19 Burst results for "Gagnon"

"gagnon" Discussed on HASHR8

HASHR8

05:10 min | Last month

"gagnon" Discussed on HASHR8

"I think i think we're In an incredibly good position in an incredibly good jurisdiction cool. That's that's reassuring. I mean. I didn't necessarily give it up a high probability of actually happening but just definitely wanted to ask. Ben what do you think is it in within the remote realm of possibilities or pretty safe to say it's not you know the the the question because it's not about any numbers right. I think we all know that this is an emotional game. And if based on fear it's not based on any of real data Which is a really scary market to operate. In you know we have regulators all over the world who are trying to regulate things that they have zero understanding about and i. I think that's always a risk that you're that we're facing the beauty about being in the united states that they move slowly and the whole system in the united states was designed around creating a system where the federal government you know is going to be very very difficult to overreach and so any source of impact that we're gonna see the united states should be very slow Which is great I am canada. They can be a little bit more fast in terms of pushing for legislation and they have push forward. You know federal carbon tax Which they've been working on for several years and went into effect this year And it's it is a a threat You know in the long term to have these sorts of policies bitcoin. Miami is by far. The world's best most cost effective technology are reducing emissions and doing so profitably and doing so with private dollars instead of government. So if this is about the data there's no chance of happening because the the benefits are clear. You know where revitalizing infrastructure. We're actually reducing emissions in most cases And we're doing so in a very very cost effective way creating jobs tax and everything else But when everything is based around emotions and can do whatever they want And so. I i think that always a risk that makes a lot of sense to Unfortunately i mean there's a couple miners are outspoken. Talk about this a lot. Unfortunately almost all the narratives are Very sort of emotionally driven and very few are very few. Conversations are driven by data. We wish it was. The inverse would easily win all of these conversations if it was the inverse but Yeah last question for you guys In this one might be a little bit more difficult to answer but do maybe not. i don't know. Do you expect canada. I guess or north. America general the us in canada to ever represents like over fifty percent of the networks hash rate As sort of we've seen at different points in bitcoin sensory from china-based finding companies Would you us and canadian. Or or just exclusively. Us or canadian companies ever ever sort of cross that threshold in the future We sort of talked about the the global spread of half hour after china's crackdown. A little earlier in this conversation. You think we'll ever reach that point where you know over. Half of it is is here Then back to you and then jamie also to know your thoughts. We are a big amount of power to be honest. I don't think we'll ever see another single jurisdiction hit over fifty percent of and i think that's a very good thing I think that the benefits for everybody and protect everybody coins..

united states canada Ben federal government Miami china jamie
"gagnon" Discussed on HASHR8

HASHR8

05:27 min | Last month

"gagnon" Discussed on HASHR8

"Muted there right off the get. Go welcome back to the to. The compass livestream This is the best and the only livestream dedicated to proof of work mining. We're glad you're watching As we all know a ton of cash rate has been leaving. China left china and most of it has ended up in north america but typically the majority of the conversation around this global shift in hash. Power has focused on the united states half of north america and by the united states. I mean texas. i'm wyoming pretty much reality though. This conversation sort of describes only half of this seismic shift in the mining market and today we have two great guests to talk all about the other half a little bit further north of the massive growth in north america's mining market in canada. Ben gannon she fighting off sir from farms and jamie liberty. Ceo of Bene- jamie it's honestly gonna be a ton of fun having you guys on the show. I'm super excited both year. Thanks for coming on the livestream african here so we have a couple questions i want to get to. I don't really like to plan these conversations too much. I think they're more fun. The less planning they have. But i wanna start off with the super broad open ended question i you bed and then jamie wanna hear your thoughts as well like what what's going on in canada. What's been happening. I mean. I'm sure you've seen a lot of headlines about texas and wyoming. Everyone loves to talk about those dates. I don't want to talk about any of that. I wanna talk about canada What's been going on with bitcoin or other proof of work mining in canada. Right now then. I think everybody is. You know look into north america. And that's i don't think there's really a a division here between the united states and canada in terms of chinese looking to relocate their minors looking to north america because both countries are great jurisdictions. And you know after china. This is the second and third largest producers of electricity in the world. So when you get the power that you know just came off line in china that i need to find a new home. You're going to go to the two primary producers of electricity. That are our next on the list. So we're seeing huge increase At least in our company and they're asking for capacity that honestly multiples of what we have listed on our website For installed infrastructure. And they're coming in every day There's no shortage of demands here and in terms of you know our operations in the province in our operations in canada aggressively expanding in quebec We're working to fill out our entire one hundred sixty megawatts worth of hydropower that we've got contracted here which is a little bit more than half That was granted initial three hundred megawatts. back in twenty eight eighteen. So we're aggressively working to develop all of that. I know a couple of other companies are also working to tap into the the better market opportunities right now but things are just take longer in the us in canada Than they would in in china and so. That's something that. I think the chinese need to understand. Is there's no building facility here in eight weeks That's just it just does not happen. You know it's going to take you multiple that you're we're talking timeframes measured in months And probably on the outside of a ten months now to go from a completely new project where you're negotiating the or securing the power. You're getting the permits. You're ordering all the materials you're actually building everything into play and everything. It's it's significantly longer than what they're expecting. That makes a lot of sense..

