20 Episode results for "Gadsby"

Comic Hannah Gadsby

Fresh Air

48:59 min | 11 months ago

Comic Hannah Gadsby

"From whyy in Philadelphia. I'm terry gross with fresh air today. Comic Hannah Gadsby. Her twenty eighteen netflix comedy special was perhaps the most talked about comedy said of that year in addition to making her audience laugh. She took them by surprise by vowing to give up comedy because the forms limitations made it too difficult to express the pain of growing up closeted in the Bible belt of Australia being beaten and raped and temporarily homeless. But you didn't give up comedy. She's back with a new netflix comedy. Special leader Marine coggin reviews a comic novel. She says takes readers on a road trip through struggling towns and farmlands of rural America. It's called Saint Christopher on Pluto financing McKinley. After Hannah Gadsby breakout comedy. Special called Ninette premiered on Netflix. In two thousand eighteen it won a peabody award an Emmy Award and was described in the New York. Times QUOTE. The most talked about written about shared about comedy act in years unquote. What made the show especially provocative was her vow to up comedy because she thought they requirements of jokes. Setup punchline tension release were inadequate for describing her life and the anger she felt about how she was abused growing up. Gay and closeted in Tasmania which she describes as the Bible Belt of Australia. Gatsby illustrated her point about comedy by telling a funny story about a guy who thought she was a man hitting on this guy's girlfriend litter in the set. She retold the story as it really happened. When this guy realized Gaspar was a woman and correctly assumed that she was a lesbian. He beat her badly and no one stopped him. Here's Gatsby from ninette. This is why I must quit comedy because the only way I can tell my truth and put tension in the room with anger and I am angry. I believe I've got every right to be angry. But what I don to have a right to do is to spread anger. Don't because anger much like laughter can connect a room full of strangers like nothing else but anger even if it's connected to laughter will not relieve tension because anger is attention it is a toxic in fictious tension and it knows no other purpose than to spread blind hatred. And I want no part of it because I take my freedom of speech as a responsibility and just because I can position myself as a victim does not make my anger constructive. It never is constructive. Laughter is not medicine stories. Holdout cure laughter is just the honey that sweetens the bitter medicine. I don't want to unite with laughed off anger. I just needed my story. My story and understood by individuals with minds of their own gets be did take a break from performing after touring with that show but she hasn't given up comedy and now she's back with a new comedy special call. Douglas named after the first dog she had as an adult. It just started streaming on Netflix. Here's an excerpt from early in the show if you're here because of the net. Why don't get me wrong? It's a good show. Solo bit work on quite fond but it was a particular show of a very particular flavor. And if that is what is what you expecting from this show. I'm sorry if it's more trauma I I'm fresh out. Just how wildly popular troll move is going to be in the context of comedy. I might have budgeted better honestly I could have built quite the career out of it at least a trilogy but I went and only truman eggs into one basket. Nydia and now here we gets be welcome to fresh air. Thank you you're welcome. It's a pleasure to have you so I guess you didn't give up comedy. I'm glad you did not. Were you surprised by the impact that had at the end of Ninette when so many comics in America started wondering like should I rethink comedy? Just comedy have limitations. I haven't thought of we. You surprised by all of that look. I was surprised by the positive response all the way through performing at like the first time I performed. I knew that I was putting something kind of electric out into the audience and sort of built in built and built and I was just blown away by how positive the response was over overall. Like you know the impact of that you know I. I didn't think it would be so successful. I just thought you know what I have to say these things. I'm willing to sacrifice my career for that I can move on So I am surprised that it was so positive but because it was so positive. It seems only natural that other. Comedians are going Perhaps I should rethink and I think that's healthy you know. I'm not saying that everyone should change the way they do things. But I think a bit of a shake-up is is good so you do not dwell on trauma in your new Netflix's special but you did talk about. How in two thousand seventeen? You were diagnosed with having autism spectrum disorder and another hilarious subject that was that was in Sufism. Sixteen Sixteen. Thank you very positive about it. You say you know that might sound like it was horrible to get the diagnosis but it actually gave you a new way of understanding yourself. What are some of the things that made you feel really different? That's started to make sense after you got the diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder. I found out and things started to make sense because it shifted the way that I understood myself. I was Al- always operating on the on the false premise. That ever on Seoul the world like I did so I was just getting it wrong Of getting a lot of things wrong the most difficult was my interpersonal sort of life. Because you know on stage interviews get the boundaries and the rules of engagement very clear but once you step out of these things and you know you're talking to people you building relationships with people that the So much more uncertainty and I don't read the room nearly as well so in many ways I appear very good at being social but it's an incredibly exhausting process for me so when I was diagnosed it just gave me permission to be kind to myself to not always take responsibility for being. You know a bit clumsy a around other people and allowed me to sort of start to tell paypal Z. But I don't mean to be and being more open about. I need to tell me what I did wrong. And then we can move on from there whereas you know I would just get in a lot of troubles from my friends and and whatnot so being insensitive and you know and it was kind of a double bind. Because I'm very sensitive and I'm very thoughtful but I miss things that other people that have go. Let's you should just know that. Like what know I I very blunt and I'm very honest so is that there is this sort of it's almost a hack joke You know and it's the ironies the agenda all that way a woman who who say to a man. Does my bum look big in this in the man will go? Yes you know. It's it's no joke and then And I've done that. Not not the bum thing because you know I probably have a larger bump so I never think anyone's bum his big but You know I remember an ex girlfriend's asked me if I liked her new hair haircut and I absolutely didn't and I can't lie so I said I'm not formed and that that was a weeklong recovery mission and that was before I was diagnosed And wasn't even a bad haircut. I I mean I just was wrong for her face and I I studied history and I I was going on and from that point of view and I have bad hair. Yeah so I really had no place. I can undo it in hindsight but hindsight is a great gift in the moment. How are you about people being honest with you when they're critical pretty good? I as a performer. That's a a good skill to have a good trait to have a well. I've been I was trained by the best. But you know I had a particularly since the mother and she always celebrated successes through the metaphor of failures. So trying to will so we've been talking about being diagnosed with with autism and I'm wondering if that contributes to how you work as a comic or where you see comedy as a comic when you the world you have to be able obviously to find the comedy in it so I could see ways in which autism could work on either side of that as being helpful or not. It's incredibly hopeful in the perspective. I have because it's sort of a not you know I don't see things obviously in and process it in the same way. Say Your typical person So there's an off kilter angle to it and and you know minds highlife has made people laugh and I've not always mint too often. I don't you know yesterday. I was walking my dogs and a couple stopped me from a safe distance and has me. Oh what kind of dogs a day and I said Look Gatos and I said Oh I've never heard of that and I said neither of they and it was the truth and I was trying to be funny. I've just want dogs haven't heard of the breed and I just said it out loud. They laughed a lot and I had to just sort of backtracking over the conversation and that was funny. Wasn't it so this is so often. I'm sort of traveling down the path of my own logic which is not not always sort of immediately accessible so that it comes across as funny so I- retroactively visit out and that's often landmine humid comes from I`Ma genuinely serious person and you know people who don't like my comedy quick to point that out and I I can't argue with them but if I'm going to interrupt you because it sounds like from what you said that you sometimes don't even recognize what's funny about what you've said which sounds like it would make it difficult to put together a comedy set but you know hindsight is my gift. I am not unable to see other people's perspective. I just don't see it at the same time they said so. You know and I'm getting better as I get older. You Know I. I have a more complex idea of things and I have a you. Know a more mature ability to engage with other people. So you know there was a time when I would just assume that I was stupid but you know now that sort of like all both can be true and that's why huma lives in that sort of mess between possibilities you know. Both both things are true so in that way. I find it a great advantage where my autism is a real disadvantage is the actual lifestyle that you have to lead in order to participate in in in comedy. It's it's late night. It's a lot of travel it's a lot of disruption. I I really don't just love routine I need. I need Routines and comedies. Even though it's literally doing routines it's very almost impossible until you're successful and what it did was gave me a level of success where I could take control of my environment and put together a tool war on terms that want. So I'M GONNA say dangerous puts being vulnerable places and So I I I wouldn't perform on the same day as I travel and things like that so incredibly that you know. Success has given me this sort of power to take control of environment. I'm not sure I could have lasted much longer. The older I got the less as it was for me to navigate in the net. You talk about that. You didn't want to do self deprecating humor anymore because when you're a marginalized group and you've grown up group where you've been hated in an abused that self deprecating humor isn't humility. It's more humiliation. I'm curious if you're willing to share what some of your self deprecating humor was like back when you were still doing it. I used to do a lot of material about my body. So one of one of them would be sort of you know. I didn't get a visit from the breast vary. I got a visit from the fair and she had a trigger finger. You know like just little little runway lines like that. A lot around my body A lot about you know re wrap will the stereotypes about being fat depressed lesbian. You know things like that. And if T. Glee about my body is the one. I don't make fun anymore because like I have a reasonably healthy body image. So it's not that I am. I laugh at myself. I just think it's unhelpful. For a bigger than average woman to use her body as like a point of mockery. Because it's so well established in the world. You know it's like of course your body is a joke and it's not my body's Bain through a lot of trauma. My Buddy is strong unit and so I've just decided to go. You know what I'm not going to do that anymore. Let's talk about growing up in Tasmania. So homosexuality was illegal until nineteen ninety seven. How old were you when that low overturn? That's up to do the math. I was born in seventy eight. What does that make seventeen? No nineteen going. Okay was that law actually enforce like where people find or put in jail if they were gay if they were caught in a gay bar or something? I guess there weren't gay bars in. Tasmania really like the action of the like. It became a thing when people tried to change the law and so there was like a ten year debate around said that. Became this sort of flashpoint before that it was basically. Don't tell anyone then it's fine But it also meant it was a is permission for violence. I don't know that because you were you were beaten. You're raped or sexually abused and I was wondering if the men who did that you felt entitled to harm you because your sexuality made you a criminal and your religion made you center. No it wasn't my religion and I think that's more to do with misogyny than like anything else like I think that's just you know men having ownership of women's bodies more than anything. The being beaten you know certainly was because that was at the height of you know debate. So the debate was being pushed into the media And you know that's what happens when there's A. There's the these things that happen. The you know the media tends to amplify the most extreme voices and and so what people don't see the ramification of that on the ground and I saw firsthand. She think the debate was empowering people to be violent. Absolute rule Absolutely absolutely and you see that happen. Platt in any of these kinds of debates you know yeah yeah. Do you think that if neighbors knew that you were a lesbian that they might have like turned you into the police or did it ever get to that point where people thought? This is a legal and I have to take action against it. Well first of all the law pertained sodomy so being Elizabeth was just a complete in disability. We don't even exist. Yes right right but you couldn't be out and proud by any stretch but no the generally it was About you know gay men home and did you have friends who were a game in who were more. No I didn't have any friends. Jimmy that literally. Yeah I mean I had my elderly. I had neighbors my best friends growing up with my next door. Neighbors and I used to go over to their house every day after school and have a competent biscuit and a bit of quiet time because those youngest of quite a large family and it was very loud and school was a lot of me. And so I just go over. And we'd just sit and have quite chatting nap and get a bit of quiet now. All my best friends. But you know that was sort of the brethren branch of religion so it was all fire and brimstone so there was always this. You know the older. I got this sort of anxiety about that so it was never on the surface but there was this increasing anxiety. You know like all these this couple and they meant the world to me. But as I got older it was like I can't share that. She begin to cleave off these large parts of your emotional landscape and reality from the people you spend the most time with and that's the real painful thing. Yeah because there's probably like not only can I share this but if they only knew the might not be so nice to me? Yeah and you can't share it in that vulnerable time when you like. I'm trying to work something out about myself And you know you see you left on your own at a time in your life when really you need to be guided by adults the me reintroduce you here if you're just joining us. My guest is comic Hannah Gatsby and her follow up to her. Really popular. Netflix special in the net is now streaming on Netflix. It's called Douglas. And it's named. After the first dog she had as an adult. We'll talk more after we take a short break. I'm Terry Gross. In IS FRESH. Air Support for this podcast. And the following message come from L. A. Time studios funded by Amazon studios for the podcast paper clip inspired by its Emmy Eligible Drama Series Hunters starring Al Pacino and Logan Lerman join host Michael Ian Black as he teams up with a Cold War historian to explore Operation Paper Clip a top secret program that brought Nazi scientists to America. It's a story of principles compromised war-crimes overlooked available now on apple podcasts and all other platforms. My guest is comic Hannah Gadsby and although she vowed to give up comedy in her previous Netflix special in the net. Fortunately she's back with new comedy special. Which is called Douglas? And her first comedy. Special Ninette was in part about growing up in Tasmania. We've she describes as the Bible Belt of Australia and she was growing up gay in not only area where other people who were gay were out so she had no one to talk to about that. But also it was a legal to be homosexual until nineteen ninety-seven. You said that you came from a really large loud family. And I'm thinking while you're like so sensitive to loud noise it must have been hard. Yeah but I used to. I used to spend a Lotta time under the hedge. The beauty of being in a large family for someone on the spectrum though is the sense of place a sense of belonging and a sense of community is is automatic so in many ways I was in it advantage because I never have to head fully formed relationship structures. I had more difficulty once I went out in the world. But you know in a family. You have these things and so the yeah there. Was you know noise and chaos? But there's also you know when you have a large family this routine by necessity and structure by necessity to wrangle so many kids and we're in a small town so there wasn't much flux now existence and so there was a lot of advantages to it and was a time when a kid could just leave the house and be a bit feral just sort of you know spend time outside and talk to myself and you know so. I I was able to negotiate that you are homeless for a while what period of your life was. And why were you home? Once I finished my degree it was a three degree the twenty five years. I didn't know what to do. Then once I left the beats you supposed to hit you know. And then they're like okay. You're off into the world. I was unable to navigate that any sort of external structures and scaffolding. I like to say you know I struggled to fill in forms. Never been able to apply for a job in the traditional form I've always just picked up sort of casual entry level work. And you know the older you get the lists easy that he's you know when you pop resume into a place and the like. Wow so older done so little so I sort of began to drift really badly. You know I worked in a bookshop for a little while and then I was a cinema projectionist and then. I traveled up the north of Australia as work at a an outdoor cinema. Because I you know I had an actual skill that is no longer an actual skill but at the time and from there I found I couldn't actually hold down a job on able to you. Know earn enough money and also navigate just the basic administration of life. I look back on that time. I feel sad is like I didn't understand I. I genuinely needed help. I needed assistance. Do Tribute that to autism. Yeah And so became femme Labor. I lived in a Vino a tent. And then you know basically no fixed address for a couple of years we you sleeping on the street at all. No 'cause I was in the in the country so there's no need to be on the straight. I had a tent and you know and then I drift in and woke on farms and then but I had no safety net. I had no backup and I mean certainly slipped RAF but it was just not on a straight. I'm taking that really literally right that sleep on the streets and I'm like yes I guess but basically I just weren't a lot of streets is what you're saying. Yeah walked out and out a nice spot and pitch the tent and Y- yeah so you had no safety net. Did you have any safety? Not Pat no guess not no no capacity you know grabbed or attacked while you were homeless knots. I Guess Waugh's but not you know because someone broke into my tent. It's at one stage. I sort of drifted into this sort of communal living situation. That turned bad turned bad Yeah what happened? That's a whereas rate. Oh that's turning really bad. That wasn't great to. Did you leave that that community afterwards living situation? No I have no way to go well. That's so awful that you stay with. That's the reality of no choice isn't it? That is yeah. That's really awful. Did the other people know? It's always hard to say you know. People are really incredible at not acknowledging things to the point where they figured that they knew. Well I can kind of see the impulse here to stand on stage and say this happened. This happened like acknowledge it happened. What future did you see for yourself? Then when you're living in a tent and you had no steady job you didn't think you could hold one. I didn't see a future at all. And that's that's trauma. You're absolutely incapable of imagining a future incapable of understanding. What a dream is. But you know you you're obviously. You're like very smart and very perceptive and very articulate. Could you comprehend why somebody who has a smart as you were and as knowledgeable art history degree would feel like you had so little future in front of you so a few options so few opportunities the that that was very always very confusing to me? I didn't understand how I got it all so so wrong You know this is. This is part of the autism situation The until I was diagnosed I could never look back on that part of my life and and make complete sense of I still struggle. And that's a that is also an effective trauma. There's no straight line through trauma So how were you when you were diagnosed terrible at domestic situations thirty six thirty six? That's a long time not to understand what was going on. You know neurologically for you. Yeah Yeah it is. Let me reintroduce you here. If you're just joining us my guest is comic. Hannah Gadsby and her follow up to net has just been released on net flicks and it's called. Douglas. It's her second Netflix. Comedy special. The first won a peabody award and an emmy. We'll be right back. This is fresh air support for NPR and the following message. Come from Doug Doug Go. Do you want the same Internet but more privacy duck duck go can help? They helped millions of people. Like you get privacy online without any tradeoffs with one download. You can search and browse privately. Avoiding trackers duck duck. Go privacy simplified. Let's get back to my interview with Hannah Gadsby. She's a comic whose first comedy special on Netflix Net was described in the New York Times as the most talked about comedy act in years and she vowed to give up comedy in that special but now happily. She's back with new comedy special which is called Douglas and just started streaming on Netflix. So you're an art history major. I assume that means that you really love painting and you know art has a central place in both of your stand up specials in different ways In your you talked about how like the like the the gay pride flag is annoying to you because it's too just like too much color. What was it like for you as an art history major? Oh I love that history that gets it was such a such a perfect way from my brain to learn about the world and understand the world like I get there eventually with reading and comprehension. But I'm slow. I'm really really slow but thorough. We've with images. I seem to get so much. I seem to be able to process an image at a speed and a depth and nuance that account with language and so studying history was just really powerful. Way For me to begin to piece together the puzzle of the world. What made you think that you could Perform comedy funny. Did you think it's funny? I knew how to be funny. I knew how to tell a story. And the way I'd learnt tell a story was to really built the skill to evade the reality of my life and just told a funny story about a moment you know. So He's a funny thing that happens and then I have to tell people about the the actual reality of my life and essentially I entered a comedy competition and it was on a whim. That wasn't this sort of thing you know I've been hoping to do. I did a lot of things on women like off. Try this thing. I'll try that thing. And there's no reason to expect comedy was going to end any better worse than all the other failed attempts at my grasp but life and this is a national competition was held by the Mobin Comedy Festival Melbourne International Comedy Festival. And they run hates all around us. They go into regional towns. And you know. Hold as competitions Actually really wonderful program because it it doesn't dwell on just sort of the cities it could really does go into regional places and so then you know as soon as I I sort of told my I you know. Gio which isn't technically a joke. It was just a few words. I strong together. I think it was the combination of you know. Just me being this completely strange creature up on stage just really made people engage with me and I held the audience in my hand. I didn't know what to do them but I knew that I had them in my hand so it was clear from the very first time I stood on stage. You know I've never heard a microphone before never been a perform. I'd never even been to a comedy show but all of a sudden kind of knew what I was doing. What was it like when you first on stage and realized that you had the power to make people laugh or to make them think or feel moved by what you were saying that you could get the response that you wanted to get It felt like I was connected to the world for the first time. I'd always felt like I. There was a disconnect between May and the rest of the world like you know and this is kind of a common experience with people on the spectrum. You so to feel like an alien being dropped in from outer space and quite connect promptly And being on stage and and making a room full of people you know laugh. Fill fill like a a connection. I hadn't been able to establish in any other environment. So comedy was a great home for you. You could tell stories. You had an audience. You didn't have to have conversations with the audience but a better eventually. You had hecklers because every comic has hecklers. How did you deal with hecklers? I'm not very good at being thrown a like disruption to routine in the early days of Ninette did get really really terrible heckles on the rare occasion from for men who couldn't see it in their own discomfort. You know there were a few times when I would be heckled in very vulnerable moments of that show but that's what also made it so dangerous to perform because you know I make the audience sit in these incredibly painful moments but if people were to break of those moments it was a truly dangerous place for me and when that did happen you know. I didn't react well. I want to get back to how you find loud noise. Sudden noise upsetting. What about the sound of applause? What about the sound of thunderous applause and cheers at the end? Of One of your shows this something this is this you know depends on the Kucic of the room. I don't like performing in say a rock. Then you weather's. It's a shell of a room that they then put chairs in and those chairs can scrape and there's an echo tour applause. Sounds really different in those places and it's Shoppa I I find that really kind of distressing but in a in a theater where there's a lot more sort of -CCOMPLISH flaws is. You know that sort of it's like rain. It feels good you know. It really does depend on the Christie's room. I don't like people sometimes people whistle and I hate that I understand the impulses positive so I M my response. But you know like if I'm able to contextualized annoys it's much easier for me to process it deal with so say there's a siren if I can't see what's making the sarin for some reason it's more painful than if I'm I bowling you know the the ambulances as it goes past So if I'm doing my job correctly on stage I feel more like a conductor of the noise right. I have more control if I'm not doing then. You know the the crowds not e-e-e-e-no sort of responding than it's a little chaotic. Yeah you'd be the first comic stay on stage saying look quiet down. Don't applaud so loudly I have done. Stop sharing me heavy. Really what response you get a very confused response to that. You have to be really careful. Custodians is like. Do you want us to like you? It's just generally when an individual breaks out so it's like positive heckling and I respond to positive heckling the same ways I respond to negative heckling. So it's not even a the the content of what the heck is it's just the disruption that it causes so I'll get some go. You know you know I love you and I'm like no you don't you've never met me quiet. Shush you know and this is. Do you say that or think that no? I Say I think people find that funny because it's sort of a genuine response right and it's also true you can't love me the never made me you they. They'd like the idea of me and good on them. Considering everything we've talked about you must be really surprised by your success. You had so you really had so many years of failure and trauma I honestly. It's kind of overwhelming. Yeah you know I do feel like sometimes when you hear a successful person sort of going. Oh this is a surprise. You like yeah but you worked your whole life toward this. So there's something like Taylor Swift. I'm not convinced that she's surprised. But I am genuinely like I can't icon process. I've just won't my first tone like I own a home for someone who's been homeless. This is just. I can't I can't believe it. It's been great to talk with you. Hannah thank you so much My Pleasure Hannah. Gadsby is new comedy. Special Douglas is now streaming on Netflix. She spoke to us from her home in Australia. After we take a short break Maureen Corrigan will review the new comic road. Novel Saint Christopher on Pluto by Nancy McKinley. This is fresh air. The news has been hard to escape so take a deep breath and join us for. Npr's all songs considered it's more than a music discovery podcast. It's relief with new episodes every Tuesday and Friday as we share the week's best new albums and lots of music. Calm the nerves here. All songs considered wherever you get podcasts. There's no getting around it. The coronavirus pandemic has upended everything and daily decisions. Made by the White House and Congress will radically impact the human and economic toll to keep up with the latest join us on the NPR politics. Podcast will through the noise and let you know what decisions are being made and how they affect. You are book critic. Maureen Corrigan has a review of a recent novel that she says through the vehicle of comic fiction takes readers on a road trip through struggling towns and farmlands of rural America. It's called Saint Christopher. It's by Nancy McKinley. I'm feeling so cooped up these days. Who isn't that? I sometimes find myself getting in the car. And taking aimless rides to know where maybe that's what prompted me to finally check out an on the road novel that came out in February right before the pandemic brought life as we know it to a hard stop Nancy mckinlay's novel constructed out of a series of interlocking stories is called Saint Christopher on Pluto. Note that odd title it summons up I a Catholic saint who was demoted because of questions about his historical veracity and Pluto once a planet but now demoted to a dwarf planet to moded or diminished. Is How you might think of the northeastern Pennsylvania's setting of this novel. Once the area around wilkes-barre boasted industry family farms and coal mines. But in recent times the region has been scarred by unemployment and the OPIOID epidemic in mckinlay's novel to hometown Gals ride around this terrain in vintage. Buick nicknamed big blue. Mary Catherine MK. For Short is a quiet woman who inherited the Buick from her grandmother. Colleen is the madcap troublemaker. In the opening story here colleen cons. Mk into helping her. Commit Insurance Fraud by ditching owned Honda Halfback clunker in a remote ravine. Saint Christopher on Pluto drew me in by its humor but like the best comic fiction it's constructed out of insider social observations observations. That sting as much as they amuse we learn early on that M K in colleen I met in the nineteen sixties when they were students at Our Lady of Perpetual Help Elementary School. They'd lost touch but ran into each other again in late. Midlife both working at the local colleen has a job at the hallmark store and K. Works as a manager at Walden books which over the course of this novel is bought out by borders which is in turn bought out by books million until the entire wheezing mall itself is bought out by foreign investors who planned to gut the space for fracking truck depot. Bossy colleen prides herself on being a do-gooder always ready to push 'EM K. And Big Blue into volunteer work which takes the two white women and this novel on Road trips deep into the less traveled corners of northeast Pennsylvania. Some stories here grow out of the casual relationships. The women formed through their jobs at the mall. For instance a teenager named Tiffany who works at the food court stars in the poignant penultimate story where she runs with. 'em CAYENNE colleen in a Thanksgiving Turkey trot charity race. She psyched because she's got a lead on waitressing job at the Jersey shore and then approaching the Finish Line. She trips and you get the sense that she's never going to make it other stories. Take notice of old timers like the Pumpers. A group of senior citizens who've survived heart attacks and power walk at the mall. They've been left behind as their kids moved away. It's the newer residents of the Wilkes Barre area. Ever who inspire mckinlay's most unexpected weddings of screwball humor to social criticism in a standout story called Navy Dodd? The two friends volunteer at a church Christmas party. Here's MK describing the harebrained beginning of this particular. Car Ride Colleen Yanks. Open the passenger door of big blue. She wears a red sweater matched by voluminous skirt. Cascades Phase Ho Ho you like. She asks her fingers tug at Silver Garland edging the HEM. My skirt was half price at salvo. I smile knowing how colleen takes pride in snagging deals at the Salvation Army thrift store. It's handmade the seams aren't finished no clasp at the waist so I use duct tape. And that's when I realized she's wearing one of those round felt covers. People put under Christmas trees. I decided not to say anything the tone shifts when the women arrive at the church. Where the kids? All Latino six are jammed into the church hall. Because of the sometimes violent local resentment against the newcomers the church is keeping quiet about this party as MK tells us there will be no human interest clips on the local news. Leave it to colleen to involve me covert Christmas party. Covert is a good way to characterize how this droll novel in stories delivers its social commentary. It's so entertaining to go along for the ride with Mk. And chatty colleen and because of their Ri- sometimes bumbling suck it up resiliency. It's also possible to take in these horrid luck landscapes and see some possibility amidst all the losses Maureen Corrigan teaches literature at Georgetown University. She reviewed the novel Christopher on by Nancy Mckinley tomorrow on fresh air. We'll talk about how we can train ourselves to breathe. In ways that may improve our health the quality of our sleep and decrease anxiety and why mouth breathing is related to snoring sleep apnea and other problems. My guest will be journalists. James Nestor author of the book breath the new science of a lost art. I hope you'll join us. I'm Terry Gross. We're close today's show with Peggy Lee. She was born a hundred years ago today. Jess Fara three shames a son just for a feel to me but I was married you could.

Netflix Hannah Gadsby Douglas Tasmania Ninette Australia Hannah Gatsby Colleen Yanks peabody award Ninette Maureen Corrigan Terry Gross America Saint Christopher Bible Belt of Australia Emmy Award Nancy mckinlay MK Pennsylvania Buick
Hannah Gadsby | Season 4

Homo Sapiens

46:00 min | 11 months ago

Hannah Gadsby | Season 4

"Hello Everybody Chris here. Just a quick word say. This episode was recorded before lockdown came into place and a reminder that we are currently releasing one episode of Homo Sapiens per week the main episode and Homo sapiens extra. The following week recorded over. Skype here is episode with Hannah. Gadsby his gray episode. Well the thing is where things knows whoops but you can't eat matt chocolate beacon give it to me then as chocolate noted. I got you the my glasses. Jim Addresses on pretty good. I'm a little tired. Love your winning the Homo sapiens merchandise. Nobody can buy much breaking news about that. Just going to get rid of these chocolates because listeners. You always complain about his eating on the but then Oh yeah this is the whole thing ellen but then people write in and say actually we never stop. Looting Theresa my mango Ango Mongo dried. We got islands. I go islands dried mango go. Everyone a coffee. I have actually got some really good news about much making to us. Well I got the web address if you go to. Www DOT EPA press dot com forward slash safeties? You D listeners will be up to buy yourself a sweater or not. Show with the website again. Ever PRESS DOT COM FOODS FAMOUS. Atheists can make any more complicated calmer thing in the end. I've oppressed dot com slash. If ain't broke don't fix it. Such a tiny thing to say Eddie way should we talk about this week's guest who is in is Hannah Gadsby? Hannah me say that. Let you weren't there at the end. She like she so she kind of came. Everybody's attention with net right. Well I would say Austrailia imagined. She was big Jim before but yes absolutely was a communist special that she did for net flicks onto Netflix and it became a sensation partly because it was funny because she was the she talked about abuse and various misogyny and transphobia and things like that and just an mid really great connections of boats herself as a performer. Kind of in a way. In encouraging or encouraging. But maybe validating in a way Type of humor. That is indeed misogynist and transphobic and stuff and so the kind of thing she said in the wasn't. She said she's going to stop doing that kind of self deprecating humor because actually contributes to the problem an incredible incredibly powerful moving until in his special. I mean I think one of the interesting things that ah boats when you have a huge success and also when you make a proclamation like that is what where do you go from there. And what's interesting about into her next show and what she came back with because she said because actually she had come out as being autistic now as and she said the actually she'd had that diagnosis prior to doing annette. She chose not to speak about it in net because she felt she had a bigger point to make with Ninette. And she said no no net. And then that musicals. God No no no. No no no you gotta musical jokes. And then if you're in Scotland and someone says to You. Are you looking at? Yeah Polina. No there's nothing you say. Are you aware of that musical in Scotland Dino? No no no. Nanette thank you. She said yes she didn't want to talk about it. And I it was interesting. I also think that for particularly for the LGBTQ plus community the idea of sending yourself up for humor and actually not wanting to do that anymore was so pertinent for me at the time that I saw net when it first came out and I just thought is very true. Would so used to. I remember having conversations who came out with my friends from school. I remember we comes as and when I came out with people from school because I was nineteen so people are being like nineteen. No as friends from school all right. It wasn't like I was put back a year and now I remember saying people like Oh. I'm Gabe DOT can again. You know he's having to try and qualify main. Like I'm not going to be a promiscuous gay person having to be little were did they care because I think it was about back then. What was at this would have been seventeen thousand nine hundred different then? Let's shaggy around people being gay. I'm say surpassing I'm going to be gay but I'm not going to help sex like I'm not gonna I'm not going to be. Do you know what it was. It was like if you think about even then the image of then was George. Michael is agency. That was the image. You know who is that when he's bashing into trees and things on these raindrop. Things t was just vilified and it was disgusting. He he was treated down the way too because he was made to feel other but in a very long winded way saying is that I just think that's about cats. Be saying that you knew a lot of people have to send themselves up. Didn't want to anymore and I liked them and then we went to see Douglas her show. Yes that's right where we learned all about the fold of Douglas which you find out what that is funny and she said some really she said some fascinating stuff about the patriarchy damn them damn them as a sort of as a as a as a source of material and also for comedic material I think is great. The way she makes things funny and also mix great point and quite revelatory as well. Yes and she's just you know because of autism Says she notices the details and certain things the other people would in my house? I'm a I'm showing around in the dressing room and we'd been I met at this thing would be invited to Amazon. Did and you go free really bag as sort of a gift to give the thing that little Charlie Charlie back stink. When you're on 'em in my dressing piles of clothes in bags and we're going reinisch went. Oh Amazon you will dams one thing and as I said it then. She said later but really bizarre details and I was like it was kind of full of clothes spilling out was just interesting that that was an example of that just happened just completely dinner thing in the room. That was a link. Something me todd. And she said she sees seized up other people. Don't but then cannot see stuff that everyone else could see ya the lake remembering to send me one of those bumbags which meant to send you and she didn't. Now listen to this. Hate me forever or we'll send me now. Alan. I'm filling in an agony uncle frame of mind to yourself from our job. It's warm and how do you cope with the death of a pet? When you're already suffering from depression rob but I would say I mean like for example when honey died has my dog for. I was devastated and I left a while but I mean the thing is that I. I wasn't depressed already but I think the thing about dogs die. It's to try and remember what a great the great things they have given you pets in general the great things that have given the way the great lessons one hundred is you told me a law. how I want to end my life and then the quality of life and what I think is important and this obsession especially in America with longevity versus the actual quality of life. So just trying to think of the wonderful things that this person. This animal hasn't left. You also just about what the you've given them opportunity given them. I opted honey. Stick adopted another opting dogs rather than getting some puppy farms into be miss. Jean Brodie and say also you should seek medical and professional help but but it's extremely hard habit this one from somebody else male How do you get over a therapist crush? I've tried just about everything very interesting. Mr Bill would pose crush. I have never heard. Of course I've only ever had one male therapist an idea I actually understand. I understand it as a concept. But you that you've had right. I've had it. How would you have to acknowledge it? I mean I think now with my therapist I well the last thing in in the service new ones. I see things like I know. I'm going to charm you. I'M GONNA I'm not saying I don't. I'm better not have nothing to hide anyway. No more secrets unveil but but I I in the past have done nothing of both using my charm to not deal with What we need to talk about and also I that charms also transferred back to them in a sort of A. I've had it and I I talked to said so. I think your sexual fantasies about you. I think the thing is the thing. It's a thing to do that door. No get your clothes off this thing within psychology in say a that. It's a condition as part of what can happen in a room with someone who is taking on a role. The is loving. Nurturing is kind of a psychological thing that happened so it's perfectly normal rub. It happens all the time. It's happened to me and I I go over. It was just I had sex therapist. Did you know that was called comedy? How did you leave it not to talk talk to him? But it and he said it's normal news flatter and Blah Blah and all that stuff and be just moved on after that kind of thing one thing address it and move on but I also think this is out there like keep your life simple. Just change if it's becoming a thing right. I don't agree with that really why because I think actually it's a thing that is normal. You just have to talk about. Don't the you know the board boating of having to start with a new therapist and tell them years of your shit that I just don't think you should start with a new therapist because you have a thing for them. I think you should just say it's a part of being in a in a I'm drawn to this person because there's many qualities that I find attractive and a knife got to just accept that and let's discuss it. They will have some into city about it. They will help you. Don't keep it from them. Hail elephant arrived in. There was another your jet going up the stairs I listened is personal. I agree to disagree. I could not have. I wouldn't be able to have a conversation. Someone I found a trying to be thinking about all the time you went with therapist. What did I'm shocked that really Dr Everything but with your therapist? Nobody is wouldn't have it as an undercurrent. I'm there to do something else you wouldn't be. You'd be super human and not attracted not have the crush thing just be like yubing. Attractive is distracting me from where I need to get done here. Nick Machine. I don't you find your attracts in. Your questions are just things that you have no control over. Would that thing? I'd just move change their. That's my boy I'm seeing. You should do. They should talk so I was right. Would you happen to disagree with like job to make our be over here with Mongo's having answered I think ninety percent of the world's problems should we met here but Hannah guards from Hanukkah and how she solved all of her words? I play a game with myself is autism or remind asshole like it's like I have to be very careful of that because I don't want to go. Oh I can just say things to people's face now without count because I'm blunt no. That's not how roles I am blunt. I'm very direct but you know I am constantly coaching myself. I you is this autism Marie on US home and I'm quite happy that a report that sometimes. I'm just an asshole a magazine. Remember these spending called hipster or gay hipster through different. Upn or gay or domain. Tell the difference rain Gail hipster poverty porn hipsters into poverty porn. It's about like the poverty aesthetic looking at the. Yeah the decision and drinking out of jobs. I used to really make me furious because we had to drink out of jobs when I was a kid. And it's like why would you choose that church right? I hate it like no Paul People. Drink out jobs because we can't afford glasses 'cause there was also that thing of store. Yeah and so insulting. Like if you've got a if you're making a decision that's like that's a bad decision. I did my first stand up When I was essentially homeless and was a and then I sort of went at my where my sister lives and I lived with her for a couple of years and then I moved to Melbourne. Where I lived with my took took me a good five years to get on onto my own feet and it was through my fam- living with my family like dislike. We live with us. What was your first stand up about? It was so surreal. Because I've never seen standard heard a little bit of the it on the radio and like anyone who is a little bit drunk and that looks that sounds a so. It was for national competition and the raw comedy is run through the Melbourne comedy festival. Youth Radio Station triple J and so it's kind of kind of in the Asia like I've always sort of none of ever communist about rural comedy. So it's that's the only thing I understood about comedy whenever you know. We didn't want to comedy growing up. There's no light seen like theater. There wasn't even cinema where I was growing up so it really was the TV. And Mom doesn't like you know whenever the on the rare occasion stand would come on late such dot because represented two things. She hated most in the world. That's men who shouted men who think they're funny and shop got news for them. That's my that was stand up So so I understood that. I entered this competitions in place woolen. Gome in two thousand and five and I understood I had. I think it was five minutes to do five minutes. I'd never been anything and I did this dog. That died recently Ronnie Barker Leon and so they're to be thinking like was so sad that I couldn't have a dark and I didn't really because I don't have a but I'm like what would I do if I had a dog died. Like you're supposed to bury dogs in your backyard's that idea of like something beloved as a pet dog bearing you back and you have a little ceremony in Iraq Don Daiki so that was playing on my mind and so I I think like what would I do if I had a dog. I don't have a backyard and I've really never done. Stand up this crazy since but I think about it now going this real surreal stuff like I started off in the first thing. I just walked up dogma. Fraser and a little bit like dome in the phrasing and the explain explain you know but I can't afford to get it created so I can keep my beloved dog and I thought well how could it be to create a small dog at home like so then like I'm booty and then I'm looking at it was I'm buildings home. Well like it's actually quite difficult. But I found out too late and I had this job dog on on the web and said like Oh my now like but it was really my head. That's the kind of you know because I think about these things and pulled them through like it wouldn't work but now I'm going to Chad Dot Org and so I put him in. Yeah so that was. They will when he went in the freezer. Yeah even worse right. But that's so bizarre like it's but I won because I think because I was just so different and I'm just and back then I I really did speak with a real mono and I had no knows I've learned how to modulate my voice and stuff but obviously dog I just this bizarre creature with walkways and I went through and I went to the state finals in the in in Sydney. Then that didn't go any further. Because you know obviously it didn't understand what was doing and also it's now I know the back like Oh these people are doing stand up all the time and then they understand it and you know there's a whole culture around that I did not I did never understood it that now we know why but so still in the midst of this homelessness situation and I wound up in Barham by Bombay. Yeah as camping illegally on a sand Dune really so working on these work. Willing workers on organic farms. And but that never last long thanks. He genuinely wanted you to work. I really worker. Yeah Movie Wolfing Willing Workers on Oak farm so basically it's like tree change people who this great owned a lot of work. Oh we'll Roeken some volunteers and will fade you and you could. Willing workers unwilling unwilling. I remember ruined a whole batch of Macadamia nuts and I'll send my yeah. Well you're not supposed to. I thought I'll be helpful and crack them all but then they apparently they go bad when you crank. Hey I'm working for free and understand the contract so yeah. So where did you do your comedy then? Like I'm basically mobile comedy festival. Foster Child I was immediately became a long form comic and began writing out. Long shows and touring the festival. I did to the club for because I could really quite good because I I know my way round a joke and I can do that. But don't like it. I just feels gladatorial on if especially if you sharing the stage with you know. Say Seven men men's store and catchy but you know you walk out on stage after you know maybe three or four blocks in a row doing casual rape jokes and I began to go this. I don't want to convince a crowd that's just been to lightning this just being laughing so easily that kind of material and it is was ripe. It's it's listener now but so I became a festival comic right which is very funny and the least festive. Is that more like it's your show. People come to your show on a bill with other people for you. Identity within it. Yeah and also I think creatively at appeal to me. You know like you get to like. He's got five ten minutes got to go to greatest hits whereas I you know and I think it was. Evidently my first rounds of standup. Where a dog in the phrase like I do need people to come into my world my manager who have been with since I won that little competition. It's actually quite a big competition. The RAV wrong anyway. So He's been sort of God my career and he's always been you know he knew he didn't take me on like she's going to be prize-winning based so you know he's always sort of. Let me do these sort of slightly odds pathways. And so neither is really expected in lake. When I I did like the first ever trial through so in front of sixty show shocked people. Those was any even the so so he's sort of been with me through this whole process and I've kept of course. Captain is manager in his. He has a connection to And he's in his own family so he's with sort of guided my navigating. This is a very old system friendly. So it's like the tour has been very much planned to not break me and because I did feel like when took this felt so dangerous and so slippery and everyone griping and I didn't understand because that's why I wrote never going I want. I want to have a lot of meetings in Hollywood yes plays. But that's what happened. Said a point of the net because it was so huge that you said I don't actually want to be told about anything that's being offered to me. Well I didn't say explicitly but people didn't tell me because I was just so completely overwhelmed so I have a very strong filter system. Sometimes I tell me declined on your behalf but you should know that you spend a lots of the what sort of things. This is. Not a very strong fields who is working content. Oh a you know I mean it's such a broad range of thing I mean. Did people want to take you out of your domain? Like put you in a Sitcom or put out hinting in that direction. And I did take a lot of I warner brothers and everyone came to like people would show for the meeting that I had an I had no idea was. I'm just like this is a large team. There were a lot of people. Even the reality TV people came to that meeting. So that's like not wont Wont like why? But also I remember this woman saying he work on the Bachelor Gulch wine wine speaking it and she said that she said she's very popular in Australia. I don't know about Tanzania so off the table which is Larry Go. Of course I called around I said did you like it. Just speaks to the dissonance. The whole process because I was also just finished touring. It had been touring and when it popped onto the net flicks. I was at the end of an eighteen months of touring at show which were killing. Because you here right so playoffs players and so you know and it was. It was a brutal Schroeder perform. Yeah I guess I got to a stage where I wasn't necessarily living my own. Traumas viscerally but I was experiencing out of the papal dealing with putting in the room and that I couldn't ignore that like that was going through me as well so it was super into that. I was absolutely exhausted. So then to have these weird Chine- meetings of the back of that was yeah high end of all and when he first did it it was. He said it didn't have any jokes. Was it the net how you work because Douglas also in the same thing? That's it's it's sort of a a larger thing that you're you condense tone or it's they really seem to write like a bellows because it expands and then I shift emphasis and when I first formed in Perth of all places because it wasn't as tight as it became really became quite. You know it's it's very proud of the the structures amusing the show as well as because it needed to be in order to hold what I was talking. A new to what I was trying to do with contents could not have been done with the ten years of experience that I understood the craft of it in order to perform another form and the content will boven together like they're the deconstruction of. That's also I love to vote Douglas last night the DU deconstruct even begin. Both the SA- before that it was content without the strong and a form to hold it I think first or second night of proper ticket pain audience to say I got the most brutal heckle and it was just after revealed you sequence of trauma the of chrome and then I started to speak about castle and this boat goes women that though and said sorry what he's did that Happen Not Picasso. I why do you ask just curious because I'm hind because I've just seen just like just of course curious that is what question is you asshole? Don't ask a question if you don't curie mine curious. Why did you ask that question like it was just like I could say just pay like my my managers? Aaron the few of the people because they knew was like they knew before. I did what I was and how sort of dangerous it was to put this into a room and I could secede running around telling people to put their phones away so and so it's this hot moment and you know closer you curious you just ask the question you asshole. And he's like when was it was nine hundred. Seventy two mistake slow. It's not relevant. And so then I just I literally toy him. A new off whole life and people who went to that shoe still talk about that never seen a theme outperform a shutdown a man in that way like it was because I had like he didn't know I had whole a whole ready to pile onto that just pile onto that man as an individual and it's like there's one and there's one and there's one but he's heckle felt like an act of violence right. 'cause I been right being beaten and he's like it doesn't matter royal. My ear is how does and it was. But I didn't like that he was was he referring to the Picasso because bit just anyone who hasn't seen advice that bit where you say because it was a forty year old man having a relationship with a seventeen year ago and that was deemed. Okay and then build them from their brilliant leaving. Why she she didn't have prime. Isn't it wrestle Kreso matter? I mean we're seeing this play out with the Epstein case some nine so tone deeply that the word that that moment did for me was to go all I know I'm doing has is so much bigger than me so much bigger than me because like for guy to sit in that audience in go Milan. My voice needs to be heard right like I'm like so what that did to me was like to thin. Focus on the form. In order to hold the contents. I see very much became then show about format years. You know the way because I still believe the way we tell stories. We've focuses on trauma itself and that is why we don't get released from trauma because we keep talking about the trauma nobody goes but there's life after trauma flavors the life after trump. But and I think that's a lot to silencing of of women when they're older like women when they are seventeen and their but we never give windows space for the wisdom of age with women is what most old ladies I know. We're just like Oh shit happens but here. We are to like a cup of you know. And that's a voice. We need where it's like. You need to see that people can. Is You know like we can hold trauma and move through it and there is life and strength after trauma. Yes because you said it'd be ended. Monette about connection. It's all about connection. Do you think is what owns tatting only connect? Is that kind forster. What you're looking forward. Do you think when you beginning to work my show like by being radically honest and really vulnerable. Hopefully I can connect yes. I wrote that not long. After diagnosed with autism I understood finally wide such a profound sense disconnect. Because I didn't know how to connect. I was trying to connect by the way that observed other people connecting which is not how I connect so the net is very much a show about cystic mind. Make connections between things that I see things that other people don't say I miss things that people to see but I wanted to show that there is a you know the differently. Thinking have something constructive. Add to the conversation but I chose not to say it in the net. Because I didn't want that prison I didn't want that the way to go. I'm to a we can just dismiss of. You're saying because you're a bit special needs. Don't you know so I want to just go? Here is the thing I can do. And that's why tecos now. I'm like I could do that thing. Because of this thing right I want to ask your thing that I find that I wrote a book about my dad and stuff like that and and one of the things. That's kind of what you're talking about. The net is that why I didn't really expect how much it would. I thought it was doing it for me. And how much people affected other people and people wrote to instill Abadia get some people saying? Oh you reading. Your book made me able to talk to Blah Blah and my family are deal with something. Give me more confidence to talk about. Abuse Incredible Book. Kanye's give a quick precis. People don't know about you finding out the story of whether Your Dad is your real dad right. Yeah but that my grandfather. Yes jewell but yeah but kickers that my dad told me. It wasn't his son and I was the kick. What was that the kick that we're actually the fact that because I want to be as happy well after the shock enemy but other stuff up to like my granddad died playing Russian roulette in Malaysia. Stuff like that and so but what I find a really surprising. An amazing thing about the book was three. Action underway. They'd helped people on the way that people still say to me that it enabled them to deal with issues in their lives and to do abuse or just family family. You know this stuff of families and that helps you tune and that did help me and it was absurd. It made me realize why was good for me to have written a book and think. You're seeing a bona net. But what I find especially in America is there's this thing where people go Soga. You did that overcame that the overcome it. And you've you've you've risen above it in his over and overcome it on your list exists and why find about the book and we want to do in my next potentially for at least make a theme as that. You never overcome it. You talk about it out there your community engages with it as you're saying but actually my dad is much more than my life than he ever was ever before an issue as it should be my dad. You should be there but I think it doesn't go away. You just learn how to handle it better and you when it comes back those emotions. You can embrace them and deal with them. But it's not something that sorted I've gone. I think that's something that people don't understand here. My grandmother had a like. It's part of the soup too late to take the onions out now. So using that the way I understood it as like Oh trauma don't when you haven't dealt with your trauma that onions is still raw so when you don't take onions out you learn how to absorb and it's part of your suit flames shoes so it's like you need bit of onion number. That's it's the unfair amount of onions that go in. You know that's drama so you can't possibly cook onions because it's all onion soup is just onions really taking this mentor for even those flavors. The whole thing. Yeah Yeah you 'cause this hasn't been affected by trauma related to search all through it all and I think that's Lake Lake. The soup analogy. Is there because you kind of think if you take if you take like? I said sort of things the same like if you take the onion you can take actual physical onions food but it is still fruit so I wanted to change the subject if I may ask you a boat the thing that I love so much the poach of Douglas. You explain the it's a it's a it's a part of the female reproductive environment as say showing saint sits between the anal cavity and the theme and the uterus Little piece of of like so. Make sure that you know in things need a bit more space You know and other ways. And sometimes you know you can but there's also like a lot of the female reproductive environment has men's name on Lopion gets a man's Elliott like this point to launch didn't basically is a lot of things like trump power like just put put on. It's like Oh gosh through us. Like minutes has gone. One ounce all that like so there's also the parents Douglas's a sheet of Douglas's a fold of Douglas here. He's a few Orient. He's you know he's he's ending the monopoly board down there. Douglas. And who knows? It's funny because I just think your dog. You're Doku Douglas. But who was this? Douglas person was a doctor. Hopefully well Dr So Eighteenth Century anatomist really and man midwife. He was the midwife to the Queen for a little bit as well. The reason I talk about it in the show. It's not explicit. It's implicit this. Is the sort of gender bias in in medicine colonization again. Yes in the sense that a lot of most studies on on most diseases Cetera is done on men as the male neutral human neutral and so something like autism. Women go on diagnosed because of that. Chauvinism like I went through a lot of really criminal misdiagnosis and dismissal for your autism. Yeah because you know and because the way hormones affect your brain I can have normal hormonal levels but they affect me quite because of all sorts of things but it was that you know you're making and you know really like this is fans some more some like that is so common for women they pick and you feel like you're going insane because there's no medical explanation for this and that's enough but the goes deeper than that. There's not enough medical research into that so D- because of when you see a hormone having your periods will fix everything but the autism has the way the break chemists brain chemistry and homes. It's sort of like it's the that's why adolescence and some star really difficult for autistic kids. Because you see so often see these kiddy autistic kids defined by these outbursts. Yes and that's really really adolescent hormonal thing that can you know like adolescents? Is Hard for everyone this is a. This is a particularly difficult thing. I don't sending science properly to speak but it is part of the distress but also anxiety and depression and a very prevalent in in people with autism because traumas often compounded is Shane of particularly for on the spectrum because with were expected to be certain people and the brain function the way our brains function. I'm quite blunt but as a woman on supposed to not be at all like it. I probably wouldn't be have million. Nearly the amount of you know disfunction. Have I been born a guy you know especially in the fifties? I could have had a mum looking out to me. A wife and the secretary paint a mad genius or whatever the hell they do. They don't have to do all the things that women have to the expectations on Women Lake compound the social anxiety. And once I understood how autism I'm just need any of that have to buy into that people can judge me for not doing these things as woman but much healthier not trying to participate it. Would it feel like the was a day when you understood that wonderful? It was just so good. Did you suspect well not not until pavement like people telling dismissed flight? Because I didn't understand how I could have it and then for some reason was actually after I saw Dr Dick Pisgah as cool in the show that I don't know what you know the sequence of thoughts in my but it had a lot to do with Douglas. Just looking at me. Because he's looking at me and I'm like you get a buddy. This connection and I started googling women with autism and the just the first few things popped up was just life came into focus. Things that I didn't know were a problem. The problem just sort of I didn't know that people had fun when they socialized at knowing this is hard for everyone. Charleston's some are people a lot better than this. I know that everyone's tracking everything in the room manually in their heads. That just actually having a nice time whereas this like this. I call myself sometimes. Sheila Homo I solve crimes. That are not cry just like non issues so I can walk out of room and I can tell people exactly what was going on in the room like we there. Because I haven't spoken like I have the strengths. That's often forgotten about autism. Seen as a thing where it's devoid of strengthen you've got all these things that make difficult I that's what I'm trying to do. Shows like their deficits absolutely but you their strengths. I see things that people don't and I make connections because manual thinker. I make connections that people have to skated across. Because I've I've gone could be that that could be that thank you so much. I think we started. We've just been enjoying some lovely grapes. Romans listening turn against him. And we Ellen yes. I've taken quite a few then I. I thought that was a brilliant interviewed. You know what my favorite was now is when you said to her. Oh being pushed my bum bag and then when you say what kind of stuff do you. Agents turned down on on your behalf and she went this social. Aarp Neal shot herself. Yeah I love her listeners while I finish that grape shit eating again. I'm pleased right and let us know what you think of that interview. Hello Ashley Redeem. Hello at home. Recipients put guys dot com and you can buy t shirts from ever press dot com forward slash homicide. I still don't like or you can buy. We can buy sweaters there. You have people always right in Naas discussion fill you in. You have to toggle between the two things of t shirt and then you can scroll down. You can jump because other people see as I think I should just be pictures of the ministry. That's Allen coming dot com for slash shop. We can put a picture of the t shirt and click on them and take you to the place. It's hard to them. But both my assistant Matt. And then he picks up the sweatshirt. Take Sweatshirt Everhart surrenders ever press. Would you know what's great about this conversation? What is going to be cut over? My this is going to be wonderfully confusing policies. Which I think is great. Yes vote with your feet. We'll we'll get the stuff on the rest of my rammed insights and please cook. Goodness Sakes subscribe to please. Please subscribe to a subscriber wherever you're listening so you can get every new episode. Yeah Pinot inbox free and every time comes out and thanks for listening. Thanks very much C. Next time same time. Same Channel it.

