different habitats. Their aquatic and also terrestrial so living in a lot of different habitats has allowed them to persist. So what's the difference between tortoises and turtles all of the animals alive today that protect themselves with a Shell? Which is basically just a modified ribcage are in the order student. He's collectively we call this group of animals turtles but individually. We might call them different things based on where they live and some morphological and physiological traits. Tortoises are a group that are generally always found on land. Smith said they say that. Not all turtles tortoises but all tortoises are turtles be turtles are organisms with. Shell which might be in water or might be on land. A tortoise is a type of turtle in general both turtles and tortoises as well as other reptiles lay their eggs on land. It's what makes them different from Amphibians which need water for egg-laying end at least part of their life cycle because tortoises are a type of turtle. It's difficult to lay down hard and fast rules about what makes something tortoise ish rather than turtles but in general tortoises are always found on land whereas turtles can be found in aquatic or marine habitats as well as Land Smith said turtles and tortoises look different because of where they live a seat hurdle is only found in the ocean the females are the only ones that come on land and that's just eggs they have four legs but the front legs are almost like wings or paddles. They're not great for moving around on land at all because they're adapted for swimming quickly. Their shells have a low flat profile for cutting through the water. Compare that to a Galapagos Tortoise for example whose body can weigh up to nine hundred twenty pounds. That's almost four hundred twenty kilos with stocky elephantine legs a high dome. Shell and big scales on their exposed skin to protect them from predators and they wouldn't last long in the ocean but luckily they don't have to. The Smith said for the most part. There's not really one characteristic that tells you whether something is a tortoise or turtle but it's pretty clear if you see a little turtle on the side of the road and it has a sort of flattened shell profile webbed feet in the back smooth skin and some brighter colors. That's going to be a turtle tortoise. Have a heavier more dome? Shell and subdued colors as usual. The terminology can be confusing Box Turtles for instance which are widespread in the United States in Central America? And don't really swim or spend much time in the water. But they're still considered turtles rather than tortoises and then there are the terrapins. Which is the name given to aquatic turtles in the United Kingdom in the US aquatic turtles are just called hurdles with the exception of the diamondback terrapin which lives in brackish water in tidal marshes in the eastern United States? Both tortoises end hurdles have made themselves at home on this planet. We find both on every continent other than an Arctic with one exception. There are no tortoise species native to Australia. Smith said

Laura Smith United States Lauren Terrapins Research Scientist Australia United Kingdom Newton Georgia Jones Center Central America
A Tale of Two Spams

Household Name

01:05 min | 8 months ago

A Tale of Two Spams

"I guess you won't be surprised to hear that I don't really know a lot about spam. I just always thought it was kind of a mystery meat. And it's not something I've really had so yeah in the continental. Us A lot of people. See it that way but the really fascinating thing about spam is that in Hawaii. It's totally different. It's a lot like Darwin's finches Darwin. Yes Darwin realized that these finches on the Galapagos Islands had all come from the same original bird but they'd actually adopted the different environments on the different islands. That's just like spam on the continental. Us Spam has had this rollercoaster journey from love to hate it too trendy food to laughing stock of the country but meanwhile in Hawaii in the middle of the Pacific on these islands spam has had a straight upward trajectory. So I'm going to tell you. The story of spam twice first on the mainland. Us and then in Hawaii okay. A tale of two spams take it away from

Hawaii Galapagos Islands Pacific
"galapagos" Discussed on Tumble: A Science Podcast for Kids

Tumble: A Science Podcast for Kids

01:51 min | 8 months ago

"galapagos" Discussed on Tumble: A Science Podcast for Kids

"We're talking to the youngest scientist we've ever had on the podcast. Brother and sister Oscar in May Johnson were nine and twelve years old when they conducted experiments in the Galapagos Islands. Go UP AGO. S- like the most famous science place in the world absolutely in this episode may an Oscar or going to share their story of science discovery. Before we get to this week's episode. We've got some new patrons thank on Patriae on Abdulah an odd non argan Silas Henry Anton Stella and Joshua enjoy. We also have some more of our patrons that are having birthdays coming up. Liam whose birthday is on February twenty third Brady Happy Birthday on the twenty fourth Christopher in Grace Mom and dad are proud of you know you accomplish your dreams and happy birthday on the twenty fifth Luke Biggs who loves dinosaurs also. Happy Birthday on the twenty fifth. I like dinosaurs to tell you. Happy Birthday on the twenty sixth Emma White Happy Third Birthday on the twenty eighth Hazel Fades completely on us on the third of March Henry. Stella Mom Dad and your brothers love you so much along with your passion for dancing skiing and robotics and happy birthday on March fifth. And lastly Charlie Happy Birthday on March fifth. Thanks to all of you and to everyone who supports tumble on Patriot. If you'd like to get a shutout like these people or get a happy birthday wish from yours truly on our podcast. Just go to patriot dot com slash tumble. Podcast pledge at the five dollar level or higher once again that's Patriot dot com slash tumble. Podcast well Disneyworld. We all know it. We're do we because if you haven't been there lately well you.

Silas Henry Anton Stella Galapagos Islands Oscar scientist Luke Biggs Emma White skiing Liam Patriae Charlie Johnson Brady Christopher Joshua
Sailing Successes: Tania Aebi & Sarah Dekker

Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

06:03 min | 9 months ago

Sailing Successes: Tania Aebi & Sarah Dekker

"Forward slash bedtime. History a big. Thank you to those. Who donated already. Have you ever seen a sailboat? A sailboat is different from a motorized boat because instead of a motor it uses wind pushing the sales to move it across the water sailboats. Have been around for a very long time but people still use sailboats today to sail in places all over the ocean. Some new just for fun others do it as a race. Many world records have been set by people who've sailed boats around the entire world. Tonight we're going to learn about two women who went on at mazing adventures sailboats. Our story begins in Nineteen eighty-four with Tanya Ebi. A young sixteen year old girl. Who was living with her father when he decided to sail his boat all the way across the Atlantic Ocean with Tanya and her siblings even though they knew little about sailing they sailed from England to Spain to Portugal to Morocco. The Canary Islands the Caribbean and back to New York City after finishing high school. Tanya wasn't sure what to do with their life. It was time to go to college but she didn't feel ready for it and didn't know what else to do. Her father gave her two choices he could pay for college or she could use the money to buy a boat and sail around the world. It was a big challenge in. Tanya made the choice to start sailing. She thought she could go on it with her friends and just have a good time. No her father said you have to go on the boat alone and you have to make the voyage by yourself. He knew was a chance for her to grow on her own. So in May nineteen eighty five Tanya and her little black cat named Tarzan set sail from New York in her boat which they named the Varuna. Many people said it was too dangerous for to go but she went anyway. Tanya started the trip thinking should only sell the Bermuda then. Once she was there she headed to the next point. Which was the island of Saint Thomas in the Caribbean as she went she learned more about sailing because she had very little experience before she left. She had lots of quiet time to herself. She said was very good for her. It gave her chance to think about her life to read to play with her cat and to focus on getting to the next point of Edge sometimes. She played her guitar other time. She wrote letters one day. It began to rain and a storm surrounded her boat. We've crashed against the side of the boat and water splashed into it. She was scared and didn't know if she could continue on but she realized the only way she could survive was to keep going and she did just that for two and a half years. Tanya continued her voyage through the Great Barrier Reef Past Australia than up through the Indian Ocean the Mediterranean and finally through the Atlantic Ocean until she returned home to New York Tanya became the first woman in a very young when at that to circle the entire world on a sailboat. When the news found out about her trip people all over the world were talking about her amazing voyage. The president at the time Ronald Reagan sent her a message. Which said you set your energy in youth against an ancient challenge on the ageless sees and you triumphed twenty. Five years later a woman named Laura. Dekker wanted to break. Tania's record and be the youngest woman to circle the globe by boat. She was sixteen years old at the time Laura was born in New Zealand during a seven year sailing trip by her parents. That's right she was born during a sailing trip. The decker family was Dutch which means they were from the Netherlands. Laura spent the first five years of her life at sea and continued sailing with her father afterward. She received her first boat on her sixth birthday. And named it the Guppy. At this time she also learned how to sail the boat on her own. She would often sale by herself with her father following nearby while windsurfing when Laura was eight she received a book for her birthday called the maiden voyage written by Tanya. Happy who we learned about earlier in the story her adventures Got Laura. Thinking about making the same long trip around the earth. During the following years Laura continued to practice. She went on smaller ships by herself and continue to improve her skills see until she felt ready to circumnavigate the globe. This means to go entirely around the earth in two thousand and ten Laura finally set off. She faced many issues with the law which said she shouldn't be able to do it by herself. Many people in her country believed it wasn't safe and she shouldn't do it alone but finally she was given permission to go. She left Gibraltar in August. Two thousand ten then made a few stops until she arrived in the Canary Islands. There she waited for a hurricane to pass then she continued to cross the Atlantic Saint Martins and other islands in the Caribbean during her trip unlike Tanya. She had a gps so her parents and others were able to follow exactly where she was during her voyage. She was also much better prepared than Tanya to make the trip from the Caribbean. She then passed through the Panama Canal then the Galapagos Islands and Tonga Fiji the non to Australia next she passed the Cape of Good Hope in Africa then finally completed trip at Saint Martin. She had traveled sixty four hundred miles in one hundred twenty three days at the age of sixteen during the voyage. Laura wrote about her experiences and the news followed. What she was doing. A movie has been made about her experience called maiden trip and she wrote a book called one girl one dream. It's pretty amazing. What people can accomplish