north america canada Ben gannon jamie liberty jamie wanna wyoming china us texas jamie quebec
"gagnon" Discussed on The Puddcast

The Puddcast

03:50 min | 1 year ago

"gagnon" Discussed on The Puddcast

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"gagnon" Discussed on The Puddcast

The Puddcast

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"gagnon" Discussed on The Puddcast

"Think it was. It was awesome to glad we went back and forth because it was called they. Decorate with the latest was whatever it was the first time we pulled the stroller in like two years but we're like we're going to sit down and they ended up walking most of it they like speeches I think or harder or that, but the actual protest in the marching and the like our kids don't even walk to the next street to part yet they walked with aside collaborators. It was unreal with eatables even have a sense of purpose back and talk about it like I was I was nervous like, how are they going to around the loud environment and like yelling and they were like right in there. And like I was saying earlier like so much of the content has been internalized in a way that we couldn't have done a want. To be part of a culture where I feel it. So this is a whole tangent, but I'm so tired of canceled culture. So tired of how we complain about thanks just get rid of people but I want them to keep kids meet people. I want us to be people who see problems an go after fixing it like how are we going to do something to make this world better and protesting active way they can do it I think we it was cool. SOC- them be part of and. Kind of begin to deposit those seats in there there. So It was. Arose of. Experience. Thank you. This has been so so good wonderful to hear all these bits and pieces. Including some of these hard and you know. Heartbreaking things that our kids wrestle with. Any other thoughts. Or some of those books that you've been reading resources things that. Leave. US. AM reading, white fragility, fantastic I feel like it just greatly beginner's guide. In terms of the kids. Were currently reading the little people big dream series the loving. Biographies. Is. Calling. Let's talk about race which has been fantastic or just my big thing is like not every book needs to be about race for kids but at least have books that are have representation. Right. To Be Light, you need to go march but let's just these are real people different look like you and they do real people things. Yeah. Every book needs to be Rosa Parks Martin Luther King Junior although it had those but I think it was neat the trick into Bata a Bible you talk off the Jesus storybook Bible Answer Try all about the stories of power of the spirit. Mitsubishi's she's really excited about that Our sun flip through and he's like Mama. Why'd you buy this book? It's all white. People. And I was like. Maybe, triesman working so hard to just say like we're where often it was actually it's all boys sewer, the females. or It's white people. So it was difficult in biblical times like, why was it? Like. Yeah. Trade has exactly what why, where Blonde Hair Blue Eyes Jesus. Like does that make sense for Middle Eastern? So it's been really neat to Tricky and it just goes through your family gets rid of every blonde haired Jesus. No absolutely. When I ran the bookstore at the Church in Toronto some one of the patches recommended from the front. The Golden Children's Bible, which was you're pointing to your like we all read I classic and. And and I just kind of was like You know what you talked about how good it was and that you grew up with it I'm ready suspicious and the girl who was running our purchasing the good friend of mine and she's Latina. And she looked online and she's like all hell no that will not coming into my store. Yeah. I remember I was talking to pastor named recommended it and I. Love Them. I love the way they walk out there eighth their kids on a great. Let me look this up at night open the Bible of plans like. Is.