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Hannah Gadsby

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

1:33:46 hr | 4 months ago

Hannah Gadsby

"You believe made it. We're with the home what's happening. Where does hannah gadsby. I was very very excited for this. Thank you to mike. big leah. Who put us in touch I am a fan. I was excited and sort of like ready ready to figure things out meeting. Hannah is so smart and so conscious and you'll see even in the episode. There's a moment where we sort of. I sort of have like a quick moment. I'm like oh that's the other side of a bit. i was doing. It's so interesting. I think. I've mentioned it a few times on episode since then all of that is to say this is a great conversation and one that has stuck with me and i really really hope you enjoy. Check checkout douglas. Her special on netflix and And the other one of course is the net. But they're both wonderful. And i encourage you to check them out I also want to give a shout. it's the holiday season. People are getting gifts and such. I would recommend getting something from our friends at living libations lit white. 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That's b. r. o. l. i. n. n. dot com and enter promo code weird for ten percent off plus free shipping brooklyn and dot com. You know by now promo code weird at checkout and show your support of this always reshow show. I don't mean to sound Sweaty or anything but it does mean a lot. If you guys like this episode if you like other episodes you like the show in general just get yourself something get your so get get get get get yourself something nice and show your support or hey just coast on through and listen to hannah gadsby but i think you know what is more in the holiday spirit of generosity in giving and fun so do yourself a favor get yourself a pizza back in the meantime. Let's enjoy the wonderful hannah. Gadsby get into it herpel. Hannah you can't hear me at high. Hey you are how. Hey i'm all right how you doing. I'm doing very well as your shirt. Purple because i said purple and i don't even know if it is purple because i'm colorblind flirt split but there is just because the pattern. It's it's because it's a check. I say when it crosses over through some of the other blues becomes pulse. What dietrich like you. That's a loving way to say. I'm not wrong. It's not only in parts is purple. I appreciate it is patchy i. I'm so happy to meet you too. What a miracle to be talking to you literally across the world year with video we're living in the jetsons via i'm feeling pretty special about. I've been watching your stuff in preparation and discuss. My heart is open and crying such a fan. I think you're incredible. So i'm excited to talk with you. Thank you very much. Yeah how are you getting on in. This is my first area. I'm in right now. He's just talking to jenny. So i've been alone for five days going for you. Thank you for asking. It's actually getting a little bit easier. I have to say in the net one of the things that i really related to was that you say you're a quiet gary I am a straight man. But when i would go to gay pride parades i would have the same observation. I was like if i was guy. Where are my gates. You know what i mean. Where the teacup. Quiet night at home people and then it occurred to me that maybe you were enjoying this as i as i sorta them in part i am with with a lot of reservations for what is happening in the world. You're able to separate the two. It is I am enjoying the social anxiety. Ings is nil now because no like drawing boundaries i don't have to draw boundaries the mandates. That's where don't have to pay interest either. Well it's icon find interest so what life what my life was usually made up of was doing the cleanup often my lack of ability to fight interests. You've made a career out of your lack of ability to feign interest. Oh lovely yeah. So then i have to clean up because i don't want to hurt people's feelings but also i can't pretend cat about some things but the social anxiety has just. I've not had low level of of of anxiety since i can remember pam and also stability in Chain which i really love like i love retain but Comedy what it is. You don't get retain you don't get to have written so i've been enjoying that and gardening like is that right garden. Yeah yeah. that's that's lovely. I've talked to many guests that garden and they all say that it's all there all the lessons. You need all the wisdom from the earth. I'm not exaggerating. They seem to see the cycles and they get a lot of messages from their garden. Do you feel that way. I know that's a leading question but yeah absolutely. Yeah i might show thank you. My grandma said it's not a garden. It's not the garden the gardening so it's And the gardens quite forgiving. You you know it gives you the lessons lake. Have watch the plants year. They'll tell you before they die that they dying and you. Can you have time to to to help them and save them in the dead plant sort of useful. Does that then become the mall for next. I mean we've seemed your loss from our methodology the cycle of life. I suppose yeah. But that i wondered when you know in your in douglas. Coming out as ashby. It's not the garden the gardening. It's not comedy it's doing comedy. You know it reminds me. I have not been diagnosed. But i feel like i have some Asti leanings has a lot of comedians. do yet Like the guy in free solo. When i'm doing stand up and when i watched you doing stand up i'm not seeing an ounce. I'm seeing confidence. I'm seeing expression. Emceeing performance emceeing complete clarity over what they're saying the nuance of what the audience to sing. I wonder if that how does that. Feel the gardening of doing stand up. Does that snap you into a heightened state. That's more comfortable i imagine. Yeah the badghis again. A very set in a stand in stand up. So when i'm doing it's not being social this. No input happening in that moment. Only inputs taken from times have had time to think about things and re reshape them. And then i just sort of get to performance and shape it and gifted if you want to call it that to the audience. But i'm not taking anything nuanced back from the audience is the vibe that they audience energy. Which then i then have to. You know this this. I don't tend to change my routine a lot of sort of bedded then but there are a lot of different ways that you can change the way you perform a pace to suit nordion has with rhythm tempo emphasis changes depending on if an audience is up. You get up with it. If they down then you know you don't want to hammer them with the same energy a hammer alive lively audience but at some having a conversation i find having a conversation with someone much more difficult to i like. Podcasts are different. Because there's a performative element because it's being recorded and we sort of know the stakes. You know how long it's going to be. You might know about the tone or whatever it sort of. Take some of that. Ambiguity out me. Yeah yeah. I enjoy watching. Real people have conversations point which become creepy. The creepy food will. But i do. I don't i don't hate. I am quite social. But it's exhausting. So i like Just observe other people being social Find that quite delightful. And i feel like i've participated in every moment of of a conversation that i haven't actually spoken but as soon as i found as my fame level increased the less able. I am to just observe a conversation because you know people like me will drive this conversation. And that's not where i'm very comfortable. I completely understand has been a challenge. I i mean. I say it. All the time people laugh at sindbad quote. He says the comedians are funnier when they're riding the bus. Obviously your sex specialists brilliant. So i'm not challenging your humor level. You've maintained that but the ease with which you can blend into a party and observe. I mean that is sort of your job. Well i've got a lock. Climb to draw from so. I can't count company reasonably light in my life. I did feel sorry for key to find comedy and then no setting amount of stardom and then lule because you know what they draw from is not not experience and i think to a certain extent. The famine sudden fame is akin to trauma. It's of course it's not bad became to new color. Yeah yeah it's not necessarily bad you know and you have more like certainly more tools at your disposal disposal and But there is something traumatic about this shifting circumstance that i felt after the net. That made me just wanna withdrawal from the world. I mean it's not what you were after. I think that's what makes your work so special and i know Douglas was your tenth specials so clearly you're somebody who's doing it because you enjoy it. It's what you're good at. It's written on your bones to do it and the comedians that i know that do it for money or power or fame fame being probably the worst those well maybe power but fame being a bad one they never make it so it is hoisted upon you. Do that make it well. That's that's a good to point that out. I don't know if i agree with me there. Let's put it this way. I tend to not enjoy those kids kind of comedian that i'm really fascinated with and they're not funny at all but successful and it's not uncommon going. I hate him 'cause successful. I just confused. Because i'm like you know because i look at things and i'm like breakdown what i say and i'm like it's not funny or interesting what's happening and it's the the rhythm of which i say they bring to the table like they bring this energy and that's All but i had to learn the energy Slicing dyson Is clinical as you like with with with comedy. And i could get that to the table but i have to really learn how to modulate my voice. That's one of the first things i noticed. I'm so glad you brought up. I wanted to ask you how you learned again. Not to assume Somebody on the spectrum that you can't do that but that is one of the first things you look for. I don't know maybe don't look for it but like the inability to modulate and perform. And when i want you. It's off the charts. You're doing it like crazy yet. It's probably a little too off the chats. Not my charts are very mild charts. The if you happen upon early my early performances i am. I am dead pan. I used to get reviews like hannah. Gadsby dull and listless and talk and i could be very much a particularly. My early career did something like the edinburgh fringe in. That's really overwhelming experience. So i'd be okay in the first few days of the festival and then i get exhausted. Because it's a stimulus. The whole time. And and then so then awakes in i would be delon leslie because i was just locking down the only place. You could go inside. I didn't understand. Had protect myself. Full line because i was diagnosed. So you know also. There's a thing called masking and goes on the spectrum. Particularly do that because girls are expected of aptly of my age when we were growing up. you know. The standard withheld held to about being social and goes on spectrum observed behaviors of those around and mimic Where's boys on the spectrum. We're allowed to have specialist knowledge baylor anti-social is like they're just boys you know that's what boys do but goes during that i. It's not like you made a special set of circumstances and family to let you do that. We had the you make the point angel and horror. We talk about that. A of the show. The archetypes. The character choices and i'm thinking about growing up even in the eighties and nineties. We add steven reich comes to mind the idea of a role that i have people in my family that are on spectrum. Yeah they were. We would have something to go. Well he's sort of like that guy you know i mean i can i. I don't really know that. Many deadpan or draw or whatever it might be said antisocial models or character choices for women to model. Yeah i would say that. If i was mayo like if i was like that's where i would have got to a but an often. What is sir. I am experiencing as passion. People receive a as anga. I'm colder angry. Comedian and just not angry. I'm curious flustered like this angry at the will. But i'm not. I don't really really let go of anger quite as late because as soon as something doesn't make sense or is exhausting. I'm just like well a few pop. So the way people raid. May i think is to do with. I probably express it incorrectly to near. Typical is and also than laid on top of that is how people like to put down public facing women women with with a with a platform as a passion is always sort of if you'd like what a woman is saying. Then you but you can't necessarily fault default. They say it. So it's an. It's sort of a double whammy. Yeah that's very interesting. Yeah i mean it sounds very much like that was what you said. If you were a man you could have become that choice. But if i did. Stephen wright type comedy which i love than i would impersonate him to. The cows came home. And i came home twice a day. The milking If i would be classed as being stupid like you know a little bit sort of soft in the head so to speak that dollop of understanding given to two boys i completely. I've seen that as well of course and You know when. I first started doing comedy. It was a bit of a gift to be off putting because it gave me an age when i woke on stage i was so outside the bounds of what april expected from me that it gave me that. Like pause to establish myself You know like you know as a as a big a woman. I'm supposed to be jelly as tasmanian in australia. All supposed to be stupid as a lesbian all supposed to be angry. But i was just this sort of confused globe. Nan and people like quant how to respond to that. So that gave me room. You know and it's really important for studying. Comedy is to have that disarming quality so then you can establish yourself instead of having people stereotypes but the that became a straightjacket off while. Because i couldn't toll unless i. There's no way i could talk about the spice rack. And the you know with if i didn't than make some sort of lake aja help. The audience adjusts to my sexuality. Might look my voice. All sorts of things that are not typical of me So there's aspect of me furious amendment. Because i would like to just tell you about the personalities of different spices herbs. Perhaps you grow in your garden. That's the one thing. Success is going to probably afford me. But i have to fight against the the piece of work in a way that established without undermining it. So susan like you ninette gave me this platform. But i'm not going to use that platform to do nenet tune in at three rain and four and you're not the fast and the furious if i'm masking men tend to call you furious for some reason but fast. I mean everybody nobody. No comedian is ever called me fast either. Douglas it's really dense show and i have a lot of energy on stage. And that's simply. Because i had an hour and a half show net big net flicks going people off that gives them off ramps. And it's serve a really tightly woven shutters so you take out one piece another pace crumbles later on the show so you can't just take chunks out so i thought i'll just talk fast and that's what happened and that sort of In how. I develop my signature. How fast were you literally insurance. So you weren't joking when you said you to cut parts of the show out to fit in the explanation of what was come. I think that is hilarious. And i can't believe somebody of your stature with ninette still was in the confines of you can't do a ninety minute special. That's wonderful like i think you know. Success comes with a lack of it. Like i think the show is you know is bigger and better in my mind but i think for an audience. You know you don't want someone rambling for ninety minutes. You know. I think. I think you know having an edit function external to you is is. Is you know. I respect Hoopla comeback from nuts. All you know a think about all notes and if they don't make sense then i'm quite happy to stand my ground but you know i don't know what the viewing habits I personally don't watch all of a comedy show myself. So you know that made sense and douglas was a particular show that made sense for you know it was rapid fire. But you know something. They took a real risk on the net. So i think those mutual respect. I love that i love. Humility gets a bad rap. I think sometimes comedians can believe their own hype to their detriment and there is something to be said like it is cold data right. You don't want your art sculpted by the data chisel but at the same time the data can be leaned into it. It's like people if you ever have to do a clean sat or something and you end up writing. Some brilliant stuff because of the restriction. Oh i i live life because of restriction i only way blue for instance because it's it's both restriction and give scope for play because there's a lot of different blues but mine don't have to get stressed about choice particularly not so much in the morning getting dressed but when i'm buying clothes so like to come up with an idea of who how i look it's just like it's easy now. Think that's brilliant. You figured out the way that your brain plays it. Yes to play. It plays better with restrictions than just with wild freedom. Yeah and for news like As some of on the spectrum having someone on the outside saying this doesn't necessarily work is compensation of always. Had you know of always had to adjust the way that i communicate in order to be understood. You know the point is to be able to communicate. It's not the object. You know you know i save my standup. As the point of it is being able to share communicate tech. What's inside may and share it with the outside well to end you know. Taking taking feedback is critical to that. And that's before it even gets to net flicks. It's already gone through a whole process of that because audience is like tell you their own way won't work doesn't we're in the fabric business. That's what we do. That's essentially why. I'm able to be quite easily humble about my success. Because i didn't expect the net to work like it was written as a shows. Like you know what i'm just gonna put this on the table and people aren't going to like it because that'd be an observing liking comedy and this this is not it i i i do. I'll say like to call bullshit. I had to write that show. Because i didn't understand what people wanted me to say and i was recently diagnosed on like i have to shake things up because i had an audience so i wrote this show and expecting it half hoping for it to backfire not have to take a backseat on my career because exhausted from travel and now i understood why and so i wrote that show expecting it to fail and it did not and so at system as like i don't necessarily understand what audiences want and the success of ninette was not just down to what i created but the audience let the audience was what made that show successful without the audience. Not no that would not have made it onto net flicks if the audiences hadn't said during the live performance It lit a fire on. Its life that's right in its lot. It's the you know when when comex an shy about telling me that you know minute was rubbish. And because it's not comedy it's hard to sort of take them seriously because it's like you're ignoring that the audience is also involved in deciding what they want. Right i feel like those same comedians. If would use the opposite logic in their own defense. You know what. I'm saying there overlooking the fact that you have your case study in front of the which is your audience and you do it hundreds of times i. I'm not really up to speed on that. I wasn't i. Maybe i don't wanna be naive. I assume a show like that would get haters. But i didn't know people were just flat out telling you. That's not comedy yeah. They're not telling me they're not. They're not that brave. But i think people think that talks to me which i do get that impression. One of my questions is friends. Question watching friends the real. You binging friend. Yes i am. I missed out on that pot when i was growing up. A american television. My mum didn't like it. she didn't like it. Because assumption she did but generally speaking was british crime dramas not not american comedy patching up. Well i find interesting. The raise mom didn't like american comedies is because of the canned lofta. She gets furious. She said that's not funny. She said i don't need someone to may when to laugh. And you do have a really different experience if you watch something without the prompt lofta. I don't think it's a bad thing. I think it's kind of fine. But i don't mind friends there is a lot of you know Around the fact that it's homophobic and i'm not seeing that quite a tuned timah phobia there homophobic characters. But the attitudes not celebrated. And i think that's a. It's time what wasn't homophobic back then So you know like you know. That's i i'm an audience so that's not necessarily relevant to a young audience. I'm not gonna cy young people. You must like the show. Why would you this lexa terrible. I find it comfort in those ninety shows. I wonder if this was something hypnotic to about the pace and the color palette all of sneaks experienced. Let's back in the day. it's going to become fitting if it's if you didn't fury younger Less chance funding confident like Nostalgia is a really really powerful sings. And but i come from a tricky place. Because i didn't experience it at the time. 'cause i you know. We went allowed to watch american and once i left i was never in a position i had a television. I'm not one of those people. Like i didn't watch television. I i didn't have a tale of vision. I couldn't afford. I would have watched it if i had one. Yeah would have love to watch. One know share houses in television and i got i watch what they expect but and to just pretty much pandemic. I've got television. I'm mostly in charge of the remote. Hey and it's fine. I feel bitter about that in I work with restrictions so having someone else choose what i watch is fine like watching other people's conversations you pick up on. Hey what are people watching yet. But what fan really fun with friends is because i've spent my whole life just observing following patterns and i'm i'm really good at predicting what lines coming next. Only god. can i tell you my gang. Show my game. You'd be great at it. We watch a show like friends. Chandler's got as well know who's Who's the dumb one not. Joey is joey. Joey's the jemaine. Been equalled them gas may it's ross. Ross is the dumbest of the dumb dumbs. Okay it's ross. Ross has his face covered in chocolate. Cake rachel comes in. He looks up. He's cod it was rachel's birthday cake. And then we pause it and then we go to our panel of comedians for them to guess and get one point or beat it and get two points. I feel like you would be good that game. Yeah right because you know. I mean that. We know the music when i watched your stand up. You know the music of comedy the problem with my if it's in that context i wouldn't well if i'm with panel of comedians and competing for the funniest line and it's like i cannot 'cause i i sort of go. Oh you've got the comedy covid. I can sit back like competitive. Like it's it's a real flaw. So i think that's i think that's what if i was on a panel of people taking it seriously. Yeah i would take it seriously and be funny. Oh i'm sorry i see. You're making a distinction if we're just competing as comedians. What what's the difference between competing and taking it seriously. Well because my comedy comes from a mis interpretation of the world around me. When i try to be funny. I'm less funny because you know there's a gap off. I can't catch up quickly. And then i realized all. That's funny that's a joke. I realized how. I've made a mistake. Yes whereas so but whereas like it's funny because it's something endearing about that but if i'm i'm trying to be funny i'm trying to be funny then i it's i can do it but it seems hola if i'm where i'm coming from his is trying to be genuine like genuinely trying to be a good person and i'm genuinely trying to do the right thing. I inevitably make mistakes and then people have to try to do that. And i think i completely relate so much of where i get premises from is from something i did in earnest that was misunderstood and this is why one of the things that i found asked me about myself was taking things too. I would often take things way too literally. Does that resonate with you. Yeah i mean it's it's really funny to be now because you know i've got enough. I think one of the the bad things that the representation of people on the spectrum and why a lot of people don't believe they're on the spectrum recognize themselves in the stereotypes is that what's often missed in the observation of from your typical people is the the humor and like most And i'm talking about people on the part of the spectrum where we have the capacity to be verbal. But i do have a friend who's got a child on spectrum his non verbal. But he's funny like but you just have to. You have to find you know the language have you seen. Asperger's are asked the dock. And i think it was on netflix. I'm sorry if i interrupted. I was gonna say it's an improv team or a sketch team and they all are on the spectrum. I have much. I'll have to look. It's a clue it's really really funny. It's really great when you see when you're talking about so you're saying you china yet the like for me and most people on the speaker like there's a moment where we don't get things and that's why people t seem to freezes and then this pity but if you just wait a couple they might just like oh are now i missed the point that and also what happens in that moment where we've missed the point and then we go back over the movement and try and make sense of it. We come up with all the meanings in all the angles. And that's a lot of where comedy comes from its rating hindsight. Yes inside and so. I think there's a there's a we need to ray riots. You know most most stories about suna people on spectrum changed with sort of tragedy but you know the capacity to huma quite disarming yes You just have to keep the tape playing. I mean that's it's sort of the point you make in the net. It's like tell the whole story pick pick where you're going to extract the meaning and you're right i mean when i look at movies like revenge of the nerds or whatever i'm like revenge of the kids with asperger's is that is that what's happening right now. Like that was us you recipe for instills. Basically exactly i. That was us in the eighties. That's what we saw in the eighties and even into the nineties and now it's so beautiful the have more and more examples. It's really meant a lot to me. When jerry seinfeld said that he felt like he was on the spectrum he later took it back but i was thinking of him early. Kept the type plane. He played it back. did he gets a saying. You can't just do net. I think he might have gotten some flak. I mean at that level. I mean he's The by thousand 'cause he can get himself a diagnosis and get into this properly. You know what i mean like. Come on come you have a doctor that will come to your house. No problem yes yeah right get get you get diagnosed since it's it's actually baffling many one because clearly hits like there's no doubt in my mind that he that he is on the spectrum. I recognize it in the way that he thinks again. Not diagnosed. either i. i'd be interested to look into that. But i thought this point which being diagnosed is is incredibly difficult and i i got lucky in in many ways and us quite dogged about it because it also. Because i'd be misdiagnosed. I i think if you experience as i did like life was difficult like because i had i am on the spectrum like there are people who are high functioning Is it's cold that you know. There's a line which you high functioning but you live a poll life because every bit of your function goes into nearly existing. It's treading water adults. And so i. I wouldn't call myself high functioning because this is quite a large part of my life than i m unable to navigate. That's a good special title. Hannah gadsby functioning. It's not call it high. Let's not and i think this it's really interesting space in comedy because often this is put down to gender. And when you when you think that there's a lot of comedians on the spectrum or given spectrum nudge recall but this straight men and the experiencing an it becomes dialogue about women with their fairly intuitive feelings And i look at that. An and i know woman on the spectrum behaves the way these men described you mean the and i know i know plenty of men. Who have these feelings. I don't understand nyc and they get angry about stuff. I just like. Why are you angry. It doesn't make sense you're talking about is not and i think that i think honestly. I think we'd have a much more interesting dialogue if we didn't do the difference between men and women and we did the difference between near typicals in an end. More atypical folk. Because a lot of you know the difference between men and women has shaped the way we view minimum and like that joke faked out know in popular culture. Like the the tagline of so many jokes is like women and what should they is like people with emotions and which is not exclusive to women of course and it's also because the you know they get to drive the conversation it looks less than because they're the ones with the microphone they going. Hey these these. My wives all the cushions evan. Why do they call it a throw pillow. It's time so it's a good bit. I'm just sort of so people. Then they they Yeah so. I think it's sort of interesting that it's always gendered and i'd like to sort of stir that pot up. 'cause i understand men like a lot of my comedy is securing the toxic masculinity Because i experienced it a lot. Because i actually get along with guys because i don't have i don't have a lot of cushions i mean that is one of my seinfeld has a thing where it's like women need cotton balls men don't need cotton balls. I i love side bill. An who really vein. A nate cotton bowl. That's right it's a more nuanced severing of of the human rainbow that you're asking for which i completely agree with. Let's not thinking of free a lot of women and afraid a lot of men up to let's take the hate of gender. Yes and think about it in terms of you neurobiology. That's right very more much more interesting. I take the weld in and you turn it around and take the world backout whereas gender is really gender sexuality is a very if people feel like they could just break that off of who they are but the way you think in the way. The world is just fundamental to who you are. Yeah do you think that's fundamental to your sex and your gender. Is that what you were saying or are you saying when people think about you in terms of your sex agenda. They and the way you sort of like i feel like my my Autism is is fundamental to who i am because it doesn't go away when not looking at me like i still think like the way that i think even though no one's looking at me and trying to understand who i am. Yeah in the way that you think is maybe even it pre. It's a precursor to your body to your gender i. it's it's even more intimate. Yeah and people. It's a people tend to then you know that's where the full science of eugenics come into it because they you know the they presuppose that race gender and sexuality then informed to even for like a defect. That's right that's not right. That's what eugenics is really just absolutely dumb science layman like even yet. It's just not actually science. Science is a bad way. It's like people just invented or they did val my wife al. Who does the friday episodes with me. She pointed out she had had attract back to the moment in history. When one group was trying to own another group and in order to justify that they had to come up with jennings base because in order to own another group to consider still superior and the measure of that is civilization rate. Compet like racism is by its very nature civilized idea. We have to invent a science in order to justify masquerading as civility. of course. Because it sounds. You can't put that on the quaint if masking. You can't ask massacre ya. I love that line. You said if you're in the minority you don't matter. My wife is Ten years younger than i am. And she's been very helpful in helping me see the the privilege and unseen perspective of even jokes that maybe not my jokes. Some of my jokes. Some of my perspectives are just coming from a place of assumed normality. And when you said that in your special it was very powerful to me. I am tinguely in the cheeks just thinking about it. I wonder if you could talk about it. I when i go to see shows. And when i did Ten years ago. I remember starting to pick up on it. I was like there's justin undercurrent of women are inferior. Or there's just an undercurrent of gazer inferior or blacks are inferior or mexicans. Latino ex people whatever it might be and it was fascinating like you as a notice of patterns. I'm like where's the line. This is a regular audience. Nobody's here to see any comedian. They're just watching a handful of comedians and seeing where this random group of three hundred people would put the line and it was pretty generous in the favor of. It's normal to be straight. It's normal to be white. It's normal to be mail because lines not drawn by the audience. That's right that's right. Talk about that. The lines drawn by culture like no individual gets to decide stuff in a in a you know like so the when people is guilty of this knife you to close your eyes and think of adopter. Clouds rise thing comedian basically. It's dr hy tax cut off. James invitation you know what i mean like. It's just what you do and that's because that's what would give an you know like the mother-in-law the mother-in-law jokes on that sort of bothered me for a long time because it's seen as if it's like harmless truth but if you dissect the mother-in-law basically it's separating a daughter from her family which is essentially what marriages nagging the day. Not what it is now but back in the day it's like you said the woman from her own family with a dowry hopefully and and the mother-in-law doesn't get to have you know as soon as the mother-in-law inside yourself into the family it's not quote interesting. It's like why am i. Respecting you you don't have money. You don't have power. I'm not related to you. Get out of here. That's whether you know lake and so the you know also you separate women from their own family you separate the source of power So the the mother-in-law joke is like a really in a long line of patriarchal devices to make sure that women don't have inter inter generational pal structures. Wow that's challenging for me. I'm thinking of a joke. I had where i said. I hate my girlfriend's parents and it's okay. I'm not embarrassed. We can talk about it. Meaning i don't mind being the bad example. The joke was what are we going to hang out. I'm having sex with your daughter. You know what i mean like. You don't like me. Don't pretend to like me. But i wonder and i'm only pointing this out not too for the fun of falling on my own spirit but to say like i didn't know but when i hear you say that it makes sense like let's get your family out of here because you're with me now right. I mean isn't that what's happening. But there's also an section there about the sexuality of the dole to so you'll presence therefore makes parents confront that and that's another thing like girls young women at to have sexuality. That's you're absolutely right. The big shock in line of that joke. I didn't say having sex. I said i'm fucking your daughter. You should want to hit me with a shovel. Yeah okay why. That's exactly what to do that. Like why wouldn't they have a healthy sex life i am. I'm there now. The special was quite a while ago. Four i didn't mean to sound defensive. I'm just saying i see it now. I guess yeah that with we have a daughter now and it's funny. I catch myself having thoughts. That i have never seen really reflected on tv. Which is you'll be holding your baby and you're like she'll have sex one day right because that's the old it's like. Don't think thing. And then i go. Yeah i hope she loves it. I hope she knows wonderful. Sexual freedom and beauty and passion and joy and bliss. I know that's weird to say about my own daughter put like well. You know you know you don't get if you frame. It is like you don't own a human. Then that's kind of healthy right. Not get involved yourself you find. But there's that was never modeled for me to be like. Yeah i hope my daughter. It was always she better. She better be home by eight. You know i've always been really fascinated by story. I'm why stories sort of overwhelmed. People before fat and i spend a lotta time on the story of adam and eve ants in both both an douglas. Was there. It was part of the shows in both times. Sort of like had to be pulled out for various reasons. It didn't quite what it had a long held fascination with the story vaneman even white has such a big influence on so many different sorts of people and how in the world of hydrophobia. It's adam adamant. I've known and steve I've been it's madam and eve but it's for my mind it's like it's a story that helps is i think is supposed to help people understand the the navigation and the troll merv leaving childhoods and becoming an adult and that sort of you know and that story the way we tell it to each other particularly in religious religious circles as will call them. It's it's a shame the women and so that's part of that. Is the slight women. Supposed to fill more. Shame than men arounds vats leaving of That's right even. I remember the realization of a teenager. And i was like. Oh adam's apple. That's like. I could be wrong. This is my child all the way down. It didn't go all the way down. He didn't swallow it like she swallowed it. She fell for it. The the snake But i am completely with you. I just think adam. Typical man didn't choice food. he's more of a hoover he he likes it down. You know. I think that's what the biblical author's get. Yeah i want to go back to something. You said earlier about trauma very interesting subject. We talk about trauma a lot on this. Podcast is comedy trauma i mean. Don't you feel like the. I feel like the most trauma experienced was induced by comedy in the first ten years. No i don't i don't see comedy is troll my howdy. How do you think i'm not sure i understand you. I think i'm going off remember. We were saying fame as a type of trauma. So i'm using a lower case. T i'm not putting it up there with the salts or anything like that. No i get that. But i'm just i've done actually understands how i'm talking about the the humiliation and the pain. It reminds me of you talking about people on the spectrum that are treading water that are learnt. That seem to be functioning but really. They're like a duck with the feet underwater sailor. -ly you see an open mic. In the first ten years they might seem okay but there's a lot to digest whether or not we call trauma. Maybe you could talk about that yet. Look i i don't like back trauma. So there was no way unexperienced. Samat you know like you know just kind of a quite a broad spectrum of trauma accumulative patriots day and bit some bulbs before. I even started comedy. And i'm say it is any point of pride or anything As i know to be the truth i would not be made in had to do it for the open mic channels because it just seemed absurd at the same like. Why would you do that. You just talking to a bunch. And i did a few gigs in those places and it just seemed like the audience's disrespectful the the comedy was most often quite hostile. Oh yeah it was. Were you know this. is you know. I've never seen so many ripe jokes back-back Might not so. I've like well. This isn't the wealth may so you you didn't do participate not didn't have time to but strategy. We have a different sort of model of standup than in in the us. And what is drives that. The most i believe is the culture around the melbourne international comedy festival. Which is an open festival. Much like the fringe. But it's fingers out into all kinds about Festivals similar modal. It some comedy and so you're encouraged to just put on our show so in fight amongst fight the same audience without comic you find foreign audience into a bunch of people to come down again. We're going to buy a ticket to show. Who so then. How did you prepare that show. Forgive my naive question. Is i started small. They run a competition called rule comedy. Where looking full. So i got my start in the role. Comedy comedy comedy Melbourne comedy festival new talent search. And i won that and then they did another thing in the next festival where they put a whole bunch of new comex into like a you know a a lineup shot and i did really well layer. Then someone said i wanna support you do an hour long show another coming. Adam hills is styling and he said he's To produce your first album show in the mobile comedy festival so pretty much. I was my experience of it. Although i'm was comic supporting other comics that idid melbourne. And that was my take away from the scene Not everybody was from australia. But just not european scene. David daugherty and i came quite close. Yeah just couldn't name. That felt that way to me. Maybe that's why i. I'd like to think it's just because i'm an evolved person that's seen one person shows that seeing a variety different types of comedy list for what you did reminded me of the shows that i would see in and then a good way of course. Yeah well. it's just the way it's long-form comedy like. I don build an hour. Long show out of five minutes sets that work. I take a- as a as a. I'm agnostic as to which is better. I don't believe that's even a conversation with having two different forms is this like better marathoner. Sprint it depends on. Who's chasing it and it's it is is different. You know so by the way. I ride a show is different. I think to a lot of us. Comex because i'm taking it as a as a whole on that guy taking twenty minutes set and going. He's my best fifty minutes for matt and building off that you can see it in the structure. You can see it in the themes. You sort of. Remind me of chris rock and burghley the way that you'll reestablish a theme over and over say a key line touchstone and those are things you get over a long form. Show that i would say if. I was going to stereotype american comedy. You're not gonna see that as much. Even though chris rock courses american but that has that our that i think is particularly near a typical to to do that. I don't think chris rock is. Oh chris rock huntington's hundred percent your typical. I mean i feel like i'm not qualified maybe to diagnose but when i go to the seller or the comedy store i'm like it's one of the reasons to be honest. I was curious if i was because i'm looking around. I'm like if this is who i get on with this. I feel the most comfortable at i was. I think we're an interesting group. Just maybe not the most neuro typical group. So yeah i agree with you. Know there's a part of that problem in newest comedy coach. Is that the this seems to be. You have the ability to believe that you're doing it on your own because you separated from the the the structures yeah In melbourne lake to participate in the comedy festival. You have to rely on paper to help you get a show up you do it on you have to hustle on your own oil. You have so you kind of aware of the underpinnings of the things that you cannot do in order to make a comedy show work. Yeah i got america you can just i get on stage and do my thing and i'm magical on the medical. I do it all on my own. Science bullshit aid people with different skill. Sets you in order to like get it. Seems like it's the most individualist Foam and say agree. But it's not like nothing is you. Don't get to do comedy without a lot of people with a lot about the skill sets that you don't have it just made me write a street joke. Hannah what did the la comedian. Who went before you think. You're said he went home. I did i did too. I bet he would have gotten it. I shouldn't have just given a longer. Bazi definitely would have gotten something. I think as opposed them like. I can't imagine like he'd be chatting at the back of my mind. Was going kid. Montreal comedy festival. He's in his tesla he's found of next week. He's hustler you're right. I i did have a guy who followed me. Who just did hold said about how much he hated the net. Oh my god really. Yeah which was actually fine. Because it was so clear he was unstated like ida destabilized world worldview to such an effect that it was just like dude. Wow i there's a weird bullying that can happen in stand up. I'll never forget. I was doing a show and the first comedian. I i can't remember. It might have been a girl and the second guy went on stage and he just went. He wiped his brow. Will and even that i mean this is what i talk about. What i'm saying for me. Starting in comedy. I'm gonna use the dramatic. It was difficult for me as sort of like a sweeter more sensitive person. I was like you just fucking sold her out. I'm standing next to her. It's that's a. that's a heavy thing to process. It's some that's the competitiveness of it. That i find like that's that's what people say it adds is like who has the best joke. Conversation is in a conversation. It's topper topper tougher on top of a taupe and which is just the most as someone who observes conversation had dow that it to what. Comedians bakery is dull events in that in that context. And so you know one of the biggest foams of stand up in is roast. And i hate routes like food Like just if the point of opening your mouth is to be cruel not want anything to do that. Like it just feels awful and i'm not saying it shouldn't happen but shoulder there's other is this. No i understand. I have been known to enjoy a roast and i've known to do a and backstage. Everyone's crying so you you are not without a point. I mean that that needs to be reckoned with the good side of it. I think i like being roasted to give you the you like your name group. If you'll being roasted yeah survive. But i never been on the in groot again one of the privilege. That's that's to. Yeah i hear you so what. You're witnessing is like bullying. Yeah i mean you just help me realize this is the moment i'm realizing like of course you love being roasted. What is there. all. I can do is win by laughing if you make fun of my divorce for example and i laugh i just win but if i roast somebody who's actually as you say doesn't fit in. It's not as fun. Right is that we agree. Ed i mean you know it's just basically an excuse to analyzed prejudice. I'm yeah i mean yeah. That's very very very interesting. You used the word fitting in you say that you feel incorrect. Which was one of the most emotional parts of the show For me. I'm wondering how you're getting on with that now. And if you have anything to say to people who clearly relate to you even if their life is different but they relate the feeling of not fitting in they they relate to the feeling of being incorrect and as you mature and grow wiser what we say to people that feel that way. How do we how do we do. We want to fit him. Do we wanna feel correct. I think they'll get more understand that it's a conversation fitting is always a conversation you don't fit in truly unless you yourself like and such a a weird way of like what is yourself is basically. It's a way of being in the world that doesn't feel exhausting like if if in order to fit in your exhausted. That's not. yeah that's not you either. That's a bad story. You're telling yet. And so like i think but it's a battle. I i think. I think all the people should be much kind of young people like i think. That's just the first thing 'cause we're away like when it's all you're trying to do is to find that balance between who who who you wanna be. How how does the world not hate you. And i just don't think older people should pile on as young people trying to work that out. I think it's one of the laziest phones of comedy as older people going. Oh when i was young like yeah and look what the world is. Now you're old. You fucked it up. Shut up. I think people lose touch with what it's like to be young. I feel like that's a pretty is particularly successful people. Yeah yeah yeah so a little bit more grace from the older people. Has there been anything that's helped. You have to think that your expression on stage is help to you. Know yourself and feel more comfortable in your body. How you doing with that shame. I was raised religious. So i can't. I'm not even trying to compete. So please don't hear it that way. But i'm like i feel shame over being just sexual. It doesn't matter what it is straight. I was raised by lapsed catholic. Which is new mattress all the guilt. None of the holidays. So i kind of get it But this shame kind that. I experienced from all sorts of areas. Don't just my sexuality. It's my body type like you know i don't ever talk about my body on stage now Like that is. I draw a hardline. Name why because it's just an open open season on women's bodies so it's not just it's not just you. It's just the joke about my body because they've all been written and none of them none of them. None of those jokes about women's bodies give any room for women to experience their own body But econ escaped coats. You brought up in. You can't escape the fact that people do judge women serve. You know i. I get aloha stability about my my how i look and why. That's the reason. I shouldn't speak but you know. Sometimes that affects me. Because i was you know part of was raised. You know this part of the cruelty experience growing up. My body was wrong and that i was wrong in my body. So if there's any trolls out there listening you do. You do the way to company there. It is but also have the tools. Now that i'm older to understand that is and i'll just take a nap and get over it so you know it's now pipe but it's i really really really private person and so i struggle with not being nat anymore and i know i put it all out there but So you know it's it's given take but the sense of ownership that people have a sense of ownership about your ideas what you shouldn't shouldn't say and also limit to attic growth. That comes with sort of a touchstone. Success like ninette. Was they like this person now. So you know they want to trip you up with your own. What which is odd and somebody. I think i twisted an extent. I'm frozen in time to the person the lows the person that wrote didn't it but you don't get to have that experience of Changes that's very fair. What would we expect you not to change. After that was found extreme. I what i what i experience through. That was extreme and extremely destabilizing. We even talk about it in the net where someone says not enough lesbian content. Which i which you know I've seen other comedians gatt. It's like you're not doing enough for what you did. And it's like you know you're not you're a human being your evolving. You're changing. Do you feel that way facing another special desert if that's going to be a thing. What comforts me with. Anything i do now is that i was so ready to fail with that. That's how i'm gonna approach everything. I love that and it's not like i'll say whatever i want to say i take great care of what i'm putting out the world because i actually don't think that would harmless but on the same hand. It's like if i'm going to take risks. I think it's kind of fills important to me to sort of keep evolving and also like if i if i feel like i just like i had nothing like i came from absolutely nothing. Homelessness and snow options have made enough of a mark. you know Turned enough coin to live. If i live frugally enough and my vegetables grow each season. I'll be ryan you know. I'll be writing like in comparison to what my life was before the net. I'll just be right. Even if enough everything tach nap turns to absolute shit and on forever forgotten and you know in one generation time means nothing in I will be fine. And that's power. I mean empowering. And i believe. I mean we've seen it. I mean that is such a beautiful lesson for any artist. It's certainly beautiful for me that you were ready to fail expecting to fail. There's just something about the dark nights of the soul where you're just like fuck it people have to know. I have to say it. And that was one of your touchstones. I have to tell my story and isn't it so funny that ends up being the most successful thing. Yeah look stop giving a fuck. Yeah and i think everyone has to find that that on their. I think that there's a a. There's a danger in Tying will. I have to have this moment in order to have success like i just think people find success in their ways and there's so many different ways to to skin the comedy cat but i you know they say that you know. Take ten years of comedy to find your voice. And i always kind of rubbish that because i found my voices since i was on stage like i felt like i had this sort of ability in comfort in how i spoke on stage it did evolve always felt like i was but then sure enough ten years in the net. And i'm like. Oh yeah i get that now. I remember feeling the same way it was like. What are you talking about. This is me you think everything you do for. The first decade doesn't count doesn't feel that way but it goes in that's how it is. It goes in. So i think you know like i have a. I have such respect for the craft of comedy like i. I don't hate comedy as much as people would like me like to think i like. I just think it could broaden It could be a wider church I think it's really interesting. The the the policing of the joke tell me. I'm like you know. In order to be comedy. The lav has to happen last. And i don't necessarily describe subscribe to that. Light can like as long as i think is genuine laughter on as part of the journey. I think i think he get yeah. You know it's funny. Mike wrigley is one of my best friends. We talk almost every day. And i one time. I don't know why we're like. What do people say he was like he was like. I'll tell you what people say about you. If you tell them what they say about me and we did it and what i said that they said was he knows us. I was like people think you're like an npr one man. Show thing for the very same reason. Because mikey likes to go. Small any likes to go big. And he doesn't necessarily do the fifteen things in a row callback. Big flourish closer. He might end on like the new one ends with through my child's which isn't even a laugh line. It's just a you know it's like a it's a realization so you're not alone in that so that's what you mean by the policing is that am i hearing right. Yeah it's just like you don't get to participate because it's really weird in like people's like you know where the lust best hands free speech but you can't say it like that like what are you talking about a hypocrite. The you know i. I'm only saying that just so you know. I don't think you think you're alone. But i'm with you the discomfort that i felt i mean coming up in the clubs in the early two thousands and it was because i was religious that i was a little bit more sensitive to it but i also just you know i i would see stuff that would make me go like what the fuck is this. What is happening right now. Anywhere else that would be hate speech and this was a nod very woke person in two thousand three in chicago. It's not like i had my doctorate in lake sensitivity sensitivity. But i was still going like this guy just brought a bachelorette on stage and mime hunter. Like you don't have to be you know nobel peace prize winner to see that like what is going on with comedy so when you say a broader church name i'm with you. Yeah it's it's hard to break up a culture when you're in it like you know you can't blame almost camp like it's just such a shakeup because he's like how can you do you know how the people doing that probably doesn't like doing but i think that's what you have to do. And so then you're able to describe well it's just. Hey get the job. Done that thomas because other people are doing it like you know on nc like the fact. Donald trump can get laughs at a rally. Men's that comedy so true not much like you get a crowd baying after the same blood you to anything against not actually well. That's my biggest problem with comedy is just getting people to agree with things that everyone agrees with. You know what i mean. And not everybody but i really mean just like the broadest. Isn't it great to eat a pizza. You know what. I mean. And he does that with his own. Bevy of selections isn't a yeah. I mean he say that. Because that's the sort of thing hillary did. Isn't it eat pizza. I don't want to run out of time. And i know we only have ninety minutes and i wanted to ask you. We always talk about religion. You talked about your mother. Being elapse catholic but i wanted to answer the question however as most interesting to you how you were raised and maybe where you are now not even from a religious sense but just like were alive. I'm talking to you. And it's tomorrow in melbourne through the internet. And as you said you are a consciousness in your body it thinks this way. I'm a consciousness in this body. Thinks that way were both. We were both woken up on an intergalactic mystery that no one really understands and we're hurling through space. How does hannah gadsby even attempt to experience that process that frame. It do have an understanding of spirituality or wonder or whatever you got i. I always had a childlike approach to things which is like a home. Never know all the things. There's so many questions. I love a question and i to frustrate teaches at school because i ten an answer to a question reverse jeopardy studied taoism. That's how i get through life. Like i find because it's just one texts and the new A deep dive it it. It's a text that sort of allows you know ideas spring fall than as you mature. Your ideas around the text can change but it it really is one that avoids dogma with john appeals to me because you know something that's written way back in the day concert five under the pressure of dogma like i think dumber is what what kills spirituality dogmas. Now that's what i call religion. It's like those compilation cds like it might be popular for a time but after a while we're like what was trumbull wamba. I don't understand. And like when i read the data aging. I'm like this guy. This is such a cliche but it is reading me. I know that's it's like this trick where it pushes through me and it makes me mirror back something that i didn't know i believe or saw or or it gets me quiet. Which is which is way better than any of that. Yeah and because it's so many different translations. It's sort of appeals to my patent mind. You know like i can't speak be regional language and no one really can now like in. It's not I take solace in the fact that chinese skull is also struggle with the But you know it's sort of like yeah. This is enough room for me in that in that text and also enough room for me not to exist at all which is also i find. I've never search for meaning may like it's always made sense that we live in them. We die and the mystery of what happens after we die. Seems like an absurd one. I think most religions use it as a way of people. Behave better care. And i'm like well that's a that's the way the toddler more grown up than that. This is like had. I just because that's why i love that i love that. Had i not hurt things and other people because that's just not right. So yeah that's that's sort of. How i you know you know i find it a and i have one particular audio version of which i find incredibly calm comforting to listen which was that. It could need woman. It could needle. He just did this. Podcast stephen mitchell has a beautiful translation and it it. He's buddhist so he like sort of rift on some of the verses meaning. It's not a strict translation in even tells you about but the essence of it is carried. Through so yeah. I'm a little skeptical of the buddhist me. Why sort of i- i- swayed toward the dallas dislike prescriptive. I think what you mean is that what is it in particular that sorta ruffles you feathers or doesn't just probably richard. I wanted for the longest time hannah to do a bit about how richard gere movies in the nineties. Do you remember when cool was cool. Like that's richard gere in the nineties. I it wasn't actually cool but like wearing sunglasses on the tip your nose leaning on a corvette in a trenchcoat and being like hey get in the car. That's richard gere in the nineties and it wasn't ironic. That's just cool cool. Do you know what that is. That is a writer's room full of people on spectrum. That is so fucking funny. That is hilarious. What is cool. I dunno give him a trench coat. Of course what has lamb dunk. I loved that while i love. I love that answer. I don't think we have to labor this. I've enjoyed this year. Great guests so you just gave and gave and gave so. I'll ask you the final question which is always. Can you think of a time in your life that you laughed very very very hard. Doesn't have to be a great story. Maybe your kid. Maybe it was this weekend. Maybe you tripped Maybe you were tripping. i've got. I've been writing down things that i'd said that a funny yes like an up shared them with other people in Down the thing that makes people off and sala just radio few those. How about that. I would love that are you kidding. I'm honored i'm hungry. Do you see any food. i'm gonna it. I mean i hate it. I mean i'm hungry. Do you see any food is the most literal. i'm hungry. do you see any food. 'cause i'm gonna eat it. I'm hungry attitude too much work. And i don't understand where the food is. Don't ask me to suck a fat leaf and call it a vegetable. That wasn't my line but it made me laugh so much. Ninety percent nothing Just little conversation yes. He's a conversation. I had a. It was a while doing a crossword with a friend on on them on the zoom. Yes and i said a clue. This clue what's hot in Pickles and i said hip drunk and they said in my defense. I was thinking about hot as in spicy. Picked a sausage said. Sorry what she said same shape. I got it before she explained it. I was there on the shape. And this is i mean we're vibe and now is little things. I've been collecting those little things. They're the little things that they really make me laugh. I love my toes. I just wanted to as a fan as they're going to be another specialty. Think let's it's really what i do when the net hit and ever wanted to pay him in ever. And you know you're gonna do your tv show. And i'm like that seems like recipe fanaticism. Or what you know having your own show about yourself self directed by you. Show run my youth recipe fanaticism and yet. There's enough proof on the table. I think i can contribute to that proof that it is an ego trip for sure yet but no i also like that's a someone on this the play some. That seems overwhelming. I i'm so. I sat down with my manager. Ms like where do we want to go. what is my ideal career. Unlike laurie anderson. You don't you just does her thing. Yeah analysts like she's batch it and just does think thing she you know she says. I want to do this thing now. I wanna make it film now that you always does a live shows. Yeah good for you. I mean talk about people doing things for for reasons. That are other people's reasons rather saying stupid shit because part of the culture that we're not even aware of or reliving someone else's dream so i'm so happy that you're wise enough to go way. Wait what actually do i want to do. Not what could i do. But what do i wanna do. Don't if it's wise enough. But i'm tired enough i'll take it. I'll take it the success. When i was young. I would have had the energy to what you spend it otherwise but i don't have a lowly. It's get the great gatsby i mean. That's what it would have been on. Nbc i'm sorry i get what's up homes a lot. I'm sure you get great gatsby but What can we yours times. My last name is homes. No but what's the rift. You haven't heard that. Instead of homeboy homemade. Say home Let's see i would have gone elementary. But that's the other characters. That is when i as watson it's elementary. Yeah you're right. Would no shit sherlock. When i make a dinner reservation i'll say home's like sherlock and they laugh and i go. That's my mother. Which which. I think good thank you and i do want end on sincere note and say you really tremendous. I'm so grateful for what you're putting out there because it's healing it's connecting and it's putting more love into the world so i hope you feel. Well i feel good loving you. I don't i. It doesn't matter how you help. Would you end. We have the guests. Say the catchphrase. It's button for the episode. The catchphrases keep it crispy. And then we'll be done kepa crispy keep it crispy is that what is cape crispy corpus christi corpus christi. That's a corpus crispy. Chris keep keeping crispy incorporate speed cape it. Crispy pickle confused. You did it though you said keep it crispy so account crispy crispy come on komo now. We're pleading i like that. I hope they come off literally co reid by like that to come on guys. Keep it chris come up it crispy. I hope we get to meet in real life someday. Nice thank you for doing this. It was a delight. Pleasure pleasure Kepa crispy you keep crispy Don thank you so much. Thank you so nice to meet you. Nice to meet each day fifty. I'm so crispy wanted.