Tanya Ebi Laura Caribbean New York City Atlantic Ocean Canary Islands Indian Ocean Mazing Ronald Reagan Netherlands Saint Thomas Atlantic Saint Martins Panama Canal Great Barrier Reef Africa President Trump Dekker Tania Galapagos Islands
Who Was First on Earth?

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:35 min | 9 months ago

Who Was First on Earth?

"Today are mysterious past the first the people on Earth. Where did they come from? Leonardo Davinci. Tesla is dying these three in one hundred others over the centuries all with ideas. You were ahead of their time. Where did these ideas come from? Metal Staples at held Mexico's Ancient Pyramids together yet. Local indigenous business people had no knowledge of metallurgy. The NASCA wells relied on air pressure to bring water up from underground rivers and the unexplained tunnels on on the two thousand five hundred mile. Inca road that are carved through solid stone. How did that happen? How were these deeds? Possible where to disadvantage. What's knowledge come from could survivors of a long extinct species of Homo Sapiens have somehow passed on the tiniest spark of knowledge through DNA? What a silly question indeed based on science I guess not so silly before you dismiss this premise? Completely let's take a look at the evolution universe. Science would agree that the planet earth is about four point five billion years old to put that number two perspective consider that a billion is a thousand million and a million is a thousand thousands for no less than a century. It has been believed that the earliest earth was covered with the see of vocally magma however evidence of this of the rocks have either eroded with time or stay down underground inaccessible enter Zircon crystals. Not the man made versions but tiny crystals pulled from the Jack Hills of central Australia. The oldest of which have revealed that during the first five hundred million years so the planet earth was not covered with the see of magma indeed that it was cold enough for the formations of continents were above sea level. What is revolutionary is these ancient crystals have revealed that early earth and some aspects? Wasn't that different from today. These science-based facts are less than a decade old. That already gaining aning the respect of mainstream science in one four point one billion year old crystal carbon was found suggesting that life existed justed on earth. Three hundred million years earlier than scientists previously thought. Twenty years ago this would have been heretical. This carbon resembles modern carbon. Though this all adds up to the conclusion that early Earth was more hospitable to life than science thought and begs the question could could the environment of early Earth supported. Humans could earth's I people have crawled out of an ancient ocean. The primordial soup so to speak and evolved over the next two hundred thousand years if we run with that rough figure man and is developed brain may have been walking walking around over a billion years ago not two hundred thousand. But where's the evidence of a civilization that all the answer is. Where's I the evidence of anything? Over one billion years old science degree so there have been five periods of mass extinction. Four hundred forty four million years ago. When eighty six percent of all species became extinct? Three hundred seventy five million years ago. When seventy five percent of all species became extinct and in two hundred million years ago with the loss of eighty percent and finally sixty six million years ago when seventy six percent fell to extinction keep keep in mind that the tortoise of the Galapagos has evolved over twelve million years each of the known periods of mass extinction did not eliminate all all the species and some fossils remain science agrees that there certainly could have been far earlier periods of mass extinction and extinction say over a billion years ago? One that would leave. No fossils. Time would take care of that. If Homo sapiens were among the victims uh-huh of an early earth extinction. Of course there would be no fossils. But what are the carbon found in Australia's ancient zircon crystals and what of the advanced knowledge displayed by South America's earliest indigenous people. Where did they come from? Your guess is as good as mine and only time time will tell

Australia Leonardo Davinci Tesla Mexico Jack Hills Galapagos South America
600 gallons of oil spills off the Galápagos Islands

Doug Stephan

01:43 min | 10 months ago

600 gallons of oil spills off the Galápagos Islands

"Maybe you didn't hear about the oil spill took place off the Galapagos islands officials say crews responding to a six hundred gallon oil spill after barge overturned and this is near San Cristobal have you ever been there Jennifer San Cristobal be one of the beautiful areas and that's what gets people worked up about this the this is off the coast of Ecuador South America and the because these areas are so clean now is so when you compare I saw something as a yesterday I think it was yesterday looking at an article about how we're trying to stop pollution and at the you know how the LA river flows into the ocean here I laid there examples of that all all over the country you know of both sides and down the Gulf and so it's in the areas where the spill off runs into the ocean they have installed basically socks they have these huge is the water comes down and goes through three or four probably four four pipes on the other end of the pipe they've installed these huge socks they collect the debris that comes out of a river I had coffee filter yeah and I thought it was pretty practical actually I know I seven think about earlier it's with a lot of common sense involved in it in in capturing all these things that we're worried about rightfully so and that's the other thing walking around the taking daisy for a walk here this the neighborhood where I am which is a pretty well to do area I still am appalled by the amount of rubbish on the

San Cristobal Jennifer San Cristobal South America Gulf Galapagos Ecuador LA
Barge With 600 Gallons of Diesel Sinks Off Galápagos Islands

Orlando's Morning News

00:35 sec | 10 months ago

Barge With 600 Gallons of Diesel Sinks Off Galápagos Islands

"Clean off a cleanup effort is underway after hundreds of gallons of diesel fuel spilled into the waters of Ecuador's Galapagos islands a crane collapsed as it was unloading containers of oil from a barge causing the ship to sink this past weekend staff from the Galapagos national park in the Ecuadorean navy immediately set up containment barriers in absorption cloths near the sunken vessel to prevent further contamination and harm to near surface creatures the islands are home to some of the most exotic wildlife on the planet listed as a UNESCO world heritage site reporter linsey Davis as local leaders are looking into the cause of the

Ecuador Galapagos Galapagos National Park Ecuadorean Navy Linsey Davis Reporter
"galapagos" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

01:54 min | 10 months ago

"galapagos" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"And every computer two weeks after a deadly volcanic eruption rock New Zealand's white island rescuers have called off their search for the last two people who went missing seventeen year old Australian Winona Lankford and forty year old new Zealander heated Marshall in mentor presumes have been killed in a deadly eruption which claimed the lives of seventeen people the news comes about a week after police speculate the remains of Lankford in Marshall in men could have been swept up by the waves and taken out to sea Lankford had been visiting the island with her parents who died in the eruption and her brother who remains hospitalized Marshall in men worked as a tour guide on the island a cleanup effort underway after hundreds of gallons of diesel fuel spilled into the waters of Ecuador's Galapagos islands a crane collapse as it was unloading containers from an oil on a barge that because the ship to sink this past weekend staff from the Galapagos national park in the Ecuadorean navy immediately set up containment barriers in absorption cloths near the sunken vessel to prevent further contamination and harm to near surface creatures the islands are home to some of the most exotic wildlife on the planet listed as a UNESCO world heritage site reporter linsey Davis as local leaders are looking into the cause of the accident a you tube Instagram star known as on me and a hell cat a diamond clad exotic car enthusiast whose photos and video showcases extreme wealth has garnered millions of views but now he's also had millions in assets taken by federal authorities federal officials have also been watching and following thirty three year old bill all market has schedule as the seas millions from his bank accounts as well as more than thirty cars including three Lamborghinis and a number of Rolex watches and jewelry got a schedule does admit to owing back taxes and says that is his TV streaming business gears TV re loaded that he believes is the real focus of the fed's attention for possible copyright violations he has not yet been charged with a crime George Amir's news ninety six point five W. D. BO.