US Toronto Mitsubishi
"gagnon" Discussed on The Puddcast

The Puddcast

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"gagnon" Discussed on The Puddcast

"Be don't think that they shared it with the right appropriate. Posher in the same way that offering like. People yelling about it in their angry than we write them off. Flip some tables. Right like I'm just. It went back in and just actually just balloting. Hey. Here's hearing. Here's one I'm worrying. So it's really changed my posture because I. Didn't like the way you said if you didn't say enough gentle respectful manner would I deem I was listening And I wrote you off for fighting agreed. To. Just listen is actual the most carrying yeah. In fact, actually can attention to a tangent it was at you probably remember this at the protests there was a woman sharing forget her name and someone certain screaming in the bill interrupted her and just, and I can tell from what she was sharing, what the person screaming that they disagreed and I'll never forget instead of telling the person to be quiet or you know preachers were ready for people who speak out of turn and we always have a gentle she just turned and paused and she looked at this person and she just waited and shoes I, hear you. I hear that's I think that was a significant shift moment for me that that changed everything I just explained it. Because of that woman's posture was I'm listening in right here you as a human being created image of I'm listening to your heart your heart cry. Let's shifting I. Mean in being a few months into this but Yeah. I mean like I think like I think in our culture I think in.

"gagnon" Discussed on The Puddcast

The Puddcast

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"gagnon" Discussed on The Puddcast

"The World Crowning Selah. Tamar had to book to two years of all such bits. Imagine. To I, three questions of sorry. What a waste? interracial. Marriage. But you've been married ten years Oh. Yeah. Is there other things that you bump into that are different today? I mean you've already vocalized fate you're more aware now perhaps things weren't aware of lowly. Things that you. Maybe. Realize more about your marriage. An to do with race and to do with. All this stuff. Now, that may be you. Know shrugged off earlier on you guys are in love. No big deal. All of our friends are mixed risk mixed race marriages. Caution, but ten years on you're sitting there going. Turns out we keep bumping into this one thing over and over again that I never anticipated. I mean, maybe maybe none of those things to do with race. That's fine I interested thinking I will I will tell you Mark Hake that I am consistently late. Fat is a cultural. Oh if you want we here we were. We just saw this because you maybe you can get your listeners. Okay if you invite us for dinner at six thirty, just just hypothetical. Six thirty. Linenger explanation it's going to blow your mind go ahead. I will not show up your castle six, forty five especially if you have kids because there isn't you could possibly be ready I would not be ready I would hope you would give me the grace to. Be Fifteen minutes eight and was there is like the most loving thing we can do shock fifteen minutes late because it gives them grace is like it's like she's offering them grace by being late. This. Larry by.

Tamar Mark Hake Larry
"gagnon" Discussed on The Puddcast

The Puddcast

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"gagnon" Discussed on The Puddcast

"At least. For me, he's very smart food and a hug. But for children that? Might get I've watched same skin color couples but from different cultural backgrounds really struggle you know five years, ten years into their marriage realizing this is a bigger deal than we realized when we got married people from. Marrying Canadians people from England marrying a mainland Europeans cultures that even myself had a lot of interplay with a lot of different. Colors. Especially, White Cultures would say there's there's plenty in common. There's not that much difficulty but I've been I've had caused before to say maybe they just should be intercultural marriages just too difficult like that temptation to feel that way before. Less. So in my own marriage because because I am I am a blend of all cultures. I don't know I don't know I have no cultural identity more. So I can't complain. But. I mean you guys have been married for for more than a minute now how? How is it different now than on? So, we've married ten years which we celebrate ten years of its Kobe in I. had this. Amazing around.

England
"gagnon" Discussed on The Puddcast

The Puddcast

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"gagnon" Discussed on The Puddcast

"At this point I'm not gonNa tell my daughter that the reason my parents are divorced is because my dad gay might eleven year old son knows and understands. How how do you reset into those moments who you're making? And all of a sudden, you have to have a really delicate conversation or do you just shelving for later I mean how does that play out? Level on this often that comes up I try trae feed. It's I think we've aired on this. Side of honesty. I'm just talking it out at an age appropriate level. But he. Then you know as watched, you try just have some of the. I'm amazed at how many books you've been able to. Find not easily. So so quite difficult twin books on race in representation and talking about some of the struggles even things like shades when all that. But soon at that leads to questions but you have honest conversations for kids about things in history that have happened things that are still going on I think he just leaned into that. I think that's the good and healthy. Yeah. I think we're just we desire to be honest as we can with them We've a friend gave us a really good advice now like anytime your child asks squad because let's be honest. Our children are always asking why. The WHITEBAIT And so we done a lot of turning back.