hannah gadsby twenty five percent bello brooklyn ninette twenty percent big leah Hello bello three hundred sixty five day Three hundred sixty five days ten percent Gadsby Hannah Emceeing badghis nordion lule douglas delon leslie dax shepard
inveigh

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:38 min | 8 months ago

inveigh

"Merriam Webster's word of the day for August sixteenth. Today's word is inveigh spelled I n V. I. G. H. Inveigh is a verb that means to protest or complain bitterly or vehemently to rail. The word used in a sentence from the New York Times by Jason's cinnamon. Wearing a blue suit Hannah gadsby begins by pointing to a prop dog made of crayons onstage immediately making fun of herself a notable shift since Nanette when she inveighed against self-deprecation. You might complain or grumble about some wrong. you see or for a stronger effect, you can inveigh against it. inveigh comes from the Latin verb the Harare which joins the prefix in with the vertebrae meaning to carry invetory literally means to carry in and when invade first appeared in English. It was also used to mean to carry in or to introduce extended meanings of inventory however are to force one's way into to attack and to assail with words, and that's where the current sense of inveigh comes from a closely related word is invective, which means insulting or abusive language. This word to ultimately comes from Inverurie. With your word of the day I'm Peter Sokolow's. Visit Merriam Webster Dot com today for definitions wordplay and trending word look ups.

G. H. Inveigh Merriam Webster Merriam Webster Hannah gadsby Peter Sokolow Nanette Inverurie New York Times Jason
177 | Creature Feature

Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

10:49 min | 1 year ago

177 | Creature Feature

"Our world is full of the unexplainable and history is an open book. All of these amazing tales right there on display just waiting for us to explore. Welcome to the cabinet of curiosities. It's a jungle out there. Dangerous Lurk around every Corner Lions Tigers and bears can be hiding when we least expect them even outside of the actual jungle. Of course. It's not supposed to be that way. But in New York in eighteen seventy four. The city was gripped by panic. Unlike they'd ever seen before it was first reported on the front page of the New York Herald. The animals at the Central Park Zoo had gotten loose. And we're now running free through Manhattan. They had all started with the Rhinoceros. Which Gord it's keeper before freeing itself and its fellow captives a panther soon found. Its way into a church on West. Fifty Third Street terrorizing worshippers donkeys apes and elephants. Were on the prowl. Taking out anyone in their path according to initial reports forty nine people had been killed one day after the escape two hundred more had been injured the Herald referred to that day as another Sunday of Horror. The police worked tirelessly to corral various beasts. And Quell the bloodshed Rhino. That had kicked everything off eventually. Fell into the New York sewer system where it fought a sea lion an anaconda found its next meal in a giraffe alliance evaded hunters on Broadway. There was also a polar bear some hyenas Bengal tiger the last of which boarded a ferry boat in search of some well. Let's just call it seafood. It would be a busy several days following the escape but soon enough. The police managed to capture an account for every animal that had gone missing from the zoo. Walk Through Central Park today in. You might not even realize that anything had happened at all. Now if you had read the original article in The New York Herald all the way to the end you would have realized the shocking truth about the whole thing. Matt had an actually happened. The story had been conceived by editor. Thomas Connery who allegedly gotten permission to run it by the paper's owner. James Gordon Bennett. Junior connery had been strolling through Central Park. When he saw a leopard bean moved from its carriage to its cage at the zoo in that time it had nearly managed to break free from its captors. The story sat with him and he considered writing serious piece for the paper to shame them for their lack security but then he got a better idea. The asked one of the Writers Joseph Clark to pen the article which came in at around ten thousand words since it had been published on the front page accompanied by such a stark headline as awful calamity. A shocking Sabbath Carnival of death. Readers assumed it all to be true. Almost nobody read all the way to the end. Where the final paragraph? Let everyone in on the joke. It was the Victorian era quivalent of only reading the headline on social media as a result. Those who saw the headline in skin the peace behaved about as well as could be expected of them. Men grabbed the rifles and revolvers and headed out into the city prepared to take down any non human creature they saw. It's even said the editor of The New York Times was among them other papers sent out reporters for witness statements and information on the remaining animals that had yet to be caught. Even police increased their patrol numbers. Eager to bring an end to the carnage once. Everyone realized that there was nothing to worry about. The Herald came under fire for its role in terrifying the city. The Times and other newspapers attacked the Herald for its irresponsibility. A few papers us the opportunity to address the original underlying issue of weak security at the central park zoo but perhaps the most notable story about the hoax came actually one week before it was ever published at the time the Herald printed many op eds against president ulysses s grant and his grasp for power grants a Republican had considered seeking a third term in office. Even though tradition dictated that presidents should never serve more than two the paper referred to this power. Grab as Caesar ISM political cartoonist. Thomas NAST also. Republican put his own spin on the rumors by using the heralds hoax as inspiration his cartoon was published in. Harper's weekly in its. He represented the Herald as a donkey dressed in a lion's skin with the word. Caesar Ism written across the side as the donkey ran through the zoo. It scared the other animals one of which was tagged as the Republican Votes Nast referred to the Republican vote as the same animal again. Some weeks later a trend that took off among political cartoonists all over the country. According to the legend it was this new parade of animals that inspired connery to publish that infamous hoax in the New York Herald and Thomas. Nast depiction of the Republican votes as zoo. Animal has stuck around today. You'll see it on television campaign posters and on the pages of countless newspapers across the country. In fact it's now considered by most to be the mascot of the Republican Party the elephant this episode was made possible by the mobile game. Best fiends I work hard so I feel like I need a mental pallet. Cleanser at my go-to refresher is best. Fiends best means is a game that you can play right on your phone but while you go all these levels solving puzzles that actually engage your brain. It's still a casual game that anyone can play. And it's a blast. I've been playing it for a while now and built up a nice stable of level fifteen characters and sense best female updates their game each month with new levels and events. It never gets old. Oh and you don't need an Internet connection to play it which means it's perfect for keeping me occupied on the plane away from WIFI. So go on engage your brain with fun puzzles and collect tons of cute characters. Trust me with over one hundred million downloads. This five star rated mobile puzzle game is a must play download means for free on the apple APP store or Google play. That's friends without the our best scenes our days on this floating rock chasing ambitions and aspirations so many of try to follow our dreams and fall. Short we slip or stumble and before we know. It's it's all over or maybe not. It takes resilience and an iron will to reach out and pull ourselves up to finish what we started. That's what Jon Gadsby did. Many moons ago in his own city. No Not Gatsby with T. That's a different story. This man's name was Gadsby. With the de- he lived in Branson hills a tiny town in a bit of a bind. Jon Gadsby had seen it for himself. Criminals were everywhere driving the quality of life in his hometown. Way Down having grown tired of watching the place he loved fall apart all around him. Gadsby organized the local kids to form a group a means to build everything back up into a shining city on a hill. Once the group got to work Branson hills population skyrocketed from two thousand inhabitants. Up to sixty thousand with boosts in weddings and births and with all of that growth came improvement to the conditions in town. Jon Gadsby had done such a good job at making Branson hills better. His neighbors elected him as their mayor. And with Gadsby at the helm Branson hills thrived. It was widely regarded as a stunning victory for the power of grassroots activism. In fact his story was so inspirational and author thought that it would make for a decent book however this writer told the story using a strange approach known as a Lipa. Graham Olympic. Graham is a story where a particular element of the language is eliminated or boundary of. Some kind is put in place in his book about Gadsby. The author manipulated the language using such tools as circum location or a roundabout way of making a particular point. It was highly author was able to stay within his predetermined boundary. All told. The book wasn't too thrilling and had difficulty finding a publisher willing to print but the author believed in his story. And did what any headstrong writer would have done. He printed gadsby through a vanity distributor. Sadly most hardbacks burned in a fire at the printing facility so not many people were able to get their hands on one however a rare volume did eventually sell at auction for four thousand dollars an Oshkosh daily critic at the time called Gadsby amazingly smooth with no halting parts. It was difficult for the author to pull off his language trick for as long as he did and in succeeding. Gadsby became one of a handful of books over the years that has utilized Lipa Graham. To tell its story sadly gadsby was not a work of nonfiction Branson hills never existed Jon. Gadsby himself also completely made up. There had been no grass roots activism. No jump in population and no financial victory. Jon Gadsby story had been entirely fictional told by a man named Ernest Vincent Rights over the course of fifty thousand words. It bore a striking resemblance to another book called Void published in nineteen sixty nine by George. Peric it was a novel about a group of people looking for a man named and vowel part comedy part horror. The story contained twists and numerous subplots in an effort to both confused the reader and show off the ability and spinning. A tale is hand tied behind his backed by a self imposed constraints right and peric shared a common love for Lipa dramatic storytelling. They had a knack for telling stories in some of the most difficult ways imaginable. Nobody made them do it. And it had been a challenge but in many regards it worked they had by all objective measures told their story the way that they had intended it also wowed critics with their ingenuity after all it took dedicated writers and a whole lot of talent to pull off what they did. You see the novels written by Ernest Rights and George. Peric lacked one important thing the letter e. I hope you've enjoyed today's guided tour of the cabinet of curiosities. Subscribe for free on Apple podcasts. Or learn more about the show by visiting curiosities. Podcast DOT COM. The show was created by me. Aaron McKie in partnership with how stuff works I make another award. Winning show called law which is a podcast book series and Television. Show and you can learn all about it over at the world of Lore Dot COM. And until next time stay curious.

Jon Gadsby Gadsby Branson hills The New York Herald Central Park Zoo The Herald New York writer Junior connery Graham Olympic Thomas NAST editor apple Republican Party Ernest Vincent Rights Corner Lions Tigers Gord Manhattan James Gordon Bennett Thomas Connery
Hannah Gadsby - we read your emails and feedback

Homo Sapiens

45:18 min | 11 months ago

Hannah Gadsby - we read your emails and feedback

"Do you know what in Scotland UCF someone's dopey. Ho Knitted Really Hannitized on about Hong Dot one I think it means that you're just a bit stupid, but anyway that I don't know why I don't know. Why said that. When we're talking about you want. It was just coincidental. Hello Listeners Hello Alan. Cumming Hello World Hello Pry. It's pride month. It's home sapiens extra. This is where we read your emails your letters and your in scrimmages. We read out review of the week where somebody can win a T. shirt blue favorite review. And we do wormhole of the week. We take relax with another. Mike Coke compadres Alan coming. Can you buy a t shirt if you win it? Good Question Allen, because if you ever press dot com slash Sapiens, you can buy a t-shirt or sweat shirt. COMING DOT com slash shop descend exactly. That's where I said. If anyone ever says anything about island Oh. We'll just have coming to. Show! The answers there. It's my wikipedia. So, if we. Welcome to the show. Hello Christopher. How are you? Hi I'm good. Thanks how you feel like I've not spoken to in ages which is. Semi, true moving a cracker. Rice Crocker I thought you can say breakdown there, which quite frankly given this week I realized I'm very I'm this eating this vizquel I feel like I'm fiddling well ruined burns. My God wolf obsolete. Insane. Time insane mass in this country of Medica. Yeah. Because obviously you are in America, so it's even more prevalent. We've still been. Allen. which come to that later on the emails, but while island finishes the cracker. I mean. Someone is tweet that said this is pre. Some of the more intense stuff happening in America said twenty twenty is giving off serious season finale vibes. This is prior and what he's hoping got renewed. Someone said this great thing today that said you know pictures of fires all right in the White House. Eighty show. Someone said. They'll meet in two thousand sixteen when he got elected. You did not think this was going to happen. It's sort of. You elect a clone. You get a circus and he's now. Probably this will beginning on Thursday. He's now hiding in a bunker right true. When. There's a great new. Hashtag. This trying called Hashtag bunker bitch. Just annoying? It's absolutely. I mean the thing I. Think's interesting about it is The, way that. It's you know this is why this use different. Is it so so much by people realising the kind of? Institutionalized racism and the police force is just inherently racist in this country and and and it's so inherent. Suggestion is that we don't even notice it and so many things happen in I've just been fascinated by these layers upon layers of things that people are nice thinking. Oh, I see I'm. No one is born racist, but you are born into racism. Because of the society's is by Nature Racist. It's just fascinating an awful and I. I mean Oh. God, I just hope that at least the list could good could happen is that? In November there is. A government that actually. Has Some compassion anyway I? It's just absolutely the idea that he could get back after this. I mean he's done. He has. been citing violence, and how youth I'm fine, thanks, you know it's been a heavy week because I mean. Larry Kramer died at allow is going to make it a big event for the week. Then we've had the riots. Because of the murder of George Floyd and I've been reading and looking at. And trying to. I don't know if you feel. This assessment is a useful reaction. is going to go beyond the next two weeks and. The. The. I was looking at a couple of people who've said good things online that I thought. I would share because I. Think it's now is the time to listen and read. And listen. So some people who are doing good stuff on instagram for example. Monroe Bergdorf at Monroe Bergdorf is sharing. Really interesting stuff to do with black lives matter and At Dash, dot penman has done a slide show. Thing called George, Floyd how can I help from the UK? which is a a series of? Recommended readings accounts instagram accounts Rachel cargo. Loti miniature lobby, candies Braithwaite and Monroe Bergdahl. Get an upstairs downstairs. I bought one of those old friend. Do you know? What's so funny is known brings the Butler did answer that. My husband Buck And yes, there's some interesting stuff there which I think is good and. The conscious kid is another account which is shares thing called forty one children's books to support conversations on race racism and resisted giving Allen on my zooms green, because when you said earlier, you know people aren't racist via born into it the early. You can be talking about the stuff I think. Is You know? He's really cool and something else. That has been going on this week. been going on its beginning of pride month, and a lot of people have been talking about how stay was a riot started by queer people of Color. and. The solidarity we were shown by. People of color needs to be returned. Absolutely and also I feel it's really interesting. I feel like. I reached out yesterday a couple of people. Who I knew what I in protesting Eve's who we have. Lead no es mature. Yes, he's good at Jaipur on instagram. Yeah, he has been doing some really cool stuff, really amazing and I also. I'm worried for him. I mean he talked by. He was prepared to give up his life. And you know the the thing that's. So and so scary and especially more than ever right now. Is this idea that you are afraid just going out? Well like. In the man who was killed when joking I. You're just afraid to actually believe your host. Just being in the world makes your target a not an especially right now. I suppose less because so many people are. Of all colors and creeds and ages demonstrating I so I hopefully, people don't feel so alone, but I mean. I've I've thought that in the past, but even like smoking port. Cynthia Nixon the idea that I I've smoked pot on the street. Say My bar. I never I never wanted endings going to happen to me. If I were of color I could go to prison, or you know lose my life. If I mean there's just. This is it's taking it back to the very simple idea just being yourself and the world you are, you are a target and you are an object of. Of, hatred is backed up by. Society's rules. It's awful yeah. Well? I think we have to give an armament into Larry. Kramer's well, yes, laddy. So tell me what Dummy about Larry Kramer. Just as you took a bite of your. Had another zoom thing before this and they did a chance to eat breakfast. I'm starving. I'M HAVING TO RACE KICKS WHATEVER MY BREAKFAST! We'll have a chic usually within. Two this one one had homemade hummus I made with ramps the last of the rumps. And this one is. vegemite have a race crack with veggies everyday day. I love vegemite more than life itself businesses. The last time I saw. Larry Kramer was the chiropractor. Because we shared the same. The same kind of b-actor. But Explain who Larry Kramer is for those who might not know. was in a writer and an activist. and He. was kind of one of the first people to. Talk about. Aids to kind of like. Screech AIDS screech a boat. Important was for people to. Realize what was coming in to change the sexual practices into and he. He was always very contentious. He's. He started the GMAC agreements health. Crisis on, but then he kind of got booted of that because he was, he was kind of. It's interesting. I think his sort of Hem as a metaphor that is kind of similar to that guy. We were talking about the one who. You know. Go all all the prep for everybody that guy in London, in order for things to get done. There's a certain level of mediation and you know. Diplomacy and kind of getting people on board Laddy was into. That told that it was just like. Listen to me, here's the truth. Here's the actual what's gone on and I. Don't give a fuck about wh- any of you. Have to say. In sort of ticket slowly all that stuff. Just. A couple of minutes. But he, so he was, he got booted out with Jim Mitchell Danny kind of. Started or was one of the findings of act, up. which was already sort of? A Much more sort of militant activists movement about AIDS and the government's refusal to. A. Fast Track the medical things, so he was just its incredible person also. wrote a writer of great, not the normal heart. which is this play kind of? His. the the finding GMAC know these things, and he wrote a very controversial book called faggots that that's about. Life as he saw that time, and he just he never kind of shut up even when the normal heart was on Broadway again a couple of years ago, I saw him I eyesight handing out leaflets. and. I can't remember what it was actually. What signing the leaflets were four, but he's he was. Local chiropractor! Then I saw plenty so I was in this film. A few years go after Louis. where I play sort of older gay gentleman who had been knocked up. And it was directed and written a Kootenai Michael. Vincent Leo Stroh. who had be the knocked up and was this. Artist and So I think. With him, and also that certain this my friend, Anthony Johnston and What was interesting about young man and an older mine and Vincent was an older game on an anti younger gay, and they kind of came together to I was brought on to kind of. Make scripts. Up You know better I suppose, and so in the story, the story of the film kind of. Mid Art, what was happening in real life and I played the guy on. There was a young guy who I kind of you know I'm this angry man? I've got survivor's guilt by AIDS I'm doing this documentary, but my friend I'm kind of obsessed with it, and it's this kind of thing. The schism between generations of gay man is basically. There's a generation missing a whole generation that we lost to AIDS. And so there are mentors for those younger people, and also there's this kind of older gay man who like either node. It's like we do on the younger game in la well. We don't know what it's like, but don't shut us I. Don't just let us know. Try and talk to us, so it was a really interesting film. Lady was a very. Behind it and because he vincent or old friends, so he came to, it came to the screening of it. When it was kind of coming out. I just happened to be in the chiropractor. Nettie was in the reception and. We're talking about the film about to be released limiting the last. Couple of years ago, but an absolutely amazing mine. and. Took no prisoners and I love that. He yeah one of the pivotal people as to why we have the rights we have today. Shall, we take a look at messages in email Allen I would love to. Almost one this vegemite. Life back. Well I'm GONNA give you a couple of shorty's, but there are fun. So John says on twitter. He's been sharing. I. Just thought I'd clear up any loose ends on Allen's colonoscopy where I'm headed to. Jones says. John Basil says on twitter. If you don't think a colonoscopy, story could be charming. You haven't heard one from Alan, coming. Now Okay Haste. He's now co hosting the savings. Poke us with Mr Sweeney, it's a twinkling light in my laborious. Look down have listened. You've been connecting with people all over the planet through my. Lord. And we had a really sweet. Message from someone in Argentina he said May I take this opportunity to thank you for having created a program that not only gives voice to different lgbtq plus life stories, but also being able to entertain amid such darkness and discrimination that still exists in an towards our community. Where we talked a little bit about that is yeah. I also want to thank you for helping me in difficult times during the sleepless nights, there are not enough words to thank. Thank you big hugs from Argentina Jan Gina. Gina Gina. So. Own, Allen. You've had an apology three. Oh Hello! system Adam. You read out my review on the podcast yesterday. Unfortunately MINGO IS A. Gaming remember. Yeah, it's giving And know him I think at grew, but I mean who would I be to say? And I just wanted to let you know that I didn't mean to disrespect Allen by only mentioning Chris. Influential person discovered from the podcast. I didn't mention him. Because Spike is is one of my favorite films at the Charts I've known about him for over nearly twenty years. More than twenty years actually. Will Listen I. Didn't think you were offended. I. Love Him. Be. Now. we've been sent a cool thing which is. It's a thing. Could West Yorkshire Quiz Stories? So There is a project cooled. Let me just try and Google it. Did they still have that thing called Queer up North Festival. Okay so. There was a great thing. In Yorkshire cooled, mess, Mac. which is big, Sexual Health Organization, which is about men who like to have sex with men, not necessarily. Gay just men who have sex with help from a busy. Exactly. There's not enough on the ground anyway to do with them. They set up. Think West Yorkshire Quiz Stories which from whether it be to Wakefield. Click clicky into Kosovo has a memory West sharing from twenty eighteen, twenty twenty West Yorkshire Quiz Stories collected stories about. Plus life from the everyday to extraordinary, and if you go to W. Y. S. Daca UK. You can see and read all about fascinating, terribly fascinating the thing again. Tell me the name of the thing again West Yorkshire. Quiz Stories, which is W. Y S. DOT CO DOT UK. Nice out. We've got some emails with people talking about Hannah Gatsby oh. Yes, Oh, this just quick! If a jingle quick bum bag update! Has She posted you? The Bombay can't nothing. I was actually going to Santo an email because she. Is All happening. Like car shows out Douglas's on net flicks. Her home assistants interview was out this week, and also she did the thing for the club coming community chess. She offered herself up as a and you still bid on it. you know to zoom coal all happened this week and so I was to eat and thank I thought. I sort of. Maybe I'll wait, so it doesn't seem the I'm desperately trying to get a Bloomberg you've got to sort of time. It has no bump back coming thus far I know I did campaign quite heavily for India episodes and dig again and it did it last. Act, this is what happens when they get a famous too many people between them in the general right through to. Bum Bike Promise. The merch. Just get stuck in the ones ever know. This subject is called latest episode and Tea Cosy. Allan Hi Chris. The podcast and your Sunday instagram lives are what keep me Sane in these insane times. You always make me laugh and audience by me. I'm already forty nine and in the last two years I've started to really put together the pieces of my sexuality. It was always a strange kind of muddle for me into learning about discovering that there is the spectrum could asexuality. Suddenly so many things started to make complete sense, and it was such a relief. Even though I'm a bit sad that this kind information was not around when I was a teen forward slash between, but better late than never. In the most recent episode Allen Talks about wanting a proper, not cozy, yes. I I'm a knitter. So if he would still like one I can make him one shutout is. The preferred colors, and it shall be done. Oh, Chris My. You haven't think you'd like. Knit is the same of a stent? Thank you so much love Hught, which is about ut ut from Germany. ITTA. Thank you well I absolutely charming. It That's so nice. I would like Delic I. Think read one okay. I'm going to go. Thank you so much. Firstly, you could get you. Do you know? Do you know what in Scott Juicy if someone's a bit dopey on? Always about Hong Mann Dot one I think it means that you're just a bit stupid, but anyway I don't know why. I don't know why I said that when we're talking about you, coups. Well. I, don't want. Push the boat out, but if if you fancied knitting Allenbach as well, we couldn't do kill to one St. I'm just going to say that. Hannah Gadsby off the hook. I'd like I'd love one innocent if I'm wearing an olive olive green, Olive Green Teasha that kind of thing I'd love to because he's. Not Cozy as well Oh, yeah! I WANNA tea cozy as well so nice go. It's like a white plastic one that looks like a sheep in this house and it's like covid teen. It's no great I used to have a pig. But now they have that awful crime in one I mean it's nice, but the perils keep putting off and on board. The dogs eat it. Talking with you hear above me. It's like the others in that film Nicole Kidman. The, other dogs running around upstairs because they're going I I. You know I can't hear it, but why can hear funnily enough is whenever I. Say Your Name My head. Would like someone says Allen. I hear in my head Nicole Kidman saying to you Allen when. You were teasing her and Graham Norton. You are. Trying to. Remember to stories spring to mind. I opened that time when they went to what I was the. New York Film Festival and I was asked if I would be. The ambassador for grandma did you. Know I was the ambassador for. The for the filled festival. I'm sorry. And I got paid of money and as much as I could drink and also the. Company had Moyen Sean Dolan so I got champagne, blah, blah blah. I will add to do was to go to three parties the opening one in the ending one an. This other one in the middle. Premiers the film festival, which I probably would have gone to anyway I invite invited to them, and so I went along. I was taken along the crest line by the PR, and they said Oh, so what brings you tonight and I said I am the bus difficult Marnie and they want to go. Why you really here as? The Best Grandma. And I said I said. Maybe I should wear a sash. Saying Miss Grun Marnie and that's a good idea. I would joking. Anyway Middle Film was. That one by Lars one cheer dog. Ville or something Tocqueville Yoke. Something had to go backstage and before with all the cast. On it was like Lauren Bacall and all these people were and she. I've been thinking about her this week. Actually because I did an interview thing with Damian Barr Amazing writer. Of the thing. Called Shelf, isolation and talking about listening and watching. Betty Bacall telling stories, but her and one of the things. I saw this thing backstage. Hey, betty, how are you? I said. What was it like making this films would. It was awful. We had to go to Sweden I was wrong with that because they have mayonnaise for breakfast. That's what she's saying. Forced eat man is. But, anyway, I'm standing there. With the car. Backstage for they're going to be introduced before the film and. Nicole comes. She's an over the. She comes up to me and. She goes to me. In this film I was a I know. I. I'm here because I'm the ambassador regret Marty. Linguist I actually think she thought I. Just didn't realize I was in that film. And somehow stumbled upon the Green Room. And was. Talking to set of a simple person. Oh funny, but that was. I loved being blasted for Grad Marnie. Is anyone else either here lately? Typically them busters for small stipend, please. Send send these messages long to Alan coming dot com slash shop. I have more. But, if you that reminds me of a story where there's a band called foles. If you're headed, them folds foles fulls. Horses. Yeah no today like like a big indie band in the UK and A. They're really well known the huge like they. Would it be funny to take their mate up the red carpet with the MS if he was in the band, because no one ever remembers who else is in the band part from the lead singer right? So the he's they will these clips on my enemy, dot, com and stuff of him. The being interviewed in them, just asking that mate like tell us about the album is. Very experienced. Loved it so good. This one is actually about Hannah Gadsby. The previous one I said was was. Hello, Chris yesterday I listened to your interview with Hannah Gadsby I've been a firefighter since I saw her in the show. Please like me and I'm so glad she's got more attention through Netflix's. Favorite Standard Comedian I really enjoyed your interview with her letting her speak and talk by interesting things that aren't frivolous, but I will say that the three of you say laugh together. She doesn't do a lot of radio or TV interviews. At least that I've seen so I'm glad she did this one I never tire of hearing her speak she so intelligent. Thank you for letting that. Show what thank you for letting that. Show that in that show there. Oh, right, yeah. Thanks the one person who doesn't have the melon front. Better targeting that show in your interview though as Nice Catherine. Thank you and there's another email. I want to read because it's about. Autism and Quintas or good. Called Lewis has been touch saying Hannah Gadsby autism and me. And, she is a twenty year old bisexual woman who is diagnosed with autism exactly seven months ago. I listen to Hannah Gadsby. Upset today and really appreciate being able to hear another autistic lgbt women talk. This is one of the first occasions in my life. I've got here another autistic lgbt person talk one of the other being Jack Monroe who was on this podcast season. One to one I think. I! Just she goes on and then. She carries on. She then says I just think that needs to be more much more discussion and acceptance of autistic people, especially autistic women, both in the OT bt community and society in general. That's true. It's very true, but that's lovely email and I absolutely agree. I'm so glad we have. Helped them? To other bits you're going like. PS. One of them is about me. We're both going to come. LOUISA SAYS PS Chris. You have such a relaxing voice. It's just coming to listen to. That's nice. It's true. A, mom, I can do es video. Whatever the called. The going to sleep things. Kind of okay for that I'm GonNa do that thing. I thought it was because there's stuff I've been hearing on instagram because because. I'm Jerome Flynn. An I am going to you know those ones that sort of massage of sounding dolphins in the background and. It's. The, same family, yeah, I think that linked. There's a lot. Of People Enter this Jerome Flynn. The someone else I know as well I should. Yeah. Jim Flynn was Orlando when I was in Azure like seventy five thousand years ago. Enemy. Get the but me. Yes exactly time is of the essence. As an autistic person, I have special interests, which is when I become intensely interested in specific subject areas. Usually, it's eurovision, but about two days when I was seventeen, my special interest was allen coming. So consider it an owner that you made it to. Special interest level managed to briefly. Knock your vision of top spot where I am honored honored. You have been A. White. Yes warm whole. I'm going to read a redeem out. Well, quit road. That's me being a sensitive. I'm just going to say I'm not GonNa only read praise we had. So Tim's been in touch well done really enjoying it, but would you these these are the words, tatum, no subject well done really enjoying it, but would you consider doing the whole show with guest and then chatting on the other week? Thanks so much. Well not shutting the beginning. I didn't fully understand it yet. Joseph has also been in touch. Hi, thanks for the great podcast with Hanukkah I listened the day after watching her netflix special. Douglas I became a fan of to sing us you. Really good interview. Please stop eating during the poker. Unpleasant. Unpleasant, to hear you and speak to try and speak while masturbating, it's super annoying. To? The audio levels on the podcast between the two of you from beginning to end and often guests are all a bit all over the map. Hope, the technical team listening. On this call of the Soom call I think they're talking about the interviews Chris. When our technical team are not with us, and it's you keep it up the keys of the audio things. That's quite an. think it gives us a nice homespun authentic quality. Boquet and yes, is there a com- common? That could be had with WHO's in charge of the recording. That would be I have to turn the volume up down various points. It's a bit annoying. All in all I really enjoyed the book cost big. Fan Joe in Toronto. Thanks. Yeah, bless you. This you! Share joke. Good I'm such a Brat I can't help it. I'm going to. We're GONNA. Do Review the week. We've got to do wormhole of the week. We've gotTA DO Anecdote. Relax tons to get through, so I'm going to do review the week very fast. This is where you can win a T. Shirt Allen right. For choosing the favorite review of the week. Learning to be more aware from flossy, bf says hello. I just wanted to say how much I'm enjoying the pocus having only recently found you, I'm child, protection, social worker, White, and heterosexual, and your conversations with each other guests have allowed me the space to think about life. The life experiences young people and adults identified lgbtq plus. It has also given me opportunity to think about how I as a caseworker. Maybe to be more supportive. Thanks to the insights, you'll conversations have given me well. That's nice. Isn't it? A lovely isn't able to ask questions and your she carries on. Thank you Jane. Five. Lesser Vicky Hill. This next one is five stars as well Vicki Novicki Hill Vicky chill. Get it. My new favorite podcast is the title Oh. Thank you, Chris Gallon. You're hilarious and brilliant love, advice, stories and frankness. Your advice on a piece of relationships. Spot on and your lefty in inverted commas. Opinions are refreshing. Love the Stephen Fry the top story and I'm not just writing this routine or am I question Mark Vicki. What was my top of this study? Have you made fire Dns forty-five? Yes? And then mental leg. Is the name of the next one five stars again. Oh, good couldn't find an zero way so it can find less than five tonnes. I promise guys I'm so blinking. Happy back. Woo Bloody Love Your Poker's edition of Alan coming is just pure genius, even though I do love William to. Canny wait for trio episode. I'm thirty six or thirty seven years old, new Mumma, and I just WanNa. Say thank you for releasing the season early. It's the treat I needed on my weekly out. Myself I'm currently suffering from PND and recovering from Corona, and it's been a hard I'm wild. Nine months. double-whammy! PND being postnasal. Patient go. First thing. And I just wanted to say a massive. Thank you for the kindness and acceptance you all exude and for highlighting mental health issues. Oh, that's great so much, yeah! Allen! Who would you like to choose as your favorite David? Would those three favorite review and who wins the TEASHA? Well I think because of the combination of postnatal depression and covert. I'm going to give it to that lady. So. You'RE GONNA. Shine the social worker. Shunning. Child protection social worker for now it's a dog. Eat Dog world in the t shirts in the fleet, T shirt business. The minus spoken. What would you say, lady? Would you agree get in touch oh? Hi! I'm going to do an apron. Say everybody gets a call. Everyone gets t-shirt. Yeah flossy gets teasha Vicky. Chill gets the teacher. Mental leg gets that. You're crazy. You'll get a car a car. Okay, so. That's how I pull it back. Yeah, that's a very kind gesture. Christopher. The. Post, office, old morning Well they're gonNA, take a while to play some going to share that with 'cause they need to be printed Blah Blah Blah. Now Allen. Did you happen to Wormhole this week? Oh, bloody hell! Yes, well, it was fascinating. It started with me deciding to sail for the club coming community chest this belt I wore at the premiere of X.. Men Two in La in. Two Thousand and three or four hundred, but was I. leave is a no Lee jeans said. Why would I like to make a kilt suit a denim kilt suit because I was because my was blue. You see, and so they made this amazing legal sparkle things on. Had A jacket. whiskered a nod, these boots, and when I was in San Francisco getting this done to his lead or show up, which is not just the kind of leather shop I'd imagined it was going to be on the. Go night. nightcrawlers studded the word night caller studied onto this big thick black belt, so bought it success and. And I decided to put my dealing with this stupid thing I'm trying to think thanks to sail to help the stuff and the performance at my bar set the not. So, good I I was looking online for pictures of myself waiting at the plan yet. So I could give it to the boys who are going to do the the auction thing, and then I my and then I ended up with. Jerry and may be having had an affair in the spice girls because. Because I realized that one of the guests who what am I dates at? The premiere of X. Men to wasn't that Jerry Space Jerry. We're friends. She came. She was Elliott time she came under. Jerry had seen my hamlet which came to my hamlet when she was a student and that's why she. The to be in the film because of that enemy I love. Harris I almost had a t shirt in Jinja, so my hamlet. But so Jerry End, so I saw pictures of Jerry Ni- online with the in this with the belt, and then because other things at the site. I ended up watching that horrible person who do not like I, don't care. If hears horrible rights. Put me on twitter called Remembers name. I'm glad he is to be a tabloid editor Navy. System Spews Spews danger through ignorance and. And and and white privilege enemy him talking to both jetty and Melby and when Melby was on it, she talked about them. Having had a little donny owns. And that was. Looking for pictures of needing belt ended up. Talking are looking at lesbian expes action. That was the. Whole of the week what about you? What's your wormhole? Wormhole was what it started with snakes shut up. Because you had to sneak incident, that's right. Let's talk about your sick. And ended with Kate Moss. So I started looking so there. I am skipping around outside, my house. And I looked down, and there is a bloody snake standing next to me and how delivering. How did you feel vulnerable? I lost my shit inside on the phone to my mom at the time. Actually anyone fucking snake. And she went, didn't about it anyway, so then I realized when I and I went inside, took the dog inside shell the doors within sixty seconds, and then I said to. Say Oh. Gosh, you know what kind of snake that was so I need to Google, to see if I find a google image, what are you snaky was quite patent and quite colorful, so it's like poisonous. With my thing. But then. I couldn't find anything. and. Then I'm sitting there typing away. Half Hoffner later look around, no, sorry I look around because I hear a swooshing noise coming up the hallway, I looked down, and there is a snake. The same snake comes swishing into the room where I was it been. Had got into the House somehow. Oh my God. were. So anyway, the RSPCA came. They took it away. And said Oh a competent too far from the house, because it will be not very near its nest, I said God please into wellness and nest of vipers. Discover that it was a snake, but my wormhole was in my voyage of discovery. Little distracted because I started looking at snake identification. then. I was like what snakes eat because I was worried, it was going to Chinese the dog because the dog is very small. So then I was at what to sneaks e small which snake? Sneak if no I told him I. as if rats, it might try and buy a dog and slowly eat it. Who knows worried parents. which then took me on to light various cross, Nick Type Websites, which somehow ended up on some house and garden thing. which took me to late pretty towards villages, and then I'm sure I was on a piece about where Kate. Moss lives in the courts worlds. And then I ended up. This is when I woke up out of my trance on a piece called. Kate Moss my life slip dresses. which was genuine piece published? Invoke this month and I thought. Why am I reading this? Right here, yeah, so that that was. that. Was My wormhole and I pressed the next his. Anecdote we let. I think every let okay Allen we're going to. We don't quite figure out dates, but here we are. We're going to do anyway because the people in, but the names tell me Alan M. The I'm going to explain anecdote relate is where we ask. We pick any name from you. Listeners that you've sent in an Allen has to think if he has an anecdote involving them. It could have been for example. This week could have been Ramani mayonnaise just mentioned a few foodstuffs and wine Allen's been intimately involved. Is there an anecdote roulette to do with share? Oh yes, there is because I was in a film with share. Did you know that? I don't think I was in that film burlesque with shared and Christina Aguilera I amongst others and. I didn't have many scenes with sheriff you, but my favorite things the first time I met her I. They were filming and I was on the set for a costume, fitting or something. and. It was the day that Stanley Tucci who's also an WHO's absolutely lovely I'd be nominated for an Oscar for playing a merger nothing that he kept to girl down up sort of hole in the ground. And coming with US called, but. Anyway. Stanley be nominated for an Oscar so they're having a little music. L. Jinx Party on the set so the producers they have you know Blah Blah coming never. Have you met Sheriff said No. So everyone share. This is island. Of Allen coming I, don't know if I did not just one name. Share! I wish I was. Too many islands anyway. And so we started chatting and what was hilarious was we just talked about olives? All was because there was olives on the blue bar on the of burlesque in the in the club, and there was at this, and we just started talking about olives and had what differentiates not. Is it well? It goes back once our stuff on and on about olives and then. My favorite part was. Having Champagne building. She was having an in as you drink. and. I do and she the thing that she liked she couldn't remember the name of the alcohol, but she came and avail bag. doodoo funny leakier that comes at a sort. Of, a bag with a drawstring got remember the infant that was that is what share likes to take your terrible. You can't even remember the name of the drink all you. Fail that bag? That's pretty. That's pretty share on the news though, isn't it? The! SOCIA Nice. She's absolutely charming. Yes, really lovely, very lovely. And I love. That didn't last concert. She comes on stage and never goes nuts and she goes. What's you granny doing tonight? She Yes oh, opening gambit is our friend road. You know right right, nate. As a sometimes it club coming and he's just a darling. Actually I was I. I met him when he was a busker. On Tottenham Court road I was just starting out music videos and I messaged him on my space. Remember that. You you were there on buster from. and. I messaged him and said I love your music. Let's dividend and we became great friends. Did you do video? I did a video which was him and sock puppets. Have you ever seen it now with? You must have to send it to you. You will love like. I! See it I, did a song with him on his couple of albums ago. Yeah Yeah it was now we did like one with. Jason from the scissor sisters l. turn you know all these different people and I did too song. That's how we met well, not I met him at in. We're sitting next to each other Joe's pub night, and then now he he does he does you know he loves ninety s music? I need as a Roman Michele's. High School disco sort of thing on Sunday Saturday afternoon at club coming. It's a huge hit and if you want to do it a question to post it. And if I were talking about road. Oh remember. Because a share, Oh, yes, oh, share he opened! For share and her European leg, Arturo recently, so he was telling me yes. In credible. And well. I've got it all lives from. Started Wake Yeah mayonnaise. A grandma. Maybe, grandma could be our sponsor for this book Jesus, sponsor! We're open to offers. Anything with booze involved. That's well. It's been an absolute pleasure island. You thank you. Say by the way you've really changed me up, so thank you. I've cheated myself up as well I. Mean I've heard myself up. Cheating you up, because yes, it's tough times and. But you know like Judi Dench, said you discuss, keep on smiling. Next says day we've got. An interview with toast of Broadway Co him every time. I've mentioned him Jeremy Harris. You were in the play of his I was I was in the playoff is called Daddy. And Jeremy is a really exciting and fascinating. Young. African American playwright, who is really provocative and deals with all these issues that you know we don't talk about enough and we're seeing our current. Situation Perhaps the products have not talking enough about these things, so he's very is very pleasant that he's I guess next week and he talks. On this controversial subjects, and also in upstate darling to. To Jeanine, so that's so chew name, and if you want to get in touch with any of your thoughts, it's Hello Mississippians podcasts. Dot Com. Messages on Instagram send us your names for anecdote. Relax well, people yes, Challenge Alan if he has an. Personal thing. I WANNA do Annika Rice. Yeah Chat. Hashtag Challenge Alad tweet. Instagram us. Do the whole Shebang. Thank you very much for listening everybody.