New Zealand Winona Lankford Marshall Ecuador Galapagos Galapagos national park Ecuadorean navy linsey Davis Lamborghinis fed George Amir sea Lankford reporter
Galapagos Islands battles 600-gallon oil spill that threatens environmental damage

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 11 months ago

Galapagos Islands battles 600-gallon oil spill that threatens environmental damage

"Treasured as an unparalleled location of evolution related discoveries and the soul place on earth where some species live the Galapagos islands of the west coast of South America are under environmental threat today as emergency teams work to contain a six hundred gallon oil spill from a small cargo vessel that overturned the site is Charles Darwin did the research on the Galapagos that led to his theory of evolution and tourists with restrictions can visit the islands which are part of Ecuador this bill occur word on the island of San Cristobal home to sea lions finches and to those world famous giant Galapagos tortoises

South America Charles Darwin Galapagos Ecuador San Cristobal Six Hundred Gallon
Does Aging Always Increase Risk of Death?

BrainStuff

04:41 min | 1 year ago

Does Aging Always Increase Risk of Death?

"Today's episode is brought to you by the capital one venture card the capital one venture card you earn unlimited double miles on every purchase everyday and you can use those miles toward travel expenses like flights hotels the rental cars and more just book and pay for your travel using your venture card and redeemer miles toward the cost capital one. What's in your wallet. Credit approval required capital one bank u._s._a. N._a. Welcome to brain stuff production of iheartradio. Hey brain stuff lauren boko bomb here. How would you like to live five times longer than a mammal. Your size has any right to expect sounds great right but wait. Would you still be interested. If it meant you had to live out your days looking like a tiny alien dressed in an old sock made from the skin of somebody's hard living grandpa. Take a minute to think it over naked mole rats. That's a taxonomic name. Heterosexuals gleyber have made their evolutionary choice in this regard. This cold blooded rodent is incredibly long-lived. They routinely lived the ripe age age of thirty five compare that to porcupines in guinea pigs close relatives which usually live no longer than age eight naked mole rats very rarely get cancer are nearly incapable full of feeling pain and when the oxygen runs out in their underground tunnels they basically start acting like plants their bodies automatically switched from using oxygen process glucose into energy in their cells to processing reserve stores fructose into energy like a plant would no oxygen necessary and in a study published in two thousand eighteen based on analysis assist the life histories of thousands of naked mole rats researchers found that while the rodents not only live incredibly long lives they also don't really age seriously their risk risk of dying just doesn't really seem to increase as they get older and female fertility doesn't seem to decline with age either the term for this is negligible citizens and and lobsters and galapagos tortoises are two other examples of animals with these qualities study author rochelle buffet stein a comparative biologist who works for the longevity seventy focused california biotech company calico has studied naked mole rats for more than three decades and has recorded the life history of each of the three thousand three hundred and twenty nine animals that have passed through her lab in that time what she's found is it naked mole rats are a huge exceptions the slightly unsettling gum pertz law of mortality which was developed in in eighteen twenty five by british mathematician insurance actuary benjamin bomb parts to assign a mathematical formula to the phenomenon of ageing actuaries calculate. The financial risk ask insurance company assumes by ensuring a given person for humans. The gun parts law states that after the age of thirty the likelihood that we're going to died doubles every eight years. Some variation of this law applies to basically every other mammal we know about with the exception of buffon's stein's lab reared mole wraps. It's a once buffet teens. Good mole rats reach sexual maturity at about six months of age. She found the likelihood that they would croak reached around one in ten thousand where where it hovered for the rest of their lives since only a few of buffon's deans naked mole rats were not killed him experiments or moved to other labs. We don't actually know how or if the naked mole rats strong longevity game eventually hits a wall. The oldest individual in the study is currently thirty five years old so who knows aging could happened really quickly for these little superheroes after a certain point in time but for the rest of the over thirty mammal crowd out there trying to have just okay day to day in spite of the fact that the likelihood of your death is roughly doubling by the decade. Today's episode was written by justin shields and produced by tyler clang breen stuff. That's a production of iheartradio's. How stuff works for more on this and lots of other. Well preserved topics visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com and for more podcasts from iheartradio visit the iheartradio app apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows in the montgomery county maryland courthouse there there are thousands of pages of documents detailing the horrific murders of three innocent people soon as i heard the details i knew my dad was involved right away instantly lawrence but at the time of the murders lawrence horn was clear across the country. I'm jasmine morris from iheartradio uh-huh and hit home media. This is hitman. Listen and subscribe at apple podcasts on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Iheartradio Stein Buffon Lawrence Horn Apple Montgomery County Maryland Cou Jasmine Morris California Calico Justin Shields Tyler Clang Breen Thirty Five Years Three Decades Eight Years Six Months
Eight Three Quarters And Eight Billion Years discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:20 min | 1 year ago

Eight Three Quarters And Eight Billion Years discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

"Bio mimicry is the practice of replicating be adaptation found in nature likely body imaging scanners at airports they're based on the echo location shouldn't have some bats yawns of natural selection have made a wealth of data that's ripe for the picking all types of companies are increasingly bringing biologist into the design process early on janine venue is is cofounder of biology gee inspired consulting company biomed macrey three point eight three point eight roofers dizzy three point eight billion years of life on the planet venue is also literally wrote the book on bio mimicry back in nineteen ninety seven wendy idea and the term for it there's just emerging when i was looking for examples of this back in ninety four ninety five i was it was really hard to find so it's mostly in academia and now it's kind of jumped into an industry where does a bio mimicry idea originate from is it is it a biologist saying like hey this plant does something that it could be really useful to for solar power or is it like a solar engineer calling a botanist and saying hey jimmy coal plant research ike unused both happens but now that it's jumped industry industry have particular functional challenges so that's how most bio mimicry done now is challenge first it's kind of amazing because biology is not organized by function so if sherwin williams calls you up and says you know we want a different way to make paint and we want you make the color yellow without cadmium will go into the natural world and find out how nature makes yellow so if it's you know bacterial or plant or animal and we do this huge survey across tax we call it a me busters zebra report what challenges getting different fields the play ball each other very often will bring in a biologist and then will also hiring engineer to be literally the spokesperson between the translator between the two because that's the biggest thing is the language what breaks through that is to break everything down into function an engineer will come to us and say you know we want we want a helmet that protects against concussions what you have to do is say what do you actually trying to do answer then you could look at lots of things right then you begin to look at things like woodpeckers and how they protect their brain when they're packing you know impact resistance is the function so for instance bauer has a new product which is a an tie concussion product based on their study of the woodpecker it's a small band that goes around the neck so it's not a helmet at all and so once we get down to that level of function than differences between engineering and biology go away the tech industry is not exactly known for humility m a n how his bio mimicry different than say like thinking about it as like hacking nature fern answer like in a way that my deal ideas and the natural world but isn't like adding to sustainability you know while mimicry has these three areas that you could look at you could just mimic form then you could look at process which is how do you make it what happens to at the end of its life you know 'em that is the third one which is mimicking at the systems level that something called circular economy right where a lot of people right now are thinking about the life cycle of a product and actually the reincarnation what is it become and it's next life that material slow story is where we get i think into the deepest rather than shallow bio mimicry in bio mimicry nature obviously is incredibly important because it's the source for i d is meanwhile with climate change i feel like were always getting new headlines about a new report out that talks about impending mass extinctions is is german urgency to kind of growing this field as fast as possible mm apps yeah absolutely i mean i you know i got this or keep the panic at bay because i reid they'll be articles the talk about the emerging of life and you know the new one million species gonna be are gonna be facing extinction within a very short timeframe yeah is it like a loss of source material that's a loss of right exactly that's a loss of snow just one adaptation station 'em but so many you know you look at one organism like the shark right and you think okay we can learn about drag reduction 'cause they're so fast and sleek a you can also learn about you know how they they're sensory apparatus you know that can help with are transportation 'em but on but on the skin of the galapagos shark there's absolutely no bacteria and it's not comical it's a physical it's a physical nanto structures the way its tentacles a are formed an battery it only till in there so company called charlotte in colorado mimicked this and it's now and antigay it's a physical antibacterial for hospitals like you know a thin film you put on door knobs and bed rails and it doesn't breed for resistance and so as a biologist watching that it's heartbreaking for me and one of the ways that i try to get people to to wanna protect 'em this planet is like saying you know they're geniuses is you know were surrounded by geniuses an end to respect them in that enough in that way to say let's keep them around because there's there's there's much that they could teach us janine venue is cofounder of consulting firm bio mimicry three point eight three quarters her voice with their i phone in told us even that users bio mimicry a chip inside filters out background noise based on how our brains pick out a single conversation in a busy room