"gagnon" Discussed on The Puddcast

The Puddcast

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"gagnon" Discussed on The Puddcast

"Fair which like already I have such. A problem with that bitch he's already noticing the different reactions that she gets. He's noticing that people do ear or love people less who are. Part of it, we have talked through different stories. We've read different books on different like civil rights. Movers and shakers in people are time but he's starting to relate that to his own life and it's heartbreaking to watch him make these discoveries but also. Really empowering this grateful thieves at least asking the questions were there to be able to you know set the record straight in love on him but also see him begin to. Want to. Be An activist own way. So because he he's starting to understand. A little bit more will we talk into the black lives matter protest you're involved in that? It's all was a discussion. In the height of Covid but we really felt because he was beginning to ask the question and he was noticing it. He was noticing that people will call me out on like knowles say different things to Nadya stop, Mama. Need that to you. So we felt like we need you shall him that there is something you can stand up do and so one of his favorite box right now is ron parks and has she stands up and she says enough is enough and so when he wanted to make his poster for protests, he was like, I'm let it say enough. Is Enough and so that's what he did and he'll continue to talk about it. We did a date this week he was like Mama d member that protest where we said enough is enough I. Think we need to stand up and fight, and so it was a conversation of what is a local look to stand up fighting Wendy's stand up and fight But it's yeah it's so complicated as a parent to want to celebrate their racial diversity to also want to build them up in a way. That, they don't stand out too much in the world like that sounds bad to say but you know if I'm honest. But to also be.

knowles Covid Wendy Nadya ron parks
"gagnon" Discussed on The Puddcast

The Puddcast

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"gagnon" Discussed on The Puddcast

"I was born like I've just perplexed but it's been. A very interesting space specially recently, the summer which is. When I think it's amazing. The conversation about race an anti-racism come to the forefront, but it is definitely. I think also unleashed people who have kept their prejudices silent for so long. It's somehow given them permission to. Just it's it's up in many ways. It is it as a culture were actively fighting racism, but it's also given people who have prejudiced now speak louder as well, which is replacing it frustrating. Certainly if we talk about. Conversations about race and there's GonNa be some partners to that conversation that might have things to say that we don't want to listen to. The beauty of living in a place that values freedom of speech when sometimes. Yeah. Did you deal. Did you guys what about in your earn your dating and your marriage and your early relationship was we ever had to wrestle with any of those things are around owning your color owning your race. So interesting that. In some ways kind of growing up style. We think we once like did the game of like how many couples do we know that our same race? To. And it was like a dozen of our close friends that were mixed race. It was the audited did not be an interracial couple. So in some ways we thought. This is the normal it's it, but then I think especially especially in what's happened this summer we've had a lot of conversations about kind of looking back and realizing there are things that weren't normal.

"gagnon" Discussed on The Puddcast

The Puddcast

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"gagnon" Discussed on The Puddcast

"Hello my friends welcome back to the Pud cast. This is episode eighty, four I. Back, in the saddle after the Nice long summer break. It's been a time a wow. What a season twenty twenty has been this year. I've spent a lot of time resting a lot of time listening a lot of time recovering. Really Tuning into how broken my heart has been. At the State of the world at cove it at the. Lived reality of so many of my brothers and sisters have color around the world. So. Excited to share this interview with you today, it is with some good friends of mine mark and Traffic Guegnon, they live here wealth they are mixed race couple and I asked them to come and share some things about their life. In many ways. I feel like there's a temptation to be like Oh mixed race that's super normal. Now, we don't really talk about it. But. The more I spent time with them in the more I hear stories that I just wouldn't otherwise here. I hear about experiences of people that are close to people that I care about that. I wouldn't know I hear about pain that wouldn't know about. I I do believe it's very important to listen to people's stories that are different from our own helps us. Bill Compassion helps us see that helps us understand. Ourselves better. So this is a really open and honest conversation. Mark shares a lot of things that he's learned painfully of the law slipper bit and. Things are unlearn learning and especially as it relates to the Canadian context. So this is fun. Just, before we get into that, I want to share some big big news with you my devotional you.