Shirt Allen Alan M. instagram UK Hannah Gadsby writer Chris Douglas I Larry Kramer twitter Google Christopher Jeremy Harris Netflix AIDS la America Hong Dot Joe Vicky Hill
11 Trivia Questions on High Words

Trivia With Budds

10:13 min | 1 year ago

11 Trivia Questions on High Words

"It's eleven trivia questions on high words. That's all different answers that start at end with H. This is trivia with buds And welcome to another episode of the Trivia with Buds podcast. I'm your host Ryan Buds. Thanks for checking out my show. It has been around for a little over three years now and it comes out every single day. So if you liked trivia if you've stumbled across this podcast for the first time make sure you hit subscribe so you never miss a new episode different topics every day tons of fun to play by yourself out loud in your car on a workout dog. Walk on a road trip or with your regular weekly Trivia team to kind of practice for whatever live night you guys might play with me in southern California or wherever you play anywhere in the world. If you're looking for other good trivia podcasts. I mentioned this a few episodes ago. But I'm saying it again. Check out my friend. James and the pod quiz show which has been going for twelve years or something like that. James was one of my biggest. Inspirations when I decided to start doing trivia podcast so if you like just twenty random trivia questions every single week checkout pod quiz. That's a really good one Quiz Quiz Bang Bang is a new one that I'm getting hooked on with my friends in Lisle Illinois. Check that one out Quiz Quiz Bang Bang and as always trivial warfare with Jonathan Oaks in the trivial warfare army. They're all going nuts with geek bull in Chicago right now. Something I wish I could go to at some point but maybe I can work out where I can do some events in town next time it's in Chicago. Today's episode is all about high words. It is not the drug high or even the height of high but it is more words that start an end with h like the word high so this was a fun one that I got the idea for from a a quiz site. I'm part of called never too old for games dot com. You could check them out if you ever need good senior community trivia type material and also just great categories a lot of times. I just go on there and I go through different categories. And I'm like Ooh I could take that and add or change stuff to it. So this was one of those rounds took a couple from the site and then I kinda came up with some of my own to a little bit young down just a little bit so hopefully. I fun with today's quiz. If you're watching on youtube you could see one of my brand new shirts from expressed for men which is covered in tigers. That look like they're about to pounce I am on my way to go host my first ever buzzers with buds of event. Do I know what it's going to be like I do? Not This is like the first time trying it out and I'll be at Togo pogo brewing later tonight to do this. Buzzers WITH BUDS event. I think this is going to do it. I think I'm going to have teams of four. Come up to this area that I'll be in they'll all get a buzzer and they will compete against each other in random rounds of Trivia that I've done over the years so I might say all right this next rounds on eighty s stuff and I'll get one team versus one team. They come on up and I ask eleven questions in whichever team gets more points out of the eleven will get raffle tickets. They'll each member of the team of the four will get their own raffle ticket. At the end of the night we will raffle off a bunch of cool items stuff like this starbucks coffee in my hand if you're watching on youtube or these little emoji con trading cards playing cards rather for playing cards at home. Lots of stuff like that. So we're GONNA rattle off about ten things. So basically groups groups of people will have chances to win raffle tickets to win prizes and have more chances to win prizes at the end of the night. So that keeps everybody engaged People that really like it can keep coming up and it should be a ton of fun so we'll see how it goes. Maybe I'll try and capture some of it on social media. You can follow me at Ryan Buds on just about everything or trivia with buds on facebook. If you want to see videos pictures and flyers and stuff for shows with me in southern California all right. We're going to jump into today's round on high words they start and end with age. And we're GONNA do that right now. Here we go all right guys high words all the answer start and end with H. Let's see how many of these you can get right number one. This kid's outdoor game is usually played on a court that is drawn on the sidewalk with chalk question number one. This kid's outdoor game is usually played on a court at his drawn on the sidewalk with chalk. Question number two for high words a type of paste. You're usually eating when you think it's Sabi type of paste. You're usually eating when you think it's will. Sabi number two question number three of feeling or gas or to raise the shoulders and bend the body forward number three a feeling or gas or to raise the shoulders and bend the body forward question number four the area in front of a fireplace number four the area in front of a fireplace question number five. This finely chop mixture of meat and potatoes is a common breakfast food number five. This finely chop mixture of meat and potatoes is common breakfast food question number six nonsense rubbish. Balderdash what word would fit in there that starts an end with H. number six nonsense rubbish Balderdash number seven first name of an Australian comedian with a Netflix special called the net number seven first name of a Australian comedian with a Netflix. Special called the net questionable. Eight not a comb but this number eight not a comb but this question number nine. An extract of the cannabis plant that contains concentration of the psychoactive resin. Making it especially potent number nine. What are we talking about their question number ten for high words slang term for illegal and inferior alcohol? What is that slang term for illegal or inferior alcohol? And Your two point bonus question. What two thousand one comedy star to rappers going to college? This one does start in ends with H. Starts and ends with H so. Make sure you follow those rules for two points. What two thousand one comedy star to rappers going to college? Those are all your questions for high words. We'll be right back in just a second with a high word answers. We are back with the high words answers. Let's see how you did on this quick crossword puzzle clue type Episode Number One. This kid's outdoor game is usually played on a court that's drawn on the sidewalk with chalk that would be hopscotch. Hopscotch number two type of pace. You're usually eating when you think that's horseradish most of the time it's horseradish because we'll be is very expensive and hard to get number three a feeling or guests or to raise the shoulders in bend the body forward. I hope I don't end up like this as an old man. Hunch Hunch is the answer. But I was talking about hunchback and I want to be the hunchback of Fontana California Hunch number three number four the area in front of a fireplace I believe is pronounced hearth H. A. R. T. H. I kept saying her the other day and an older lady goes. It's called a hearth and I said all right. You're probably the only person that uses word ever number five. This finely chopped mixture of meat and potatoes is a common breakfast food hash corned beef hash something like that number six nonsense rubbish. Balderdash hogwash. Wash was what I was looking for. Hogwash number seven first name of Australian comedian with Netflix special called the net. Hannah Hannah Gadsby number. Seven number eight nine to comb but this a hairbrush starts and ends with H. hairbrush number nine. An extract of the canvas plant that contains the concentration of the psychoactive resins making it especially potent high sheesh Haschisch or Hash again and number ten slang term for illegal end inferior alcohol who ch- Turner and Hooch and for two points. Two Thousand One comedy starring rappers. Go back to college. How high method man? Redman who I walked by one time at the Paris Casino in Vegas and went was method man and Redman and they kind of like nodded and I was like. Oh and I was star struck. It was pretty cool here. We go the answers are done so I hope you had fun. Hope he played along. I hope you've got all eleven questions correct and if you did let me know. Or if he didn't came close. Send me your scorecards in those scorecards on instagram or on email. Whatever you WanNa do hit me up. Ryan buds gmail.com. And you can also hit me up at that email address with the question of the day answer. Today's question of the day is what song is playing in. One Thousand Nine Hundred Ninety Batman the joker and his crew start destroying the museum. Tweet me your answer at Ryan. Budget email gmail.com to be eligible for a prize. Yesterday's questioned that answer was John. Ritter Voice of Clifford. The big red dog on the series and your Trivia team name of the day is drako. Ula malfoy so DRACO malfoy with a little vampire in their drake. You DRAKO ULA. That's stupid. I can't believe I type that out and now I'm saying it again. Drako ULA malfoy. Thank you guys so much for listening to the show. Thanks for checking out the show on Youtube. Thinks you'll even itunes reviews rating reviewing and subscribing to the show. And telling all your friends who like Trivia ticket. We'll see tomorrow for more trivia with Buds Cheers Home Berman.

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Hannah Gadsby - 'Hannah Gadsby: Douglas'

Awards Chatter

1:02:59 hr | 11 months ago

Hannah Gadsby - 'Hannah Gadsby: Douglas'

"Hi Everyone, and thank you for tuning into the three hundred thirty fourth episode of awards chatter, the Hollywood reporter's awards podcast I'm the host Gothenburg and my guess. Today is an Australian comedy writer and performer who shot to international fame on June nineteenth, two, thousand, eighteen, with the worldwide debut of her Netflix's special net, which paired punch lines with personal revelations to tell the story of quote, a broken woman who has rebuilt herself close quote. Time, said it quote. Kick started a global conversation. Close quote and the New York Times called it quote an international sensation, the most talked about ridden about shared about comedy act in years close quote. Indeed everyone it seemed had an opinion about ninette and its creator fans included the actress writer Emma Thompson who said quote I've never come across any single artist WHO's changed my perspective on the world more close quote. Detractors meanwhile objected to classifying it a standup comedy at all, describing it instead as a lecture Tedtalk or a one woman show. Whatever you WANNA. Call it. It was recognized with a peabody award and its Creator won a Primetime Emmy for best writing for a variety special. Now, not even two years later. She is back with another Netflix Special Douglas, which is very different, but also sure to get people talking I'm talking of course about Hannah Gatsby. Over the course of our conversation, the forty two year old and I discussed her hard road to comedy and to self self-discovery. Her recent autism diagnosis, and how the neurological disorder affects her life and work. How she confronted the sudden attention that came with no net and the daunting task following it. Plus much more, and so with thanks to Hannah, and without further ado, let's go to that conversation. Okay doing doing fine. Thank you really appreciate you coming on the PODCAST and. I guess before we talk about anything work related I just want to ask. How are you doing during this weird time? And where are you doing it? I'm okay. Where are you doing it? I'm okay. I'm in. Regional Victoria Australia so. This plenty of space. I'm fortunate. Telling doing okay and I I like quiet time. I'm enjoying doing publicity like this. Parolee a lot better than having to Schlep all over the place I'm able to do a lot more. That's for sure well as a move into the real questions I just want to mention, I'm I'm assuming. A Lotta people but not everyone who's going to be listening to this podcast. We'll have seen both of your netflix specials so for their purposes Maleta this. May you know some of it may be familiar, but I'm hoping you won't mind if we retread some territory, because hoping we're also bringing in new folks to the fold, and and and so to that and I guess I would just begin by asking you as we do on each episode. Where were you born and raised in? What did your folks do for a living? Straight jump in. I was born and raised on the north west coast of Tasmania in a small town. Called Smitten. That is remarkable for not being. And My dad was a mathematics teacher. My mother was a hairdresser by trade, but She only cat her children's hair by the time I was a long, and she's a cleaner at the local golf club. Yes, and I actually leads nicely into the next question. I was Gonna ask what you remember being a big part of your childhood and I was a little surprised. To learn especially having seen Douglas where golf comes in for a bit of a beating that you were actually a championship level junior golfer, so that was part of your childhood. I'd love to know about anything else that really. Stands out as well you know. I lived in as part of a big family youngest to five, so we this was a pretty tight knit group, so that was that was a large part of my life, just existing lodge family. That really is a self sustaining entertainment entity. And I did play go. Is a small town. You know that you're either get into trouble place And so I used to play. Hockey is when I was really little. Eleven I had a neighbor reconstruction. Couldn't. Couldn't play anymore. So Mom said well why you place low hockey and that's goal. And I tend to be a small country town playing golf. There is not the same as playing golf. In the world. You know. Little nine hole course meant that. I could just go for long walks in my parents Numero Walson. Quite handy it's quite handy I think got dantonio fine and five handicap. But I stand by everything. I signed Douglas. Specifically that it's not a coincidence that they're played at country clubs. So. I guess if we were to go back and track down classmates of yours from the equivalent of junior, high school, high school and stuff like that. How would they remember you, were you? The class clown as people might suspect, or were you more introverted I mean we've. We've got a sense of that from your special. You talk about it a little bit, but I'm just curious what you think they would remember. Nice enough. I. Below the radar a little bit I. Mean I got teased bit. I think everyone gets teased at school and I don't remember being teased more than some people. I went to school with so. Like to think that is a big deal. You know there was some. Bullying going on and wasn't aimed at May I. Don't know I always struggled to understand how people say me and I don't I I always by the way when people say I remember you. You were this kind of person I'm not. Because I tend to live inside my head, so how people say is not. So I be interested to know how people save. What's interesting? Though is social media. There was a period of my life when so for medial I'm that old? Wasn't a thing, but then it came about, and you start looking up people. You went to school with Oh. My Gosh, they've they're adults. The human live evolve who I remember them to be kind of fun jarring situation. Yes, well, something that I've learned from your specials. Is that in Australia up until as recently as nineteen ninety-seven homosexuality was a crime. That's Tasmania. Excuse me Tasmania yeah, so it wasn't a national lower was in. The state situation and It was specifically. You know sodomy so. Didn't really. Well, so you were you were nineteen, though in nine, hundred, ninety seven, and if those were the prevailing attitudes that we could extrapolate probably applied to the rest of the LG bt, Q. Community. I guess if it's not too personal at to ask, I would be curious to know. Had you by that? Age already recognized that you were gay, and were you already? Had you already encountered bigotry yourself or was that after the? Is I mean the worst part of that stories I bigoted? So you know that's. Because you grow up in a place like that that told you the here. You really don't hear dissenting voices. You know most of its casual most of its casual, but there's always that sort of bubble of violence under you know it's. It's always a possibility and you understand that so. There's that intersection of who I understood myself to be in and. Who I understood the world it, you know what the what I understood the world people like may end. You know there's a good period of time where I I was on team height. What I am even though you, so you? You did know that you were gay. Adequate at any have. You? So favorite even deeper into the closet like you don't get to decide. To Change Your worldview because the world shapes your view, your world shape show view, so you know that's a process and when your child. Kind of impossible Rondo will view the. You didn't really have a large hand in. Informing you talk about in the net. Coming out to your mom, and even within your own household, there wasn't an immediate warm response to this notion of yeah yeah. No that's that's kind of a a very people fishy from people from you know the country. It's kind of a common. Thing I want. You know what I like to focus on. The change did occur. You know it's very easy to focus on that flashpoint where it was toxic and awful and I. I don't say that was great. But ever in the story evolved in. That's a great will in a net. You Sheriff the fact that. In your early years there were. Numerous different TRAUMAS that come up and I guess. I, guess it would be weird to say spoiler. Alert here, but I I will I will inject that before I know. You know you were talking about Childhood Sexual Abuse, a physical assault at seventeen raped by two men in your twenties, I wondered. We're maybe I missed this in the special, but. Things that you had ever been able to talk about to anyone prior to Ninette or was in the net, truly a kind of. Opportunity to share that unburden yourself those things. No I'd I'd spoken to people here and there and. Eat A bit. It never could be formed part of my known narrative, even though the troll morale foot. Certainly formed a huge part of my. Struggle to keep moving forward in life so. You know it wasn't like I couldn't talk about it. I just knew that it wasn't people didn't want to hear about it. They don't WanNa. Hear about and let's you know. Why would you rounds a nice day? Well so! I guess. What was your thought? Process your outlook of the world at the time when you go off to university, I, believe I in Tasmania than a moving over to the mainland to pursue this degree in art, history and curator. Which you've talked about, you know at that, I guess what initially do you think drew you to that subject matter? And and what did you imagine it would lead to after your graduation I? Is drawn out history in own in high school. I used to you know love, art, history, the history books and Like windows into a world I didn't understand, but felt like I. was more accessible in a a book with Pictures. It wasn't just history was deaf. Is Specifically Art History? I still like my books with pictures in. So it's sort of. Always been fascinated studying at university I took when I finished. School light had brought. A number of is just drifting. I worked in a supermarket on the farm and whatnot, and then eventually. I applied to go just a bachelor of art at university. which is. The equivalent is there and then after a year in in Hobart. I I decided to take. A major. That's not often in many places so I got a I applied, but it was really just to get out of Tasmania. And so was that a very big. Change in your life to. Had you ever really spent much time in mainland? Australia before that. Go on to play in Golf Tournament. No, you really, but you know the so that experience of Australia was nothing like the will was going to into. When you play Golf, you're entering into worlds of elite comfort. And that's not where I belong to. You know I think I had any idea of what the rest of us. TO THE COUNTRY CLUB! It was. Moved to Canberra, which is straight is national capital, and it's not a big place, but to me. It was massive and it was very overwhelming. and. I didn't imagine out history. It would lead anywhere I one of the tricks of trauma. Is that it? Puts a stop on your ability to imagine your future like you just don't actually have an. Don't understand how to create future of. So that that that that yes, can you share I? WanNa just make sure. I have the chronology, right you graduate with your our history and curatorship degree in two thousand three. When was it that you first tried comedy for the in any format? And what were the circumstances that led to that? It just seems like it kind of two thousand three Oh to. Remember. I felt your university is is bragging on the website that it was oh three, but maybe they got it wrong. No it's I was too has an to, but maybe I got around to getting the certificate into. Three you're to fill informs. Just finished the course. You've actually got into paperwork to graduate. Infuriate unbelievable. I don't ready, so yeah, there's a bit of a lag there, but that's fine doesn't really matter who cares. Confused. Yeah two thousand five did my first of a standard Gig and then I. Really I didn't I did three gigs in the beginning of two thousand and five, and then didn't do any more to the beginning of two thousand six, and then I've stopped, so let's let's just set the scene. If we can about what led to you even attempting this for the first time in two thousand and five was it just some people say they were some. Stand ups who I've spoken to say. They were sort of dared to do it or other people they knew were doing it just so curious. What motivated someone who had not? To my knowledge been particularly interested in performing in front of others or doing comedy of of any sort you know. How do you end up in front of a microphone? Australia illustrating we have mobile international comedy festival runs. into runs a national. Comedy Competition. and. That's I've been aware of that for years, so every of sponsored by. The youth you radio station, and so you know they always play the clips around the time that rule comedy was coming up so. And I was like. You know so he these clips in the Neil I'm. Yeah I. Get what they do. so that sold like I I end the competition because. A poisoning aware of it. Because of these little clips that would be played on the radio, and then I just sort of said to a friend. Five, this woman's like. Sorry do? Like one of US whole. and. Our. And he's like. Yeah actually are rick and you would and to be honest. You need to broaden your audience and I'm sick of being ninety one and. That's kind of happen. Do you remember what was your material? Would you go in there? With the first one? I was really all. Stuff was about ten of burying my childhood dog and. Because he just thought he was still with my parents, so they buried him in the back yard, but I'm like. Like I'm technically homeless like there's homeless I didn't have any we live. I was also of scrappy and I'm like what if I still have my door weighty? Berry Adobe, like like I knew enough not to give people the whole truth. It would be too much to go I'm homeless. I have no to bury my dead dog like I'm sorry. But so I timed it down a bit. Weightier, do you? Where do you bury a dog if you don't find your home? But you can't. Because cremating pet is really expensive. So I ran through a few scenarios. Dark and surreal stuff I. It's not. How did it play with the room? I mean the first time I went to stay, absolutely owned the room and I look back. In hindsight, it had nothing to do with the material. It's just I was a creature from out of space. It's like I just woke up on stage. And, I just woke up. Had A. Going to Dogma Freezer. Yoga phrase because. As I ran. The scenario is on what to do like I thought. How hard can it be to create a small dog Hong? Turns out really hard, so I've just got an overcooked dog. Phrase like that's because it didn't happen, but I was taking it to its logical conclusion. Yeah, it was good, but I didn't go any further I. It's funny, but. And did you feel that? Were you immediately hooked with the idea of you? Know you get a great reaction to doing this? Was it immediately something you knew you wanted to do? More of not not dealing with your dog, but performing comedy in front of others gaps. And soon as Respond people reacted to me that react to my facial expressions. I wasn't always aware of why people were laughing, but I knew that. They were and it felt nice felt really nice felt like you know is participating in the world in a way that I'd never felt like I could before. The my issue was is like I didn't have to be involved in A. Comedy Circuit, but I didn't have access to. I'm not very good at networking and I was appalling man. You know and I. Long I do this, you know. This is so much more to do anything. Beyond just doing what you do on stage, but so I took me a long time to. And, that's why the competition so important to me because I wouldn't have done comedy. Had They not pay? These infrastructure rounded. I would've? I would have been doing. My life was going great, so I can't imagine things would be great for me and we should just note so this was as you say, sort of like an open Mike thing associated with the Melbourne comedy festival, and is it and you one. Is that the way it worked for the next year? The next year I entered it in. I ended up winning it. Into, the national national switcher broadcast on on. on TV and filmed and I was a wild card, so I lost the state final. But I was sent in as wild cards. Basically what that means is the judges, said no, but other people said Oh. That's a mistake. A save. So, go to the experts I. Just every opportunity of Since then is just bane. Fat from that. Is that the same thing or a different thing than raw comedy competition that that is? So that was two thousand six in that. Really put you on the on the map as you're as you're saying and I guess it led to. Edinburgh is that the the thing that kind of directly led to that? They do they run similar competition, so you think? You funny also say so he. No that doesn't sound right because no right. So you, think it funny. And so I went to the Edinburgh fringe and came second, which is a very for people outside the comedy world like myself. I didn't really fully appreciate that until I had done an episode of this podcast with Seth Meyers. Who I think had similar. Experience there and that's a within comedy circles. That's a that's a huge international deal. Right it's. Interesting the ember festival is it's not. It's not only comedy I could. It's theater it's it's like all things, and it's great for comedy because it means that you know it's open to. Anyone can put on a show and they do. But it means you're able to learn how to do that. Think about comedy as this show is a live like people think about specials. As being a thing, you do for food for for the camera like for special, but you know if you're out of the frame circuit. That's how shows like that's how you comedy is always thinking about your Edinburgh Oil Melbourne show. and. That's kind of what I've always done. So I. Guess One question that comes up since you know, we'll come to this more later on, but I mean. Something that you had happened after the net that you talk about in Douglas is that people don't quite know some some people don't quite know how to label what it is that you do. They want to say it's a one woman show, or it's a lecture. It's a Ted Talk. There's some reluctance to just acknowledge that it's a standup comedy because it's not necessarily conventional setup punchline as you broke it down. was that already the kind of structure or lack of traditional structure that you are employing way back early on where it was not obvious comedy that in the way that you're saying? That's not uncommon Edinburgh. You yeah like I think you know because you gotta fill in an hour and you gotta make people's time with while Lake you. You need to have the. Light and shade and whatnot, To, help support you know people's. Time in our like I. I've always vote for longtime I could never vote. Watch me back. I wasn't earning enough as made in to be able to go watch. Perform as Canadian. So. Why is being really careful to make sure that my shoulders? You know I'd put a lot of work into that. And so yeah, there is A. Edinburgh. Fringe is filled with comedy. Shows that have broken rules and. All that stuff. It's not like I. Really did give it a real. With the net that is absolutely true, but you know this of experimentation sort of. Common thing in it. So was it the combination of the raw comedy competition to Edinburgh to suddenly now when you're back home or I don't know if there was now a home. How quickly that because you're saying you essentially homeless I? Don't know when you get back to Australia wherever you were living I. Have Now. You had a home at that point. Nine not at that point I for long time lived above my brother's fruit and vegetable shop I. He's pretty much solely responsible for me being able to follow my comedy create because he gave me some live, there's no way. I didn't have the means to be able to support myself and do comedy. So I, sort of you know, shopping lived above lift above slowly, but if I had to pay for if I had to pay rent and. That sort of stuff I wouldn't. Be Creepy. and. That would be the case even after those kind of early milestones which lead to SOM- profile for you where you start doing. I think there were nine different comedy shows that you did prior to the net right. It took a few years to become solvent. A and there's this huge circuit in Australia that there is in the US soon. And to do the second, he still have to travel enormous. Enormous distances and there's there's a time when I would know gig in Sydney in early enough money during the gigs in Sydney. To Really Pay For the travel. So. It's tough. Yeah, and then I found ten dollars. So Can I ask about those as things progress, and as I said, I think about nine different sounds like different sets, an sense, nine nine different variations of your of your work where happening. What were some of the topics that broadly you were dealing with? You know I I know that in in the net. You say you had done a lot of self deprecating humor so I'm assuming that's a big part of it, but I wanNA leave it to you to cover that with my my first show A. Kiss me quick. Full of Jubes which you like a lolly here. Candy sorry. And it's just a thing. My mom used to say so. That was pretty much the show that I was talking to Internet the coming out story. So that's that was my first showed. The second show. I, really we're not going back through my back catalogue over. I really realized that I may not following the rules for from early on, but I was still using old tools comedy I was just using the wrong. Wrong. So, my second show was about I walked across England. And broke fate as came off antidepressants because I've forgotten to pack the fringe so instead of. Going to see a doctor, which would have been smart? But required all sorts of hoops to jump through them not very good at executive function dog on a couple of weeks parable across England. There's this famous trail you can do. and. It's like thirteen days of hiking and I wasn't prepared. I bought me shoes I shouldn't walk for thirty days straight on issues and might compound fractures my fate, but didn't know it. It's like so that was the show, but also coming off depressants and sort of grappling with that, so that's like that was my second show, and if if I was to do that now, that carnage right now with what I understand and condone I've got actual skills. Now's a comedian. That still would be like that. You know people were Ooh, that's. Just. What I thought too so when you say you walked across England and that was your show. Do you mean that you were sort of stopping at different places across the country? told the story story on. SINGULAR LINEAR line of May. And then this happened in. Ironically the show was all about quitting the walk, so I've got form. So just go and then I quit, but then I couldn't quit because I couldn't leave. The only way out was walking out to keep walking, but it was is what was different about it was. It was a singular narrative like seeing one container store with jokes jokes funny. And then other things. Other shows I've done out lecture in my shows before I talked about a lot about mental health, stuff and body image stuff so all the. Classics. And then how did Australian television enter the picture? I think you've done quite a bit of important stuff. Their onscreen and behind the screen as a writer right I've got bits and bobs like nothing. Sort of like I was a side kick for a talk show. For coming in hills and then I I made a couple of out documentaries, so heaps of cash. And then please like me was probably A. Big break for me because I wrote on that show and performed dinner I've never been offered any real acting. Ivan's now was there something I had come across. I think there were a few things where sort of in the vein of what you do in one segment of Douglas. Hadn't you sort of worked as a curator? Some Willing in an art museum that had been morphed with comedy, or how did that work? I. Know I used to comedy out lectures at festivals so I'd run. So when I say I've done all the shows I've also done. Four out lectures on top of that so directly. People went to those. Really enjoyed my lectures. I did one on the Virgin Mary. An entire show on the history of the Virgin Mary in Western Art. Wonder if Netflix's will take that as a comedy special. And one on the history of Australian the. The new dinette in all sorts in poetry demand poacher, so those were comedy free or in in our bringing. Thorough funny! Funny, but I didn't feel confident enough to discuss. This is a comedy show. Yeah, so One of the energy that around the time of the net. I think you were saying that in the years immediately preceding. That comedy routine which which you did many times prior to being on Netflix, you had a career that was going. Sounds like well. Though is the way it seemed to be characterized by you there, but not you not personally in A. An content place what was was that for the reasons that are expressed in the net where you see that just the political situation in the country was not great towards the lgbt community, or was it more about that? You would come to sort of think more about the comedy that you've been doing and you didn't want to continue to do that. What was your? What explained the reason that you were not happy going into the net? This is quite a lot of things going on. All of these things kind of true, not true wants, but also I damn. Bay diagnosed with Autism Netzer through my wealth into a little bit of chaos in just in terms of like Whoa Gosh. How do I understand myself? And then also you know my crew was good, but it wasn't going anywhere and got to that point in my career with people. I was at the top of my game creating really really good interesting stuff to appeal and then I. Wasn't getting anywhere unlike. Account keep. I don't know what to do you know like. You know I didn't getting off the -tunities to sort of help. Take things over. You know the sunny certain amount you can do on the festival circuit in order to make a living. You have to then subsidize with the radio GIG or TV. GIG Economy Wilson getting anything like that and I was exhausted from creating. And then they was the political climate. The gay marriage debate here was particularly vicious, and then I realized that I hadn't dealt with a troll. merv Tasmanian debate, and that's really where that fire spark from. so it was quite a melting pot of in frustration to you. Know I, I are really. Good morale was doing, and I just felt like I felt like opportunity. Slipping away in my work was suffering. For that lack of momentum, like I was like I'm GonNa. Ride another show and I'm starting to write. Dull show, not dull like I tried heart, but because I like. I wasn't pushing myself and the boundaries as much as I had done when I was earlier and discovering the AFL. And that was frustrating, too. So I guess it's two thousand sixteen when you sit down to. Begin work on what became the net. How long did that take? Did it just sort of pour out of you and I? Guess incidentally, who is the net? Really the show beginning V two, thousand, fifteen, riding it into fifteen, because that's when the guy matched by kind of really kicked in so I was sort of halfway touring a show. Called, dogmatic. Pushers pretty much a dissection of Taylor. Swift's ninety nine thousand nine album. Right really think about but. PRETTY SHOW! Halfway through doing that and. I was bored with material like the show was good, but I is the gay marriage. Debate was unfolding. I shouldn't be talking about this. This is not actually interesting to me. It was interesting to me when I wrote, but now I'm performing. It was like this is not an and I think my work suffered for that. If you're not interested in what you're saying, the audience understands that and that goes accused to knock alleged being content. You know which is all one place. Fair enough, but also I'm not. Just a lesbian like there were other facets to what I can think about Shirley but. But so that's when I began writing all, and I was also making a documentary on the new denials, and that was at holy frustrating process, because I kept interviewing paypal and challenging them on things that I thought were obvious dislike. You know exhibition or it was full of news. In their all women, what's going on here like? Why am I looking? At? Picasso's penis draped over this young girls face. Pupil. And in the editing process. Okay, this is knowing. Let's put this in like. Let's not rock. The boat and I was furious I'm is like. Why not just to be clear? Who would this this documentary was? Non There was not intended to be a comedic aspect. It was because of your your your passion for and knowledge about art history and it was A. Well he said the problem with me is is like nobody would get me as an historian to make an art history document. That's generally reserved for crusty old men. Or my favourite, the nun sister windy. But a brisk pace. So no one was going to say yeah. We appreciate the way you think about, but we're GONNA. Get you to you funny when you talk about stuff, but they wanted to keep it and not challenge the narrative, but the way I think I'm like I don't like the narrative going to challenge this team for the joke to Mike. The joke is the narrative. So I understand why I couldn't do what I do because you know when you make a film like there's a lot of money involved and you know. The the institution that I. Is Half paying for it, so it doesn't help that I've been made a mockery of their curator's right. I get it, but I used to work in comedy to stand on State this shit. Soul stuff so that was a wholly frustrating experience for me because I'm the. You know. So many artists who you know. Waiver via who behaved badly and. Have to talk about that. And I'm like I don't want to say that rubbish, but we need to talk about the way they behave is bad, but the only way we can seem to talk about is like romanticizing like that can't be artists unless they abuse women. Isn't that lovely, no terrible. That fed a lot internet and that I guess just coincidentally, but maybe not really in terms of the net that coincides roughly with the beginning of this whole new wave of men behaving inappropriately right the whole. Metoo stuff I. Think was twenty, fifteen, twenty sixteen, when when it really broke out, that couldn't have made your anyone else reasonable. Very happy either I'm sure that fed into it up right? The Matrix thing was really fascinating from exciting idea that it was a thing. You know to being running for a long time like I think it's important to clarify. US centric like I. Kind of am now. His successes led me in that direction, but that's not where my thinking was, so you know? It's sort of the Hollywood reporter. Thing, isn't it? I? Can now I understand what it is, but it says like you know it's just more noise from America. is a lot of noise from American. When you live in other places, you just like. Oh, it's the MO noise from America but I mean it did. I think it was? It went international dividend. And evening that but me too movement that been happening a long time, so yeah. Like, but it wasn't until it became a global thing that everyone's just lago all, and that was in October two, thousand, seventeen, so I think I'd been doing it for pretty much a year by right, and so, what began as a show that the gay marriage debate in Australia by that time the game marriage it. went to a public boat and running a strategy going. What are you talking about? Of course we want gay people to get married. They thought the plan for you know. The the popular vote was going to go the other way that people like. Not La Does seem to understand the people. They leading, which was a nice moment, but it also meant that I shifted the focus in my in the focus in my show, so used to be mostly about the gay marriage debate with. Your. Sexism sprinkled across and then it was at flipped the other way, so it was mostly about been the sexism with gay marriage debate on top of it and. So. That's what that moment sort of. Invalidated what I was saying and it was an incredible. And were you always from the outset committed to the idea that you're going to lay all of your cards on the table in terms of things that you've had to deal with? Was that all known to your friends and family or was? That could be a big reveal. Look, it wasn't. And some people knew something's people knew other things. And it was it even from my family. That I didn't know the things that was really hard and I wondered. How could I felt like I had to tell them before they sore. But I couldn't. Like I have to throw the men. With. The you know and it was. As they then stood why that happened on. We've taught been able to talk about it since and if anything were closer as a family order pretty close. But I feel like I'm part of the family again in a way that I probably. I think they felt like I wasn't a part of the family I. Think I felt like I. was noah part of the family? And that was as much withholding as they're not knowing. I had read that basically there were essentially two hundred fifty plus times over eighteen months when you're performing. Net starting with the Melbourne international in two thousand seventeen, maybe ending I would think with the Sydney Opera House performance that we all saw on Netflix I. Don't know if you did it beyond that afterwards, or how did it? Show after it went one more graphically, okay? We experience in my life. People were applauding setups. Unlike Oh, no, Oh Jeez! Yeah, that would be weird. Well the reason I bring up. Just the you know. People might not get when they watch it on Netflix that. This was something that you had been. As as usually the case with with stand ups, you've been honing it. You've been working on it, but you also therefore had to tell these deeply. Personal stories that many times I wondered, was that emotionally brutalizing to yourself or was that Cathartic? Or how did you feel at the end of the day? Especially at the the one that was actually recorded for Netflix's I think was the first one from what I've read where your mom did the whole thing, so the the what it was like for you to go through this grind of two hundred and fifty plus performances. Was it was pretty full on. To put it eloquently and. I felt like I was doing good, but I wasn't always sold those doing good for myself and. That was. I felt compelled to keep performing it because I just felt nine. I was told and people. The response people gave us just like it felt like I was putting something important mountain the world. For just the people in the room like it wasn't made just. Only change. Every single room. It felt like that as I was playing out hoping it was a good long game for myself. Because in the moment, it was excruciating. Sting is no way I was even capable of enjoying the success that I was experiencing all of a sudden. You know sellouts. The first time I performed the net. My manager came down in Spain with since the beginning he's. He said. We're going to sell out Wednesdays with this show. He's mark of success. If you can sell out of Wednesday at a festival, you have made this a big man. It's real big day, so he saw the magic in before I did if anything. To tip, take my hat off their. He's a straight white man. Acknowledgement where acknowledgments at you make you we, we feel overlooked too often so I appreciate you. Acknowledging help. Yeah, so it was. Hey We he gathered a team around me to make sure they're all support through every step of the way. Because it was grew, nickname was it did take a lot out of man, but I'm also a bit of a gardener. I. Framed it in a way that it's sort of like ripping up. And turning over new soil, so as playing the long game, young I think this will be good for me in the long run. And I think it has been I. would imagine yeah, and at what point did. NETFLIX's enter the picture which would I would assume be a very big deal for any comic, but. For. Let me, let you. Yeah I'm just chuckling because you know in hindsight I realize it's a huge deal, but I was incapable of processing another time that Tabora, so it came. Just finish the Edinburgh. And my people did I wasn't involved in the talks. 'cause I couldn't toll. This is too much, and so it became mike part of that whole thing, and they're like film. It and I kind of understanding the Netflix deal of what that men I wasn't quite able to process and honestly. I didn't think about until after I started to get the response in how Mike. Okot God. This is. This Day. What have I done? 'cause they filmed just that one performance, and probably in a way that it wasn't like right in your face, the cameras or anything you just did your thing that you've done two hundred fifty plus other times, right? Yeah, we're careful. When when we did this with Douglas I get very easily distracted. You know I can't ignore things so that the camera setups con very deliberate. So that it isn't invasive to my because you know, it's a live show I'm alive before my. You know very, we need to. We like to sort of maintain that. So Yeah! I wasn't thinking about filming our I. Put a lot of trust in my team. That, helped. I guess I should ask you who is Madeline Perry. It looks like she's the person that's directed. Both of your Netflix specials. was that someone who you knew and trusted already, or you had to sort of take a gamble on. Took a gamble. On a new of the second time rap, yes. It's actually with Sherlock Nin- felt to me very important to have fame Directa. Incredibly important, and she didn't necessarily have live filming experience. so Pedro. Journal. Who had more of that experience, but it was. Really important with me not to abandon the idea of having director who could? Not Men. Not. In order to change that you have to take a gamble in a way because you know. They're there. You know people with experience. But in order to get experience. You need to have opportunities so the coupling And as far as using her again like we. Finding someone to fill a specialist difficult in La, because people are busy, people are doing stuff. And we had someone lined up I kinda fell through because they got TV series and go with that. No regrets there, so we decided to go with again. It gets the job dumb. No, no, so also. Important for me like I. I like to know like new things of difficult for me. In my life was very new, and everything was nearest. It was actually really great to have someone I felt I could trust Listen who I knew would listen well one last question about that special before I talk about it going out to the world on June nineteenth, twenty eighteen in the question there is. Did you ever seriously intend to quit comedy, or was that sort of just an aspect of the? Show that you added for whatever other reason in the very beginning. Yeah, because I was the doubt. Suspect not talking to the world I was talking to the audience that had slowly built up from my career. That's who I was talking to. And they believed they've gone own It has a lot of people had been in. Those audiences have been there since my first show. So? That's who I was talking to her when I. I wrote because I couldn't keep doing what I was doing couldn't keep doing as exhausted. But, then also, the was conceit in a way because it's like technically what I'm doing is not comedy, so how about I call not comedy and Queens and deal with your own feelings. But you can't like. Ninette is a comedy because it uses all the tools of comedy like it's not a theater show, none of these things because I don't use any tools that were like every tool I use the net a tools that I've learnt how to use by doing comedy, and now I think is what makes comedy, and not anything else and moreover I. Know from other things you've been interviewed for. You've said quote. The thing is I'm not acting can act. That's not that. That earth that's part of the autism thing. I'm unable to filter who I am close quote, and then another question I thought was interesting quote. Let's define what the purpose of comedy is, and that's I believe to laugh, and what's the purpose of laughter? Catharsis to feel better about something. Laughter is not the only way to reach Catharsis. So maybe I do standup Catharsis close quote so I thought those were very well. Put explanations for anyone who's still having a hard time accepting it as As comedy or labeling it, or whatever but I guess. The Big Day. Maybe the biggest day in one of the biggest days in your life surely has got to be June nineteen, twenty eighteen. That's the first time this goes on. netflix meaning it goes to all, but like North Korea. In the world's. How quickly did you realize that it was a going over in a big way and be? Was GonNa Change Your. Life in a in a major way. Just flipped on social media just to have a look and when. The pure volume of turn. My head. Like I it was a, it was a flood. I got good advice early on with that this like just checkout to start engage in. He said the only thing you need to know better. River is that it's running united being. So I kind of clocked off on that like I knew, and then of course you see, Bill bowed with yourself forward. You like things have shifted. Someone sent me. Want someone me today, apparently on a billboard in Times Square, which is who surreal because no one's INS, right right, but also that image is perfect for me because I hate crowds. That's the only time square where I could possibly enjoy myself on a billboard in Right Square! Glad! Someone's looking over the place. At the moment of Yeah I mean a lot of things those surely changed in other ways as well just in terms of people wanting to. Not only not only people knowing about you and probably strangers approaching you, but people wanting to work with you and you know you're presenting it the EMMYS and all kinds of stuff, and I wondered. Were you able to enjoy that or were things that you've talked about to do with autism or just? Any I. Don't think any person would have maybe a challenge processing all of that. How did you digest it all? It's taken me I'm still digesting. The EMMYS was found I really enjoyed that because I. I don't think I understood what I was doing. Until I walked out on stage and I'm like all year. Yeah, so it just worked on. And I did the rehearsals, and like you know bits and bobs in the pastime Iran stage and I'm understand. A live audience was worried. But then you just look cat and what I understood when I walked out was like this. Is The dentist room I've? And I've performed four am in. Edinburgh Right! In front of college students who couldn't even string a sentence together. This room was dead because what I realized because I was quite late in the night. Mushrooms disappointed because they haven't won so the Electricity of an awards night in the beginning, because people still in the game. They're like all right. And then it's also quite long, so then people like. Exhausted because I have to look happy because. On show. It's not really it's a really difficult. To be an item Magin. And so I worked down on stage and I felt like. There's not many people who still want to be here. And of course I knew that like even the award is producing. The person wasn't even in the room, so it wasn't. Like I wasn't even going to get a little bit of any of that guy because he was not even better, so it was just like that just hit man and Every every nerve I had just left me unlike when al.. Match, so, what was supposed to be Quite a fast routine just became just like this is not going to work like bats why it works because I'm. Stole the show. I was that the same evening when you won your Emmy for the writing of the net, or was that a different that was that was the before because I net came after. Sorry. Yeah, it's all blurring my mom to paint after the campaign to kicked off. Well politics. Really Yeah, the award season absolutely, but so yeah, so like didn't go to them last year because I was performing. I wanted to ask you if how the autism diagnosis that you've got around the time of. I guess while the net was being. Done did that change your life in any way, and do you think that? In some ways autism May. I hesitate to even says because it might be crazy thing, but just having autism make you a better comedian in a way I think you're more certainly supposedly from what I understand of it. You see things that other people don't see. Perhaps more observant of other people than. I mean there just seem to be some things that could feed into comedy Oh. Yeah I think. Companies certainly a spot for the outside. A nothing puts you on the outside more than having a neurological kink. But it's certainly changed. My life like I was just why you're asking that question I noticed those sort of rocking, and that's the thing I'd never allow myself to do before even though I always do it and. Knowing that I. Have Autism I'm now able to process like I told you that. That looks weird now. This is what my do. Repetitive movements helped me help me calm down and that sort of thing. So one it's done is allowed me to just understand things that I used to be kind of ashamed or confused by Cobra that into my understanding of myself, and then turn the list critical lens on myself and turned outwards. You know I think it's also important to keep that critical and. Turned on myself particularly as I gain popularity with that power, but I think as far as my autism is consent Spain of. Once Understood, a lot better. It's helped me be kind to myself. So without even naming it because I. Don't know how early on you named it. How soon after net did you sit down and start working on the follow up because I would imagine that there might have been some pressure. To say the least, how do you follow something that was such a phenomenon as the net, and in the beginning of Douglas you certainly kind of acknowledged the elephant in the room that you know sorry guys. I use all my trauma and that kind of thing, but was the process of creating Douglas any different from the net. Did you feel a different sort of? Pressure then you had with Lynette just curious about the just. Kind of giving the content of ninette like it's easily. It's pressure I could handle. Like! I kind of figured whatever I did was gonna just be compared to the net and. So exhausted after minute, and my life has changed so much felt very unsteady and I felt very unsafe. I figured the best thing for me to do is to do what I know. How To you know like I'm good at what I do because it's a craft and I know how to. Say What I WANNA say in how to say it not necessarily so even if Douglas, people didn't like Douglas and that remains to be seen. Not My job to like it. Push the tablets now the will, but even if Douglas sort of is a is a say, nobody could deny the good at what I do. You like that soon. I could disappoint people because it's not what they expected and all these things, but I just wanted to show that I knew how to do so go up. She knows if I'd have then gone after the neck on. You know what I might try. TV show that's a whole group of skill sets have to learn quickly, and then all that pressure would be looking at doing something. I didn't know how. And also doing comedy is a safe place for me I. Know How to do it, so there's a familiarity to it and with the successive. Ninette meant that I could do it on my terms, so I could create a tool that was. Less stressful than by usual about so. It was a anything now that it's done dust and I think it was the right decision for me to make that time, and just for our listeners to know the timing of this. We're talking on May twenty seventh. The Wednesday this went out. Yesterday to the world may twenty six douglas here in Yeah, I think all around the world from what I understand. It's gone over great I don't know if you if you read up on reactions or anything like that, but you know it's obviously as you acknowledge very different, but also very bold in its own ways. I mean there. There's not many comedy specials that I'm aware of where you kind of somebody comes out and the. Of essentially sets the lays out what everything else is going to be, and then has to live up to that and you know something like that was. A decision. Decision to myself. Yeah that's a that's A. It's really fun vocal at a device, but it's also ferry autistic, and from just the you know particularly on the tour and now Spain out in the world a little bit. Too, big, response from people on the spectrum going. To stick like bow the people responding to a going on this is a neat device. This is interesting, but people on spectrum of recognizing it. Well, you know somehow. The thing that it reminded me of. There's there's another. person who is not in the comedy world, but another very smart person who I admire and like Rachel Maddow. I don't know if you've ever watch her program, but the thing that she some people give her a hard time adult, but a lot of other people love is the way she takes her time easing into her show each night. Where there's some setup and you're trying to figure out what is the even have to do with anything she could begin by saying. In one, thousand, nine, Sixty eight Toledo Ohio, and then you get to the Connecticut. So I found that thinking about that. Yeah, that's high praise. I think that's high. Praise I think also in in this. Very. Like we stop listening very quickly. You've gotTA. Give Rachel to get us for plan like that's a bold move 'cause. You know. There's so much content. But it's also a breath of fresh air I. It is a similar way I. Make Connections I play. Some things don't seem like they should connected. Make that connection that's that's part of my autism. Rachel has autism I. Don't think that's what I'm trying to say. Well last thing I will ask you here because I appreciate all your time. I just want to quote back to you. One of the lines that I think resonated the most with people from the net, and that was quote. There is nothing stronger than a broken woman who has rebuilt yourself close quote so as someone who is obviously rebuilt herself in A. Major Way I guess I. Want I wonder if we can leave this with just you know. Do you now feel stronger than you did? Whatever it was two years ago or so when that went out to the world? And what to you now hope now that you have a large audience for your work. What do you hope the long term impact of your work will be? Yeah I certainly feel stronger this. There's nothing about I mean. He can't underestimate the healing POW financial security. I, just I been homeless, and this is now I now own a home and. I can't. It's just brilliant. Help strengths like I think I was strong, but I was house spoiling for a fight like still scrappy, and now it's like Oh, I can take a breath, and you know if you WANNA. Keep strong simple. To be able to take breath. For the first time in a long time in my adult life I've been able to inhale scrape. long-term look I I don't know. What I think, the power of net is what I hope it is that it has the ability to reach into people's brains and stirred up and I hope. The hope is that then other people will create stuff in in the scheme of things, then it might be forgotten the job for historians but In if anyone's even interested, but. Even know the hope is when you create. Something is not how people receive it and it stops. Tell papers emily. They run with it. Yeah, well, I thank you so much for doing this and for the to fascinating specials I wish I'd had the chance to see the earlier work as well but. This the boat. But, yeah, thank you again and. Say thank you to stay. Thanks very much for tuning into awards chatter. We really appreciate you taking the time to do that and would really appreciate you taking a minute more subscribe to our podcast for free on I tunes or your podcasts up and to leave us a rating as well. If you have any questions, comments concerns, you can reach me via twitter at twitter dot com slash Scott Fiber and you can follow all of my coverage between. Between episodes at Ta Dot com slash the race finally. Be sure to check out the other podcasts that are part of the Hollywood reporter's podcast network, all of which are excellent, Lesley Goldberg and Daniel Feinberg TV's top five set the brim of its and chip pope's. It happened in Hollywood Caroline Gr Dina's behind the screen and Josh wiggly's series regular on behalf of all of us at the Hollywood reporter. Thanks for tuning in.