Eight Three Quarters Eight Billion Years
Biomimicry draws on natures billions of years of R&D for design solutions

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:36 min | 1 year ago

Biomimicry draws on natures billions of years of R&D for design solutions

"Bio mimicry is the practice of replicating be adaptation found in nature likely body imaging scanners at airports they're based on the echo location shouldn't have some bats yawns of natural selection have made a wealth of data that's ripe for the picking all types of companies are increasingly bringing biologist into the design process early on janine venue is is cofounder of biology gee inspired consulting company biomed macrey three point eight three point eight roofers dizzy three point eight billion years of life on the planet venue is also literally wrote the book on bio mimicry back in nineteen ninety seven wendy idea and the term for it there's just emerging when i was looking for examples of this back in ninety four ninety five i was it was really hard to find so it's mostly in academia and now it's kind of jumped into an industry where does a bio mimicry idea originate from is it is it a biologist saying like hey this plant does something that it could be really useful to for solar power or is it like a solar engineer calling a botanist and saying hey jimmy coal plant research ike unused both happens but now that it's jumped industry industry have particular functional challenges so that's how most bio mimicry done now is challenge first it's kind of amazing because biology is not organized by function so if sherwin williams calls you up and says you know we want a different way to make paint and we want you make the color yellow without cadmium will go into the natural world and find out how nature makes yellow so if it's you know bacterial or plant or animal and we do this huge survey across tax we call it a me busters zebra report what challenges getting different fields the play ball each other very often will bring in a biologist and then will also hiring engineer to be literally the spokesperson between the translator between the two because that's the biggest thing is the language what breaks through that is to break everything down into function an engineer will come to us and say you know we want we want a helmet that protects against concussions what you have to do is say what do you actually trying to do answer then you could look at lots of things right then you begin to look at things like woodpeckers and how they protect their brain when they're packing you know impact resistance is the function so for instance bauer has a new product which is a an tie concussion product based on their study of the woodpecker it's a small band that goes around the neck so it's not a helmet at all and so once we get down to that level of function than differences between engineering and biology go away the tech industry is not exactly known for humility m a n how his bio mimicry different than say like thinking about it as like hacking nature fern answer like in a way that my deal ideas and the natural world but isn't like adding to sustainability you know while mimicry has these three areas that you could look at you could just mimic form then you could look at process which is how do you make it what happens to at the end of its life you know 'em that is the third one which is mimicking at the systems level that something called circular economy right where a lot of people right now are thinking about the life cycle of a product and actually the reincarnation what is it become and it's next life that material slow story is where we get i think into the deepest rather than shallow bio mimicry in bio mimicry nature obviously is incredibly important because it's the source for i d is meanwhile with climate change i feel like were always getting new headlines about a new report out that talks about impending mass extinctions is is german urgency to kind of growing this field as fast as possible mm apps yeah absolutely i mean i you know i got this or keep the panic at bay because i reid they'll be articles the talk about the emerging of life and you know the new one million species gonna be are gonna be facing extinction within a very short timeframe yeah is it like a loss of source material that's a loss of right exactly that's a loss of snow just one adaptation station 'em but so many you know you look at one organism like the shark right and you think okay we can learn about drag reduction 'cause they're so fast and sleek a you can also learn about you know how they they're sensory apparatus you know that can help with are transportation 'em but on but on the skin of the galapagos shark there's absolutely no bacteria and it's not comical it's a physical it's a physical nanto structures the way its tentacles a are formed an battery it only till in there so company called charlotte in colorado mimicked this and it's now and antigay it's a physical antibacterial for hospitals like you know a thin film you put on door knobs and bed rails and it doesn't breed for resistance and so as a biologist watching that it's heartbreaking for me and one of the ways that i try to get people to to wanna protect 'em this planet is like saying you know they're geniuses is you know were surrounded by geniuses an end to respect them in that enough in that way to say let's keep them around because there's there's there's much that they could teach us janine venue is cofounder of consulting firm bio mimicry three point eight three quarters her voice with their i phone in told us even that users bio mimicry a chip inside filters out background noise based on how our brains pick out a single conversation in a busy room

Eight Three Quarters Eight Billion Years
What Is the Humboldt Ocean Current?

BrainStuff

06:03 min | 1 year ago

What Is the Humboldt Ocean Current?

"Today's episode is brought to you by gravity blankets. They make weighted blankets these blankets that contain fine grade glass. Beads to weigh them down when you curl up under one it's supposed to simulate the feeling of being gently held her hugged. They sent me want to try out. And I genuinely love this thing it is so comforting and relaxing. It puts me in the mood to sleep right away. The microphone duvet cover is incredibly soft, and has these ingenious little internal clasps to keep it in place if you'd like to try a gravity blanket for yourself. Let them know that we sent you and get fifteen percent off your order by entering the code brain stuff at checkout. It's one word. That's gravity. Blankets dot com. Promo code brain stuff. Welcome to brain stuff. A production of I heart radio. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren Vogel bomb here in December eighteen o two small sailing. Ship called the casino set sail from Peru northward along the South American coastline toward Gua quill in present-day Ecuador, a trip of about seven hundred miles or about one thousand one hundred kilometers one of the ship's. Passengers was thirty three year old Prussian aristocrat Alexander von Humboldt. A mining engineer by training Humboldt had an insatiable curiosity about nature that led him to roam the planet studying plants and animals as well as phenomena ranging from magnetic rocks to river systems in ocean currents fresh from studying the value of bat guano as minority because y'all humble used the sailing trip to investigate a powerful cold current that flowed from the tip of Chile to northern Peru ranging from just offshore to about six hundred miles off the coast. That's just under a thousand kilometers the current existence had been known for centuries to sailors and fishermen, but no scientists had ever systematically studied the flow Humboldt carefully measured the water temperature. The speed and continued on his journey, which eventually would lead him to Mexico. Humbles work was the beginning of scientific understanding of what's now known as the Humboldt current or the Peru current the current helps hold warm moist air off the coast keeping the climate cool. It also pulls plankton rich water from deep in the Pacific to the surface. Feeding a vast number and variety efficient birds and creating the richest marine ecosystem on the planet. It's fishing grounds. Provide about six percent of the world's catch and the Humboldt Kerns nutrients support the marine food chain of the Galapagos islands and influence its climate as well, it has helped make possible the archipelago's incredible bio-diversity in that sense. The Humboldt current also helped shape the development of evolutionary theory, the Galapagos provided the living laboratory for another nineteenth century scientist, Charles Darwin, who's paradigm shift and work on the origin of the species was published in eighteen fifty nine the year of humbled death. Darwin himself was inspired by the work of Humboldt who might be the most important scientists that we don't care much about the early to mid eighteen hundreds though, he might have been the most renowned researcher on the planet. I'm what was the first to investigate the relationship between mean temperature in elevating and came up with the concept of maps with isotherm aligns the delineate areas with the same temperature at a given time he did important early work on the origin of tropical storms. Most importantly Humboldt altered the way that scientists see the natural world by finding interconnections. This scientists invented the concept of a web of life. What he called this great chain of causes and effects some consider him to be the first to college issed. He was a head of the curve on understanding environmental problems such as deforestation and its effect upon climate, which he I observed around lake Lancia in Venezuela back in eighteen hundred Humboldt was also predecessor to Albert Einstein as a scientist with a strong interest in social Justice. He was a critic of colonialism and supported revolution. Mary movements in South America. And also criticized the US a country, he otherwise admired for its institution of slavery. We spoke by Email with Aaron Sachs history, professor at Cornell University and author of the Humboldt current nineteenth century exploration. And the roots of American environmentalism he thinks that rather than focusing on humbled scientific discoveries. It's more important to look the insights and approaches to the work that we're based upon his research and observations he said to me his version of ecology was significant not just because he stressed interconnection. But because he combined it with a social and ethical perspective. The fact of interconnection had certain implications with regard to human responsibilities toward each other and the environment. It was a cosmopolitan open minded ecology. Today's episode was written by Patrick j tiger and participate. Tyler claim brain stuff is production of iheartradio's. How stuff works for more on this and lots of other interconnected, topics? Visit our home planet has stuff works dot com. In for more podcast, my heart radio, I heart radio app, apple podcasts, or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Hi there. It's me Josh Clark. And if you love the beautiful musical score that point Lobo created for the end of the world of Josh Clark. Then you can rejoice. It's now available as the original soundtrack album sixteen tracks selected and remastered by point logo capture the highs the imagination and the far out of the series, and they all come together to make really great album. It's like the spirit of the series now in a convenient capsule. You can get the end of the world with Josh Clark original soundtrack album everywhere. You get music online apple music, I tunes iheartradio Spotify. Amazon everywhere. Could check it out today.