Bill Compassion Mark
Who was Einsteins first wife

Science Friction

05:13 min | 1 year ago

Who was Einsteins first wife

"Tashin. Mitchell here this week with a controversy that just will not be put to bed. What do you think Russia language of science? Form Language asked me are the narrowly and a fan figura. Can you guess who this is? How is it that fantastic difficult language if international think of wild wiry hair and dark penetrating is he's arguably one of the greatest original thinkers of all time and certainly in science in strive for. An outdoors. And clarity of. concepts. got. Their. Mutuel. Relation. Anti correspondent who sensory date it's L. Dan Stein yes. predicted the behavior of black holes and their immense gravitational pull through his general theory of relativity, which visualized gravity is warping of the fabric of the universe or space time around objects. But have you heard of a woman called Malaysia Malaysia Marriage Johnston to babies sauce she was his first wife and a promising scientist in the making in her own right when they met and fell in love. Now, there's been a vocal malivert fan club in recent years. It says she was fundamental to Albert's early scientific success, even a key collaborator on his theories and that her legacy was hidden. Will a brand new investigation strongly contests this climb and over the next two episodes I'm going to drilling into that evidence to let you decide buckle up. It matters just to know the truth I and Stein is portrayed as the great hero of Science and N Stein is seen as a god and you don't touch demand. For some people is just like attacking the the Cohen that the Bible, you don't touch those things. We try not to make up stories. And this story appears to be largely the hopeful story people hoped it was true they it was true but it doesn't seem to be true. She. Helped in a great. Measure. That Einstein became what he became. I. Have Serious doubts that he would have got where he is. If he did not have her supporters, he needed someone to discuss them. He needed someone to calculate them. Compare them. So she left us a genius that's her gift to the world. It's important that the truth be told when stories are based on very unreliable evidence. When you start to examine the sources, the stories just aren't hold out. And stories that matter. Mathematical abilities rivaled on stands that she co-authored on Stan's early research that they worked late into the not together blazing a trial for quantum physics. Malivert and our wits relationship really on the came to be understood at all in the nineteen eighty s when early letters between them were found in a family bank faulting California very little other material evidence remained then and physicist Dr. Pauline. Gang Gagnon believes they could a reason for that. Two people were really adamant that this story would not come out about manage. These were Helen Ducasse the personal secretary of Albert Einstein and these are two. Nedam. Both of them became, but they were the executors of his estate and these people were adamant that this story will not come. Polling is a particle physicist now retired in Germany she spent much of her career investigating dark matter at the European Laboratory, a of particle physics soon, and at Indiana University she's taken up. Malaya's 'cause and explains that even elbow full story was with health for a long time. The first biographies came out more than twenty years after the death of Albert Einstein the reason was that do not end for example, not allow anything in writing unless he would be righted himself. The everything that was in the possession of Albert Einstein was cleaned up it has to do with the fact that auto. Natan after the death of militia marriage. In. One, thousand, nine, hundred, forty, eight, or two thousand came to Zurich to her apartment. To search the apartment and probably took everything that he could fine of scientific merit. So these people made every effort to clean up what was there and to erase any trace of market right?

Albert Einstein Johnston Physicist Helen Ducasse Tashin. Mitchell N Stein L. Dan Stein Russia Zurich Natan Gang Gagnon Cohen Stan Malaya Malivert Scientist Indiana University Germany Secretary
"gagnon" Discussed on The Adoption Connection | a podcast by and for adoptive moms

The Adoption Connection | a podcast by and for adoptive moms

07:42 min | 1 year ago

"gagnon" Discussed on The Adoption Connection | a podcast by and for adoptive moms