Netflix Douglas Australia Edinburgh Tasmania golf Emmy Mike writer New York Times Spain Hollywood Melbourne neurological disorder peabody award Ninette reporter Hannah Gatsby
Best Of: Comic Hannah Gadsby / Inside The Snowden Story

Fresh Air

50:14 min | 11 months ago

Best Of: Comic Hannah Gadsby / Inside The Snowden Story

"From whyy in Philadelphia. I'M TERRY GROSS WITH FRESH AIR WEEKEND TODAY. Comic Hannah Gadsby. Her Twenty Eighteen Netflix's comedy special was one of the most talked about comedy sets of that year. In addition to making her audience laugh. She took them by surprise by vowing to give up comedy because the forms limitations too difficult to express the pain of growing up closeted in the Bible belt of Australia being beaten and raped and temporarily homeless. But you didn't give up comedy. She's back with a new netflix comedy. Special also talk about reporting the story of Edward Snowden and American surveillance programs with journalist. Barton Gilman snowden leaked thousands of classified. Nsa documents to Gilman and two other journalists and Maureen Corrigan reviews. The New Comic Road Novel Sing Christopher. Show by Nancy. Mckinley support for this podcast. And the following message come from L. A. Time studios funded by Amazon studios for the podcast paper clip inspired by its Emmy Eligible Drama Series Hunters starring Al Pacino and Logan Lerman join host Michael Ian Black as he teams up with a Cold War historian to explore Operation Paper Clip. A top secret program that brought Nazi scientists to America. It's a story of principles compromised and war-crimes overlooked available now on apple podcasts and all other platforms after Hannah. Gadsby breakout comedy special. Corden Annette premiered on Netflix. In two thousand eighteen it won a peabody award an Emmy Award and was described in the New York. Times quote the most talked about written about Sherrod about comedy act in years unquote what made the show especially provocative was her vow to give up comedy because she thought they requirements of jokes. Setup punchline tension release were inadequate for describing her life and the anger. She felt about how she was abused growing up. Gay and closeted in Tasmania which she describes as the Bible Belt of Australia. Gatsby illustrated her point about comedy by telling a funny story about a guy who thought she was a man hitting on this guy's girlfriend later in the set she retold the story as it really happened when this guy realize gasping was a woman and correctly assumed that she was a lesbian. He beat her badly and no one stopped him. Here's Gatsby from net. This is why I must quit comedy because the only way I can tell my truth and put tension in the room with anger and I am angry. I believe I've got every right to be angry but what I don't have a right to do is to spread anger. Don't because anger much like laughter can connect a room full of strangers like nothing else but anger even if it's connected to laughter will not relieve tension because anger is attention it is a toxic infectious tench and it knows no other purpose than to spread blind hatred and I want no part of it because I take my freedom of speech as a responsibility and just because I can position myself as a victim does not make my anger constructive. It never is constructive. Laughter is not medicine Stories Holdout Q. Laughter is just the honey that sweetens the bitter medicine. I don't want to unite with laughed or anger. I just needed my story. My story and understood by individuals with minds of their own gets be did take a break from performing after touring with that show but she hasn't given up comedy and now she's back with a new comedy special called Douglas named after the first dog she had as an adult. It just started streaming on Netflix. Here's an excerpt from early in the show if you here because of the net. Why don't get me wrong? It's a good show solo bit work. I'm quite fond that it was a particular show of a very particular flavor. And if that is what is what you expect from this show. I'm sorry trauma I I'm fresh out. How do I know just how badly popular troll move is going to be in the context of comedy? I might have budgeted better honestly I could have built quite the career out of it at least a trilogy but I went and put all my eggs into one basket gets be welcome to fresh air. Thank you you're welcome. It's a pleasure to have you so you know. I guess you didn't give up comedy. I'm glad you did not. Were you surprised? By the impact that had at the end of net when so many comics in America started wondering like should I rethink comedy? This comedy have limitations. I haven't thought of we. You surprised by all of that look. I was surprised by the positive response all the way through performing it like the first time I performed it you know. I knew that I was putting something kind of electric out into the audience and sort of built in built and built and I was just blown away by how positive the response was over overall. Like you know the impact of an you know I. I didn't think it would be so successful. I just thought you know what I have to say these things. I'm willing to sacrifice my career for that. I can move on so I am surprised that it so positive but because it was so positive. It seems only natural that other comedians are going Perhaps I should rethink and I think that's healthy. You know not saying that. Everyone should change the way they do things. But I think a bit of a shake-up is is good so you do not dwell on trauma in your new Netflix's special but you do talk about how in two thousand seventeen were diagnosed with having autism spectrum disorder and another hilarious subject. That was that was in two thousand and sixteen sixteen. Thank you very positive about it. You say no that might sound like it was horrible to get the diagnosis but it actually gave you a new way of standing yourself. What are some of the things that made you feel really different? That started to make sense after. You got the diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder. I found out and things start to make sense because it shifted the way that I understood myself. I was always operating on the on the false premise. That ever on Seoul the world like I did so I was just getting it wrong Of getting a lot of things wrong the most difficult was my interpersonal sort of life because You know on stage interviews get the boundaries and the rules of engagement very clear but once you step out of these things and you know you're talking to people you building relationships with people that the every there's so much more uncertainty and I don't read the room nearly as well so in many ways. Ip very good at being social. But it's an incredibly exhausting process for me so when I was diagnosed it just gave me permission to be kind to myself to not always take responsibility for being. You know a bit clumsy a around other people and allowed me to sort of start to tell paypal Z. But I don't mean to be and being more open about. I need to tell me what I did wrong. And then we can move on from there whereas you know I would just get in a lot of trouble for from my friends and and whatnot so being insensitive and you know and it was kind of a double bind. Because I'm very sensitive and I'm very thoughtful but I miss things that other people that have go. That's the you should just know that. Like what Juno I I very blunt and I'm very honest so there's that there is this sort of. It's almost a hack joke you know. And it's the ironies the the gender all the way. A woman who who say to a man does my bum. Look big in this in the man will go. Yes you know it's it's it's no joke and And I've done that. Not not the bump thing because you know I probably have larger bump so I never think anyone's is big but you know I remember an ex girlfriend's asked me if I liked haircut and I absolutely didn't and I can't lie so I said I'm not formed and that that was a wake loan recovery mission and that was before I was diagnosed. wasn't even a bad haircut. I I mean I just was wrong for her face and I I studied history and I I was going on from that point of view and I have bad hair so I really had no place. I can undo it in hindsight but hindsight is not a great gift in the moment my guest is Hannah. Gadsby her new comedy special. Douglas is now streaming on Netflix. She spoke to us from her home in Australia. We'll hear more of our conversation. After a break and Maureen Corrigan Will Review Nancy. Mckinlay's comic road trip novel Saint Christopher on Pluto this fresh air weekend support for NPR and the following message. Come from duck duck go. Are you tired of being tracked online? Duck duck go can help. They helped millions of people. Like you take control of their personal information online with one download. You can search and browse privately. Avoiding trackers duck duck. Go privacy simplified. Let's get back to my interview with Hannah Gadsby. She's a comic. Who's twenty eighteen? Comedy special in the net was described in the New York Times as the most talked about comedy. Act IN YEARS. It won an emmy and a peabody in the special. She vowed to give up comedy but now happily she's back with a new comedy special called Douglas. Which is streaming a net flicks. Let's talk about growing up in. Tasmania homosexuality was illegal until nineteen ninety-seven. How old were you when that loans overturn? That's to do the math. I was born in seventy eight. What does that make seventeen? No nineteen okay. Was that law actually in force where people find or put in jail if they were gay if they were caught like in a gay bar or something there weren't gay bars in. Tasmania really like the action of the like. It became a thing when people tried to change the law. I think before that it was basically. Don't tell anyone than it's fine But it also meant it was a permission for violence. 'cause you were you were beaten you were raped or sexually abused and I was wondering if the men who did that to you felt entitled to harm you because your sexuality made you a criminal and your religion made you a center. No wasn't my religion and I think that's more to do with misogyny than like anything else I think that's just you know men having ownership over women's bodies more than anything. The being beaten you know certainly was because that was the height of the debate so the debate was being pushed into the media And the media tends to amplify the most extreme voices and so what people don't see the ramification of that on the ground and I saw firsthand. She thinks the debate was empowering people to be violent absolutely rule Absolutely do do you think that if neighbors knew that you were a lesbian that they might have like turned you into the police or something. Ever get to that point where people thought like this is a legal and I have to take action against it. Well first of all the law pertained sodomy so it was just a complete invisibility like we don't even exist. Yes right right but you couldn't be out and proud by any stretch but no the generally it was About you know gay men and did you have friends who are gay men who were more. No I didn't have any friends. Jimmy that literally my elderly neighbors. My my best friends were growing up with my next door. Neighbors and I used to go over to the house every day after school and have a competent biscuit and a bit of quiet time. 'cause those youngest of quite a large family and it was very loud and school was a lot me. And so I just go over. And we'd just sit and have quite chat and a nap and get a bit of quiet now all my best friends. But you know that was sort of the brethren branch of religion so it was all fire and brimstone so there was always this. You know the older. I got this sort of anxiety about that so it was never on the surface but there was this increasing anxiety. You know I all these this couple and they meant the world to me but as I got older it was like I can't share that. She begin to cleave off these large parts of your emotional landscape and reality from the people you spend the most time with and that's the real painful thing. Yeah because there's probably like not only can I share this but if they only knew the might not be so nice to me? Yeah and you can't share it in that vulnerable time when you like. I'm trying to work something out about myself And you know you see you left on your own at a time in your life when really you need to be guided by adults. You are homeless for a while. What period of your life was that? And why were you homeless? Once I finished my degree it was a three degree. Twenty five years. I didn't know what to do then. Once I left the beats that you're supposed to hit you know and then they're like okay. You're off into the world. I was unable to navigate that you know I struggled filling forms. I've never been able to apply for job in the traditional form I've always just picked up sort of casual entry level work and you know the older you get the less easy. He's you know when you pop your resume into a place in the olden of done so little so I sort of began to drift. Really badly You know I worked in a bookshop for a little while and then I was a cinema projectionist and then I traveled up to the north of this was going to work at a an outdoor cinema. 'cause I you know I had an actual skill that is no longer an actual skill but at the time and from there I found I couldn't actually hold down a job. I was unable to you. Know earn enough money and also navigate just the basic administration of life. I look back on that time for quite sad like I didn't understand it. I I genuinely needed help. I needed assistance attribute that to autism yeah And so became a farm labourer and I I lived in a tent. Basically NO FIXED ADDRESS FOR COUPLE OF YEARS. We sleeping on the street at all. Well no because I was in the in the country so there's no need to be on the straight I had a tent and you know and then I drift in you know work on farms and then but I had no safety net. I had back out and I mean I certainly slipped Rav but it was just not on a straight. I'm taking that really literally right. That just sleep on the streets and I'm like yes I guess but basically I just weren't a Lotta streets is what you're saying. Yeah of town and found a nice spot and pitched tents and yeah. Yeah so you had no safety net. What did you have any safety knowing? Guess no no no Cappella. Wherever's robbed or attacked while you were homeless I guess I was but not you know because someone broke into my tent. It's you know at one stage. I sort of drifted into this sort of communal living situation. That turned bad the turn bad. Yeah what happened? That's a whereas rate. Oh that's turning really bad yeah. That wasn't great yeah to did you leave that that community afterwards. That living situation no. I have no way to go. That's so awful that you had a stray with. That's the reality of no choice isn't it? What future did you see for yourself? Then when you're living in a tent and you had no steady job you didn't think you could hold one. I didn't see a future Dole. And that's that's trauma. You're absolutely incapable of imagining a future. Incapable of understanding. What a dream is the? You know you you're obviously. You're like very smart and very perceptive and very articulate. Could you comprehend why somebody who was as smart as you were and as knowledgeable art history degree would feel like you had so little future in front of you so a few options so few opportunities the that that was very always very confusing to me? I didn't understand how I got it all so so wrong I do you know this is. This is part of the autism situation That until I was diagnosed I could never look back on that part of my life and and make complete sense of I still struggle. And that's a that is also ineffective of trauma. There's no straight line through trauma So how old were you when you were diagnosed? Terrible that the meth situation. Thirty six thirty six. That's a long time not to understand what was going on. You know neurologically for you here yet is what made you think that you could perform. Comedy did say that you were funny. Did you think of yourself as funny? I knew how to be funny. I knew how to tell a story and the way I'd learnt tell a story was to. I'd really built this skill to evade the reality of my life and just toaff a funny story about a moment you know. So here's a funny thing that happens. And then I I didn't have to tell people about the the actual reality of my life and essentially I entered a comedy competition and it was on a win. That wasn't this sort of thing you know I've been hoping to do. I did a lot of things on women like all. Try this thing. I'll try that thing. And there's no reason to expect comedy was going to end any better worse than all the other failed attempts at my grasp but life and this is a national competition was held by the Melbourne Comedy Festival. Melbourne International Comedy Festival and they run hates all round distracted ago into regional towns and hold these competitions. Actually really wonderful program because it doesn't dwell on just the cities and so then you know as soon as I sort of told my I you know geotech. Which isn't technically joke. It was just a few words. I strong together. I think it was the combination of you know. Just me being this completely strange creature up on stage just really made people engage with me and I held the audience in my hand. I didn't know what to do with them but I knew that I had them in my hand so it was clear from the very first time I stood on stage and I've never held a microphone before I'd never been a performer at never even been to a comedy show but all of a sudden. I kind of knew what I was doing. So what was it like when you first on stage and realized that you had the power to make people laugh or to make them think or feel moved by what. You're saying that you could get the response that you wanted to get It felt like I was connected to the world for the first time. I'd always felt like I. There was a disconnect between May and the rest of the world. You know this is kind of a common experience of people on the spectrum. You sort of feel like an alien being dropped in from outer space and you can't quite connect properly Being on stage in and making a room full of people you know law Phil felt like a a connection. I hadn't been able to establish in any other environment considering everything we've talked about. You must be really surprised by your success. You had so you really had so many years of failure and trauma I you know. Honestly it's kind of Wilmington. Yeah you know I do feel like sometimes when you hear a successful person sort of going. Oh this is a surprise. You like yeah but you worked your whole life toward this. So there's something like Taylor Swift. I'm not convinced that she's surprised but I am genuinely like I can't. I can't process. I've just bought my first tone like I own a home for someone who's being homeless. This is just. I can't account believe it. It's been great to talk with you. Thank you so much My Pleasure Hannah. Gadsby is new comedy. Special Douglas is now streaming on Netflix. Six she spoke to us from her home in Australia. Who are book critic? Maureen Corrigan has a review of a recent novel that she says through the vehicle of comic fiction takes readers on a road trip through struggling towns and farmlands of rural America. It's called Saint Christopher Pluto. It's by Nancy McKinley and feeling so cooped up these days. Who isn't that? I sometimes find myself getting in the car. And taking aimless rides to know where maybe that's what prompted me to finally check out and on the road novel that came out in February right before the pandemic brought life as we know it to a hard stop Nancy mckinlay's novel constructed out of a series of interlocking stories is called Saint Christopher on Pluto. Note that odd title it summons up I a Catholic saint who was demoted because of questions about his historical veracity and Pluto once a planet but now demoted to a dwarf planet to moded or diminished. Is How you might think of the northeastern Pennsylvania setting of this novel once the area around wilkes-barre boasted industry family farms and coal mines. But in recent times the region has been scarred by appointment and the OPIOID epidemic in mckinlay's novel to hometown Gals right around this terrain in a vintage. Buick nicknamed big blue. Mary Catherine MK. For Short is a quiet woman who inherited the Buick from her grandmother. Colleen is the mad cap troublemaker. Troublemaker in the opening story here Colleen Cons M. K. Into helping her commit insurance fraud by ditching her own Honda hatchback clunker in a remote ravine Saint Christopher on Pluto drew me in by its humor but like the best comic fiction it's constructed out of insider social observations observations. That sting as much as they amuse we learn early on that M K in colleen I met in the nineteen sixties when they were students at Our Lady of Perpetual Help Elementary School. They'd lost touch but ran into each other again in late. Midlife both working at the local mall. Colleen has a job at the hallmark store M. K. works as a manager at Walden books which over the course of this novel is bought out by borders which is in turn bought out by books. A million until the entire wheezing mall itself is bought out by foreign investors who planned to gut the space for fracking truck depot. Bossy colleen prides herself on being a do gooder. Always ready to push 'EM K. And Big Blue into volunteer work which takes the two white women and this novel on Road trips deep into the less traveled corners of northeast Pennsylvania. Some stories here grow out of the casual relationships. The women formed through their jobs at the mall. For instance a teenager named Tiffany who works at the food court stars in the poignant penultimate story where she runs with M. K. and colleen in a Thanksgiving Turkey trot charity race. She psyched because she's got a lead on a waitressing job at the Jersey shore and then approaching the Finish Line. She trips and you get the sense that she's never going to make it other stories. Take notice of old timers like the pumpers a group of senior citizens who survived heart attacks and power walk at the mall. They've been left behind as their kids moved away. It's the newer residents of the Wilkes Barre area. However who inspire mckinlay's most unexpected weddings of screwball humor to social criticism in a standout story called Navy Dodd? The two friends volunteer at a church Christmas party. Here's MK describing the harebrained beginning of this particular. Car Ride Colleen Yanks. Open the passenger door of big blue. She wears a red sweater match by a voluminous skirt. That cascades over her knees Ho Ho you liked. She asks her fingers tug at Silver Garland edging the HEM. My skirt was half price at salvo. I smile knowing how colleen takes pride in snagging deals at the Salvation Army thrift store. It's handmade but the seams aren't finished no clasp at the waist so I use duct tape. And that's when I realized she's wearing one of those round felt covers. People put under Christmas trees. I decided not to say anything the tone shifts when the women arrive at the church. Where the kids? All Latino necks are jammed into the church hall because of the sometimes violent local resentment against the newcomers the church is keeping quiet about this party as MK tells us there will be no human interest clips on the local news. Leave it to colleen to involve me in covert Christmas party. Covert is a good way to characterize how this droll novel in stories delivers its social commentary. It's so entertaining. Go along for the ride with M. K. And chatty colleen and because of their Ri- sometimes bumbling suck it up resiliency. It's also possible to take in these hard luck landscapes and see some possibility amidst all the losses Maureen Corrigan teaches literature at Georgetown University. She reviewed the novel. Saint Christopher on Pluto by Nancy McKinley. Coming up. We'll talk about reporting the story of Edward Snowden and American surveillance programs with journalist Bart Gilman. This is fresh air weekend. The news has been hard to escape so take a deep breath and join us for. Npr's all songs considered it's more than a music discovery podcast. It's relief with new episodes every Tuesday and Friday as we share the week's best new albums and lots of music to calm the nerves here. All songs considered podcasts. There's no getting around it. The coronavirus pandemic has upended everything and daily decisions. Made by the White House and Congress will radically impact the human and economic toll to keep up with the latest join us on the NPR politics. Podcast will cut through the noise and let you know what decisions are being made and how they affect you. Six years ago the American intelligence community was rocked by the leak of thousands of classified documents. A new surveillance programs by national security agency contractor Edward Snowden our guest Gilman was one of three journalists snowden chose to provide the documents to gunman's new book is about the experience of reporting on the massive archive and about the meaning of the snowden revelations in the debate over National Security and privacy. Gilman says he believes snowden did more good than harm but their relationship wasn't simple or easy at times snowden stopped communicating with Gillman. Gilman's book is a gripping account of high stakes investigative reporting and in it he reveals new information about US surveillance of American citizens. Barton Gilman has covered national security and intelligence issues for decades spent twenty one years at the Washington Post where he earned three Pulitzer prizes. One of them for quarterbacking. The team that worked on the SNOWDEN revelations Gomez currently staff writer for the Atlantic. His new book is called Dark Mirror. Edward Snowden and the American surveillance state. He spoke with fresh. Air's Dave Davies. Will Barton Gilman. Welcome back to fresh air a pleasure to be here. Dave. You were one of three journalists that he provided this material and really the only one from the background is a mainstream journalists. How did snowden regard you as opposed to the other Laura Laura Poitras the documentary filmmaker Glenn Greenwald then with The Guardian Snowden? Chose Glenn Greenwald first. Because he was a commentator and opinion leader someone who was a powerful Voice of skepticism against the establishment and Snowden wanted that sort of loud and clear and all in kind of defense. He chose Laura poitras because he was filmmaker at who had herself been subject to the scrutiny of the surveillance state after she made a film about Iraq she found herself stopped every time she crossed the border into the United States and had her. Her belongings searched her videotape copied. Her files copied and so on Snowden came late to me. Laura Poitras can him that having a mainstream journalists long and having someone who knew the subject as I did would be good for him. Snowden was deeply skeptical. He thought that the Washington Post would be afraid to publish or would bow down to government pressure. I had many conversations with him before he agreed to include me in which I said you don't understand my world at all. We don't stand down because the government doesn't WanNa see a story It took a lot of convincing for him just as it took a lot of convincing for me that he was for real and just review for what the terms were of him. Providing this information to you in the two reporters well I told Snowden that I was not undertaking in advance to publish everything. He gave me anything in particular that I would make my own judgment about the news value and that I would give the government and opportunity to tell me about damage. They foresaw if story was published. And so I had that conversation with the government. Every time snowden at first seemed a little skeptical about this and worried that it simply meant. I was GONNA give the government veto power over an article and in fact he saw it as potential evidence of a cowardly approach by the Washington. Post later he came to see the value and the importance of trying to avoid avoidable harm in the publication of these stories and he began to insisted that was what he wanted. All along Snowden has always said publicly that he He wanted the journalists to evaluate this material and handled it responsibly. He didn't want to dump it on the Internet net or or give it to wikileaks. But did he wanted journalists to make judgments and I think he says he wants them to confer with the government so harm could be avoided. Was that your understanding. All along snowden absolutely wanted to make our own judgments about newsworthiness. He absolutely did not want to dump the entire archive online. If he wanted. Daddy could have done it himself. I mean the guy knows how to work the Internet. He wanted the credibility of journalists behind the disclosures He wanted us to check the facts and set the context and he wanted us to decide what was newsworthy and what was harmful so he. He essentially relinquished close judgment. Calls to me and my fellow journalists and eventually he left himself without even access to all this material right. That's right that's one of the most fascinating things here. Once he gave the documents to me and the other two he removed his own ability to access them. He destroyed the encryption key and he did that because he didn't want to lose the documents he didn't want them to be stolen and he didn't want to be compelled to open them. When he crossed the border he foresaw that he would be under the authority of one or another foreign government. He didn't want to be carrying around a suitcase that he could open That would expose all those. Us secrets directly to a foreign government. So he made it literally impossible for him to do so. I WanNa talk a bit about your relationship with Snowden He said at one point. I think that he vetted you more than anybody else. Among the three journalists and that in the end you screwed him. What did he mean snowden wanted advocates on his side he wanted a pure and clear message of dissent against the way the NSA was behaving And he wanted nothing that would raise any doubts or questions about him or or get into his personal life. Or anything like that I continue to ask questions the way a journalist should ask questions and so we would have these tents exchanges which he would say for example are you purposely asking me things? I won't answer just to Piss me off He was angry at me one The first time he got angry at me he was right to be angry. In a an early profile of him I inadvertently exposed and online handle an anonymous handle that he was still using for communications and that caused him some trouble as he tried to. Change handles and encryption keys on the fly and that's when he quit talking to you for a while right. He quit talking to me for several months after that and We started up again because he believed hours handling these stories. Seriously that I was making that I was diving in to the subject in a way that was exposing. Truths weren't being exposed anywhere else because this wasn't just a question of opening the documents reading and reading your story The documents were incomplete pieces of jigsaw puzzle. Very hard to understand they required external reporting with sources in the government and out of the government They required interpretation and discovery And I was putting things together in a way that he thought was important. And so he got over his personal Anger at the way. I behaved I. I think it was December twenty thirteen. You went over to visit him in Moscow. Right I I don't know how much you can talk about this but I'm curious about your security precautions in making that trip man you you. You were careful. You're careful to protect your digital data Did you figure that the Russians would be following you or or surveilling you while you were there you know? I don't like to be dramatic or self important but I thought yeah. There's a pretty good chance that if an American journalist who's writing about Secret American intelligence programs comes over to interview a former intelligence officer. It's not that that would probably be worth Their devotion of a little bit of surveillance themselves I assumed that my devices and my telephone calls would be monitored and so to begin with. I didn't bring any data over with me. I wasn't gonNA bring classified documents to a country where they could possibly read them And directly expose American secrets to a foreign power So and I didn't log onto any of my accounts I didn't bring my actual computer or my usual telephone. I brought empty ones but still had the puzzle of how I was going to interview. Snowden take notes take photographs make recordings and then bring those back to the United States while crossing an international border and not hand over those documents those recordings and so on to either government. I didn't want the US government to hear everything. I had said with Snowden I didn't want the Russian government to have access to all that information either. So how did you get the material safely back without carrying it over the border so there one or two tricks that I won't mention but here's something I can I tape recorded the interview with Snowden on digital recorder that recorded the audio onto a little memory card. Sd Card. And so what I did was a citizen interview ended. I would copy the data from the SD card which was Unencrypted into an encrypted archive on my computer and it was encrypted with a key that I didn't carry with me it is possible using something called. Gp To encrypt a file in a way. That you yourself cannot not decrypted until you until you go. Pick up the key that you've left back in New York for example so I- encrypted it that way I uploaded it onto some cloud servers in that encrypted form and I was also did not carry the key that labeled me to download from those same servers and then I took the St Card at a computer. And I cut it into pieces so I was no longer to be in possession of the audio file at all. It was sitting in the cloud waiting for me. I just hope to God that I didn't screw it up and that I could decrypt it when I got home You spent a lot of time talking with him did. Did you end up with a different impression of him than you had before I did? I was expecting to find a guy who was very serious and I find that I was expecting to find a guy in Moscow. Who was shell shocked and lonely and very conscious of the sacrifices that he'd made and maybe even having second thoughts i. It's one thing to anticipate you're going to be alone in a foreign country. But he had not actually even planned to be in Russia he got stuck there and what I found instead was a guy who was very much at peace with his choices who is as he described himself an indoor cat who doesn't usually go out into the world very much anyway. His socializing and his intellectual and his productive work is almost all done online. I I asked him at one point. How many hours a day do you think your online? And he said the hours that I have a week there was a a house. Intelligence Committee report about snowden which was harshly critical. And there's been reporting that the classified version of that report listed several instances in which national security was harmed. I'm wondering if you have any insight. Into what those instances were if there were particular harms done by particular disclosures. That fact itself would be classified as you mentioned and so. I can't argue with an assertion that's made in the dark and there may be legitimate reasons to keep that classified On the other hand I would have to say that not to put a fine point on it. That House intelligence committee report was garbage. It was a political document. It was basically a long screed about. It's not and it was filled with facts or assertions of fact that were plainly regrettable that there were simply wrong just the simple question of calling. It's no highschool dropout He had earned his ged at the same time that his class graduated With top top scores They knew that he had advanced computer security and computer science credentials. Or for example. They said there's no evidence that it's not actually was injured in the army and so he was lying about the reasons for his at the end to his army service. Well army records made it very clear. I I've seen the record. He broke both legs in training. I and for the House Intelligence Committee which had privileged access to government records to say things like that gives you a decent flavor of the more complicated untruths in the report. It's interesting the effect breaking the story. Had on your life I mean apart from dealing with the government and dealing with SNOWDEN A. You're now publicly in possession of a lot of secrets and you're pretty careful about protecting your digital information. But did you become aware that you're either being followed or surveilled or people trying to hack your stuff? Yeah you know It's not paranoid people are really trying to get you And I knew from the first time I saw the documents before I published a story that this was going to paint a big target on my back. it's advertising that you have something special in secret and advertising pretty quickly. I was not going to publish all of it So I knew that I would be a subject of interest to Hackers to the US government and foreign intelligence agencies and I gradually accumulated considerable evidence that this was true Someone tried to break into my g. Mail accounts Where I did not store sensitive documents But nevertheless Google warned me Big FLASHING PINK BAR ON. My screen said Warning we believe that state-sponsored attackers are trying to break into your device. Or your account. I found out later that that was the government Turkey. Turkey was unexpected and bad news for me because I thought there were a substantial number of likelier candidates And more capable candidates coming after me so if Turkey also was joining the party That suggested the threat landscape was broader than I would have liked to think My IPAD was hacked right in front of my eyes as I was holding it The screen gutter out into to static and then white letters started marching across the screen with a technical commands in a language called UNIX. If that had worked as expected as intended it would have happened while I slept or wasn't looking at the machine and After a couple of minutes of fooling around like that the hacker would have complete control of the device. and what worried me about that? Was that remotely hacking an IPAD is not Beginners Hack. It's quite difficult And quite expensive to breakthrough. Apple's considerable security remotely without physically connecting to the device is a million dollar. Hack say that that data brokers Or Surveillance brokers pay million dollar bounties for what's called an untethered hack of the IPAD operating system did not want to be worth that kind of effort. I do not want to be worth that kind of expense but I was will burn Gilman. Thanks so much for speaking with us again. Thank you for allowing me. I love the show. Thornton Gilman spoke with fresh. Air's Dave Davies. Gunman is a staff writer at theatlantic. His new book is called Dark Mirror. Edward Snowden and the American surveillance state Fresh air weekend is produced by two recent madden. Fresh Air's executive producer is Danny Miller. Our Technical Director and engineer is Audrey Bentham our interviews and reviews or produced an edited by Amy Salad. Phyllis Myers Roberta shorrock Sam brigger Lauren Crandall. Heidi Soman Thia challenor. Seth Kelly and Joe will from Molly Seavy. Nesper our associate producer of digital media. I'm Terry Gross.

Edward Snowden SNOWDEN A. Netflix Maureen Corrigan Douglas Hannah Gadsby US Australia Nancy mckinlay Colleen Yanks Fresh Air Barton Gilman snowden Barton Gilman Nancy McKinley America Bart Gilman Tasmania Apple New York NPR
Guest host Hari Kondabolu with Hannah Gadsby and more!

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

53:26 min | 1 year ago

Guest host Hari Kondabolu with Hannah Gadsby and more!