Humboldt Scientist Alexander Von Humboldt Humboldt Kerns Josh Clark Peru Iheartradio Galapagos Apple Lauren Vogel South America Ecuador Charles Darwin United States Aaron Sachs Gua Quill Mexico
Dozens Of Nonnative Marine Species Have Invaded The Galapagos Islands

All Things Considered

02:52 min | 1 year ago

Dozens Of Nonnative Marine Species Have Invaded The Galapagos Islands

"Cornish. The Galapagos islands are like a biological arc in the eastern Pacific Ocean. There giant tortoises and swimming iguanas and numerous creatures found nowhere else is one of the world's most protected places. But scientists have discovered that dozens of exotic species have invaded the Galapagos underwater NPR's Christopher Joyce reports on this unexpected finding marine biologists James Carlton remembers when he first got to thinking that the Galapagos islands may not be as pristine as people thought on my first visit to the Galapagos collected some samples from both bottom barnacles sponges and other hitchhikers that was nineteen eighty-seven Carlton didn't know if those creatures he found were native or not so four years ago he and a team of scientists decided to return and take a closer. Look, we didn't know quite what to do. Expect what they did know was that on land. There were lots of invasive species species that are not native to the islands, but in the surrounding ocean. Scientists only knew of five invaders everything else presumably was native when Carlton's team looked underwater. However, they found a hoard of invaders and now we have fifty three which is a rather stunning increase marine biologist. Gregory Ruiz says they found exotic species on pilings docks and mangrove roots. They hung plastic plates underwater in all sorts of alien invertebrates latched onto them at the Smithsonian environmental research center in Maryland, where he works Ruiz shows me, the invasions lab, researchers here track invasive species around the world, this is a organism that we've found in the Galapagos tuna could also known as a sea squirt a tiny tube-like animal. He has more invaders in glass bowls filled with alcohol barnacle. Nls LG, CNN enemies. They're described in the journal aquatic invasions recess rising tourism in the Galapagos means more boats, docks, pilings, transportation and homes. For invasive, these organisms aren't just footnotes in the biology. Text zebra mussels invaded the Great Lakes and caused havoc the tiny parasite called MS X has killed millions of choice tres in the Chesapeake Bay on the east coast James Carlton now, professor emeritus at Williams. College says tracking invaders helps authorities stem they're spread he expects other tropical areas or heavily invaded as well. And in a protected place. Let the Galapagos he says their presence means something's been lost. We value a world that we think represents nature before we began altering it before we began removing species, Abby species and changing the abundance of species, even in the Galapagos that were. World is

Galapagos James Carlton Cornish. The Galapagos Gregory Ruiz Pacific Ocean Williams Christopher Joyce Smithsonian Environmental Rese Great Lakes Maryland Chesapeake Bay NPR LG CNN Professor Four Years
Galapagos discussed on Gary and Shannon

Gary and Shannon

00:14 sec | 1 year ago

Galapagos discussed on Gary and Shannon

"Generations and a giant tortoise spotted this week in the Galapagos islands belongs to a species not seen in more than a century. The Fernandina giant tortoise was thought to be extinct. A tortoise expert on the island say the females all, but most importantly,

Galapagos
Andros Unexplored Blue Holes

Curiosity Daily

03:04 min | 1 year ago

Andros Unexplored Blue Holes

"You've probably heard of the Galapagos islands. That's where Charles Darwin was inspired to develop the theory of evolution. And it's home to a huge number of species that you won't find anywhere else on earth. What you may not know is there's a spot in the Bahamas that may also have a startling variety of life. But we don't know because we've barely scratched the surface exploring it. I'm talking about Andros the largest island in the Bahamas. You one. Listen up if you like diving or snorkeling snorkeling is really cool. Actually, I went snorkeling and believes for the first time a few months ago, and I was really surprised how much I loved it. I've never done it. That sounds great. It's like you're spying on another universe. All the life down there and millions of little fishes, and you're just like. Wow, too big world awesome. Yeah. So underwater adventures listen up the thing about Andrews is that it's home to more than two hundred blue holes there underwater, cave systems that go as deep as almost a thousand feet. Blue holes are home to ancient limestone, caves carved into the ocean floor during the ice ages glacial runoff a road the limestone earth in that formed elaborate cave systems once the glaciers melted. The sea levels rose and the caves flooded. And that's what created the mysterious. Blue sinkholes that exist today when these blue holes are found out in the oceans their appropriately named for their indigo centers and light blue perimeters. They follow the rules of the ocean. Subject to tides and home to the same species found in the surrounding area. But while these offshore blue holes are visually. The most familiar Andrews has more than one hundred seventy five inland. Blue holes there tucked away in wooded parts of the island, and they're very different from offshore blue holes, and quite frankly anything else on earth. They look black. Thanks to the accumulation of dead bacteria from fallen trees and leaves from the surface. They look just like swamps. But what lies beneath is incredible see because of the reduced title flow. These blue holes are sharply stratified by a thin layer of freshwater on the surface that stops oxygen from reaching the dense saltwater below the result is an ecological anomaly, you end up with an underwater world of prehistoric species that are still capable of surviving in an oxygen free environment. Like that of early earth instead of oxygen the wa. Is chock full of another gas called hydrogen sulfide, which potentially fatal to humans until recently. Very few people have dived in these dangerous inland blue holes, but as of late scientists have started investigating just how other-worldly they actually are in twenty eleven biologists performed DNA analyses of microbes across five different Bahamian, blue holes and found absolutely no shared species, thousands of experienced divers flock to Andrews every year to get a taste for these underwater Marvel's, but snorkeling the surface is also a popular activity dive in and you may find some clues to the