"Don't know it was crazy. She was half four and I was walking down the hall. Everyone was stress me. The doctor, the doctor that wasn't there. It was a day. Absolutely, so think about our babies right so it up clean of birth MOM's heart rates increasing Ma hormonally mom is releasing cortisol because Mommy's stress right, and then we also know that there might be sounds of grunting or yelling. His mom is hurting. Because there is pain, baby understands that this person bet they live inside is fueling pain and stress, and then they are moved from the womb into the birth canal where contractions begin, and that is the squeezing of the baby and moving from the environment that was completely regulated. To something that is chaotic, stressful and at this regulated. At that moment, a baby believes they will die. A baby believes that something bad is happening, because it's not what they experienced for this whole period of time all their senses. Reading this person who's cared for me is stressed out hurting and it's scary, so the baby moves from the birth canal. In his born. What is the most beautiful picture of motherhood and birth is what we do with the baby after that we naturally place the baby on the mother's chest, and just to give you a picture of of what happens with the with the mother Gun design the body in that moment on a mother to actually open capillaries on the mother's chest region to warm her body quickly in that area, which to me is absolutely fascinating, so the the baby is placed on the mother's chest. The mother's chest gets warm by the opening of capillaries, and she becomes almost like a temperature control zone again. On the mother's chest. The baby is hearing her heart rate. That's now calm sharing the mother's voice feeling the mother's touch. And then we place the baby to the Mother's breast, and the baby then is tasting. What the baby tasted in the womb, and so we see this comp- complete picture of of the attachment cycle were attachment babies stressed cries. The need is match. So that's what happens through the birth process. Baby is stressed. Cries placed on the mother. The need is met and so what happens when the baby then is taken? By a new caregiver. Or. The baby then responds and has to go to the nick you. We see a break in that attachment cycle that causes stress and so I think that's a really good way to understand how in utero development and attachment is so incredibly important starting at conception, not at birth. Yeah, that's amazing. Talk to me about like what is that? Is the trauma bond what you're saying like the attachment and bonding after a traumatic experience? Like how are you defining that? So when when I was being with him, he was saying trauma. Bond is exact exactly what you said. Where it's, it's a overwhelmingly so trauma in itself is when Someone Stress Response System is over K, and so in a child, their Straw they're. They're incapable of handling the stress that is occurring in that moment it feels out of control. It feels life or death. It feels like I in this moment might die, and so the trauma bond is within the caregiver or person in their life steps in to coagulate, and and be with them in that moment to give them that safety or met need. Okay, and so in a typical having your own baby of nerd typical situation that bond is met by the person who the baby has been smelling experiencing. All of those things which we know is really healthy makes a really strong attachment and bond. Do we as people who are carrying for babies who were not grown in US have the ability to kind of complete that trauma bond circle even if it's not ideal. Absolutely you know. I think what I don't want people to take away from. This is some sense of hopelessness I think it's. It's an understanding that kids are not resilient to steps that occurred in Utero or at birth. I think it needs to that. We need to understand when our kids have things that are that happened. That are a broken attachment or those kind of things or even drug exposure. Exposure in Utero or things that we have to actually build a narrative for them to understand those emotions and those feelings, because they're pre-verbal, and they don't have the ability to understand those emotions so much of healing in our kids, especially when we've adopted them at birth needs to be a built narrative around the emotions and feelings in what happened prior to them coming to us. Yeah it's really important, and and in some ways I think that trauma can be harder to overcome because from a logical standpoint you get to be ten eleven twelve teens, or even before that and you're thinking. I was adopted from birth I've been with this family, my whole life. I don't know why I feel this way. I don't think I have the right to feel the way. I know that I've been in safe family. My entire life and you almost don't have permission to feel the things, and so then you stuff them. You can't narrate for years and it's definitely shifting now. Fortunately, the professionals would also tell you. You know there's nothing wrong with you. You've been loved and cared for and safe, since I and so I think that can be even harder because we have. We can't narrate it as well because the wasn't pre-verbal experience. Absolutely an understanding and you said it that we there is there is coming from a place of loss right, and and if we know okay, we understand that kids when they experienced trauma or they experienced Something, abandonment because that's that's in in essence. What this is is abandonment right They're going to blame themselves, so we're going to see kids spiral in shame and blame and so like. I think what's important to understand? Is that this picture? This understanding is us speaking truth into our kids that this. This was not their fault. There was nothing wrong with them that they are worthy and chosen in wonderful that. This was an adult that they did not have any of and I think that that we don't do that because we think they don't remember, but what we have to understand is that our kids carry this on a cellular level. Their bodies do remember number and I'll just throw kind of lake, the flip side of the coin as an adoptee who, for seemed resilient to a lot of that or didn't internalize a lot of that mission. If your child isn't kind of watling in all. All of this loss and seems pretty resilient. They're also doesn't mean that there's necessarily anything wrong with him or her personality. In different things, a lot of us have different thoughts, feelings and emotions about that initial loss, and it may come up at another time so I.