"This episode of Studio Three Sixty is sponsored by how to raise a parent a new podcast from dairy pure in collaboration with slate studios dairy pure believes is that the world would be a better place if we reconnected to what's pure and innocent in ourselves and each other. That's what host Mallory Kasdan explores in how to raise a apparent throughout the series she talks to parents and experts about how our kids can teach us to shift our perspectives conqueror fears and become more open to all all the exciting things got to offer make sure to listen and subscribe to how to raise a parent wherever you get your podcasts today a on studio three sixty these arguments about this is not comedy is give one person can kill comedy comedy comedy that robust. Hannah Gadsby isn't losing any sleep over trolls claiming. She's destroying comedy. It's in land lung anyway. I just pulled the plug plus. I'm a Korean Canadian woman a French lip major. I'm from Vancouver. All none of those things are essentially hip hop so few. Chang on her remarkable career in hip hop so to be not only to be welcomed but to be embraced. Just the way that I was was so incredible I'm Hari Kondabolu Comedian and South Asian American sex symbol guest hosting for Anderson all all that and more is ahead in studio three sixty right after this this episode of Studio. Three sixty is sponsored by Hyatt centric tune in to somewhere new with Hiatt centric hotels hotels that put you at the heart of the action in connecting you to your cities food culture and music from Miami to Milan and everywhere in between Hiatt centric hotels points you toward the hidden gems hotspots and local sounds your destination has to offer enjoy amenities and details that capture the unique spirit of each city helping you get a feel for the neighborhood before you even set foot out the door. If you're ready for an exciting off the beaten path adventure get started with Hiatt centric when you start here you can discover discover everywhere explore our hotels around the world at Hyatt Centric Dot Com studio three sixty colonels and I'm sitting on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. I level of guard this Thomas Jefferson's Vegetables Dr. I'd like to have the chicken waste very well. Done editing is all all about timing. I tried to get a little bit away from the actual subject. Let's get sick and may sixty with good Anderson. Hey everybody I'm hurry Kabalu filling in this week for Kurt Anderson so I'm a stand up comedian and my favorite special from last year was by far Hannah Gadsby net on net flicks wchs the pride flag a love what it means that is perfect pride wonderful but the flag itself busy. The net starts out a very conventional stand up special. There's just lots of great jokes. It's just six very shatti. Assertive callous stacked on the top of each other no risk for the afternoon in that way even in the face on to express my entity through the metaphor of a map and then over the course of the hour gets a lot more confrontational. It gets more serious as lots of twists and turns. It gets gut wrenching. 'cause she's talking about serious stuff. She's talking about Trauma Violence Homophobia and the nature of comedy itself. Do you understand what self-deprecation means when it comes from somebody who already exists in the margins. It's not humility. It's humiliation. I put myself down in order to speak in order to seek permission to speak and I simply will not do that anymore. Not to myself or anybody who identifies phone net was incredibly funny and poignant and smart it deconstructed the form it was able to challenge people's notion of what stand up is supposed to be her new show. Douglas is just as good the big difference is that there are a ton more jokes and it's also powerful because she's talking about her diagnosis with autism before last summer very few people in the US had ever heard of Hannah Gatsby but she didn't come out of nowhere. Well she kind of comes out of nowhere. I mean she's from Tasmania but she was well known in comedy circles in the UK and Australia before she even wrote in it should be performing hour long shows over a decade and festivals. Melbourne an Edinburgh will every year. I'd run a new show so my first show was my coming out story which is kiss me quick. I'm full of tubes which is candy in Australia. My whole mines played a cruel joke on me. I said let's make this one in the ultimate baby carrying this do and then give absolutely no desire to Mike want. I'm like transform that doesn't fancy driving and then the next show was called the cliff young shuffle which is a long form pace about walking. I walked across England coming off antidepressant Jason Homeland God podiatrist. He openly laughed at my feet as well. I'm glad you went into daughtry. Not Not GonNa College could never written an without those ten years of the shows before and you know with a with a sort of the building blocks that led to that. What was your life like before net so quiet. Were you in Tasmania Nia. I lived in Melbourne now living in little rental. I didn't believe I'd ever be able to afford a homes my own so I decided sided about a year before I wrote a net. I really wanted to garden. I'm just GONNA plant out this rental and so the phone really it was dogs in gardening gardening and t and a lot of alone time. I spent a lot of time alone. I think I was exhausted. I'd been diagnosed with autism so is adjusting back to that new sort of framework of understanding myself I of course diagnosis doesn't come with a change if you just haven't that happened before and that was released. Oh Yeah Oh before it was written. I mean it was pretty much. The show I could write once I understood what was setting me apart because I was always very confused infused. I was like I just don't like there. Was something really deeply wrong with me so I was always to scrambling to get to the starting line of normal and then once I was diagnosed ignores them like a one never can get you know there's this brain situation so I began to look at myself with a lot more empathy not because all my work prior to that was going. I'm sorting out what's wrong with me. Whereas then I'm like. Oh I know what's wrong with me. I know my limits but then I turned and my critical eye on to the world and I'm gone I can also see you'll limits and there is too much hysteria around gender from Uganda normals. You'll the weed. You're a bit hysterical that you're we'd your bid up. You need to get a agenda. Almost Hall Seriously Calmed Down Gender normals get a grip now. I'm in an address. We know it's not do you know what's weird. PINKETT bans on bold babies but then it's also interesting to me that's weird breadth of demographic that really loved in it and that's I think really kind of great to know that like when you think of all the things that I took off as an individual's being in the margins platforming wind which is in the center of Privilege Right Right which is I think what let me get away with it like if I was testing where not traditionally good-looking overweight eight indigenous woman and it wouldn't have happened. Men Net really touched people. I don't think I realize the extent of it. At first. I mean all all my friends were talking about Nana's popping up on facebook constantly but it was only when I saw you on stage presenting at the Emmys when I realized how huge you'd become denies just what jokes especially men arrive fell. That's why I'm presenting alone. This is the point where I can't because I literally gone come from nowhere. In this circle well like it's in the Hollywood situation but all of a sudden. I'm an alien that weld for people know who I am and it's we'd like people I I I've seen on TV only associate as like I went to this party for net flicks and they were people that you moving around just kind of caution as Jodie default day. I'm John stomas get I and then they coming up to me so I'm getting and they seen in it and they want to talk to me and that is he's a really trippy experience like John Stamos. I mean Jessica Fan of Ninette you would not. That's what I mean. John Stamos has seen in twenty cents what he told me but you know people lie. I I WANNA believe on congestion after events. Can we trust the Lao so that's sort of this weird because I'm used to being in a crowd. I can be invisible bowl and I just walked the world guideline. I'm very happy with that then. These people are coming up to me on my own that today which is also good because they they get to lead the conversation and then I'm like I say I am also a fan of your work robot and then so I mean that so that's already already quite a lot to take in and then this woman taps Children's Janice friends would like to meet. You and I'm like Oh look around for her. She's not there because I'm being summoned and and so I'm like well okay. Let's let's Shaw and then all the way through this party like I'm following following this woman weaving through the crowd on like this weird also weird because outdoors had white carpet only outdoors the land decisions all decision and also wind decisions but anyway we get there and uh-huh introduced and she's delighted to see me and I'm delighted to see her hair is as good as everyone. It's not all photoshop and she's like she goes in for a hug whom I refuse and then she said I'm so excited to meet. You just have to tell you. I have not seen it was based on Hypo. HYPOC people are Jennifer. Aniston wanted to meet me because other people had told her and then I just sort of very bluntly replied why. Why did you tell me that you said that yeah. I have autism. Oh Okay and Sheva firmament. She seemed slightly thrown by that 'cause she's like I'm Jennifer Aniston. That's why tell you I think you heard us off and then laughed like it was a lovely genuine moment we just like. I just wanted to connect to you. I've heard such great things have been able to watch it because I've been filming and I think ultimately is we'd and funnies interaction is it's also kind of you know. She lives await life yeah and she is. She's probably going. I don't know what goes through people's had. I have autism but it was a strange little little account. No little situation wasn't I liked it ultimately I. I think that was a good interaction. That's a great in hot of me goes on you. I won't motivate cool and by the time I identified identified as being gay. It was too late. I was already homophobic and you do not get to just flick a switch on that. No what you do. Is You internalize that enough. I be any learn to hate you. Hate yourself to the call. I mean you got so much love for but there was a really loud backlash from mostly mostly dudes complaining that he doesn't count as comedy the there aren't enough jokes. Comedy isn't supposed to be a serious. It's supposed to make you laugh like how do you respond to that. I think if the only reason you speak to make people laugh yeah. What are you saying right and we hear from our peers too? I WANNA be able to destroy in every every room. I WANNA make people laugh in every room. If you want to then build an along show that that you won't you know for now that you want people to sit down and watch. It's very arrogant to think that you know just destroying every time you walk in is going to be enough of people who are not in a room with the it's a different form because people get bored laughing. Believe it on you can be walt wool funding for seventy minutes and there there are other get bored or mindless. remember a thing that was also fine but these arguments about you know this is not comedy is what comedy was invented so recently. It's a literal joke. You know like you mean the form of standup around long enough to getting this high in mighty just made up yeah like it's made up like a lot. Eventually you know if you dig deep enough. It is made up by where it was performed perform the context that was performed in I mean if you look way back way back before even the written would you have oral storytelling is how culture was passed and that was something that women participated in and then historically women and being squeezed out the the sharing stories and the writing of stories you know for not being able to access education public spaces etc etc so really you stand up. Comedy is the logical conclusion of centuries. All all of you know men writing their own rules for themselves which is fine good on fellows but you made a mistake by letting women educated now we so back off right right. I mean because the accusations already been made like oh you killed comedy killing comedy but if one person can kill co comedy comedy comedy that robust in an end lung ending I just pulled the plug and comedy I saw the there must be some evolutionary benefit because whilst where we still laughing like the clearly there is something you cannot you cannot kill that art form will you can because people are okay at making themselves love. They don't actually need to outsource particularly now like friends and family make you laugh more than any comedian ever world. That's right absolutely unless you lonely which a lot of comics speaking from experience but it's also people are able to make themselves laugh in their circles quite easily particularly now with the Internet. You can have access to love anytime you want so you can go. I need a love you look on Youtube. Whatever whatever floats your boat you can find that laughter that I think the F- The live form has to evolve because the world has has what it needs at its fingertips. If if you want to take comedy seriously then you have to you know has to move into a moment reform otherwise stay fat jokes against a brick wall and there's nothing wrong with do not in the net. You talk about leaving comedy altogether. I do think I have to quit comedy in seriously probably not forum to make such an announcement. Is it in the middle of a comedy show but I have been questioning running this whole comedy thing. I don't feel very comfortable in it anymore. The past year have been questioning to reassess says. I don't think it's healthy for an adult human. Take stock pause and recess and when I first started doing the comedy over a decade ago my favorite comedian was due KOSPI guide very healthy to raise this isn't it if Nannette had had not hit the weight hit and became this global sensation. Would you have quit comedy. Altogether would quit the cycle autozone which is writing a new show. Every year was diagnosed with autism is my understood. The last hours leading was incredibly distressing so I'd spend three or four months really in a catatonic state which is off to the Edinburgh Festival would generally and so then I'll have a new show and I believe that shortening my life but also I'm approaching it. You know my when I do next in the same way that I approach internet which I need to not care if this fails. I need to know that I'm happy and I am. I know that I'm happy like if this all goes white I tomorrow just go back and live with my dogs and Notre Garden and probably get a few shifts my brother's fruit and vegetable shop and and you know what I am that simple in my needs I would be fine when you got diagnosed with autism is there. was that part of you that you there's that perform report every experience every piece of pain you recycle it and you try to turn it into something funnier. You know the was there a part of you that had the instinct this happened. What do I do with it. I I have fairly good instinct. Cape to myself because I had put most things out into the world quite like that's that's something I can wrangle into a show but this cut right very much to the center of my identity. This is my brain. This is the way that I think I know like just you just know the the way people view. Autism is not great. It's not an empowered platform so I knew to keep it to myself and then but what I did when the net was a show about autism ultimately. It's like Luke how my brain thinks it's constructive. I say things that people don't I don't see a lot of things except most people do in your new show. Douglas you talk about your diagnosis really like directly and powerfully for people who know you from ninette when they see Douglas. What are they getting dictating. Well Festival beginning a performer. WHO's not you know frightened. Every time I stood on stage to perform the net I this a a new what was coming so there's a you know was carrying a lot and never easy to perform with Douglas. It's a fun show like it is a playful. Oh silly. It's showing a another facet of WHO I am. There are so many jokes. It's Really Joe Candy. I mean that does respond to like like Oh. She doesn't have jokes. I'm like no. What do you think they're going to criticize you about now. Since you've proven you're funny and you have even more jokes and this hour oh that's why I'm doing it. I'm fascinated. They will have something saying. I need to know what it is so you're you're. You're trolling them hide painting. Yes I call it what it is in the show. I'm deliberately height baiting. Wow yeah sort of like I take a poignant moment and then I sort of destroy it. That's the most talented trolling I could possibly acidly platform. What are you GonNa. Do you GonNa do good. You'RE GONNA troll. trolls already done good. Yes I want trump trolls. You told me about Your Dad's scrapbook. Oh Dad has been that has been collecting reviews an article since I started doing comedy and he's listening Tajik from more of an archivist say he's like here's the thing that Google that said that you've been mentioned. It's the good bad and ugly before I wrote in there was to spyro bounding went to staples office twix and strategy but I'm trying staying and got the bound. Spiro bounds shade being printing often so he's got these two spiral bound things at Christmas the phone the net. He said it's starting to get a bit same same so I'm going to stop. She said they as you scrapbooks had like on the front. My comedy career would like Microsoft would graphics thanks three day off so cute and then of course I wrote in the net and then halfway halfway through the as like well if I had to start a new spiral bound and he was really ill his melanoma being treated for melanoma throw. This is kind of like a really great way for me to be in his life. You know because there's not much you can do while someone's didn't treatment like for me to go to cancel my New York season. Go Home and being with my dad's is like that's a lot so that was a really wonderful way for me to still be like actively connected to my dad during the the whole thing because he's like you know Google on man of course it was so much press so much press. He said to me said you know when you're in Edinburgh. I could just take the ads and you print it out on a knife or piece of paper flying but this New York Times reviews went for pages not made of time in the New York Times should know that they should restrict how much they can't. My Dad's not made of tone and thank you for doing this. Hey My pleasure. Thank you gets new shows. It's called Douglas. She's currently in the middle of a world tour by the way a few days after we talked. Hanwha an emmy for her writing on the Neth coming up like he's an orphan the movie that was my fourteen year old self secret obsession. He thinks he's got things. You've got a baboon heart. That's next in studio three sixty hello to sixty listener. Here's another show to check walkout. It is called mogul is from spotify and Gimblett media and it's a podcast all about hip hop most iconic moments told by the people well who lived them. It's hosted by the hip hop journalist Brandon Jinx Jenkins and this season of mogul will take you down south to tell the origin story of southern hip hop and a big musical controversy of the late twentieth century the show is a rich and riveting mix of Miami Bass send beads battles over free speech and definitely one you won't want to miss the new season of Mogo starts with the story of two live crew how they made hip hop Nastier than ever sure and then find themselves on a collision course with the US government you'll also learn about the world of Pirate Radio and here's some exclusive interviews with lots. What's of Miami greats such as Trick Daddy Rick Ross Trina Flo Rida while she fire and more you can stream the entire season of mobile on spotify now or listen to new episodes every Wednesday. Wherever you get your podcasts o n a piece of advice get your best headphones to listen to this one because there is is a lot of base and Great Music Studio Threes Sixteen Hi. I'm Hari Kondabolu and I'm filling in for Kurt Andersen who is currently on assignment in Hawaii doing research on my ties but it's not actually the first time I've been here two two years ago. I came on the show to talk about a secret obsession of mine a work of art that began the process of brainwashing me into thinking that relationships were just about love the movie that taught me that as long as you have love there are no other complications the one thousand nine hundred eighty romantic film untamed heart magic magic records in a baboon her he almost got me believe in untamed heart is a romance film that stars. Arza Christian slater wondering you think about me half as much as I think about you and Mersa Tomei. I don't want you to die. I love you with wonderful support work by Rosie Perez you and while the filthy mothers plot and you're the first time I ever saw it was probably the end of junior high school early high school. I think that was around the time I was like. Oh discovering girls and it's like Marisa Tomei wow and used to get HBO HBO for free for a week you know 'cause they used to have those previews and so I remember seeing midway through and being amazed like I've never never had these feelings before and I feel sad at the same time. I want to feel that kind of feeling that they're having. I believe it's called love at some point. Remember going to a store. You're an athlete vying. VHS Tape of untamed tart which I think must have been strange to see like a teenage self Asian boy with a a copy of untamed heart like it's. I don't think people would have expected that but maybe that read it. Form Hasn't been created yet it. The opening scene of the film was a mercer. Tomei runs into her home and she's about to go on a date so she's changing out of her waitress. Close and Suzanne Vega's Song Tom's diner the remix version was playing while she was changing very ninety ninety s did and runs down and goes into the car and it's clear the guy isn't as into her as she is into him slowly anymore. No I didn't say that. It's just maybe we should start seeing other. People and it's kind of this constant. UCF things just not working out in her life. She works at a Diner Caroline's walking home in two guys who had been bothering her at the diner had followed her and attempted to rape her at which point Christian slater's character. Who is the busboy named? Adam takes a two by four or four by four. I really don't know the dimensions of the piece of wood but then knock doc the both unconscious and takes her home and so then they start falling in love with each other. Take my fourteen year old me is like Oh my God you can and say that and you can feel that like this is this is new. It was very confusing because usually when you think of puberty. You don't don't think of complex emotions. You know you think of that girls hot and it wasn't that it was like this is really beautiful like he's an orphan. He's smarter than people think. He thinks he's got thinks he's got a heart. Christian slater claims that he has a baboon heart just a story one of those nuns at that orphanage told a scared little boy who didn't know I was so he's got a heart problem and so he believed till adulthood that it was a baboon heart the this becomes a bigger factor when the two guys that Adam beat up earlier to save Carolina Comeback and stab him which sends them to the hospital and because of the enlarged heart it he almost dies and he refuses to get a heart transplant because he's worried that if he gets a new heart he can't love Carolina the same and the heart. You have this diseased. No one is taking away my heart. You were just a kid. It was just a story. You're going to guys if you don't do something about it. Heart the doorbell so anyways he doesn't get the transplant and you see like a montage of about a year of their life in how deeply they fall in love with each other and then Adam Dis which I suppose in some ways as the spoiler but you know what's going to happen could be like that was the one thing I followed through with in my life. The one thing I didn't give up on the film doesn't have a happy ending but I in some ways. That's the important part it's the fact that she loves him so much and that her crying at the end in her morning shows how much she loved him. You get that sense especially when she's by herself in his apartment holding his vinyl records listening to the same Nat King Cole Song they played earlier which is nature boy and the thing is if you hadn't hadn't died at the end. They might have still broken up. You know you don't actually know that. Maybe you know he was bad with money. Maybe he doesn't want to have kids and she does or vice versa versa. Maybe he's so awkward. Her family can handle it anymore and she's like all right and there's all sorts of things that happen. Life is complicated but it totally began the process of brainwashing me into thinking. This is how love works. I mean people ask you what your favorite film is an independent dependent on if I wanted to be honest or not and if I wanted to be honest I would tell them untamed heart if not I think I probably said newsies than I realized. That wasn't a thing you could say either. It was hard to tell that to two other guys came movies untamed heart like really it's not cliffhanger or rocky or Jurassic Park as a teenage boy not supposed to have feelings like this. You're not supposed to want to fall in love. I think and you're not supposed to appreciate a two characters. Were in love like it. It's not really taunt that you hurt yourself. wasn't finished. There's incredible chemistry between Marisa. Tomei and Christian slater and I think Marisa Tomei really makes this film and I'm I'm not just saying this as the like fourteen year old boy that was in love with him. Resituto may or the thirty four year old man who is still in love with Marisa Tomei but I mean this. This opened the door for me like after this I saw love story nineteen seventy with Alli McGraw Ryan O'Neal love each never having to say. You're sorry bed of roses. I so afraid to be happy. Don't you think of these worth far and away not a good movie untamed heart. This started the whole thing. That was a very strange enchanted ball. They say he wondered very far very far. Over colon slash my guilty pleasure when I was a strange enchanted boy and now I must cynical man. What's something that you like that is unpopular unfashionable or is just really surprising that someone like you like something like that. Let us know in an e mail the voice memo and send it to incoming studio three sixty dot Org Schuyler Swenson produce that story coming up. I I wasn't interested in come from movies because of my cultural tonight all right. I was mentioned come from movies too limiting. How Safiya Chang's three decade long friendship with the Wu Tang clan brought her closer to her own culture being able to broach the topic of my cultural pride through the circuitous route of hip club and looting. That's a gift that's next in studio. Three sixty studio three succeed. I'm Hari Kondabolu guest hosting for Kurt Andersen. I grew up in New York City and when I it wasn't watching garbage romance films. I was listening to a lot of music and of course hip hop in New York in the ninety. S was pretty unavoidable. I mean I remember me. My friends blasting pragmatics flavor in ear remix in the summer of ninety five. We're talking BUSTA RHYMES BIGGIE L. Cool J was on that I mean it was packed baby and that's a key part of my childhood. It's unavoidable so but hip hop would have been easy to miss for Korean Canadian Sophia Chang. She grew up in the seventies and early eighties before hip hop and really exploded and she was far from the rap epicenter. I mean she's Kinda. Far from everything she was in Vancouver. British Columbia nevermind not hearing hip hop. I didn't grow up with RB. It was really like rock and roll and the closest that I got to hip hop was punk that kind of sense of urgency but not with beat but what really really changed my life. The song that changed my life was the message by grandmaster flash and the furious five her to my senior year of high school hearing that Song inhering those opening synth notes and the beat and the bottom missile and then to hear the lyrics broken glass everywhere. That's wow it everywhere people pissing on the note. It just don't care. I can't take the noise got no money to move out. I guess I got no chart. I mean just this world that was painted that was so diametrically opposed to what I had grown up in. It was cinematic so beat cost. I'm close to the odd. TRY NOT TO LOSE my head. It's like a jobless how there was a sense of anger and urgency said this is our world. This is our our reality. This is who we are and this is what we're dealing with. Sophia Chang wanted to be closer to where the music was coming from so right after she graduated with a degree in French literature she moved to New York at that time. The scene was tiny. You know it was one thousand nine hundred eighty seven and this is right kind of what we we all generally called the golden era of hip hop right but it was still very New York centric. It was berthed here obviously so going to the clubs loves what was extraordinary about that. Time was the sense that the whole community was there so you had the emcees the DJ's the poise the you know the graffiti artists but you also had the managers the people the Promo people the agents the lawyers and hip hop was the galvanizing force soon after she got to New York she landed a job with record label and she rose quickly to work in our in marketing and management for some seminal hip hop and R and b artists a tribe called Quest Hieroglyphics foucher nickens Raphael Sadique Dangelo and most importantly taking the job thinking sorta she entered the Inner Chamber of the Wu Tang clan clan led by the brilliant producer Rizza the legendary nine member group out of Staten Island changed hip hop forever starting with their nineteen eighteen ninety three debut album into the tanks. Only Brown Chang was right there with them. She's managed Rizza as well as other members like old dirty bastard which is uh. She talks about that lifelong friendship with Tang clan new memoir the baddest bitch. It's an audio memoir released by audible so there's no physical traces her incredible career to when she started working in the music industry. I find it fast 'cause you. You're doing an ar it was with Jive yes and you worked with a tribe called quest and I find it interesting as you were talking about this time where you have all these music music executives and it's like the art and the commerce were together now. That's a good point but at the same time I was thinking about that tribe lyric industry. We Really Eighty record company. People Are Shady number. Four Thousand Eight People Are Shady so watch. Ah Look at how the act you. How were you able to not be one of the shades records executive people that q tip talks about. I hope he wasn't talking about me. I think that what was always at the core of my ammo was as I always wanted what was in the best interest of the artists and I think that I've learned that they don't necessarily get that a lot. Yeah what does and this is a very basic question. What exactly does an a an Ar Rep do so oh. Anr stands for artist and repertoire but essentially the simplest way to describe it is that the anr person is the talent scout so they are the person that goes out and they find the talent Aland but once you find the talent and you convince your label to allow you to sign them then you shepherd them through the system of the label and the process of making an album album and you facilitate that early nineties you know you're obviously one of few Asians in record industry and particularly in hip hop wasn't only in Asia is an Asian woman right so I was a minority within a minority within a minority. I'm a Korean Canadian woman. I'm a French lick. What major I'm from Vancouver. I mean my you know type my background my culture my language. None of those things are essentially hip hop so to be not only to be welcomed but to be embraced. The way that I was was so incredible it was such a privilege voyage to be there and all of that went to a whole other level with the clamp. When did you first hear the Wu Tang clan. I've heard the Tang clan probably in the spring of Nineteen ninety-three when I got the demo and was on a maxell tape and I just remember he was like scrawled and kind of crappy crappy handwriting and at the bottom of the name was prince rocky and it had this phone number which I remember to this day that's right. I've original. rap name is Prince. I call him recommended this day. We don't make it's a clock to see hostile apostle and so I heard the demo was playing for anybody that would listen yellow. Walkman wasn't it was put on those personal shitty listen so I knew that I wanted to get to know the guys and also the mind behind the music right and luckily the guys were doing some of the recording at battery studios which was in the same building as Jive and that's when I met all of them and then how did you build the relationship when you weren't like they weren't on Jive. You weren't representing them. At the time right. You ended up later. Managing Rizza JR is an od but at the time that was not the relationship. So how did you become friends. How did you find a way in exactly what you're saying right. I don't work for you you. You don't work for me. You're not signed to my label. You're not signing to my publishing company. I don't manage you. There's no transaction right. I'm not sleeping with any of you. There's no money there's no powered. There's no access. There's none of that. I am I am this woman that is a huge fan who just shows up at your door door and I'm this kind of anomaly like this little Asian woman and she's just brimming with excitement and she's like a Jack Russell terrier and and we Kinda can't Ed get rid of her but we don't want to. I WANNA play a clip from near the beginning of your audio memoir. That's on audible. What I love about hip hop and Wu Tang in particular it was a they made it acceptable not only to be angry but also to express that rage through art as a petite Asian woman. I never had the luxury injury to simply lean in. I had to kick down the motherfucking door. I had to learn to be big and strong and other ways as the Rizza would say my took my sword and I assure you I have this rated many in my day. You talk about how you appreciated. She aided the anger and the rage that Wu Tang showed in their music and how rare that was. Why did that attract attract you to their music. Why is rage and anger in music and art specifically important to you. When I was young long I mean I got called. Chink Jap Gook all the time Chinese Japanese dirty knees look at these and that fucking pissed me off yeah watching Ching my parents and I'm sure you went through this experience watching my parents who spoke English instill do with an accent and have clearly different phenotype live right core clearly other watching them be made to feel other in the most crass and vulgar way was enraging to me so to hear music by these black men who also had essential bridge who also lived on the margins who are also held down and black women of course and who were also held down by white supremacy and white patriarchy. I mean obviously I didn't have this language when I was a kid but I knew that I was mad all right. I just knew that I was mad at being called Chink and so when I heard this music and feeling the sense of but also a sense of pride and one of the things that I find so remarkable about voting yes we can talk about their arms. Yes we can talk about Rizzo's beats. What resonated with me as a petite. Korean Canadian woman was also a fearlessness carelessness right. They walked with so much confidence. They would walk through the clubs a hand on each other shoulder so they would form a chain. It was almost almost the idea of a spartan failings meaning. Wu Tang clan ain't nothing to fuck with right and that kind of claiming their space was incredibly powerful doc. I was GONNA say Congo Line but you're right. I think it is probably better you can yeah. I remember when they came out. You could tell there was a degree of fear from part of the mainstream because they were willing to be angry and they were willing to be honest and I think that honesty and that anger and that straightforwardness straightforwardness and there was nine of them. There's nine black men sharing the truth aggressively that scared a lot of people and look at them now and it's kind amazing because they love Kung Fu movies in a weird way the Wu Tang clan. They made their own Kung Fu fan fiction. It's the most bizarre thing they refer to Staten Island a Shaolin tank so have just been took to the death kid. I mean like they would almost be seen as nerdy in some ways today no question so many of us who don't fit into that white black battery end up having to navigate that space and be the closer to whiteness or closer to blackness or shift depending on the code switch depending on the situation a lot of us have drawn strength from black art and culture the idea of speaking truth and challenging a sorority and it's interesting because the Wu Tang they actually drew strength from an elevation culture mhm you know. I think that Rizza is. I believe that he's the Bruce Lee of hip hop RISI's a philosopher at heart and think about what Bruce he did right so he took from all of these traditions and then he put it together and he made his own style Jikun Dawn. I think that really did the same thing with music. He took all of these styles then he created this music. None of us had ever heard anything like it. Wait a second it's messy and it's dirty the and it's grimy and it's incredible and you're just so vibrant and I think that he would attribute that to a lot of what he gleaned. From watching Chino's martial arts movies show in shadow boxing and Jiang sought style. What you say is true the Shaolin and the Wu Tang. Could it'd be dangerous. Do you think you'll time saw can defeat me. Is there an argument to be made that it's cultural appropriation cultural appropriation when it's by people of Color does not feel the same to me uh-huh. I have a very smart friend named Kevin Brennan. He teaches race at Babson College. She says you know there are three kind of markers for cultural appropriation denigration exploitation and eraser. I don't think you could say that will. Tang is even remotely guilty of any any of those things. It's like you said they're quoting clan for right Xiaolin. You know my ex is a Shaolin monk to this. Day is one of the risk closest friends rizza trained in Kung Fu right so rather than erasing Chinese Culture Asian culture martial alerts culture. I think they did the exact opposite. I don't think we would have had crouching tiger without the Rizza and I mean that seriously. I don't think we would have had rush hour without the reserve. I'm not saying that only and by the all exist of and they're big star the films that they were in love with their from another era. So what you're saying is that it kind of brought them back and that's absolutely relevant. I think that's right. I think that what happened. Hurry was when people listen to me for instance. I wasn't interested in Kung confirm movies because of my cultural denial right I was interested in movies until I'm experiencing their love of and respect for Asian culture up close that I had never had myself and frankly had never seen anybody else. Including my people was phenomenally empowering being able to broach the topic of my cultural pride through this circuitous route of hip hop and looting. That's a gift yeah. I started doing standup comedy. After I saw Margaret Show do standard Korean name my career named Moran which is a pretty name but you have to understand up my my mother scream it from across the hills. They'd never seen a voice that wasn't black white or Latino. Doing Sanford and even though she was a Korean korean-american woman from San Francisco the ability for her to speak about her parents and her life and for her stories to be valid and for her to make people laugh with who she was and they weren't laughing at her they were laughing with her that that changed my life and my only wish that I knew you existed when when I was fourteen it would have been wonderful to know that this music that me and my friends listen to that was our soundtrack in New York City that there was an Asian person that was contributing to the movement and we had a place so I thank you so much. I am so honored to be here. I really really appreciate it. Thank you thank you so few. Chang's audible original memoir. The baddest bitch in the room is available. September twenty six and that's it for this week show studio three sixties the production of PRI Public Radio International in association with slate. The production team is Jocelyn Gonzalez Andrew Women Sandra Lopez monsalve Evan Chum Lauren Hanson Soon Kim Sarah Sanders. Tom Zaria Morgan flannery Kurt Anderson and I'm Hari Kondabolu. You can follow me on instagram and twitter at Hurricane Abol also while I'm on tour all over the country including Charlotte Northampton providence just go to hurricane blue dot com for show dates H. A. R. I K. O. N. D. A. B. O. L. DOT com or just go to google figured out her Anderson's back next week. Thanks for listening R. I. Public Radio International Next Time on studio three sixty. She changed the style Silo Theatre. David Hyde Pierce one of the many students of Haagen who turned from a great actress into a great acting teacher she had to come up with all this grounding reality because otherwise she would just fly off into the wings because she was so innately theatrical celebrating the birth Centennial Haagen next time on studio three six

Kurt Anderson Hari Kondabolu New York City Marisa Tomei Wu Tang Rizza Vancouver Wu Tang Douglas Christian slater Melbourne Google Miami emmy Safiya Chang US Hannah Gadsby Hiatt Brown Chang Edinburgh
29. Hannah Gadsby