Andrews Bahamas Charles Darwin Andros Thousand Feet
"galapagos" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"galapagos" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"I think I've read about this in cases of the early visitors to the island also that you know, it was kind of dangerous to land there. And for example, there is one case where I read that a crew was driven to land there because there were scurvy on the ship. And it was only because the disease had gotten so bad that they risk trying to land. Yeah. The sort of the typical story book reasons for landing on an uninhabited island with a strange crab ovulation, right? Yeah. But out of the scurvy pan crabs. Yeah. And it, but but it is it is weird to think about places like this places where we're humans just didn't take residents. And of course, you have to of course, realize that moving to an isolated island is a difficult proposition. Like, you've really gotta have a reason to go there and a reason to stay there and a way to to to to safely arrive there as well. But still, you know, it's enough to make one wonder for instance, homo erectus or Java man lived on the island of Java relatively close by one point seven million years ago, humans practiced agriculture they're on Java. As early as twenty five hundred BC Java was known to traders and other powers the kingdom of Muhtarram ruled there until they lost power to the Dutch East. India company in seventeen forty nine and became a vassal state of the company. A statement that I think really drives home the the power of the East India company, the idea that you would have a vassal state to a corporation. Yeah. But that's job. My my point is that I just find it. So enthralling this island remained either free of human contact for so long or only encountered minimal influence. You know, I guess it's possible that at some point somebody wound up there by purpose or accident, and he didn't stay legit. Didn't stay long enough to leave a footprint. Yeah. Galapagos islands or another example of this though, there there have been at least disputed claims of Inca artifacts found on the Galapagos islands perhaps due to Incas sailors being blown off course, the Seychelles in the Indian Ocean are another example of islands that were unhappy with through most of recorded history, though, they may have been visited by early seafarers as well. Depend on who you talk to. But with Christmas Island, I found no such thing and not even a crackpot theory. So it it really does seem. As if humans not even a Vikings by no Vikings or anything. So it really does seem that nobody visited it until the seventeenth century with the earliest sighting. I think having occurred in sixteen fifteen no after that. Of course, it actually did become an economically significant island because of mineral deposits discovered there. That's right. It was explored by British naturalist John Murray. And this was eighteen seventy two he discovered that there were phosphate deposits on the island which would play a key role in the island's future exportation of phosphate again in eighteen ninety five by the Christmas Island phosphate company in this activity led to the loss of twenty five percent of the island's rainforest area. Yeah. No phosphate was important in the late eighteen hundreds because it had been discovered by that time that phosphate when treated with sulfuric acid could be used as an ingredient in plant food, and of course, synthetic fertilizers became very important in the development of commercial agriculture scale. And so now. There was a reason at economic reason for people to not only go to Christmas Island, but to work there. Yeah. And so- settlement began in the eighteen eighty s later on during the second World War. There was a Japanese occupation of the island from nineteen forty to nineteen forty five and in the postwar period, it was administered by Singapore. Which was then a British colony and then Australia purchase the island for two point nine million pounds on January. First nineteen Fifty-eight day. That's known as territory day on Christmas Island today. It has around read two thousand full-time human residents in the ethnic makeup is mostly Chinese and Malay originally brought in for labor now a big portion of the land of the island today is basically a national park. It's like a big wildlife preservation area. Yeah. Two thirds of its landmass or our national park now and a big part of the wildlife significance. Here is the Christmas Island red. Crabs. So I guess we should die of headfirst into a puddle of crabs after we come back from break..

Christmas Island John Murray East India Galapagos India Seychelles Indian Ocean Muhtarram Australia Singapore nineteen Fifty-eight day nine million pounds seven million years twenty five percent
Lost ‘Darwinia’ islands could be origin of species in the Galapagos

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

00:27 sec | 2 years ago

Lost ‘Darwinia’ islands could be origin of species in the Galapagos

"Galapagos islands or another example of this though, there there have been at least disputed claims of Inca artifacts found on the Galapagos islands perhaps due to Incas sailors being blown off course, the Seychelles in the Indian Ocean are another example of islands that were unhappy with through most of recorded history, though, they may have been visited by early seafarers as well. Depend on who you talk to. But with Christmas Island, I found no such thing and not even a crackpot

Galapagos Indian Ocean Seychelles Christmas Island
"galapagos" Discussed on The Tom Leykis Show

The Tom Leykis Show

03:38 min | 2 years ago

"galapagos" Discussed on The Tom Leykis Show

"Swim in the deep sea with green glow sticks. It lizards. Haven't orgies with lizards in green glow sticks. A body of water around the Galapagos all in. Art web swimming around the Galapagos lizards gloss over or. Timpson? That's some art web. Email address. I know what three thousand Tom be funny. New hampshire. How's it going Brad? Would you like my advice on how to drive women wild with your tongue? Sure, ask her if she's put on weight. Thank you. Dino, one three thousand Tom telephone number. Be funny. Hey, tom. Yeah. Adam Corolla, you're getting into podcasting. But why are you doing fine cash? Women. Nine zero one three thousand Tom be funny. Those. Hey. Marketing. Bobblehead doll. Spring in the Bogle head don't return. I just know screaming the Bogle head because. Not to more violent my wheelchair. But don't. The products not start there. Richard. Bogo dexterity? Sure. Burke. Now, I want to say is after next Thursday. Where will you go? Sketches with Brian stow is one of the characters. Be funny. No, I'm on a plane heading toward then it doesn't matter the stewardess. Hey, if there's an accident you stick your head between your legs. And I'm like, hey, I could do that. Why would it be? Hi, tom. I'm a public speaker. But I really need to be more. Call. Advice? Really.

Tom Galapagos Bogle Adam Corolla New hampshire Brian stow Dino Brad Burke Richard
"galapagos" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

03:30 min | 2 years ago

"galapagos" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"The. Mercedes, Benz of plano news center a federal drug trial underway in Sherman, it's a sixty seven million dollar cocaine smuggling case. Involving a ship that was bound for Hong Kong the US attorney for the eastern district of Texas. Agreed, to take the case which started with a drug seizure two years ago. West, of the Galapagos islands five people have already entered guilty pleas but. The Chinese captain of the. Ship, and another member of the crew are, facing drug-smuggling charges in Sherman the morning news reports the trial is expected to, lay, out among other things the way drugs are, smuggled from Colombia to the United States now the heat has been a major issue, in North Texas this. Summer and the alerts have been posted the electron signs you've, seen them on the highway warning people. Not to leave. Children and pets in an. Unattended vehicle well a, new survey is just out. At Fein's overwhelming Jordy of parents are still unaware or refuse to. Believe that there are susceptible to forgetting a child in the car airy Finkelstein is with Kars for Kids dot, org joins us, on the KRLD Newsline no. One believes that it could actually happen, to them that's what we found in the survey only about sixteen percent of parents are actually concerned that it can happen to. Them the numbers are amazing that I mean sixteen percent. Concern that can happen to them fifteen percent even taking precautions. And, the reaction that the other part that was so interesting was the, reaction of people in the survey, when it happens. To someone else reaction is that you know people should be put in jail or someone apparent you. Know, who who suffers a loss from such a tragedy You know is is maybe even call the murderer or or on. Fit to be parent they never should have had kids in. The first place those reactions tell you how people view these things and they don't, look at, it as something research shows is a memory lapse, that can, really can happen, to anybody this happens to people for the most part who who are who made a mistake exactly all the stories. You know they just seem so identical, teach our they just keep repeating each other. All right now the campaign is called it can happen. So what are you trying to get across to people what are you trying to get them to understand and how can. They work to be better at it, so we're trying to get them to understand, that it, can happen to them and it can happen to good parents and hopefully when they recognize that they'll take the simple precautions there's plenty of things you can do to try to prevent this simple things like you know people suggest leaving, a something like a teddy bear you know in your car In your car seat. When the child is not there and then whenever the child is very you put that in the front seat people. Recommend leaving maybe your phone in the backseat there are. Apps we developed an app a few number of years ago a free app that people could download that reminds you and there's many other so apps on the market. And it was just training yourself to always remember when you leave the car just look. Before you lock. It's something, that you could just train your your, your brain to do and and. Then you know such things will never, happen hopefully and. We hope that you know next year will run the? Same survey and hopefully the numbers will be very different and you know a lot more people will have? The reaction that yeah this is something that that that I'm worried about can happen and I do take precautions to. Stop it well the numbers are startling but also you have. The information what's the website cars.