Bond Utero cortisol Ma US nick
How the Federal Reserve’s “discount window” works

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:35 min | 1 year ago

How the Federal Reserve’s “discount window” works

"I'm thinking the best way for us to frame things today. When just how different things are has now? Become so clear is do what we've done a couple of times. The past couple of weeks macro micro big picture to actual people in an economy that is coming to a very sudden stop. You don't get much more big picture of course than the Federal Reserve on a Sunday afternoon pulling out. Maybe not all but certainly a whole lot of the stops that had has that huge cut in their short-term interest rate that you have heard about Shirley and other big bond buying program echoes of the financial crisis to be sure also a cut in something called the discount rate short-term emergency loans dispensed through what is known as the discount window sounds a tad. We D I know but in reality it is so big picture because what we're talking about here is the Fed making some really big moves to keep credit flowing to households and businesses marketplace's. Amy Scott gets us going with what the discount window is and why it is so important in a crisis. Think of the discount window as a shot of. Wd Forty if advanced is short on cash to cover customer withdrawals or make loans it can borrow money short-term directly from the Fed in effect it's kind of keeping the finances lubricated during a stressful time banking consultant. Burt Ely says the problem is banks are reluctant to reach for the Kellyanne. Borrowing from the Fed is usually more expensive than borrowing from other banks and Joe Gagnon with the Peterson Institute for International Economics says that looks bad. I mean if a bank has to pay a higher rate to get credit it's usually because other banks are leery of landing to it so it looks like it might be in trouble. The Fed is trying to reduce that stigma by slashing the discount rate and by urging banks to use it and not add. Mahdi teaches finance and economics at Stanford. If they say well please come. Please come which they also did during the financial crisis. Then it's like everybody's doing it and it's okay and it's legitimate. It could help the J. P. Morgan Chase recently said it plans to use the discount window to help break that stigma. Gerard Cassidy an analyst with RBC capital markets says bank balance sheets are really strong right now partly because of nervous customers. There's been an influx of deposits for the safety of the FDIC deposit insurance. So I don't think the banks are going to be forced to go to the discount window but he says better to get them comfortable with the idea before. There's a real

Federal Reserve Gerard Cassidy Rbc Capital Markets Peterson Institute For Interna Fdic Burt Ely Amy Scott Shirley Joe Gagnon Mahdi J. P. Morgan Chase Stanford Kellyanne Analyst Consultant
"gagnon" Discussed on No Wahala with Tune Day + Bawo

No Wahala with Tune Day + Bawo

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"gagnon" Discussed on No Wahala with Tune Day + Bawo

"This is to smuggle me thank now colors because there's lots going on in russia who can go out and do i'll come out then you know i wanna wear my wow wow i mean oh speaking of gone i know you don't grade them up so much but shadows the guy is lifted podcasts because they know they just respect popping out you know what i mean they're doing no they are they don't there's a lot of gun is making waves so big up everybody living there saying so i bumped into bumped into easter egg justin timberlake had like a private of the parties member died so we have he had a private so isa was there so you know you know i walked into what and i'll just asking her bunch of random questions like have come happened martikan in july sunday what is your favorite type of july snow respond she gave me what what do you think that she what is she told her didn't read the word fortunate so my natural inclination would be that she said gagnon saliva she likes mitzah already inside she likes her laughlin so ladd that latin fact you don't call it solid because a lot when it comes to select already is i yeah she been here prove it's the window no no home fortunate be that's the one more ready gelo like on our chagang roy's gonna give let me just let me just for the faxes i'm here on the record i'm here for the i'm here for the coon by you know i mean i'm.

russia justin timberlake laughlin roy gagnon
"gagnon" Discussed on The Cracked Podcast

The Cracked Podcast

01:53 min | 4 years ago

"gagnon" Discussed on The Cracked Podcast

"The inmates are getting into the shakespearean characters who and i think one of the reasons behind that is for your average college student attempting to play hamlet or king lear or some character out of his shakespeare tragedy you only have so much life experience to be able to connect with that character oca there's a lot of imagination that goes there in two axing out some of those rules i think some of these inmates because of the tragedies that have happened to them in their childhood and then the you know whatever happened to them to get them in prison in the first place these shakespeare characters speak to them more than by somebody else and so it's amazing how expressive and emotive their performances are they have connected with tragedy before exactly while i feel like what i guess to improvise almost lowballing them like they're doing shakespeare that's been tested and also may be all male companies like the original but so yeah exactly um wow as we're talking about diya's therapy is anyone studying these prisoners is anyone i i know we have studies of dis therapeutic impact on people and then we have prisoners playing d and e is anyone going out and doing like a scientific research involving these people as subjects i feel like there would be something there it's not your job to make this happen i'm just curious left to make that happened yeah i don't know if any formal steady gagnon if there was one i'd love to know about it yeah i definitely thought at one point about trying to do a serve ages to find out how widespread this actually was but there's logistical challenges in doing that i mean assent flyers out to course prisoner you know how does that work but absolutely to me i'd love to see somebody with more of us sake research background approach this topic.