Conan O’Brien Needs A Friend

1:00:07 hr | 2 years ago

29. Hannah Gadsby

"Whether your home or traveling to a place, you've never been the same question. Always seems to come up. What should we do Airbnb experiences are one of a kind activities hosted by passionate locals, and more than a thousand cities Ovid for quality and created for the curious just like you. Now, play you did this, didn't you? Yes, I went ghost hunting in how on Hollywood Boulevard, and it was, and it was all sponsored by Airbnb. Yeah, Airbnb experience and it was awesome Ida great time. We didn't see any ghosts. You didn't see any ghost. We'll, there might have been like a ghost coming through like this, this FM radio thing, but it was really fun. And on. It goes coming out of FM radio. A lot of history to when we went to a bar, and you'll appreciate this bar, where the black Dahlia victim is last seen. Wow. So we had a whole experience. See Airbnb is so much more than you think. That's right. See a ghost or a murder scene with Airbnb shakeout Airbnb dot com slash experiences to learn more. Do it. Now. Don't be a fool. Jesus are you gonna forget what happened three seasons ago on that show? Everybody's talking about, you know, that show but you don't you'll never forget a delicious Beal tea made with unforgettable creamy, Heinz mayonnaise. Slathered onto a mouth watering, Turk club mix it into a luscious garlic a Oli or lay it on a thick cheddar cheeseburger, and because of the unforgettable creaming hours later, you'll be telling everyone within earshot just how good it was. Because guess what people like to hear all about the mayonnaise. You had several hours prior. Try something new try unforgettable. Creamy Heinz mayonnaise and the new Hines mashups, mayo chop. Mayo Q mayo must and Kranj time for me to go get an MRI because my brain's on fire. Hello. My name is Hannah Gadsby. I feel confused about pain, Conan, O'Brien's friend. Foams. Walking. Looks and. Hey, welcome to Conan O'Brien needs a friend. I'm Conan O'Brien. I guess that part was obvious. Not many people have my deep bass voice. I'm joined by my assistance cinema Sissy. How are you Sonal? I'm doing great. Are you? Yeah. What do you have your fingers up at your mouth? I don't know. I was biting my nails 'cause I've been a nail by nail biter. Yeah. Sucks. You know, when we were kids, and we would suck foam in our mom wanted us to stop. She took that clear stuff that you strengthen your fingernails with varnish and she put it on our thumbs. Mouth. But then the problem is that perfect safely. My phone would go into my mouth at night, and then I would wake up with all of this. Oh, yeah. But here's the kicker of the story, I was twenty four. I am not surprised. Yeah. I was sleeping giant crib. That's more of a sexual thing for me early is here. Man. How are you better? Now that I've heard all that. Are different fantasies and mine is to be a six foot four inch Irish baby. Michika. You did it. My nurses, so fee of Gara. What did she comes in and says? You know. I don't know. I didn't I just went I don't know what happened there. She was eating something when she came in the room, she was eating some quiche. I Caramba I dunno what she would say. Move on dot org or whatever it takes just introduce hush happening. What is happening? I don't know. I'm just a guy. I'm just a guy who's trying to earn a living one of the hardest ways you can earn a living. The pot. Between digging a ditch with my bare hands or doing a podcast. I gotta tell you that'd be a tossup because this is a very dangerous job. And there's a lot of physical labor involved moving these mics around and drinking water. Okay. Let's get into it. Stoop? I'm very excited to talk to our guest today. She is in my opinion, a brilliant and brave performer writer unit. She is just a very impressive person. And I'm thrilled that she's here she exploded onto the scene. She'd been around actually doing commie for quite a while. But in two thousand eighteen she didn't Netflix special entitled the net and it was a seismic cultural event. One of the most disgust television happenings of the year. If not the most discussed it was absolutely breathtaking. She is now touring with a new show called Douglas and I'm overjoyed that I get a chance to mind meld with her today. Thank you for being here. How's it going social? It's going well for me. I'm delighted I just met, you minutes ago, and I am delighted and I don't use the word delighted often used to several times, very quickly will soon it will soon be revealed that I don't know, many other words. Yeah. I'm so delighted with you right now, I'm furious. I am I did Mirer wish it could use a stronger word. I'm trying to figure out. What's the better word Cyrus stalker? Longtime FanFest on cool. Exactly. I'm going to get this, right? I. A massive Ed Mirer of your work, and I really was blown away when I saw the net. I know you hear this from a lot of people and I hate to be the person who saying the same thing you've heard over and over and over and over again. But I thought it was brilliant. I thought it was spectacular. And I watched it. Glad you enough to. I was just working off of just working off at an article on BuzzFeed list. But the I felt so many things afterwards, there are maybe thirty five we can't get to all of them, but there are thirty five things that you brought up in your work in that performance alone, and just in your comedy that have got my mind reeling. And when I found out that you were willing to come and do the show, I was so relieved. Because I thought I wanna talk to you, personally and I want to connect with you in this in this way, they can only happen in a podcast because if we talked in real life, wouldn't be recorded in would make money at Rukh away. Like I, I have a this is a good like. Oh, I know what's happening in conversation. Sometimes, I think it's finished and hasn't thought too late. So you would have. By now just walked away property. You do pools. And I wasn't sure but I knew because everyone's still sitting on taking my cues. Okay. Yeah. Okay. Wasn't on. I do intend to go on. Yeah. No, it's okay, I anything I can do to help, you know, this is all great. Okay. I'm good. Yes, you are. Actually, you're wearing a headset tethered to the table. So there's nowhere. You can go. And this is my chance to talk to you about so many things. I'm going to start with self deprecation and your special Ninette. You sucker us in beautifully with great great softer, appreciating humor, and then you talk about the pitfalls of being self deprecating and some of the problems with it. And so, you gave such a compelling argument for not doing self deprecating humor. You made a very compelling argument for why should go away and I'm not even kidding around. And so I wanted to talk to you about it. Yeah. I I'm finding myself in an interesting vision. Now. Because like part of the reason why self-deprecation was bad for me was because I exist in a mountain lies several months allies identities but posted a net. I'm in a powerful platform now like I have quite a quite a voice in the platform. And so now is the time to be self deprecating, but I can't I won't be self deprecating about those intersections of Montelimar identity. So I'm not going to make fun of my physicality. I'm not gonna make fun about my gender and my sexuality, but being generally hopeless fine. So that's still on the table. I think so, yeah, because that's, that's universal rural lady. That's, that's that I'm so glad you said that because over the years, many people after my show became established, I think too many people they would look at me and they would think, well, that's hollow. He's being self deprecating but he's a white man in America with a television show and. Aren't enough of and I fought myself. Deprecation went onto my hard drive at a very young age when I was none of the things that I am now in it I was anxious. Not always won't. Well, if you want to get into it. No, no. It was not always white changed. I have changed. But why are they go for this shade of white? Really commitment. I could've gone. Could've gone for an off white. I mean, there's so many ways. An ecru. No one uses that word enough. That's not gonna help. It's not gonna help me. No, no, no. Just the and go must slip that into. Sanction. Yes, they will someone out there is writing down at crew right now. And he's it's I think it's e c are you and I was the person who's writing it? Okay. I was in the midst of telling you about my childhood pain, and torment, and you've got us off on these billing of ecru. And now I'm less than delighted because that's still the only word I know help to help. Tell me. I don't know. I felt when I was much much younger anxiety, and lots of just negative feelings that I think a lot of young people feel, I downloaded all that into my comedy, and then it never changed. And so three flicks it's a reflex, and it's there and it's a little bit my approach to the world. And I have never minded that that was my approach to the world. But I have often thought especially after seeing your special it made me think a lot about ways in which self deprecating, humor can stunt what it can stunt you it can freeze you in that moment of powerlessness and anxiety, and reinforce it over and over and over again. And I watched it, and I thought I believe you're right. Always that and that conversations like, oh, Canadians at the press, like. Because a lot of a lot of comedians walk with self-deprecation and it's you know there's an investment in being Pless. There's an investment in being, you know. You know, we're gonna make many people off his high status very few comedians. Get away with that. They like on nailing life slink. No one case, I don't know if you're gonna agree with me, but Jerry Seinfeld seems to be this strange exception where his manner is very much. I'm good. And everything's okay human neutral. Yes. He's kind of like the perfect straight white man. You know, he's just like yeah he's not. He doesn't even have red hat. Yes. Made some bad decisions on the hair and the shoe front. But other than that, right? He's fine. Right. Right. You know, there's a little pressure, particularly on, I think, guys to, to be likable in the best way to belong to believed to be, so if depreciating but in this world where finally recognizing, you know, the, the perils of power, like there's a lot of particularly guy COMEX who don't know they have their in a privileged position, because they've worked their entire life going on just a little guy and live Todd for me because I'm not the perfect guy. But now it's like but being guys an advantage. And you know this, this floundering to be head. Yes. And so when I watched net there's so many things that started spiraling in my head. Not just self deprecation because I thought, okay, I can't I gotta table that but Hannah really has me thinking about this and. Ways in which it might be seen as false ways in which it might be falls ways in which it might be stunting may from finding something else, or communicating in a different way. I think are things in enormously helpful way to grow like, you know, the compost, polish it on. And that, but then, you know, you can't just, you know, I think that's where I was a micro, like I was, you know, ten twelve Eason definitely not eleven. And just going out to what else to say. Like it's just repeating the same angle when I was growing with confidence, because, you know, reasonably Tennessee now, but I was doing quite well, now it's silly, but sort of, you know, I felt stunted and I was watching a bitterness creep into my attitude, and that's never been in a professional jealousy. And just like you know, it's like that doesn't make sense. So there's all sorts of things that are no longer part of my life now because it's changed much. But that was part of the writing all star break out of a route, what you did in the net is so raw and so real, and that is the power of it. And now you have people that might be saying, we can get you hundred ninety days doing that. Or we can, you know, thirty five Netflix specials, and you're being asked to man you know crank it out do not. What I'm saying. That's something we do in America is in the UK, if something's good. They make six of them. Yeah. Done on the United States. We make we say what's just keep making these until everyone hates them. Yeah. Which is great. That's a easy way. Retirement plan. I'll keep keep trying in the Santa line hated in will quit. Like I promised. The only I'm very good at being in the I'm feeling that poll, but I'm, I'm not so much doing it. I mean, I've written a new event touring it but, you know, I feel slighted vantage in that sense is like a lot of comedians. I work with started when they were teenagers. I was in my late twenties. So there was a law. There's a lot of unmined material. And then I've been working quietly on the other side of the world for twelve years, hurting my craft and now suddenly on him, but I've got a got a whole life, you know, although I did do regret packing so much into, that's that could trade show. They could truly said, separate exactly token, token was one of the writers helped you parts of it. The part where you go in the misty forest loss. Necessary. But, you know. Getting you to the next thing there's a I feel it. Anyway, this, what's next, what's next. What's next? What are you going to do next? I'm very fortunate that someone else had the idea for this podcast and said, would you do a podcast. And I didn't I wasn't that excited at first, I thought, why would I do a podcast. I'm doing TV show forever. Why am I working my way into radio? Absolutely loved it, because it is a completely different rhythm. And it's a rhythm that I love it's a rhythm that I find really exciting and honest. And, and also, I get to talk to people. I really really, really wanna talk to the way, I wanna talk to them. So not much of a risk their obviously a white male doing podcasts as I said, not a big risk, but a huge reward to try something new. And I'm just curious for you. You say you're fairly inert, but that would be a strong temptation, I would think people were coming. At you. And saying, okay, we know you have a new show, but can you come speak here? Can you come speak there? And when you can you can you retail some of the parts of Ninette that are must be very painful for you to talk about. They clearly were in the special and now might be pressured to. It's out there. It exists in. I will I don't really wanna talk about, you know, to directly anymore because it was painful, and I toured for an eighteen months before even add. So it was, you know, perform that show in front of crowds of, like thirty and ninety people, which is no a comedy show. Someone kicking off at a family reunion. Rolling and it is like broke the code like I broke the contract of comedy. And I knew what I was doing and the new that was going to be what you think you broke code what code using he broke people relaxed. You know, they don't have the defenses up they not in ready to receive trauma. And that's what I did. I made them relax. And then I did that too. And that's a violation, essentially, so I have to take care of them. So that's why the show is written. So precisely you know, I do leave people in these, you know, it's quite quite a hot place. So doing that in the room is released when people watching in the home, they can pose turn off walkway. Whatever all the, you know, the does a whole room of people getting any certainly did not expect and so kind of like a exhausting for me. Eight months of that. I very strong reaction to anybody. And I didn't hear it a lot. But I heard that there were people who will wait a minute. Is this stand up? It starts out his stand up, and then it becomes this, and I had a very, my view of these people have like, well, you not a human. Like I I thing is after watching that game technically comedy. No. Exactly. It again. Fine. Roman. Point. I fall. Where is the rule? It's, it's. Don't I know? But it's an hour. It's an it's a it's an hour and ten minutes of you in a microphone. It is going to be what you want it to be. And it was powerful and it no moment. Did you lose me? And I laughed a lot. And then you also you also did what I think great art, great theater. Great works of writing are supposed to do it. Got in me and wouldn't let me go, and made me think about a lot of things in a way that was very grateful for. And so I was very I was very angry with anybody, that had a bit of a like what the fuck you talking about this. Is this is a beautiful powerful piece of work, and I will fight anybody. This is great. I really did feel that way. I never really happened in the live shows like that's not. But once I guess, we went on people in their own spaces happened a little bit more and particularly here I think you have a different stand up culture that we have in the UK and astray area. So it's long distance runners, opposed to sprint but to interesting people that I taught about when I wrote was Donald Trump, Trump Taylor swift. What I was going to finish that sentence for you together again. We've all heard it. Yeah. We all put those together because it was kind of watching with horror, Donald Trump rallies. Right in the four he was not even nominated but just those like, he's not saying anything and he's like, it's an. Just watching that group mentality. And then. Taylor swift. I went through a brief obsession just only because I wanted to understand I still don't but I really studied at hunt. The Taylor swift of it all this. What is it? Does she? Couldn't stand. I mean. But it's like a lot of people think it's Molin, fine. And they like she brought her and songs. If. If. I mean rains will I will not sit here and listen to this rain is a strong metaphor, but it shouldn't carry an entire crew. I really don't have a problem, but I did study studied the swift and. The during her ninety ninety nine we'll too. I think it's called the clean speech. I don't know if you're not that would make me creep yet. My I really don't feel on the demographic. But it was it was intellectual. So she just sort of in her concerts, an, it's like platform, and with cable and she still there this link messiah. Just go to this huge crowd and alert crying going, this is profound. And I got some transcripts. And just studied them. I'm like she has said nothing like she's genuinely not sit anything like she's meant it whatever she didn't, sir. Really meant. I think it was that sort of, you know, that, that vagueness of speech, people will just like I want this. They fill in the blank. It's preaching to convey to the converted. Yes, quite literally, but was quite fascinated with and it happens in the room, like it's a live these things wouldn't work on. So I was fascinated with that, that moment, Tallahassee, and I'm like, I don't think that's healthy. You know, that's not how you open a closed mind, right? Like if you said, that's why I started I need to shadow that allusion like break the audience up. So people like I don't know how to react because. No. That consensus has being broken people lift as individuals in, in the room. Amuses. I wish the show hit ended with dedicated to Donald Trump. Taytay. But if known just which you were talking about. Needed that pointed mission. Yes, we have this tradition of the stand up special where someone prowls the stage and didn't move. Yeah. Exactly. I was going to say you were like a master matador you'd you didn't go. No, you didn't. You didn't move. I don't think you moved an inch. And in fact, at one point, you went and you went to take a sip of water because maybe one or two points during the show. But when that happened, it was electrifying. Because you was so minimal you didn't move really conscious decision. I made me on because I, I chose to stand still because that's the thing I don't have to make a decision about drink full performance of it literally taking a stand. So because it's a lot of heavy lifting. Yes. In the show, you know, emotional, I guess, but, you know, also the show I think is technically, you know, if it had all the material that I trio full strands, three free and half hours long. So I would pull it together and take every performance with slightly different was alive in the in every room than I did. So that's why. Well, let's not throw wound king, and thinking into the same. The same moment. I thought you are so eloquent and clearly, well read and clearly have fought through everything. So, well, I thought that added a lot to the performance that your language was so precise. Was that a choice or you're just really, really smart? Which I know you are coalmine Columbia. Was famous working along and I found that being intelligent was disarming for this bundle being quiet quietly, intelligent, actually worked early on foamy. And I think what is, is quite small, generally, like, I think they're getting increasingly more intelligent, particularly with comedy. Because we've got access to comedy all the time now, like there was a time when the only time you could watch comedy, usually on TV unless you, you know, in a city that had a live sane. But generally, you know that's not much of the world in the scheme of things. And so, you, you had a very small amount of Coney in that, that was what you will left with. Now, you can call me anytime you like and I think that I think is great for the foam because it's like, whoa, we can really push it now. Because people have got the CAC sorted anyone can just Google videos, the fine, they can have laughs like that. So that I think it's blown the, you know, so much potential. In, in the idea of what, what stand up can be. And it's, it's I think it's become much more specialized that used to be everything's become more specialized entertainments, become more specialized, you can find the exact thing that you wanna find because there's so many different small nations that are possible. Now when they used to be in this country, there were three networks and that was it here. The show is yours. Happy days. Here's liver and surely shut the fuck up and go to bed. And that's what you got. I didn't mean to show you all know that that's real insight into your life. Shut the fuck up a bit. That's how my mother used to speak to me. Yes, she did. Sailor. But very good, sailor. Yeah. Yeah. We'll be right back with more things that aren't true. Support for today's show comes from Chrysler, and I don't just mean financial support also mean emotional support, I'm serious. They've emotionally supporting my whole life. Chrysler. I my family were long Linda Chrysler people. Cool. Yeah. It's one of the first cars, I learned how to drive a Chrysler Newport. Yeah. That my grandfather, don't anyway, let's talk about a much newer Chrysler that everyone's buzzing about the Chrysler Pacifica. This is an amazing car. In fact, Adam Saks our executive producer last time, we talked about this car when on and on about how it blew his mind. The question Pacific is all about technology. It's got you connect theater system. A you connect theater system, that comes complete with dual tenants HD touchscreens and built in games apps. It's got a Blu Ray player. Do HDMI inputs wireless headphones wireless, streaming your kids can watch different movies on the screens in front of them, or plead other games like tic TAC toe license plate game chequered, sit Oku. More your children. Will never look out the window again. They'll have no concept of the outside world. Thanks to the Chrysler Pacifica. When they're in their thirties. They'll go, what is that father, and you'll say it's a tree, but father in the question Pacifica, we were so enjoying our tic TAC toe into okwu. We never looked out the window. That's right child. It's a tree, and you'll see more of them. But now back into the Chrysler Pacifica courses in the future. So it will fly by that point. No is really cool. Apple carplay Android auto integration stuff. I didn't even know existed. You can access maps, apple music Google play even sent messages with ease, plus the twenty speaker Harman Kardon surround system, own my God. Twenty speakers in one car. It's a lot. Why not forty I say twenty speakers, that's insanity. That's crazy. But you hear all the best. Fa favorite music podcasts. You got to check out this car. Just check it out. Have you seen one Sonal I have and you know what I think? Mini vans, used to get a bad rap until this car. Yes. Chrysler Pacifica made. The minivan cool. Yes, also, I'm told uh-huh. And now crisis offering a thousand dollar incentive to all Conan O'Brien EADS friend listeners. That's, that's a lot of money money received this great offer at Pacifica, Coenen dot com. That's Pacific Conan dot com. You'd get one of these. Of course, you're not gonna be child stage it your newly married. But yet but one day, you'd consider the question Pacifica, wouldn't you kidding? I would get one now. Right. Just because it sounds like it's a cool car to drive right? Yeah. An-. You famously ruined my car on your show. So it would be nice if maybe you bought this car for me and we're out of time. Travel, constantly, I'm always on wcgo shooting. Those travel shows, and even when I'm not shooting something I traveled because I'm restless inside when you have no soul. You need to move to compensate, any who you got to have the right luggage. That's why I use a way away offers high quality luggage at much lower price because they cut out the middleman and they sell directly for you. I feel a little bad for the middleman. But when you get those lower prices, screw them, right? Yeah. You get to choose from nine colors, four sizes, the caddy on the bigger carry on. They could come up with a better name in that both of which are complying with all major US airlines, the medium or the large man, what do they come up with these crazy names? I'll suitcases are made with get this premium German polycarbonate. Nice. That's lightweight unrivalled in strength impact resistant, they got the three hundred sixty degrees. Spinner wheels guaranteed for a, smooth ride. I like to sit on those and just spin around. Sometimes that's normal. Yeah. To normal thing to do. Best all the carry on's are able to charge anything, that's powered by a USB cord. Yeah. Now that's a good feature. You've used that feature because I sent a some definitely I got the purple one of these, I got the, the bigger carry on didn't ask you which size. I'm sorry. And I it's the best because my phone's always dead. Yeah. Or I tell you, my phone's always day, tell me whenever I need to tell you something important, and I can't get you. You later on say my phone instead guess what? Now I know that with away luggage. You don't have that excuse think of something else, like you broke your ankle or something. Anyway, try it for one hundred days. And at any point, you decide it's not for you return it for a full refund. No questions asked. If they ask you one question you can go no questions. You've loved yours mine. It's definitely. I mean just I love for spiel spin wheels. I I love four wheels. That spin I think you are spending just now was not a bet. You're just before you came in for this ad read you spun around. That's why you're so out of it when we are on hiatus really if we're in here doing this for twenty dollars off a suitcase. Visit a way travel dot com slash Coenen two thousand nineteen use promo code Conan two thousand nineteen during checkout. That's the way dot com slash Conan two thousand nineteen use promo code Conan two zero one nine for twenty dollars off a suitcase. They say you can't run from your problems. But yet you can escape your problems and bringing away bag put it all behind you away. That's good advice. I made that up. And we're back beautiful. Oh, it's really good. I even read it as you said, it, it's something I noticed that. I thought was brilliant. I loved it because I've never seen anybody do this. No one's Gus do this. And so many people talk about the brave aspects of your show. And there are so many of them so many brave moments. But the one that I don't hear about is that you go after Picasso brave on so many levels. But no-one he is always held up as the example of. Well, you can't I mean Picasso and I just love that. You just said, I don't get it. I don't like it. I don't like him. I think she is in his shit. Business fine like Josiah Barak. Let's bring him up into the world but it's. You know. He's just a mythology now nobody really these moved by Picasso now known emotionally at the time shore. He's doing, you know, and I could say the same thing in it. And maybe five ten years time, you know, more people have done things, grow in the idea that I fern out that and then it doesn't move people in ten years time, because the compensation change it's all the time because does not move people now tastefully go good with the line, but essentially, like he's an historical figure and the only reason he moves people is because of his worth, and he's built on his mythology and I just don't have time for this is like only rich men by Picasso's, and that's why they talk about it. That's why he's worth. And he's, he's wrong came in the museum's. Keep the conversation going Shaw, but had a few other people in and let's Cape in the story that he was a Pri biscuit, like he was awesome. And he was, but, you know, we can learn we could have learnt from that. But it was a naval. All right. And that's you know, not looking at that and thinking about that. And making sure that that's part of the story with still those guys who getting away with stuff, and people who allow them to get away with stuff, because that's the culture 'cause we think, oh, we can't exist without the genius. Genius genius is like it's an event, not a person and it's replaceable like you know where it is in need outta swift, Philip. But you know you don't have to put an artist on a pedestal. They no longer responding to the world. They don't breathing the same air. So I it's shit. Oh shit. No. I've also it's also driven me crazy. When people say things like well, if you know if it weren't for Newton, we wouldn't know about gravity. I think listen Newton was amazing. And I'm not going after Newton. That's your job to go after Newton, but no someone else would have figured he was brilliant in his moment at that time, but whenever people think that had Thomas Edison not come up at the light bulb would still in two thousand nineteen be stumbling around on the Dr I wanna fight them in a bar. Daca berg. Just twenty wildly connect with someone you would eventually. If you've seen me fight. Sort of like freckled pasta with around. Oh, wow. Yeah. No, that's an image. Yeah. Do you strands of freckled pasta? Just flailing. Yeah. On a on a sort of ill made turbine. Steam powered spinning. Really just sad. You. Good image. You. I'm working lazy. Susan, like esteem, pal. Our lazy Susan that you've stapled to pieces of freckled pasta to the pastas. That is, you know, those inflatable saying, yes, yes, it flip and flop around, yes. In front of a car lot. We're showing cars that you finding dot com. Yes, imagine that. But being able to see it hitting no one. This is quite then now. Yeah. I want to say something else, cool. And I think I'm allowed to my name is somewhere in the show, kiddo. I'm not a fan of the angry comic on stage because a lot of times I think, wait a minute. They're men. They're really not that angry about getting a bag of peanuts on an airline. The he they're really not that angry. This is manufactured there. Moments where you're quite angry upset, and you're expressing that, and it is profound will, the, the filming walls, actually kind of even more difficult than usual. My mom was in the audience, and that wasn't supposed to be. I heard about this, your mother's was did you did, you know, before you went out that your mother would be in the way, I'd been looking after all day, you know, so, and then I did a whole round of the upper house before I film that, like a couple of months, I kept saying, doing pup. Playing around too. And like. So she's a pirate. Crazy. I organized the date for the filming. She can pull up that. Yeah. All right. Can yeah. So like bullshit. Yeah. Because I couldn't do I had to do it. So, but so that and as it happened, I could see quite distinct white crop of hair, and you know, this like in my line when I did this certain. Bit slump, you know, life. And I it was it was a lot. I cannot imagine that. I, I think I have a good imagination. I can't imagine talking about something that potent. And your mom is, is there. I know that she's going oh and let my don't the I is not what I was saying. But, you know. You know, that's you that you think. Kohl. She's going to think that in that room, you know, like so that really, you know, I can say with confidence that was genuine performance because of that also, you know, like, I just think the separation of comedy from drummers, not the smartest thing we've ever done like starkly, you know, voice coexisted done. You know, done anything new, I've just reminded of why Wook so, well, so it'd be interesting to see what I didn't. Well, let's talk about that. Talk about that. You have where do you go from Ninette? You know what's, what's the next you have another canvas now? So it's. Why stop talking? But I did. I think skid. Touring. Yeah. It was kind of really interesting creative process because I felt a lot of pressure creatively to spirit in which I wrote it was like well Trump back in it. She's quite seeing you can't just keep, you know, it'd be disingenuous to his the mole trauma. Yeah. No. I think I've, I've dealt enough of that out. I just need work on this stuff online. So I think the way approached it was say, well, I can't back that up, you know, I have to create something, you know, that's content to live in the shadow of Ninette. You know, because, you know, that's where I live now at the moment. I'm living in the shadow of minute. That's what this show nights the big. So I, I ended up running a show that's really from. Really fun. I'm genuinely having fun on stage. Which is new thunder. I mean, I'm happy for you. Yeah, I want you to have a show that is giving you joy and not. And not putting you through the ringer every single night. Yeah. Getting angry that peanuts on the plane. Manufactured manufactured rage, working willful smashed melons for a while onstage in your Gallagher phase. All right. Very good, prop coming back. That's something people don't know seen the footage he were master. I used to take the muck for now. The stand. Prowl the stage. Yeah. Amble. Yes. So I'm actually quite excited about it. It's interesting my first American tour. I know really, you know. You know, did neocon a couple of dates in LA, but I really haven't haven't traveled about. So it's gonna be fascinating how, you know, audiences receive it's interesting now I get steady nations before I even get to the moniker phone, and it's weird because it's like he's you gotta keep me room to fuck out like don't like it sold of light. You just need to have some respect for you. So I understand going, thank you for what you've done like I said, I live in the shadow of. Yeah. So, you know, which is funny that I've created quite a light show. Yeah. Wrote it in the spirit of like I. A need not care if this fails, which is I wrote Neten a need to not care, if this does push me into even further so it's like I'm prepared to typically creatively take a risk and files, that's fine. Well, so that's I mean, I have to because I we did don't even come from liberty knows. I live, you know, she lives in. She's doing thing in people's heads. It's a no. That, that tro has had an impact often enough. Can cough now? Is a human right? No. That was not the point of this podcast. Clock office in like in my no just like I can just get a job around the supermarket and for vigil just have a nice garden and stuff. Like, yes, you have earned the right. Yes, you have that permission, because I need that from me. That knowing that and thinking like that gives us a crazy freedom that, perhaps, if you invested in the wall to wall, I had to say, I have to say, I think the risk that you took to risk people's I r- disatisfaction feeling that this isn't a comedy show. That was my house killing accident. Sign up. Call money show old mothers. Snow off in a comedy show. This in Cali. Yeah, yeah. It's still very relevant at the young people. Yeah. You know, stralia. When I before I tend aiding I'd seen to films cinema was Marlin Otis, and crawled under eight. Oh my God. You just saw crocodile Dundee. You started. Artis and crooked. Unday two. Yeah, I just I was just in Australia, and I was telling you that, and I think one of the big, I feel like that country's been lying to us because I went there and all the done my whole life. My perspective has been Australian saying calm to all straight. Yeah. He. You're gonna party all stray. Oh, yeah. 'cause where's no rules. And we shrimp on the but there's no rules. Listen. You're gonna listen to this accent. This is important to me feeling. Fire comes all. It's crazy down here and then I got there, and it was we have a lot of rules. Hang tight about the rule makes me laugh about that. You know, like, wait kit. Throw another shrimp on the. Wait, don't say shrimp. We say prone, if we really didn't care. We'd say another function prone on the Bobby shop, and learn exactly we speak different woods sometimes. Right. Don't drink false, does log height it everyone hates it Austrailia cats pass. Yeah. That's another thing. They always said, forced ho strean full. And outback steakhouse. What's interesting, you guys have blooming onions. By the way, is that a real thing? I don't know. I don't know. Specific the two. Tumbleweed earn artichoke fried onion that they've convinced us is an Australian delicacy. The people that fast. Conspiracy thing is like. The idea of str- strays a huge country, like we had a very large population, but it's a massive into of its environment, but people think it's either like surf all the desert, which is centrally. That's what it is the outlines. But I'm from Tasmania, which is another world entirely. So it's not. It's more like new-zealand really in its acceptance politics. But, you know, like, so it's that sort of like it's almost, you know, people's idea, I don't come from people's idea of straight near the best times, but I did have a meeting, one of the meetings, where I think it was wanna brothers. That's where we are. Now, this is one of brothers enough me, you know, she's saying, oh, you know, tweeden particular showed that she's worked on. She sits very popular in Australia. I'm not sure how popular it is intense and the. We love rules. We have rules are very intervals, and they kept saying, you know, very needy, the very needy and they give this impression that locating prawns off. Trying to life. Good. Are you doing? Yeah. It's I love that, that they were very very very interested in in this closes at this time. And no you can't we don't serve after this. And these are the rules, and this is the district that you're in, and you must. Yeah. Did you get a hunger games? There was a long train in Woody Harrelson was there. That's. Austrailia this a frightening tourists that tourism ad you seen. I know. Yeah, they yelled at me about fosters and they yelled at me about a shrimp on a prawn. I was scarred for life. Yeah. We'll dig deep into that. Well. Comedy. That's. You see my our fifteen minutes show. About how I was deceived by Australian commercials in the late seventies, the lofty, minutes, pin-drop. I did want to thank you for busting the myths, and I believe you that pain is necessary for, for art and for inspiration because that has been one of the big struggles in my life is for years. I refused to seek any help because I thought, no, I need this to be funny. And then I finally got to a point where I thought, whether I'm funny or not. I don't care. I don't wanna happy or, and I'm planes, always gonna find you know what I mean? Like fly, that's what it is. You don't go looking for it, and especially staying, and I think there's a lot of I know a lot of comedians who like I don't think I'll go on anti persons. That's women funny, isn't like me. Yeah, that's funny. Right. It's, it's, it's harmful, but, you know, couple couple shows down the track all just be doing comedy. And that's when the issues really. You're gonna work out your real pain with prop comedy. That's the emptiness. Well, that's very different. It's an honor to talk to you it really is. And the name of the show, it's throw a wine about Conan O'Brien needs a friend. The truth is that I really do value meeting people that I admire who've done something, I think, profound, and getting talked to them in even just be their friend for an hour means a lot to me. So this is a big deal for me. Thank you, likewise. It's been spin a treat go. It's been pulled consequence of Foster's in. Form, we're going to get money. See now you sound Australia sped are heated. All right. Thank you, very much in the gets. Thank you. God bless me with mazing hair, and I'm not bragging. I actually it is just find out what I said, I am bragging, I have deficiencies, just not in the hair department, and what I'm saying is that not everybody's been fortunate as I am when it comes to hair, and that's why I want to talk about hair club. Hair club is the leader in total hair solutions in this country's been around forty years. I remember watching their commercials and I was a kid. So if you want to revitalize the growth of your hair or you want to help your hair in any way, there's, they do replacement. They do restoration. If you have historic old hair that needs to be restored and you want it done in a way that sensitive if your Harris from the eighteen twenties, and you want restored properly hair club has professionally trained stylists and hair health experts, but anyway, though craft a personalized. Lucien to ensure that you feel your best. Why not make your hair the best hair, it can be hairclips sent us a bunch of products? Yeah, they did. They an I, I was fended because sending hair products Conan O'Brien is like, you know, telling Beethoven he needs piano lessons, but whatever I took it with a grain of salt, and there are some they have good shampoos, smells good. It's it. Yeah. I didn't use it. Well, I put some of my hair, and I've smelled good all day. There's a lot of people out there struggling with hair loss, looking around this room. Everyone seems pretty good actually here. You guys are all in good shape. Don't be chump. Go to hair club dot com slash Conan today. For a free hair analysis and free take home hair care kit. That's valued at over three hundred dollars. Yup, that's hair club dot com slash Conan for a free hair analysis and free haircare kit hair club dot com slash Conan. Hey, we haven't done this in a while. Let's do review the reviewers. So these are some of the I team's reviews, they're all five stars that I have here congrats wings. There. I'm sure there are others that are less than five and you didn't pick those those people should use special. Hell, why don't you say? There are no come on Conan. There are none. Thank you. Seri-. Okay. Why are you like that? When my life who I don't know damaged inside. Well, call my parents now. Speaking of that best out there, five stars by elbow, sixty eight and their review is good job, Honey, mom. Oh, well, my mom has never used a computer in her life. So that's not coming from my mom. Is that what this person's employing? I guess, you know, my mom brilliant woman, but she doesn't use computers. And if you gave her a computer, she would try to microwave a ham sandwich with it. So as not from my mother. Sorry. Nice, try elbow, sixty eight Lulu catch. You says wish I could be Conan's for five stars. The podcast is, is amazing because I get to listen to my favorite comedian slash celebrity just talking befuddle and learn more about his life, and the lives of people in comedy, I love learning, and who better to learn from than sexy, professor O'Brien. See can I say something that's someone who sees me as being sexual? So I don't understand this riff. You guys have going good. I'm you know, gross Conan. How could he ever be central highly sexualize being? If you listen to last episode we talked well, we would grow you being sexual. Yeah. Yes. In general, most people are grossed out when I in any way into intimate that I may at one point. That's true. When my wife. Goldblum was in here. He he pulls it off. I have to say there is a sexual energy between Jeff Goldblum and I and I'm not even kidding. Something's going on there. And I, I am a heterosexual male, but there's something going on there that, that hard take a Louisville slugger to that. What, what could murder him, did you stick to collecting presidential memorabilia and making wildly different fashion choices every time you come into this. Yeah. Tomorrow a pork pie hat God. Hey, look. He's wearing a World War One German helmet and Gulf shoes. I don't know that you're never the same guy two days in a row. What are you talking a very different? Look just wearing a polo shirt, but then two days ago. You're like an architect from the twenties. You're never you're never treasured every time just because I came right from doing my show, where I in fact, wear a uniform, but Easter nice thing for yelling at the ER doctor for who's, you're always in scroll. Kennedy are always drugs. Would you change it up a little bit because I don't to infect the patient, whose brain I'm operating on just come in at Dickey's coveralls from now on. No, I'm saying is pick a look and situates very confusing. Trying to get your soul. No, no have to stick to express myself through, sir. To'real ways. Listen, first of all your cocky, because you know there's nine hundred or podcast that you have going at this time. And it's like, oh, look. He's a beekeeper. He's over said who's he going to be tomorrow? Hey, look, he's, he's a he's the embassador to Finland and it's nineteen eleven look he's earned. Today's is very tips, wearing jeans a nice sensible polls, these sweater. You're wearing came in. I didn't realize it's a sweater. Yeah. I didn't realize you were in the IRA, and you were blowing up bridges so cool. I guess, suffering bastards. House. Listen girly, I liked that. You take chances and you take wildly different chances today. It's you're just being as your person, that's all acting like lady Gaga or something just wearing pants, and a shirt, whatever the point is that what you're wearing today. It's that it changes wildly doesn't change does change wildly. Don't you dare ever speak when I'm speaking the idea of podcast with three people that only one speaks and the other to listen in reverence, Reverend, he and reverence, the wrong field reverential off? I'm going in hospital gown on open in the back seen that. This one took a I mean it took many turns it didn't really it was fantastic. You many direct hits. All right. Let's please. I'm tired. Let's wrap this up. What's rapid? Go bed. Conan O'Brien needs a friend with sonum of session and Conan O'Brien as himself produced by me. Matt Chorley executive produced by Adam Saks, and Jeff Rossa team CoCo and Chris, Bannon and Colin Anderson at ear wolf special. Thanks to Jack white, for the theme song incidental music by Jimmy of Avinoam. Are supervising producers, Aaron blared and the show is engine neared by will Becton you can rate and review this show on apple podcasts, and you might find your review featured on a future episode. Got a question for Conan call the team CoCo hotline at three two three four five one two eight two one and leave a message to could be featured on a future episode. And if you haven't already, please subscribe to Conan O'Brien needs a friend on apple podcasts, wherever find podcasts are downloaded. Cocoa. Production in association with Newell. Hello. This is Matt goalie. I just wanted to let you know that you can listen to add free episodes of Conan O'Brien needs a friend, only on Stitcher premium for a free month of Stitcher. Premium go to Stitcher premium dot com and use promo code Conan. Hello, everyone. I'm Adam coun- over, you might know me from my TV show. Adam ruins everything. But now I'm going deeper as the host of the new podcast. Factually out now on your will eventually is a podcast where I interview exceptional experts to reveal shocking troops and thought provoking new perspectives from around the world of human knowledge. We dive in with everyone from professors to Pulitzer. Prize winners about topics like transportation guns in the constitution trans issues and the military big tech sleep poverty environments in more, and you know, doing best to make it funny. It's an investigative comedy podcast for curious people who never stop, asking questions. So go on subscribe now to factually with me out of con- over out now. Listen, Stitcher, apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts.

Conan O'Brien Ninette Netflix Airbnb Hannah Gadsby Austrailia murder United States UK America Apple Adam Saks Pacifica Donald Trump Tennessee Hines Gara writer Montelimar
NPR News: 02-24-2020 2AM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 1 year ago

NPR News: 02-24-2020 2AM ET

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Nora Raum. President trump has arrived in India for a two day visit shortly. He'll attend a rally at a cricket stadium in the Indian Prime Minister's home state. Npr's Lauren free reports from Ahmedabad. Tens of thousands of Indians lined the route of president trump's motorcade from Ahmedabad airport to the Ashram that once belonged to Mahatma Gandhi. India's freedom leader trump is also inaugurating a newly renovated Cricket Stadium here which is hosting rally dubbed Nama State trump which means hello trump in Hindi trump hosted India's prime minister Narendra Modi for a similar event in Texas last year dubbed. Howdy mody. Npr's Lauren Freyre later. The president is a tour the Taj Mahal and go to New Delhi to meet with government officials and business leaders Democratic presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders says as the presidential election approaches. President trump is trying to divide Americans. That strategy will not succeed because we are doing exactly the opposite. We're going to bring people together. Block and white and Latino Native American Asian American Sanders spoke at a rally in Houston Sunday. Texas is one of fourteen states which holds primaries on March. Third Democrats live abroad and in American. Samoa will also be casting ballots but the next contest is on Saturday in South Carolina. The number of new cases of the corona virus in China outside. Its epicenter of WHO Bay province continues to drop. Npr's Emily Fang reports. The country's National Health Commission says of the four hundred nine new cases confirmed only eleven and other parts of the country numbers of new cases across China have been dropping most of the last two weeks. Local governments have been lifting some quarantine restrictions to let some three hundred million migrant workers return back to work and five provinces have downgraded their emergency levels too low or medium risk. Alamo officials to begin removing the most reunion controls on movement and commercial activity but now the corona virus is spreading more rapidly in other countries Iran. South Korea and Italy are some of the countries which reported a rising number of new cases over the last week in a televised speech Sunday. China's leader Xi Jinping China's battle against the virus was still in its quote critical stage. Emily Fang NPR news Beijing in South Korea authorities raise their infectious disease alert to its highest level Sunday. They reported another one hundred sixty one new cases of the virus taking the total to seven hundred sixty three a seven. Th Death was also reported. Many of the new cases are connected to a single church in the southeastern part of the country. You're listening to. Npr news from Washington former fashion model chef restaurant tour and lifestyle entrepreneur. Be Smith has died after struggling several years with early onset Alzheimer's she was seventy years old. Npr's Karen Grigsby Bates has this appreciation after a successful modeling career. Barbara Elaine Smith began the next chapter of her life as a chef and lifestyle icon with her husband and business partner. Dan Gadsby Smith Cook. Books became bestsellers and launched her into a multiplatform business. That included a syndicated cooking. Show a line of kitchenware and be Smith style. A well regarded lifestyle magazine. Eventually Smith Open three B Smith restaurants which featured her glamorous twist on southern hospitality and cuisine but in two thousand fourteen Smith and guess bef not Smith had been diagnosed with early onset. Alzheimer's they became educators about the disease especially as it affects women and people of Color. Smith died Saturday night at home with Family Karen Grigsby Bates. Npr News a federal judge has denied a request by lawyers for Roger Stone that she be removed from his case because of bias last week. Judge Amy Berman. Back Jackson had sentenced the longtime advisor to president trump to serve forty months in prison for obstruction witness tampering and lying to Congress in connection with the Russia investigation. At that time judge Jackson said the jurors had served with integrity stones lawyers say that that shows biased against their client and should be removed from the case. Jackson denied the request and the court filing Sunday saying she has ensured fairness for stone throughout his case. I'm Nora Raum. Npr News in Washington.

Npr News trump Barbara Elaine Smith president Samoa China Nora Raum Washington India Karen Grigsby Bates Emily Fang Prime Minister Bernie Sanders Cricket Stadium Dan Gadsby Smith Cook Alzheimer South Korea Texas Ahmedabad Smith
Illusions, Delusions, and Flat Out Lies

Slate's The Gist

33:02 min | 2 months ago

Illusions, Delusions, and Flat Out Lies

"I'd like to warn you about the explicit nature of the show. But i'll just hint that you know what you're in for making this an implicit explicit warning. Think it's wednesday january twenty seventh twenty twenty one from slate. It's the gist pesca. One of my take on game stop. You're treating it as a game. Stop moving on on the show. Today i feel about the lives of joe biden why they are merely difference in degree even an exponential degree compared to what we lived through but first derek del guadagno could be the best his job in america his a special out on hulu now directed by franken is called in and of itself. So you may have noticed that. Got into the show a little quicker today than i usually do. And that's because i've been thinking about this interview and this show in of itself so the hulu special is based on a live show which played in la and new york city for five hundred sixty performances. You walk into the theater. There are hundreds of labels on a wall. They're all the size and feel of a coat. Check tag and they have descriptions on them. A mathematician a matador a blacksmith daughter. The life of the party and umpire. And you pick one. The come into play in a specific way. Later the entire performance however is a look at identity and labels and the perceptions of what people are so the john mara the raw of the show when i said derek del guardia is the best in america is job. That job would be magic and the genre would be a magic show. Only it's probably more often described as a magic but show as in everyone who has seen it tells their friends was that about. They'll say well it's magic but it's storytelling their confessional aspects and it's personal and the audience is involved and there's just a lot of motion it's really real. That's what they'll say. It's magic button. But i was interested in however wasn't magic and magic tricks but what's wrong with magic. You'll hear me ask that i get that. Magic has these connotations of joe bluetooth or doug leading the spirit of illusion. They all might be off putting especially if you're doing what derek is doing and tried to communicate to the public. This isn't the joe. Blue bloom disappeared. dove. That you're used to and frank is who i don't know is he. America's most accomplished puppeteer probably he also finds the label of puppeteer. A little off putting by the way. I just realized this puppeteer also a job blue passion so listen. The three of us have a good discussion. This preamble is in a warning. It's not here to condition you. It's not saying look interviews little rough at times. Now i mean i push a little. They push back. I think in the end interesting insights or had. But i just want to use this space to give a couple of my other thoughts on the labels that we use but also when an audience expects a show a work of art would be one thing and it winds up being the other and i think audiences hate that at least american audiences. Do i remember the cameron crowe. Movie vanilla sky think. It was a remake of a french movie and it was sold as a romantic movie. But it's really here's a spoiler. It's really a sci-fi movie and that fact drove audiences crazy they re volt it another example little little bit different is the hannah gadsby. Special ninette was probably praised. The best standup special the year but a lot of comedians. The comedy community within the comedy community. There is a lot of pushback. you know. This isn't comedy and it became a flash point among some comedians because it changed challenged the form upended expectations and did things maybe to some people. That didn't seem like comedy is upsetting. Seemed like a category error. So what's fascinating to me though. Is that hannah. Gadsby was always very clear. Well of course it's comedy. of course it is. I'm a comedian. Don't exclude me from that tradition. Whereas derek and frank derek is. I'm thinking of magicians does not mind escaping the definition of magician nor frank just puppeteer and i have followed derek. For years. i've interviewed him before and yet true should be limited by. Don't come into the show thing and that's all he does. He does tricks but this is the best added since it is in a way the apotheosis of a storied tradition wanted to know why he felt. The best strategy was to issue the tradition. Sometimes we eagerly shed labels and that's a good thing. Sometimes we keep the old labels to help position the work of art in a line or as a craft with a history as a discipline. That's part of a tradition. Take newspapers most of them are on paper so we could say oh the wall street journal's video on capitol rioters. That's not a newspaper. Don't limit it by calling it a newspaper or we can take that idea of a newspaper and expanded to very much. Include some of the great journalism. That's being done off the page. I've always said that. Podcasting is radio if i look back on my career. I'll say i started in radio. And i stayed in radio. They just changed the delivery system but the practitioners the craters do have the right to define themselves how they would like to and if there was ever a profession that would want to make themselves disappear. I guess it's magicians. I know don't call it magic okay. It's the engrossing thought provoking transformative work of derek. Del kouadio and director frank. Oz the just sponsored by the jordan harbinger show jordan. Show is aimed at making you a better inform more critical thinker so you could get a sense of how the world actually works and come to your own conclusions about what's happening even inside your own brain. The episodes feature a guest. The guest is typically fascinating jordan pulls out insights from said guest because he is curious thinker. We're talking about legitimately changing your mind improving your life right away. Talks to a fbi hostage negotiator. He talks to a cinematographer who discovered a lost city in the jungle. One of the most important archaeological finds century for listeners. Of this show. We recommend checking out jordan's conversations with joan. Berger about how to change anyone's mind and mark edwards about true confessions from fake psychic plenty of listeners. Really enjoy this fascinating show and we think you will as well search for the jordan harbinger. Show that's h. e. r. b. as in boy i n. Is nancy g. r. On apple podcasts. Spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts or go to jordan harbinger dot com slash subscribe. Derek delgado's in and of itself was a stunning theatrical experience. In which the two time academy of magical arts close-up magician of the year uses his craft. tell a story about himself but also about us. We're all the unreliable narrators of each other stories that i'm not just defined by what you see also defined by all the things you will never see in and of itself was a part memoir part philosophical contemplation. It's now a hulu special of the same name special. Being the operative word the play was and now the film is directed by frank. Oz who like derek is known for an exquisite mastery of a storied and ancient craft Gaza's miss piggy iota. Cookie monster puppeteer. They're both with me now. Gentlemen thanks for joining me. Anything so i read about the connection between you. Two in fact derek. You had a long tweet thread about how you decided to tap. Frank is i was thinking about the connection between two and probably ninety something percent of it is artists and storytellers but there is the element of physical literally manual manipulation of material to achieve a desired effect. A story to how people frank have you ever contemplated that and do you think about that connection ever no no. I don't think so again. It's the you saying puppeteer. He's a magician. The show is actually about that the idea that we label each other when actually there is more to us than one thing. The idea that. I'm a puppeteer is only one aspect of me. The idea that derek is a magician is only one aspect of him but then she question no. It never occurred to me. I know that that's part of it. Derek the paradoxical nature of identity and how when we say magician. Perhaps that connotes something like liar. Someone who can't be trusted and this show is using the skills that you have in the tradition that you have to a little bit explode the box of what the labels mean. It's an attempt but only in in the sense that i needed to to actually say what i needed to say. It's difficult to convey what i wanted to convey. If people think that i'm i'm trying to deceive them so the title of magician just tends to to conceal the things. I'm trying to reveal. But i guess my question is i've read a lot about you and i watched old interviews and you have such a reverence for the tradition and the craft chafe at being called a magician and in doing so is that what does that say about what i know to be your reverence for the history and tradition of that craft. Well it depends on it. Depends on saying it if people if people haven't understanding of what it means to me than no but if they understand it as they understand it it has nothing to do with how i see the world or how i see my role or what i do than than yeah. It's difficult to kind of to let that. Stand so really depends. It's not not so much a running from it. So is it is wanting to wanting to make things that i wanna make out having perception of others get in the way of it. Yeah yeah derrick. I think that's true for both of i mean i don't have any problem cong- climbing puppeteer and i think jerk has no problem with people calling him a magician if they actually knew what we were doing and the perception usually is that they don't. The perception is rather limited and often georgia and condescending. It's not pleasant. Their perception of pleasant not been named were caller. Cells right there. Yeah that that's exactly where the connotation or what maybe is the common like. You said the common perception. And that's you're not say like for instance like starting a conversation on this. No we're talking about these. Things is is already a a distraction. From what the show is actually about in terms of like what. What is the dialogue. That i'm trying to have and so it's like it tends to be as It sidetrack us from the things that actually matter. That really genuinely matter to me i. I'll just throw in here mike. I mean urine right. Yeah it's one of the things i do. Well that's all your interviewer right. I know what you mean. Yeah so you're an interviewer. And that's how i see and so i get it at all you do is just when you wake up. You gotta get some coffee and then you talk to be. That's it right right. Yeah yeah the publicity team says. Don't don't call it magic. And i've done hours and hours of research into what you do and so from my perception. I have this reverence for the art of what you're doing and to some extent right how i feel about it is something like why should it be an insult if someone uses. I understand you're trying to market a exquisite work of theater that says so much about the human perception. But if you don't have that label on it if you don't have the category i mean maybe i can convince you know. Some percentage of the audience to sit down. And watch this thing that you don't even know what it is but there is also a necessity. I guess just in terms of getting people to pay attention to categorize what you have. And i don't even know i'll say i don't even know that if people come in with that perception that's working against you. I think the intrigue and mystery of not knowing what it is. We'll get more people in you think. This is a performance. See a man and a theater as an audience. It is difficult to see. Pass what this looks like. You can see it for what it is or you can imagine what it could be. I know from experience the difference between someone thinking they're going into a quote unquote magic show and someone going in. Just being told they have to see this and the expectation of seeing a magic shows much for disappointing and confusing than than not having any preconceived notions. It's an inescapable truth. There's nothing wrong with with the crash of magic or puppeteer ring or the you know the art of the interview any of these things but everything comes with some sort of preconceived notion in some of those fields in crafts. Have more weight or or pejorative connotations attached to them and unfortunately magic in puppeteer are are two of the lowest in terms of the entertainment world. And so you can't doesn't matter. It doesn't matter. If it's frank like you know you have the best in the world is something and it's still That's what it is. And i think what they seem is unfortunately they see a lot of bad magic. In bad puttering you know and they. They don't understand that there can be something lifted higher than that. That's all. I remember the first time we did. a colbert show of the late show in two thousand eighteen and we had been doing well with the show and and going on obviously going in the late show with cynical bears a huge bump in terms of you. Get the coal bunker End it was true for ticket sales. But what what happened. Which we didn't expect was the audience came just hated the show. They herge magician and they heard stephen bear likes it. And that's they bought tickets and it didn't matter all the other beautiful things he said about it. All they heard was magic. Show steven colbert told me to come. See it and and you know we have a one star review average on tripadvisor now because of it because because people are like colbert sent me to. The show is not even a magic show. This is ridiculous so yeah it's it's a problem in terms of setting expectations and so It's not it's not. We're not being you know delegate about link hotel call me this. Don't call me that. it's we want to have people go into this experience. In a way that is appropriate and setting the wrong expectation can actually literally destroy what we've tried to create for them. Yeah it's interesting it. It sometimes went two ways. One is hey. I came for matching shuttle magic here. What's all this talk. On the other hand sometimes it becomes the trojan horse and they realize. Oh jesus is this is more than i thought so in terms of putting it on film. Bring me this question. One the greatest card manipulators. I've ever seen as you're doing this frank cuts to. It's an editing choice your face at times. We don't even see the cards and that to me tells me that what you're trying to do is not necessarily. Wow the tv audience or the hulu watching audience because you know that everyone could just say well with camera tricks you could actually achieve any effect so there's no point to even commit to trying to wow them in terms of that and this is my question in a way. Does the film get to the heart of what. You're trying to do in a different way or more direct way than the theatrical experience did yes. I think that this is more The film in many ways is more true to the work than the live show was because we have the opportunity to show you what we wanted to show you and and say what we wanted to say without knowing that you can't be distracted by the trivial things like what our hands doing or what's occurred things like that that you can't help but think when you're in a in a theater and so puts it puts the right issues in the foreground and puts everything else in the background which is which is a luxury that we're we're fortunate to have though i think the real difference here in the real help in showing it's not about trips is a close up. The power of the close up is extraordinary. And that's what this thing is about is people's emotions on their faces in in the theater. One can't see that even if you're in the first row you can't see a real close up of derek face and the subtleties and you certainly can't see everybody else in the so here's an opportunity to see all the people in close up with the human face which is the most emotive visage in the world. I'll give you another way in which the film is actually maybe better than the theatrical experience because we can help his audience members butter question. How in effect is achieved so when as an audience member you see. There are several points in the show and the tv show where you interact mean deeply interact with members of the audience and i think most people will spend at least some of their mental energy. Saying how do that is that. Is that person plant. How on the up and up. It was but then when you show twenty thirty different people. Having this experience it becomes clear that there was no trickery per se. There was no. That's true mike. Yeah yeah you're right. It was it was we we knew we. That was one of the things we knew going into. It is 'cause i heard from doing the show. Obviously i had come to ask me questions and talk about it afterwards or right things about it and i knew that i knew that that was one of the things that people thought was. Oh i bet that there in on it or that's an actor things like that Into we knew going into the film that this is a way to to Show the honesty of it in that. I really was just telling the truth. And they're they're the ones telling themselves allies in that these really were people who experienced these things but more importantly that they you know like with the with the book the these people took the leap like even people got. The book was was like an actor like that. Oh someone didn't really come back every day or whatever but like in the film. It's very very clear that these are real people having real experiences and And that it's not. It's not based on any sort of trickery. These are really human. Moments really caught on camera. Yeah i guess how do that. How did he do. That is the lowest form of being audience member or appreciating or thinking. About what you. Of course i mean. It's it's like going to a movie and thinking about the special effects. If you're doing it's your it's wrong like you're you're vis. The filmmakers messed up or something is not risen to the risen to the you know the occasion of being experience that you're completely immersed in in your just on the ride and you should just get off in your head spinning and and unfortunately the how did you do that. Part is is generally the point. It's not part of the experience. It's literally the point and that's not the point for us on any level. Did you have discussions about to. What extent is this presenting a show and to what extent is this a documentary of the show. We did but it turned out that there shoul told us. The movie told derek and i wanted to be in. It was neither a documentary or anything else. It was whatever it was. It was in and of itself and again. That's the exciting thing to both of us that you can't describe it and it's intriguing because because of that and people hopefully will come and see it with their anything that fell away. That didn't translate. No no that no. I don't know it all is in there. But it's either either heightened by some sort of extra media The animation archival footage things like that. But no it's all it's all fair berto gaudio's show in and of itself was directed by frank. It is available on hulu. Now thank you guys so much. Thank you nice questions qualcomm. We believe in staying connected and you can see us wherever five g is helping transform telemedicine supporting remote education empowering mobile. Pc's the invention ages here. Learn more at qualcomm dot com slash invention age. And now the spiel. Joe biden is a liar has been caught in a lie. A serious lie. Three quarters of the way to an egregious. Lie if you go by pinocchio which allies air conditioners or the ib. You is to beer. Of course the international bullshit unit here is the thing. He said the untruth strapping. I apologize in advance for platforming aligarh. Under the previous administration. The federal government contracts awarded directly to foreign companies went up thirty percent that is going to change on our watch. Washington post ruled. That three pinocchio pretty bad. I would like to take a few minutes to quibble with the number of pinocchio. They gave which of course puts me in the position of arguing. Pinocchio public pinocchio pinocchio pinocchio pinocchio. They're not an objective quantity. There is no correlation to the amount of radiation given off by mineral. That's kept in a jar geneva. Pinocchio are set against the naval observatory does not maintain a pinocchio meter that you could call into at the tone. The lies will be to pinocchio over here. We got pinot kyaw via. Don't kill really. The analysis is of foreign contracts and the post was confused about where to even find these stats and they documented and i understand the frustration. And then they get into that. There's really no solid metric for what counts as a foreign contract and the figures for the entire country are impossible to go by but they find that and this is from their own reporting. I'll just read you. the quote. In the last year of the obama administration that presented afar contracts that were given waivers to buy american rules in other words with a lot of Procurements you had to buy american. you can apply for a waiver. the government might give you a waiver. Twelve percent of foreign contracts had waivers under the last year the obama administration in two thousand nineteen. It was thirty one percent under the trump administration so by that metric these foreign contracts. Were up thirty percents. They increased to thirty one percent. But the post also gives a lot of context. Why that's not the end. All be all that and they did convince me that it's probably not true however you counted that thirty percent of the government contracts were with foreign companies. Okay it's a quibble. This certainly seems like a distortion. That joe biden perpetuated on the american people. He may be got the direction of the trend right. Why am i running interference for this liar. I in fact. I do like the overall effort of holding everyone accountable. It's not like there shouldn't have been newspaper column about that claim and looking at that claim and even if the post wound up giving out pinocchio cheese samples at trader joe's it's a fine investment of resources he engaged in some shall we say malarkey. Here is another thing that joe biden said. Sadly it is another lie. Adam sir were noted this one in an column larger column and made larger points called biden will lie to you. Indeed he will. Sir were pointed out this one about the number of vaccines. I found it fascinating. Yeah yesterday the press ask. The question is one hundred million enough week before. There's in biden you crazy. You can't do one hundred million in one hundred days. Well we're gonna mm-hmm god willing not only do one hundred million. We're going to do more than that but this is we have to do this. We have to move. No one said joe biden. You're crazy no instead hundred million in one hundred days it's not even a double digit increase over where the trump administration was that least joe biden. Didn't look at the cameras when he said you all said you're crazy and say you with your lights on you know what. You're doing boo boo. And when he said at least he said they came up to me and said biden. Didn't say mr president. Aw okay. I'm just having flashbacks things for bearing with me here but you know it was an exaggeration. What joe biden was engaged in. And while sir were doesn't give out pinocchio 's the pinocchio are the point grey columbine him there was right to point out that no one was saying one hundred million wasn't possible everyone who knew everything said you gotta go bigger and bolder than that sir. Were in his column. That joe biden. Will you points out that all politicians like all humans lie. There are reasons to lie venal in strategic and he wants us to note that trump did it worse more often and with much more malignant intentions. It's all true. But i think it makes an error not giving pinocchio aaron conception donald trump's lies and the lives of other politicians are comparable in the same way that a lot of people bite their nails and also jeffrey dahmer. A humans is comparable to think of the lives of donald trump as just a more frequent sometimes much more frequent form of bad or une virtuous behavior that we all engage in is a disservice. It doesn't really get out the truth of trump's lies trump lied by the washington post. Count thirty thousand five hundred seventy three times. That's not a raindrop. That's not the weather. That's an ecosystem. Placing trump anywhere on the continuum of somewhat liar to lots of benefits in two ways. One it makes his successor. Seen as engaging in trump like behavior you know doing the same category of thing so at sully's biden but it also has to kind trump and it characterizes him to think of it as well. Everyone lies difference in kind but degree. That's the category of conception. We're thinking about. Hey just think of what. Trump is doing is not a different kind of difference in degree. It misunderstands what we all went through. Actually so when you lie once or twice once or twice a month you have lied when you average thirty nine lies a day like trump did in two thousand twenty his most dishonest day featuring over five hundred lies. What you're doing is seeking to remake reality. That was literally his strategy. It was as conscious strategy. Steve bannon said so. Trump has lived his life that way and got to try to execute this strategy. If joe biden gets people to believe that foreign contracts are up by thirty percent then people will be walking around saying. Oh that's a bad thing. Maybe i'll support biden's agenda though in this world when you point out that liar explain it to people probably a better way than the posted. That lie can be rebutted. The person who lied could be hurt by having people realize it was a lot you still in the realm of reality thirty thousand lies is remaking reality with the express purpose of creating a world where nothing you say can ever be disproved. Maybe not to everyone but to enough people don't in this world you don't have to argue every fact you just get carte blanche to sir what you want to assert and part of this strategy. It seems to me. I think we can recognize now. In retrospect was welcoming in a whole group of people who are never allowed to operate normal politics and understand truth right the cunanan crowd or the online lunatics. Their brains were pre broken and they help the overall project which is once again not to get away with is it's to operate in a world where there is no such thing as truth to recreate reality to your whims or your purposes. I wish we actually had a different word or term or concept for the phenomenon of lots of lies. This is true. There are some things when they reach a certain critical mass. They become a different thing. Think about collective terms right. It's one bubble. It's a few bubbles. A lot of bubbles but think of bubbles one bubbles relationship to foam become sort of a different thing or a strand of hairs relationship to a rich pelt. But it's even more than that. What i'm trying to get at a different term for what trump was doing in the number of lies that it's not about scale takes itself off the scale and we need to recognize. It's a different category of thing. Entirely for instance we've all seen a mirage on the horizon when we're driving or we've all heard somebody it was that. Yeah oh. I thought. I heard something. We've all done that. But there are people who are constantly hallucinating or are experiencing flora delusions or are hearing voices and with those people. We don't put them on the continuum of. Hey sometimes my eyes play tricks on me. There's a new category for them. We call them to lose if we could specifically diagnose them we call them. Schizophrenic truth there are non schizophrenic people who might have a synoptic misfire now and again and leaves them in a kind of fog for a moment but they're not understood that person that phenomenon which we've all had it's not understood to be a lesser form or more normalized degree of schizophrenia. Donald trump is alone. He's unique he is unlike this very important. He is unlike his not the same kind of thing as politicians that came before politicians who came afterwards by all means. Let us be mindful and serious about calling out the lies the lies we experience now that we hear now from our current politicians but let us also recognize. It's a different kind of vigilance. Where the stakes aren't existence itself and that's it for today. Show shayna roth precent digest. She really resents being pigeonholed by the occupation. She held a few years before she got her current job. She happened to stop a few species of fish into barrels that she made. But this didn't make her. Only a group or cooper margaret. Kelly just producer is so much more than that and her collection of short dramas about arrow makers while great. Don't just make her own right. Playwright all right and don't try to stereotype alicia montgomery because why because on the weekends she crafts. Small covey's from the local rock dove population but she's not wholly a pigeonholed literal. The gist never been cut into by iota. There's a little piece of advice. i have. Just pretend it's fuzzy bear down a lot easier improve peru and thanks for listening.

derek frank hulu joe biden derek del guadagno john mara derek del guardia joe bluetooth hannah gadsby ninette jordan Gadsby frank derek Del kouadio nancy g Derek delgado academy of magical arts jordan obama administration
Hannah Gadsby on comedy, free speech, and living with autism