Sherman Hong Kong Galapagos US attorney Texas cocaine plano Fein Finkelstein KRLD Colombia North Texas United States sixteen percent sixty seven million dollar fifteen percent two years
"galapagos" Discussed on Mac Power Users

Mac Power Users

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"galapagos" Discussed on Mac Power Users

"Could tell we were out chewed but we didn't really over exert ourselves and we will find again we'd had some horror stories on there was one guy who who was affected in all that group but not tremendously badly but i have had some horror stories but no as long as you you you know you you don't go mad it's it's normally okay but it's well worth it though i mean it's it's such a spectacular place to visit you know it's yeah although i've seen all all the pictures and everything until you actually go that an experience that you don't really fully take it in you know the the scale and how how they actually put it altogether that's just unfathomable so so don when you go on these trips i'm assuming you strap your mac to your back pro yeah i it's yeah no it's it's the the ipad and the the macbook pro they would need most places now i it it really depends i mean most you know most hotels that we go to tend to have a decent internet connection we did have a difficulty but went to the galapagos because we were on a you know a small boat sailing around the island so that was a bit tricky but we managed to pull a few emails down and the the thing i try and do is of course is to make sure that everything is done in advance before we go away so hopefully got a couple of weeks worth of shows in the can so that if anything major does while we're awaits you know it's it's knocked what impact the the publishing of the shows so i always seem to be now in a constant state of either catch up from being away all in preparation for going away again you know so you it's never consistent now i'm always in catch modal preparation mode so the children traveling with technology it seems to me like these days quite often isn't power but internet access oh it's always internet yeah always internet access that's that's the main thing yeah i mean if a decent can connection it's just like working from home but you know as soon as soon as you get to a dicey hotel about connection now it's it's a.

galapagos
"galapagos" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"galapagos" Discussed on WTMA

"Kito very high elevation yeah you need an oxygen tank sometimes when you're there as i and then of course we went to the galapagos islands which belong to ecuador and you know this is not we keep getting this argument that that oh they have to leave because everything's so terrible ecuador is not one of those countries and if these countries like honduras and guatemala are so horrible that no one in their right mind would dare stay then maybe the world could should get together maybe the united nations should you know they should they should declared a world heritage site or something like that since i go around declaring every bus stop a world heritage site these days for for some nefarious reason that i'm not entirely dialed into but i i'm marveling at the phony baloney arguments that that we get every time we have laws and and you know there are on the books you can read them we have immigration laws we have borders we have a sovereign country i would appreciate it if you'd respect those laws if that's too much to ask then we might have to deport your s because you know that's that's it all i was only dealing a little cocaine you know like this woman that did twenty years and president trump let her out of jail yesterday community sentence we have laws and the democrats have no respect for our laws and they have no respect for our borders and they have no respect for really for anything got respect for some awful terrible horrible thing for pretending that the hyde amendment doesn't exist there's one that comes from they have respect for that oh the third leg of the triple crown is coming up and i've got some bad news about that too you know the horse justify the big you know is likely to win the third race the third leg of the triple crown coming up well i've got some news about justified.

ecuador honduras guatemala united nations cocaine president trump galapagos twenty years
"galapagos" Discussed on The Show About Science

The Show About Science

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"galapagos" Discussed on The Show About Science

"That's funny that you mention that oh yeah was that because czar do is one of my favorite episodes of reply all and so is the glove goes from radio lab awesome and i listened to them both about thirteen thousand times oh my josh so a total twenty six thousand times yeah twenty six thousand you must know those stories so much better than i do at this point i know them by heart wow really really but some afar listeners probably haven't heard those ups odes so could you tell them a little bit about the galapagos episode from radio lab yeah you got it so the galapagos it's an hour long episode that i did for radio lab and it's about it's about a bunch of different stories that are all happening in the galapagos islands the galapagos islands are really famous in the history of science because that's where charles darwin went and where he started to develop his ideas basically about how animals evolved and i went there and when i was there i saw that it's actually a lot of people go there now and a lot of people live there and there's a lot of controversy about that because when people move to a place they bring a lot of changes and they changed the environment and so all of these animals that had lived in the galapagos islands without any outside interference at all for millions of years all of a sudden their lives started to change and some of the animals started to die and so it's about the ways that that happened the ways that the tortoises were affected and the ways that finches where effected like there's a i don't know if you remember there's like this story about how darwin finches they were attacked by this lie.

josh galapagos galapagos islands afar charles darwin
"galapagos" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"galapagos" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"Fish or orlando animal eventually we'll turn into a massive mammoth or a tiger or a human that's just not true there's there's so much that we'd been misled about the fact that the we're already seeing will be considered the alien microbes and alien water right from comments and things that have come that we call panspermia from all these different locations on the earth or from the universe and the galaxy around us and so the first thing to consider is the fact that there are billions of habitable worlds in the universe literally billions of earth like worlds and and we need to get past the fact that we are not alone there are there's life all over the universe and the fact is that we are not ready to meet our galactic neighbors because we're we're still fighting and and working through what's considered are lower state are lower shocker state of our evolution which is we're still in this war mentality materialism where we haven't we haven't gotten over the fact that to see the higher picture into move move to the next level and until we can do that we're going to be kept in the dark about what really is out there and how that connects devolution is that darwin himself in if you read his what he wrote in his theories he specifically stated when he was in the galapagos that one of one of the things the reasons he went there was to try to prove that those finches and all a lot of them were from this distinct you know evolutionary track whereas really if we look at all of the world is these locations that have all these unique species it's like dna library it's not an evolutionary libraries the dna library of specific zones and what darwin said is he found so many faults in his theories on volition that he thought it was like a placeholder for science meaning he said that when he expected when other theories would come out in the future they would disprove him he actually came out and said that people can look that up and what happened is the church jumped all over darwinism because it was a really easy way to go along with the whole i called the.

galapagos
"galapagos" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"galapagos" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Check that up a rare and uh do some research burgers burke of course and uh different hat fried or grilled world which i adored on back when after christmas complete the seven you will notice still in new orleans i do and it just got to be this season oh absolutely sure went through proper spoils this morning and never better time to be in new orleans wonderful now there must be some places in a world that you haven't been to did you ever visit not because i learnt no which i believe earned the clock because ireland uh but that is high on the will of maybe i can get smith this year a my my wife claims there to be won over favors my wife jean and i have been around the world almost four times and cruise ships and on land and galapagos was high 'nother part of the world that i recommend wouldbe the mark kansas islands and if people don't know whether they are there part of french polynesia and they have a ship called the arrow newly which is a freighter and to go to the mark carries us is an absolute wonderful experience to eberharter lift mark i what was your favorite part about it uh to visit the islands and the ship itself isn't experience because it serves some very unusual food a mixture of native polynesian food as well as french food and specialties and the ship cells as i say uh is of no lure uh not to be forgotten and then when you've got to who've what you are and many different islands uh it is just unbelievable he onto our annoy cruise ship unbelievable the people extremely friendly they invited my wife and i quote lunch to their home and showed me some ardour rex and painting is is just an experience not to be forgotten those are the mark case those islands twinch polynesia and uh i already mentioned what is the allure officers americana call you marcus tvs the also all cooking was spicer's mark.

new orleans ireland smith jean french polynesia spicer galapagos mark kansas islands
"galapagos" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"galapagos" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"If you think of the galapagos islands remind might jump immediately to the islands endemic species such as the giant tortoise and the marine iguana but what you might not know is it the pacific ocean archipelago also has a growing population of tens of thousands of people this ballooning human presence on the islands his presenting a unique set of challenges the islands ecosystems and for the urban designers planning for the future professor justyna caricatures from the university of melbourne in his researching house plan for the future of the kasese population while she spoke as though he ferguson about how up an isolation isn't always a positive thing may mean kenner anam her how epa underlining architecture in bringing wrecking of malcolm the galapagos islands a famous for their unique biodiversity in it's really hard to imagine them being harm to a growing human population how many people currently living there well productivity back come from census is about fifty thousand uh do you appropriation nobody knows because they see lots of people who come from the mainland ecuador equally stayed there longer so it's probably like 65 maybe even to forty thousand people on the island and what does the population growth look like well the actually mentioning that it might double in the time which is quite frightening because over to keep the designated urban areas uh smoke fair not denselypopulated so he's the way of accommodating the increase of the population that people who are coming to the island all dreams about having the on the house on the bit of lunch as he can you imagine so if that is the case that will be properly possible pretty much and it will impact the ecosystem and obviously not have to.

professor ecuador the house galapagos pacific ocean university of melbourne ferguson
"galapagos" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"galapagos" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"And sheep on a story crowned evoking the three wise men because in an effort to block controversial ads metro hasn't allowed religious once for two and a half years the archdiocese of washington argues in the new federal law those rules are unconstitutional and this ad is simply about hope and an invitation to the christmas season if the latest in a series of ongoing legal challenges to metros and policies metros accepted salvation army and yoga ads but rejected birthright israel adds among others mack smith for cbs news washington coming at president trump addresses today's north korea and launch wtmj news time three o eight all right big meeting tomorrow a huge meeting tomorrow were discussing our tripped amodu peach you and the galapagos people to sign up for the trip meetings tomorrow at six thirty to milwaukee restaurant you must iris vp to attend the only way to do that is to send me an email would you like to get more information on motchi pete you and the galapagos in our trip there next fall it's an incredible trip the inca ruins in the andes mountains the beautiful galapagos islands with all that wildlife it's your chance to get more information and to sign but you must aris vp meeting at six thirty tomorrow would you like to come to the meeting or get more information email me john mercure at wtmjcom john dot merck here at wtmjcom it's match you peach you and the galapagos islands fall 2018 of bucket list trip more nation or more lee to sign up for tomorrow 630 informational meeting you must ours vp my email john doubt mercure m e r c u r e at wtmjcom prion carol maria i'm coming congress i enter in milwaukee june before one and only carol burnett coming to milwaukee evening of laughter a reflection worthy audience as the questions and carroll gives her fun what he answers carol.