shakespeare diya gagnon king lear
"gagnon" Discussed on Trumpcast

Trumpcast

02:07 min | 4 years ago

"gagnon" Discussed on Trumpcast

"Practice to cultism and freemasonry and eventually converted to sufi islam and gagnon is the founder of a religious philosophy called traditionalism with a capital t sometimes known as primordial traditionalism and this is going to sound like something out of a dan brown novel but the idea at the heart of primordial traditionalism is that there is that in the earliest ages of mankind god revealed certain esoteric truths that lie at the heart of all the ancient religions the hindu fidanza sufism paganism and that this knowledge was lost to the western world beginning with the enlightenment this is essentially an anti modernised philosophy evola unlike gagnon believed that finding transcendence was not about spiritual transformation there was about societal transformation and so evola made common cause with mussalini with hitler and tried act as ideas that way he mostly failed and wound up as an avatar of rightwing italian terrorists in the '60s and '70s in now is a very popular with richard spencer and white supremacists abandoned claim know that that was not the part that interest him as idea it was the first chapter reservoirs decline in gagnon famous book is called crisis of the modern world can see the throughline in this idea of crisis but what so batty about all this not to cast aspersions anyone's religious beliefs is that bannon in gagnon evola or all believers in the hindu concept cyclical time do you know that is yay or shia the idea that the world passes through certain stages so you've been yone an ebola believed that we're we are right now in the midst of what he knew call the cali ugo six thousand year long dark age when man's a connection to god to tradition is wholly lost.

gagnon founder hitler richard spencer bannon gagnon evola ebola cali ugo dan brown six thousand year
"gagnon" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

01:38 min | 4 years ago

"gagnon" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"But you've heard me before lament how sports you get those finals which were as aesthetically pleasing a basketball as i've ever seen in my life you get that and what it turns into is well lebrun can't win or kevin duran took a shortcut it's not how do we celebrate it's how do we criticise sure and what i want to do today is celebrate something that i think didn't get celebrated enough about that golden state team guy all the time in sports you guys are criticizing people because you think they're in it for themselves their selfish that might be the most unselfish basketball team i've ever seen in my life in every way never mind how they play which is so obviously unselfish it's not i so ball they get a ton of assists every game and move the ball and it doesn't matter where the points come from and dream on green is willing emotional volatile dream on green is willing to be a guy who just does the dirty work puts up a bunch of two for nine games and his just going you can't say it's ever a bad game matry mongering now because he's always doing those things on defense because he can guard anybody it's beautiful watch i mean it is but yet to mvps in their prime on a scene tale but gagnon that though it better be but but i'm not even talking about beautiful watch i'm not even talking about unselfish on the court i'm talking about how absurd it is.

basketball lebrun kevin duran gagnon
"gagnon" Discussed on SXM20

SXM20

01:41 min | 5 years ago

"gagnon" Discussed on SXM20

"Like what they want to look like that you're the person that they want because you're so much better than the person that they want to and just some what's a nicer or you got to change their opinion about what they thought about a person that looks like because that's where you there and i knew that when i walked into busines that on me that i have to be as a driven and as smart and as talented and as open to everything that's around me and my business not was from the term out of doing theater here in pounding the streets as it is to know even though right and how i mean people people defer to me own people go at purchase a nasty into how is he to you it was nice to me on seven of that oh yeah get us through right but i also know that i presented months so in such a way that they want to be nice to me because then they won't be in business looking great because conduct him out business in such a way that makes them believe that i'm not those other get right you know you not like the other right you know and what i'm trying to make them see is i am like the other because the other ones can be like me right you can't just put me in this plays and they've been our only warm all other media ndez lynn more gagnon as they look to fars and they see one of those guys you know none of us came from this lofty plays right all of us came from a plays of humble began all of us pounded payments.

gagnon