mack smith carol burnett john lee vp milwaukee galapagos president cbs washington christmas carroll galapagos islands north korea trump israel new federal law
"galapagos" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"galapagos" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"February how about island hopping in the galapagos tattoo to linda just a few days ago this trip is filling up fast it's february ten through the eighteenth and we're going into the galapagos islands and visiting many of them there's nineteen volcanic islands right on the equator just six hundred miles from ecuador and this is going to be a fan if you have always wondered what it would be like to island hot to follow in the wake of charles darwin this is the trip for you and you can find out all the details the itinerary and uh showing each day tissues my touch keyword bortin that's b o r t o n and then you're also see all of the other destinations that they have first hand experience africa china antarctica asia india south america's scandinavia every person on the board in overseas team has a specialty and they'll help plan a trip of a lifetime use my taught keyword bortin good luck race one hundred and eleven days making a splash a mayo clinic hope and healing let's go okay you cannot air now you know god two thousand two hundred in ten days getting a kick out of life mayo clinic hope and healing hey it's marley for waxing the city and i'm hanging out with tara regional manager at waxing the city tell us about the exciting new product line for your eyebrows that at waxing the city right now we.

galapagos ecuador scandinavia mayo clinic regional manager linda charles darwin africa china antarctica asia i eleven days ten days
"galapagos" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"galapagos" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Great talking good morning yet welcome to our show number six hundred forty four originating live from the galapagos islands del graybrown got back safely from the galapagos richer i gather is home to species of birds that arching anywhere else on earth ray thanks for coming back to join us well thank you my pleasure scott and as we birdying people say let's not beat around the bush did you see the blue footed booby all we saw many blue footed bubis and also their cousins the red footed bubis withdrew just as spectacular and there were finches that darwin made famous right that's right at his time it was thought there were thirteen of these species of finches and you know he wrote his famous on the origin of species twenty eight years after he left the galapagos islands that's the the treatise that's really considered to be the foundation of evolutionary biology and this scientific theory about a natural selection but it's interesting scott because scientists now with dna studies in such have decided there are many more than thirteen species there are up to nineteen isaac at last measure and i gather you went snorkelling we will snorkeling i think five times if you're going to try and persuade me their birds who live under water i'm going to be very sceptically well there are birds that swim underwater most notably the the flightless cormorant the league's us there whose wings have evolved into these tiny little appendages so this spurred cannot fly but it can definitely swim and we did swim with them but we snorkel along with some other species it kind of might surprise you green sea turtles marini guan guavas galapagos sea lions galapagos penguins and low this is a real believe it or not to species of sharks swam underwater with you yes indeed ray ray the ideas do avoid sharks man massacres women within now you tell me but our guide assured us that we needn't be afraid so we saw these white tip reef sharks there maybe five feet long and then we saw these galapagos sharks who joined the standard a relative or a type of bull shark oh bull shark grid i told the.

galapagos scott bush galapagos islands del graybrow darwin twenty eight years five feet
"galapagos" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"galapagos" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Three takemura's good morning yet welcome to our show number six hundred forty four originating live from the galapagos islands del graybrown got back from the galapagos would i gather is home to species of birds that arching anywhere else on earth ray thanks for coming back to join us well thank you my pleasure scott and as we birdying people say loves not beat around the bush did you see the blue footed booby all we saw many blue footed bubis and also their cousins the red footed bubis withdrew just as spectacular and they were finshers the darwin made famous right that's right at his time it was thought there were thirteen of these species of finches and you know he wrote his famous on the origin of species twenty eight years after he left the galapagos islands that's the the treatise that's really considered to be the foundation of evolutionary biology and the scientific theory about a natural selection but it's interesting scott because scientists now with dna studies in such have decided there are many more than thirteen species there are up to nineteen icy at last measure and i gather you when snorkeling we were snorkeling i think five times if you're going to try and persuade me their birds who live underwater i'm going to be very skeptical well there are birds that swim underwater most notably the the flightless cormorant the league's us there whose wings have evolved into these tiny little appendages so this bird cannot fly but it can definitely swim and we did swim with them but we snorkel along with some other species it kind of might surprise you green sea turtles marini guan as galapagos e lions galapagos penguins and while this is a real believe it or not to species of sharks swam underwater with you yes indeed ray ray the ideas do avoid sharks man that occurs women with him now you tell me lori but our guide assured us that we needn't be afraid so we saw these whitetipped reef sharks there maybe five feet long and then we saw these galapagos sharks which i understand her a relative or a type of bull shark though bull shark greg i told the.

scott bush darwin galapagos islands del graybrow lori whitetipped reef twenty eight years five feet
"galapagos" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"galapagos" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Revis talking good morning yet welcome to our show number six hundred forty four originating live from the galapagos islands gerald graybrown got back safely from the galapagos would cure i gather is home to species of birds that arching anywhere else on earth ray thanks for coming back to join us will thank you my pleasure scott and as we birdying people say let's not beat around the bush did you see the blue footed booby all we saw many blue footed bubis and also their cousins the red footed bubis with just as spectacular and there were finches the darwin make things right that's right at his time it was thought there were thirteen of the species of finches and you know he wrote his famous on the origin of species twenty eight years after he left the galapagos islands that's the the treatise that's really considered to be the foundation of evolutionary biology and the scientific theory about a natural selection but it's interesting scott because scientists now with dna studies in such have decided there are many more than thirteen species there are up to nineteen icy at last measure and i gather you went snorkeling we were snorkeling i think five times if you're going to try and persuade me their birds who live under water i'm going to be very sceptically well there are birds that swim underwater most notably the the flightless cormorant the league's us there whose wings have evolved into these tiny little appendages so this spurred cannot fly but it can definitely swim and we did swim with them but we snorkel along with some other species it kind of might surprise who green sea turtles marini guan as galapagos e lions galapagos penguins and low this is a real believe it or not to species of sharks swam underwater with you yes indeed ray ray the ideas to avoid sharks man massacres women within now you tell me lorry but our guide assured us that we needn't be afraid so we saw these white tip reef sharks are maybe five feet long and then we saw these galapagos sharks which i understand her a relative or a type of bull shark though bull shark grid isn't it i told the and when bolivia yeah we swim with them with snorkel with them it was quite remarkable hearts the galapagos.

Revis galapagos scott bush darwin bolivia gerald graybrown twenty eight years five feet
"galapagos" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"galapagos" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Years introduced goats to galapagos but on islands like isabella which is this massive islands size of rhode island the goats were actually penned in just a part of it because there was this black lava rock that ran across the island stream leave rough lava that's extreme finally difficult to walk across twelve miles of it so that had acted as a barrier basically with goats on one side tortoises on the other but according to linda some time in the late 1970s the goats gop brave we were probably talking just a few goads but by the 1909 those few goes the population had exploited the news about one hundred thousand dollars well and if you think of a hundred thousand and goats eating everything in their path every sort of plan even the bark of trees they destroy the forest so now they had a dilemma on the one hand the tortoises needed help on the other hand you had all of these goats that didn't choose to beyond the i'll deal wasn't their fault and have been there for five hundred years some people were concerned with the goats have their eyes set of if he will right to be there those zarghee means came out frequently to which karl would respond here are we going to let tortoises go extinct yeah this thousands of islands around the world that have goats on them these tortoises are only found here so whittier values lie and so in 1994 we had what we called the tortoise summit in england and that was where we started the discussions about what are we going to do experts came from all over the world linda says we want to get rid of the san many of them thought we were nuts and that it was impossible there's a a hundred thousand of so many doubters in any case after endless planning meeting took eight years ailing they commence project isabelle.

rhode island karl england linda gop whittier one hundred thousand dollars five hundred years eight years one hand