The Ezra Klein Show

1:32:19 hr | 8 months ago

Hannah Gadsby on comedy, free speech, and living with autism

"This episode is sponsored by the Jordan Harbinger show or some of the most interesting thinkers in the world. Pull back the curtain on their incredible minds Jordan show which apple named it one of his best of two thousand eighteen demystify motivations and influences legendary creators, iconic cost writers, and other essential change makers. So you can apply their unique strategies and perspectives to your own life. Some of Jordan's recent guests who've been really interesting. You'll Brennan on comedy writing talks about his boundary pushing special three Mike and how to pull apart professional accomplishments from a sense of happiness bill nye on radical curiosity and how I made the leap from Engineering TV personality Blake Majkowski founder of Toms shoes. Tilson for yourself search the Jordan Harbinger show spelled H. R. B. I. N. G. E. R. ON APPLE PODCAST spotify or wherever you listen to. Gusts. I back in like if I hadn't a fan stand up comedy, I would be dead but now I just really honestly believe that. The fact that I found my way out of it is a story of such rich absurdity. The it doesn't it almost doesn't ring. True. Hello and welcome the CONSCIO- on the box media podcast network. This is an exciting episode of Redo but it's one of my favorite artists. The first episode we taped was obliterated by two not one, but two according failures one in the main recording, and then a secondary one in the backup recording and Luckily, we're able to do it again and I will tell you as good as the first one was the second one was even better some God. This is when we get to release Hannah Gadsby is on Australian comedian she was behind remarkable netflix special. The net just resigned brought out on a new one called Douglas. Nets. A piece of art that actually means a lot to me. It's one of those pieces of art people tell you you engage with things. You can maybe get a glimpse a little glimpse of what it is like to live with someone else in the world. And the net did that for me I think it's a beautiful beautiful piece of work and it's also just like its structure I. Remember my jaw has dropping as it unfurled towards the end. Of Her most recent special is Douglas which is about the way she thinks has received a diagnosis of autism, a couple of years back, and that is a contextualized parts of her life for her. So we talk about those issues autism of the issue brought up in the net around speech and safety and going through the world as somebody who the world is not make much space for very honest conversation where most what I knew about her came from her shows and getting this much deeper sense of her life. and. How? Brutal some the periods that she has turned into comedy turned into stories were. Just. What is like to be in the world as an autistic person with her tendencies in predilections in needs and hopes and desires I found this to be really moving conversation I. Hope you will too as always. My email is as recline show at Here's Hannah Gadsby had a gadsby welcome back to the show for viewers. It's first time on the show. Yes via the moments in invisible dissipation disappeared into the eighth. But it's so good. There's a Wilco Song. I love called the late grades about how the best song has never been heard like it's like this one show nobody went to with a singer nobody has been around to to listen to, and it's like that it's like the perfect show that has been out there hanging out in the hanging out in the midst of Legend. When there was a time when the form of communication with running very recently started to capture a communication and to make permanent and I think that's half arrays in we're in this mess. You know because once permanent is this less chance for people to apologize and the n shake reshaped thinking 'cause like I mean held. Held to ideas that had previously and the nine doubled down on become assholes. I think it's actually really right I. Whenever Read History Books I'm struck by how beautiful everyone is at crafting themselves in letters and I think about how today it's it's what you say on the one hand we're GONNA have like video evidence of every dumb thing we've ever said, but also the only way you'll hear what we thought about it is they're gonNA pull text messages out of our phones when we're dead defensive which we are so it's going to be more on a speech. I think off when you look back into history and you've got my word, we used to be eloquent. We used to have madness. We didn't. We just didn't proof of the otherwise. Do. You think it was better when we wrote letters do you miss letter writing. Known my whole life has been filled I. Still feel guilt. Letters I didn't right when I'm sure of written the Manasseh. Kids. used. To. Play Golf. Played Representative Gov of all things in Tasmania. Anyway the very long possibly an interesting story I can't judge. But anyway so it'd be selected to play in the state team and full that pleasure I had to the think the committee that selected me and then when I go and play in Australian Juniors than after finishing a thank you letter to everyone involved in that and I never rant running those letters look back in hindsight and I was rex. V is. because I knew I should read those letters I understood that it was Manas. Most of me was aware that my brother who was also playing didn't have to write those leaders and so the hypocrisy really really annoyed me and then also rising lettuce You sit down and write a letter in is like you know what people want to hear an effort to sound Thank you. Note to the selection committee to there. Will I know what they want to hear from me. So why not just pretend I wrote it because I'm just gonNA write what they want to hear. There's no sincerity to it at all. My whole life have had complete version too stupid exercises like at like. You understand what people want. So you do what they want. And just doesn't feel like there's any personal. So I never wrote letters but I felt guilt around not running the lettuce. Who enforced the differential thank you. Note regime was it was it that the the women's team had to do it or was it your your mom made you write letters and didn't make your brother write letters or wanted to make you write letters? It didn't WANNA. Make your brother write. Let us not it was it was sort of like the dumb thing ghost team so Basically, iggy played golf as a young woman to prepare you to be a wife. Whereas Boys, reply Gulf, because they play golf. So when I'd win a trophy, win win a casserole this or something like that a still under my parents time release yeah. I've got my dowry. I was collecting a Daria. I've got lice tablecloth got a clock. CUT, out. Of Hewn Pine in the shape of Tasmania that never needs to be. Tidied bit of would so obvious basically, every competition one encourage me to. Put together a dowry. A BLENDER WANNA blend to ones whereas my brother would win things like. Gulf balls and things that encouraged him to play more. Golf is golf involved in Tasmania in marriages where did this association come from? No, it's just the idea of like what does she do blend into the social infrastructure of golf? And Golf is awful on every level as far as sexism and racism and Elitism is concerned I. Think I think it's so funny that I used to play. Because it really is everything that is wrong with the world. What were you like is good. I was very slow moving I was very quiet. I was Roy. I think people tell me I had a good sense of humor I like rotate. I was watching the world for the most part I didn't participate in life until very recently. Except for the Gulf. Well. Go like sport was really good thing for me because. New to me. So this sort of lake. 'cause I used to play hockey. As from this this, this is fun from the Soda Town where if you didn't play sport the got into trouble if your boy, he did drugs if you go pregnant. Really, honestly girls debugged, we can do it all. You was a tough place to live. The town was dependent on industries in industries noise look after the population. So. The bleakness to it. and. So my mom was very adamant that we played spoil. And so I as a young kid I played hockey and I was in goals because. I didn't fare so well in team sport. A. Good because. The so many variables whereas in goals you know the scope of what you have to do, what happens is much more limited. So I was in that goalie I was quite good at it, but then I have an accent, my life is punctuated by experts. Had A lot of law of accidents. And this was one of the first big ones I told my anterior cruciate ligament just fell off my bike rate when Mike end and had to have a target construction I was living his old, and that's not not lazy reconstruction to have when you're still growing and certainly not an easy reconstruction. For to be effective in when you're in a small regional hospital. ACID to the world, they did the best but a didn't it? Basically I had a knee that would collapse. For my entire adolescence wasn't fixed until lousy my twenties. So I'd have this need. Buckle under nickname in regular. Intervals for Atlanta lists since I couldn't play any more. So my it what place slow Hokey Jug that Gulf. And it's I'm pretty good. Burn on. Golf Mom's pretty good. But Gulf was also easy for my parents. This man was the cleaner at the local golf course. Adult Club student claimed Nicole's It's it's made to A. Job at the she she was declared that they assume sort of my brother and I. We played golf. Because it was easy for ticket keep an eye on us. involved in the club, but it's IT'S A. Really. Small Club studied IRA steady a year for my brother and I had to play as genius ends when I left Smitten I couldn't play golf anymore because it was. So expensive. I had no idea how expensive gold. And then so I never played again. But the sexism was boil bite ride into the whole idea of golf like I couldn't be member. My brother could bay I was in the socio eight women couldn't play on weekends unless we didn't interrupt the men's games and for June ago that doesn't leave you much school. Either and then like I said, the prizes were a- casserole dish. If I want a big competition I win kitchenware my brother wanted me said golf clubs and so is that that sort of thing and then also the so many restrictions on what I could or could not wear when I competition skirts. Will Shuttle? But the measured to how high about the knee had to be not the evitable may either because the Logan the better. But basically being ladylike. Was the driving principle of the tame whereas voiced teams were like, Hey, you should try and win. That's probably the most important thing in a game ago, he should try and win. It's the the the idea of being very competitive about golf to me. I. Know I don't WanNA insult. All everybody who loves God did I hate it. Had like really carry go into Golf I. Know It is. But but always strikes me as peculiar like it does for for for many sports. But okay, your mom, your mom pushed to to play play any sport bucky and then so hockey like what were you in do did you have? Did you have sort of your own sort of weird interests and I just really just? I think back to my childhood I was just dreaming Kid I was just live my own head and very happy there. I remember doing things like I would just pick up, takes off the ground and put them in a bucket. And then I swing the. Swing and just throw the bucket. So the pigs land every which way and then go around and the pigs back in the bucket and a bit too old for that to be like a game. But I just really enjoyed the sound of the pigs fooling in the bucket and. look back to all things that I spend a lot of time in a lot of revolt around repetition pleasant sounds and things like that. I used to play with Lego a lot but I never built. Elaborate Lego situations because we didn't really have the the kids we just had Iran's left either laggers. So. We just had a drove staying, which is fine. It's good. My brothers could build interesting things but I would just build wolves. Wolves because. I was just into a repetitive. Tasks and I think it was because I just like doing things while I was thinking. And that's probably why I like golf. because. It's like it's a lot of line time. Yeah I? Guess that would be right A. To next question that people have seen Douglas it's very much about autism and and your autism diagnosis and what it was like growing up with autism and since our first like legendary. But unreleased conversation I've been doing a lot more reading on that. I don't WanNa like like impose anybody else's experience on you but one of the things that was really. I guess somewhere between pointing really sad to me and some of the. Book I was reading was how much People refused to believe that kids who are tested who are enjoying doing something that didn't seem enjoyable to their parents or didn't seem socially like what a child should be doing. We're having a kind of rich good experience in how many kids were institutionalized because he couldn't make that that single like it seems now in retrospect very obvious leap. The kids like building big walls of legos and having the repetitive activity but the efforts like force people away from that. Just was the driver of all this terrible tragedy and what and what happened to children was it hard for people around you to sort of understand and leave you to what you liked or was that something that your family's pretty good about. Well, in many ways, I was very lucky as the youngest of a very large family, and so by the time I came along my parents were exhausted. We went very well off. So my parents you know. They had. The looking after five kids so much not so much money. Dead delivered the papers in the morning and mom was the cleaner at the country club. They. Then Cook County meals 'cause trying to swap my older brother through university, and then we used to work on founds just to try and make. Ends meet. So it's like a very busy place. Like as long as we will put lie. that's my my parents believe that. We have to try our hardest and. And? Be. Polite. I kind of raised by my brothers and sisters more. because. My parents were absent that very prison but because I would tie it. Now, we're wrangling five kids in that like you. You'll now a group you you play together. and. So it was very easy for me to understand my place in a ready made family. And it's very easy for me to disappear when the quiet time I had mine. At highdown the hedge and have a sit down on the network hide in the linen press on a bad day. Just disappear tank myself out and I look back on a go I was resetting. But. There's a difference between boys and girls when it come. Biologically in in autism in experience of autism. But some raisin in this very, very understudy but goals. A bit masking. So when you're doing the wrong thing, you look like you're doing the right thing girls often look like they're doing the right thing. More often than young boys with autism are able to. And? I think that's a really interesting area of study. You know that could be done. It was like is that because more expectations are on goes to be more socio so that? Often. Boys hyperfocused. That's not such a bad thing. The real problem hits the most goals in the often widen misdiagnosed or never diagnosed diagnosed later in life is because it becomes Suddenly not more difficult to get away with. Looking like doing the wrong thing as relationships become more complex. So when I was really young, I was fine. To a certain extent. Paper left me alone I left them alone on you how to be polite but then you want sort of like early teens. Relationships become more complex particularly in in. Female school relationships, and that's when it all fell apart from May and full pop many goals that age and suddenly the simplicity of childhood. Childhood relationships becomes very very fraud and goes with autism cannot navigate with just terrible. And the problem with that timeframe is. that it coincides with puberty and then people go. It's just hormones and so yes, Sir lumped in I'd have a meltdown. A Go to school a just struggle all day I do things wrong people remain to me I'd get bullied. I'd come home and that's where you safe and you'd let go have meltdowns and then that was then like, Oh, you're being home your teenage go what was really happening was foul your biological. As opposed to Just being attained. So. My childhood's upset night was relatively happy. And then it got deeply traumatic very quickly and. I never covered. Tell me a bit about what the experience of school was like. It sounds like it changed over time but was it school in terms of learning side of it? You talk a bit about this Douglas was it the social side of it was all of it what was school like for you? Well, the pluses of school were chain and the uniform the uniform told what to waste has no choice. Of carry that into adulthood I anyway. Blue cleared now because it completely limits. Choice and also it's Kinda Calming California to look at. So if I'm out in the world and I sat fill distressed I always know that there's something blow I can look at which tends to to come have a calming effect. Now when I have people who address before really great boundary that I might. Not. I'm not wearing a fancy clothes. I knew a blue wants to become find me fancy blue ones away my own clothes. Okay by. Using how much stylists do not want to listen? But anyway, that's another story and just not a well I really feel like a Labor truly belong. So the routine and the uniform appealed to me. But where really struggled with free time I. Just never understood what I was supposed to in lunch and little ventures we cold. And, the schoolyard politics would near on impossible for me to navigate ice to walk around looking busy. That's all I did. You know I knew how to keep my head down a new how not to draw attention to myself. So as never believed terribly, but in order to avoid being bullied because I had a taste of it. It meant that I wasn't allowed to participate. So I was just completely alone in isolated. And so I just sort of a ghost almost. And then I, the older I got you know during Ely's. Who would teach you everything for the whole year and I like that and then you get to identify equal weight. You is Middle School I. Guess. That's where everything goes to hell yet and I would have daily nervous breakdowns as. The wrong. Would they meltdowns because? I couldn't. I couldn't get so many changes I had every class was different I have not I don't have a executive functions. So being able to handle a timetable and different teachers and not just those things for me it comes at different smelt. Like a take time to adjust to new environments, and that includes smell sound oldies, very basic inputs before you even get to learning. So, completely. Overwhelmed end put that into context I went to a tiny school. I went to school with people are non my entire life. You lived within a very small town like it wasn't. It's not overwhelming on paper Lake, the town I grew up in. Two Thousand People and. It wasn't a thoroughfare. It was the name of the road. So we didn't even have tourists interrupted in some like it's not you know what I mean like it's It's what some people would call a hole. And certainly not may but I just did and so. You know I like to remind myself that. When I'm struggling now it's just like I didn't have any hope of struggling in the world. Taliban. Now I mean surviving her. To a debt because I couldn't adapt to a world that was so consistent anyway. I via a eighteen month, old son and I think a lot about when he starts going to school because I'm not in any way compared to my experts fear is a adult think I on any on the spectrum but I had a really hard time in school. I was bullied really badly and did very poorly and. and. I found school completely illegible like literally starting in. Middle School. Said where it all goes to hell. I, just like for years I couldn't figure it out and like college pick back up for me like end of highschool I started to like get my bearings. But a lot about how Ends why your your comment about just the smells and the changes brought this up for me how we expect school to just be legible the kids the idea that there'd be intangibles that you might need to move around by that. Oh now's an adult like how the room looks to me is important radish declutter my desk before I start working music I, like music I don't like the amount of control. I, drink caffeine my name how to control it try to create a my space to do work. Well, it's pretty intense and nobody tells you when you're a kid going to school that like Oh, your environment is GonNa matter for this it's not just are you smart. It's not just are you paying attention it's not just you being good and. I don't know I could be more sensitive to that as a as a father because I had some that experience but it it seems like there's a lot. We don't tell kids about going to school an retrospect. It strikes me as really strange will because we don't know what it's like to go to school. Honestly, the everything is the landscape changes. So quickly now my mom had no idea what my school was like. Is this generation get things are evolving like wait? We don't know what it's like to go to school surrounded by technology. We don't understand what that is. So I think. The the speed in which you know society and the Weldon winning and living changes means that we literally do not understand. While school looks and feels like Now. So, had like my mom barely finish school. So let's not like she could tell me what high school was like she was already. Had, an apprenticeship debate headdress by the time I was in my second year of high school. How is she gonNA help house she helped me navigate high school. You know like a lot of parents now didn't grow up with with. smartphones things is part of the social. Interaction so how they ain't gonNA help. Kids navigate that. Now I just I think it comes down to a blindness than A. The We'd actually don't understand the young people have to navigate. And that's why it's so important not to tell kids how it's GonNa as to listen to them as they trying to find words to tell us how it is for them and that's sort of the struggle of autism like you know you see parents to a bit. They potty kid with autism is like I don't want to go to one a day, potty the health skates for me at, but parents are going. Yes. But in order to be normal person you have to love. The Day potties, you'll sad because you're alone and of Pipkins with autism like no no no. No. I'm happy because I'm long being alone is happiness to me. I visited a school in Portland went onto and one of the most. Beautiful sites I ever saw maybe gray from ion childhoods in a way with. With pulled up and it was lunchtime. A school yard full of quiet. Just. Full of kids on doing their own thing. and. It was just beautiful because it's like these are the kids stand on Because people got other being bullied in ostracize won't tightening in that school is like they want to be on their own. Like in a you know this this difference between feeling safe to approach people win and if you need to and also on the other hand, just being forced to always interact. Is. Really distressing. Experience of what was the experience of a kid's birthday party Creo? I always might friends with among. They made more sense. I? I say that like I went through that two three one was a slumber party and that was my last just sleeping with the smell of another person's house. No. Thank you. With the kid I'm okay now. I bring my own smells. That's not rank as it sounds. anyways, you know fine because it's just the noise, the noise and the as I got older the politics of social engagements. But when you really littlest fine though 'cause adults supervising now we're gonNA play this game. Now. We're GONNA play this game then as waste traits, sodas felt okay but it was always overwhelming used to get really tired but they weren't actually that many birthday parties. Were there subjects you loved in school. I loved everything when I was younger like four, five years of school and a height everything I just got overwhelmed because I. Did Not have. Learned. I wonder how different a debate foamy now Having, access to the Internet. Honestly, the Internet has allowed me to foster my creativity and my curiosity. I didn't I wouldn't have said I was creative Oh. Curious. When I was at school I just honestly didn't seem to exhibit either those things and A lot of that environment like at the school that any anyone with main zoll. school elsewhere. So really it was. Fairly. Rough school I went. They did a good school like the water was and some not saying to a terrible school, but it was not a school where people struggling to lend. Had any. Help. Especially someone like myself who snapped so I get by but I was I was struggling like I wasn't living. Wasn't leading to the fullest Mike Potential but forty percents of potential was a good student. At. School. So. Could get by to just get by and. Just getting buys not the same as learning untalented just enough to pass. I couldn't right essays. A couldn't finish icon do a lot of things still I have helped now I have helped. Enough I have to survive things I had that had to be handed in I I. Know Now that I'm allowed to have helped us hope many's I. Didn't understand that I had your lending difficulty. And Struggled under the weight of things in the last year school, my family moved from smitten, and so I went to place blunt system. Tasmania. The second biggest city. That's not very big at all, but it was so big to me and I. I suggest to function I'd have panic panic attacks meltdowns. Easily on my own I was invisible suddenly parents with stretched Orion raisins my brothers this time and I was trying to navigate a brand new environment and I couldn't. And I all but failed there any reason I didn't file schools I knew enough to get adopted certificate. and. I remember going to the Scott caught the things. I'm really tied I was really tired but I got diagnosed with the virus. If the doctor asked. Any questions. I should have got a Diagnosis of severe. Repression But I didn't even know those things existed. So I didn't have angle my. Have around those things is the doctor nominated more I. I should have been diagnosed with autism. But what I had was the virus that allowed me to file just poss- pastas kid she's obviously Well, we don't want to invest time in educating highlights is pushing through. It was just incredibly easy for someone like me to fall through the cracks nobody can't. Listed won't way. So I finished school. And it's important to know I. didn't learn anything. Like I was way behind I didn't know how to do things. The kids should not have. The obvious. You know snap. But you know I barely spoke I had confidence my first job I. had a school was. A job at a supermarket. and honestly thought that was good. That was where I was GONNA go like that's my job. I'm going to work in And I'm smart. So should be through. Ranks of the market. And that's wrong of good afterwards and I-. Now, in this point in history people who work in in supermarkets not I did not have what it takes. To work in a suit. Naive. Arena people working in grocery stores limit. That's a tough job and I don't have what it takes worker grocery store and I knew it then. Put in the Delicatessen his won't me at the front of the show. Because I was mono-syllabic I think it's really important to stress that like as monosylabic if I could talk a used lace woods as possible. and. As. Much less capable of faking I contact the fact then so I'd be looking on the. In Mumbling and An I needed to be told what to do every step of the way I lacked initiative right I could've been incredible work if someone every step of the way going this entity but no one I didn't get. told so I was really really struggling and then I slipped on chicken fat. It's just funny thing site and then I had a was terrible. Just too funny. Funny, the my life is full of this is like and then a we'd accident happened. And that was like it was a really really bad accident again had to have a total knee reconstruction. So like within three weeks, I have a job and I'm like this is made this I'm being a mate I'm GonNa make it. Had A total name construction again and I had to go and you know really massive surgery. Rehabilitation. That was really difficult to navigate. We are still living at home, but my mom thought it was time I wasn't living at home in her way of letting me know that was not giving me any support. and. So I was trying to. Navigate. These things. while. Not being able to walk didn't have any friends. I didn't know how to make friends and I was. Woke. an-and from that I, I did a season of found black. Seasonal. and then I got a job selling knives. when I say a job, I mean I enter the Blind Pyramids Game Final Beckley. Yeah Anna just adding to that was cinnamon trauma. which the thing about trauma is, you cannot imagine a future. CanNot, project yourself into a future positive or otherwise the attract you trapped so I was trapped physically financially. Literally and also. figuratively. 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Is introduced when I was in my little school in Smitten and there was a few history books and it makes me laugh now though just full of black and white images. So I learned about through black and white images but still. Let me take. Let me tell you about a of anything black and white ones, but I can still talk about. And what was it sort of the same way you do a cryptic crosswords? So the best way to cryptic crossword is right? You. Look at what's the answer? And then the clue and tron walkout had a clue. Gets Foam. And then you start to learn the language, and so that's kind of how I started to build the well. I could look at the assets look what people said about the APP. And then looked what other people said about the and about the context of the art was created and every time I still had that object in that will. Keep going back to. You know that was full of. An dynamic welds but not overwhelming wells where there was also sound and smell. And all these other things like. Just focusing on one sense which was in most cases it was is visual. So if both expanded unlimited. The touchstones. So we're from being interested in not meant nothing. Galleries. You know there was no well, there's no I run of the laterals from like didn't seem like it was just. The. Joy of it and so. I was always obsessed with thinking looking at out. But of course, we didn't have access to the Internet. So it wasn't like I could go online like I do now nge going in the rabbit hole. Jenny's. Have the best time tracing. Ideas around I was stuck with libraries in libraries in places I tend to think well in because something about the temperature folks puts me We flourish in the same temperature books and I. Said Larry. Tens of made me go to sleep in the fluorescent lights. Make me flatly ill so you know I take books out of the library and then I go home and you know anyone I was sort of your. Left school I would go to the public library during that. I is I an affinity with indexes I love going through the index is you learn what's important in the book before you have to go into the bulk in civil that makes savior a the way I make sense of the world is different to everybody you know to most people. I have worked my way backwards to make sense of things but doing that in doing that what I've discovered later in life is that. I get different things because of the way that I think in the way that I learned means that I have different perspectives in different a different. Way of seeing the world. That are think is. I always used to think it was. A deficiency. But now Jest. It's it's. Yet. But it's strengthen I was thinking strength strengths in in terms of outside of me. You know inside of me when I'm just on my on, it's just how do things and I like it not love it and I don't feel the need to. Justify to anybody else. I. But as soon as I stopped being in the world trying to communicate, it was always a deficiency. It was embarrassing thing. I had to do these things are so slow and now I stay as a strength but it was always a wonderful place for me when I'm on my own. So, then how does somebody who is mono-syllabic? Tries to speak in few words as possible doesn't make big groups of people. Move to stand up comedy. Well, this alleged Chang, my life missing between where lift often when I start doing comedy net was going to college in that that came about. Because I. was just running adult like life options. I couldn't even damage over the supermarket. I. Failed at trying to be an adult for long enough that. I became what's nine? Here's a mature aged student which meant you could pretty much get into university. How old were you when you when you went to university at Twenty one. So it's not very all but they make you feel like you're an adult now and you failed at being in adults are his mature age students slop. Twenty one. which is so funny to make us so naive and immature. On some levels because I've never participated in life I'd never actively involved in Los Angeles ahead and whenever outside of my head of just. So I moved to Hud about. which is the first time I lived a twenty one, the first time I lived outside of home. And it was the unmitigated. Disaster. I. Filed again. But again, 'cause, I've learned the trick of getting. Like Trading off again, a doctor's certificate is fine. But what I realize hindsight like no, I needed help and I didn't get as had ask for and I was depressed and you know really really horrible anxiety. Like I was I could not function. And that's when I started I drank quite heavily I drink quite heavily because. And Smoking. Because I guess. Not Guessing it is like basically numbing the input. So in a sense because I'm so sensitive. I'm so sensitive environment noise sounds smell. Assistant noisy sound but sound I feel sound sound becomes a feeling quite. strongly. In my body and it works both ways but only just discovered the pleasant feeling sounds and how to ski my my environment so that things feel pleasant to hear. But for the most at Tyne I felt I feel a lot of pain is the sounds. At that lack of executive function nets when I was beaten up so that was a Such a low. Like I can't even doubt I just feel such sadness that Hannah. because. It's like so on. An trying to understand my sexuality a knew I was gay but also I knew like homosexuality was only legalized ninety ninety seven. And that's when I was nineteen. So I was living. Not. Being able to hold a job down at a supermarket then. And just because the Lord Change didn't mean it was necessarily a safe place. To be. Guy and settling I found that out. When I was in my ear university. So. It's interesting to me. Is People do Ernie knowing me from the net on talking about that time of my life. But I think people take me think that I was the person I was when I stood up on stage is the same person I was. When will that happen to me but I wasn't like I was I was a shell I was. So full of anxiety ends. In inability to navigate the world, I was alone a didn't really have friends I started to make friends a university, but I didn't understand how to maintain friendships. I couldn't pay bills. What's really fascinating to me in that he's like that's the year. Ellen came out. And Just blows my mind now aliens in the news at the moment. N people starting to ask me what do I think about that? And I just. Can't help but think context my own context in a landslide you know when Ellen came out. It didn't mean a thing to me. Like it had absolutely no impact into my because that's where I was I was. A nothing person. Like I didn't even identify as being gay of subhuman. So after I got back now. I just sort of cited to. Apply for every single university on the mainland as I possibly could. Mainland and. I couldn't do that because at involved enormous amounts of. Executive function that I just don't have. So basically, what is able to do is find universities toll art history 'cause I knew them out something lakes interested in. and. There's very few of those in A. So I just applied to all of them. And I mentioned to get into one and then I left Tasmania. And so what happens it at university? The begins to to bridge the gap between the person who can stand on the stage and the person who has a Husk. It was very slow recovery A. Getting to the mainland helped enormously like Tasmania become very very cost phobic for me. In many ways like I had to learn the basics of life, I had to learn how to look up to myself. I had learn how to pay bills and I struggled like doing those normal things. Still this very die at things that I actually really really struggle to do. One of the things that happened university which throws this like a kidding me like this e kidding me. Now, you just making this up now but I got hit by three house while as university. That's to all all at once Nights or added you headed. Well. So the first one. Was My first six months of being there just of. I. It just throw. Now that saying that loud is concerned ridiculous but it was a hit and miss. Ano- A missing hit. So basically a car. Cycling and so I just went to close to me I had swerve and I hit a parked car but. A hit is hilarious with you described that. Thank you. So I hit a pot COBB, but after being sort of Drivers, Australia Height cyclists, and the way they show that is by driving dangerously. The bed of the road the drive is that's that's a good rule of thumb. this. Anyway. So I had a you know. So that was like I was a bit of a dust up, but just a broken ankle at fine. And then the next one is someone reverse. I kept riding my bike and this is an important distinction to make I. I kept getting hit by us and I kept getting back on my my bike. And the reason for that is the couldn't afford to drive. In order to drive, you have to get driving lessons and Dakota and the things were just not. Anything that I was capable of scrambling together. And Also that is public transport and I. I cannot I cannot read bus timetables I cannot cope with the environment on public transport like it's just really distressing. Public transport is really distressing me. for me was to cycle and I love riding my I love moving through space. So I really love that did not love getting hit and. The second one is a man just reverse doubt if he's driveway too quickly and I was riding passed and he collected me. I only cracked ribs and bruised my liver on that one and what was really strange about that one is really really badly hurt. But he sued may will he asked I? Don't know that he sued me he just. He just off disappeared. But he wanted to, he wanted me to pay for. Equal at a trunk like identities trunk in. Hey. Like, made to pay for that. So I gave him a down payment on I didn't have any money. I want a bully like what a bully he hits a kid on a by the said yet. But because I didn't understand how the world. People could bully me they did like people would take advantage of all the time. Anyway. So that was that. I kept falling behind university. Naturally, and then the last one was this all happen within a year of the third time I get hit with Daud. So cycling CADORE I. Shattered my cullum. You know there's no looking out for me. That's I may not think could have been had. I. Asked for but now malls for the did not have to ask for because I didn't think I was with it. So I had this broken bone and have been fixed certified is placed but. You, know I don't know maybe I was on interesting to the papal emergency or something, but just gone, it'll be right in a wasn't right down the track. I had to have it repaired. So, this was all in Australia, we have healthcare so I was looked after in that sense. And because it was a road amount of protection, you get around road accidents people have insurance that. Compulsory Insurance, at least at this stage might my? Healthcare was being hateful. Because of the act wasn't my fault but I had a pin putting my shoulder and in the pin. Didn't will pin ended up coming what himself loose and coming out the back of my shoulder. It removed itself from the clavicle and fame out and the doctor put it in Hey told me that I shouldn't say. I believed him in a like Oh my God. You lost person who should be giving me that advice but so great. And I'm like, okay and he's like, yeah, because. You'll the lucky when it happened to to other people in the US. In a win and a punctured lung to the pin, went the other way and so he got this whole sort of like is just not a person to be able to fight this medical insurance thing because you know ninety nine like. In medical companies that make these things. What is the? It's a minefield I know now as an adult who can look at these things like there was never any hope for someone like me to be able to fight for my rights the this this pin shouldn't have been in circulation should never be put into human body but. exhausted. I'm on my own in the doctor. Put it in. said it useless defined this? So there was. So that's what I was actually doing university. Is that I had full more operations on that that shoulder? and. Continue to serve just. Did the band minimum to pass. And then I graduated and fell off the face of the again. And how'd you end up on a stage? Well, that's the mystery. I. I started working. In a bookshop in his cinema projectionist predictions. Had A skill but? I couldn't make enough money of those did not had graduate from entry level casual positions. I didn't know how to like bookshop full years. Would you like to manage the weekend shifts? Those things would never going to happen to me. I could. Just, bad life bad work. Lacking initiative like is really hard. To to make it so. I then got a job as a farm labourer was traveling around the country. Palestine Broccoli. Planting trees That's an industry that really exploits work is so basically, I was working. In a sixty nowadays. And not earning enough to pay rent saws living in a tent. You're homeless. Yes. And in a cycle. that. I. Didn't had a breakout like I didn't know. Because I also traumatized didn't know how to imagine a better future and I didn't think I deserved one. Back. In the night if I hadn't a fan stand up comedy I would be dead but now I just really honestly believe that. The fact that I found my way out of it is a story of such rich absurdity that it doesn't. It almost doesn't ring. True. You know it's like the ranked riches story that is just so. Ridiculous. That I'm almost embarrassed like I just got. Won't believe me but. There it is. Of, move past. What other people think is like explain it. So what ended up happening I had another accident I. Farmer Shane, kicked back. And basically tore all the ligaments in my hands which meant that I had this. is no stability in again. I got screwed around with workers comp punctual I. Look back on that guy. I could have. Like a very vulnerable citizen. And nobody really looked after me and I didn't know how to ask for anyway. So I had to have my wrist fused A. take my hitmen putting my wrist, a plate and screws. Ultra this that's what's holding that again. During that process like adopted got hospital which Which? It sounds really silly but this is like I remember going to hospital going. Fin living in tents. and. That was the point at which I got back in contact with my family like I'd come out during a university and it didn't go well. I didn't have the strength to wrangle that emotion. And so I just let myself drift away my family they didn't ostracize me. I. Just didn't know how to navigate it. Let go drifted. As soon as I got back in contact my sister. went to live with my sister. And then after that moved to Melbourne in a life with my brother, like that was up until really recently, I was relying him. To get me out of the. Financial. Like just. You know I was homeless. It wasn't for my family I would never be able to shoot comedy. Because it was the generosity of them that allowed me to do something. To be able to shoot comedy and the reason I got into that was after had my surgeries I ended the copetition and there was no reason for me to do it I still don't understand why did. But I didn't. Ended the National Competition He is code roll comedy has run through the comedy festival. And they just basically travel the country and try and find interesting new voices and I signed up for it and I did all right I got into the state finals in didn't get any further than that but then the next year. I won like I ended the year after I won the national competition which was televised and. It's nice. Small thing but. I understood house. Navigate stage better than I ever had a navigate a normal room like normal social interaction as soon as I stood on stage. I somehow knew how to. CAJAL the energy in the room. You know like I just like it felt like an. Conduct. Like a new people had a response to me and I knew how to wrangle that response to me like the strangeness of a Mike Presence. Made people take. Notice off me, and then once I had that notice I knew what to do with it and you know I'm certainly I wasn't like as good as I, and now when I first started I, had I guess that's what they call a natural ability. So. Every Opportunity I. Don. I made the most of and when I started doing comedy I was monosylabic. My, says, drunk. Was An delivered light this Guy China. That's a Pailin drawn. Sinai forwards and backwards. If he can spell. The family tradition every family has Pelindaba McKnight's. Go Mom. Debt? Umbrella. Kayak. Now it's a really great job, but like that's how I deliver it. MIGHT NOT I've learned how to put inflection in my voice of learned. The things but even the bed buns like. I understood how? To make jokes and then how to be a presence on stage. And there's no evidence that was going to be the case like is nothing in my life that would have said all this natural phone. Internet you define. Telling jokes is sort of building this tension. In the audience and then releasing it, do you think part of it is simply that? Assembly who found conversations? Less legible that you were just comfortable with attention. So when it came time to inflicted upon others. That was a more natural space for you. Will. But yes, I couldn't navigate tension in that. But also, I I am attention might my actual presence as always caused tension? I've never done things Moore's I got older late bloomer but when I was a kid like. Didn't do things right and when you don't do things right you tension. So I learned how to diffuse that tension that I. Myself created an Iowa's used to think it was just the fact that I was a woman that calls attention but now I understand it's also it's. It's you know how I interact with the World Tennessee if mine your biological situation also causes the tension. So that natural ability that I had as soon as I walked on stage was really grafted through a life thing. At presence that was off putting to people. The cut the. Cut. The CUT PODCAST is here. Any narrative that says. You have to be doing X.. I just I just reject that all right I don't know that anybody normally thinks of themselves as being a subjective and be like, I certainly don't. You don't have to always put your views on somebody else. My name is a retrial man and every Wednesday. I'll be working with the writers thinkers in the brain trust the cut to bring you stories about the moment we live in. The first episode of the cut drops on August nineteenth, subscribe on Apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your podcast. Do you sound like this. I'm able. To do you wish she sounded like this? Or better yet even this I'm fact a semi beat boxing boot gets put K. I, think i. A she she. Laura American. Built clearly, fluffy smashing the pecans into little bit suspect. There's a swing and I'm about to go on it three to one. How To skateboard a pandemic far are four park kids summer series this now wherever you find the today explained podcast. I want to take a site turn here to a tensor or yet penser. Space. That I was thinking about rewatching net getting ready for this conversation So in journalism political journalism, there's been this ongoing set of fights about speech and safety. And I think on some level tension and something you say, Ninette at the end as you begin giving your story more honestly you say that you're not going to do the thing here of releasing the tension of what your life is really been like that tension is now hours the audiences to hold. And that should give us some idea of the tension people on the margins hold all the time. I wanted to ask about that experience because I think I do think part of what is happening in my industry is people are very uncomfortable with the amount of attention and they wanted to stop. And that people who have been under tension don't they want that to be shared? What is it like to be under tension all the time? What what lessons does it Teach, but do you take from it? It's not a great place to be in. It's cold stress. And Humans upright the best when they stressed into stressed but. When you're on the margins that's a constant and I've only just recently left that space like a suddenly family. So in a position, just as the world is devolving into chaos. And uncertainty of suddenly. found. Out that, I'm not distressed all the time anymore. And I didn't understand that. Tat. In fact how I was living. I'm really new to this. And I find myself in a strange weld where. You. Would look anger over your privilege I am but island house. is of training to be in this position. I have much more experience in being invisible and unheard and living in deep distress stress than I do. Privilege. I know what it's like. To feel tension and to have everything I said about how end if my life like I didn't live coked I tried not to attention myself a live with. Pulling my head in. And when you do that, you don't get to live you don't get to talk. You don't get to to breeze like I really understands. That sentiment of the black lives matter. I can't breathe like very, very, very different reasons. But I understand that feeling of not being a breeze. And it is not it is inhumane. Net State and when people like brave. Takes enormous amount of. Pain. And strength to be able to not sight out. Loud. But to understand that that is what is happening to you like I didn't understand. How Terrible my life was. because. That's what. Thing on the margins does to you a tells you that being treated. Inhumanely is old you deserve nets reality all. Sold that a like. I don't care. What that is talking about Is Not actually. It's not a fight for survival. In like if if there's a moment twitter like. It's the problem with the. The faintest toxic because only the worst voices amplified. There's no. Like is. This binary of you know. Get exhausted by that and I sent extent grew up with that debate around human rights with the legalization of homosexuality has mania. All you ever heard. The extremes of those arguments. and. What was missing from that? Would People Caring. I think in this moment in time table to pay their rent. People are literally and metaphorically struggling to. Even breeze. If you've got a platform. That platform to Toke that thanks and George tension to people who don't have a voice or move aside and give a platform the people who native voice like I just. This is the late. Complaining. That's what that says to me like like understand it's all intellectual and fund intellectual. Games but. Like. Freedom of speech is is is in trouble. But that led seems like a waste of energy to me like I just was bored by it. I'm just like you kidding me this is what you can waste your time on like I understand it's really important freedom of speech is. Is the You've got freedom of speech use it. Not to complain about how you feel a little skit CEO peace of mind. Like apart from that, what are you using it freedom of speech full then what are you using it full? What are you using a platform soul? Like if you're just using your platform, you're known as platforms talk about freedom of speech. In wasting your time. Usual Freedom of speech constructively. To actually build something to help others used as. One of the things. That strikes me as maybe similar between the comedy world and some of the debates that have happened there in the past couple of years and the journalism world. Is that. It feels to me like if you have these big platforms now. It stopped being enough to just have opinions. Because there's so much more. Conversation in different directions, the audience can speak to you like everything taped. It goes up on. Youtube they're conversations around your conversations. And so now you have to. If you want to take on these hard issues, you have to have all these other skills of managing a hard conversation of dealing with feedback and criticism. Well of all these things a lot of us weren't pot. And like I'm seeing something sort of similar to what I've seen in what I think. I've seen in comedy where as the audience began to be able to speak back has been a lot of anger a of fear. There is some fear right? People worried about being canceled I don't WanNa. Take away that there is that there can be real concern here, but it does seem to me that just part of it is. Yeah, it's just gonNA mean if you have this big platform, you're going to have to learn how to do more than have views and that's harder like it. It is definitely hard like I feel like it is harder but I think it's going to be what it looks like from here on out. I. Don't have problem with have taken responsibility fee speech late. Cancel culture only happens in. In this area. Like in other places, just code taking responsibility for your actions. I mean, I just don't come from media entertainment backgrounds like I had to work with. With dangerous men. For a long time. Guy had to work alongside of men trapped in the cycle of poverty and drug abuse. And we were working on films together and I was frightened of those men. And I had no voice. You know like. Is Unsafe, in the company. But I'm not. Vulnerable Diane. Now. and. That's a very interesting. Space to occupy like all of a sudden I have a huge platform I have a huge. You know the sphere of influence. Those guys who were. Could've like you know the post real like. Dangerous to, be, in the midst. Right. For me. But they live still sucks. Like I don't know how to navigate that but I dislike that's the world on from. Like if there's a fine. About freedom of speech, it was a literal fight. Punches right. Like it's a rough place. So you know. Sometimes. COMEDIANS sensitive. At that criticism. It's weird to me like. The fans get even more sensitive on their behalf in a bit of A. I just keep going back to like this silliness like this is immature use of time like. I very confused about. What people are angry about? I honestly don't understand what a Lotta people are angry. I do understand that they angry and I gave it they. Don't know what they are angry about I. Think one of the things I hear that I heard for a long time at comedy and I'm starting to hear from A. Part of the journals more old is idea that. The audience through twitter and social media, not the audience but like very a portion of the audience, the the loud voices in the audience. That Because of their ability to create codex that it's creating boundaries on what people can say, and that the Comedians feel that they were there to have hard conversations and talk about things that. You know are tricky to talk about a now. They feel they can't in there watching their backs and can't work out material and you get that sort of the political world to. Look in in comedy like it's just bringing the reality of water thing and that is a dial with your audience like if you stand up in front of a crowd, you're not talking at them I. Think a lot of Comedians think that they ride they get insight they get Tokyo grip able but a crowd is a living breathing thing and in the room, that's what it used to be that crowd was just in the room and you have a dial with that. Route. But now it's got to the point where that room has now expanded. Right? It's not just the room that you're in and so there's a huge like you just got to be more careful and Molina. You'RE GONNA sign something new to believe it, and that's just responsible speech. If you believe something thin. Is like if that's if you're holding your but lot of comedy particular knives coming up through the ranks, what was in vogue with shock comedy so that the last fame from being shocking. And they probably coming probably struggling in this moment because what they believed in was the right to shock. Not. What I was saying and. So I, think this is become a really difficult time for them because they're like it's my right to shock unlike. What he's saying. So you know like it's just. I think it's a you've got to really believe in what you're saying now and you've got kicked one hey, Fridays data mistakes going to be made because language is messy but I honestly believe we shouldn't be recording everything. Like. That's the way the real trouble what I said in the very beginning this is like permanent. Permanent Records. Of Communication. Is Really. Like it's a, it's a really difficult vice to navigate because. Communication. needs to be able to be flexible and dynamic and adaptive. But because we have these permanent records now is like. Unit, get what you've got to say out. Best. Like you either have to be just really really really on point every single time you say anything. All you just be completely bland. And that. That is a boring will living boring well to extremes, and so I I think what has to happen probably won't happen anytime soon is that we need to learn a language of adaptation evolution forgiveness. Shane learning how to shame. Without the permanence of that shaming leg. Hey you messed up there. Yeah. How do we then move on from that like people were very Young to be defensive or to apologize nuance to the to the discussion ended this is incredibly difficult space to May to navigate because this is a really high connected and high social world and I'm really bad at being. Like I'm really like my autism Maine's. Quite blunt and a failed to pick up on the nuances. This is this is really difficult space for me personally to navigate. So I, don't feel sad when a comedian who used the shock anytime he likes. Suddenly funded difficult spice unlike always been a difficult spelt SEIS. The world has always been a difficult spice I want to underline what you're saying about the capacity to have people make mistakes and feel shame and boo I, do think a big part of the problem is is the lack of clarity and what that process should look like often because there's not real accountability but their social accountability nothing happens to most people who misstep but also the feeling of something happening to you is like twenty, five, thousand people turn on you online is. it's a kind of trauma to people that sounds weird when they say it doesn't They don't know what to do with it but at the same time, the part of it that I've become I, don't WanNa say unsympathetic to. Agree with what you're saying about it's hard for everything to be recorded. But in my industry, a lot of these problems is coming from. Everybody moved onto twitter and for years in journalism, we do that. If, you wanted to be in a hard conversation talking about tricky issues we would have this big edifice to protect you editors and copy editors and people who check your headline and all these things so that if you like ended up in a bad place leisure `institution was there with you and it tried to help and was now baden alongside you and everybody works out the on twitter with none of that around them and then things go bad and I think a lot of the tension in my industry just comes from the constant feeling of that the away what he stuff panel twin it like. Why who does that landed on twitter? It's the worst they everybody and I've done it do I wanna say that like I have done this I've stopped basically I've stop tweeting except for twenty out my articles because they don't I've decided that it's time for me to stop saying I don't like it and act like I don't like it but it's become a place at the journals out the material than they work it up poorly, and there's a bad reaction and just everybody's like anger like long-term just keeps going up at each other. Yeah. My journalists should be better learning like what's wrong with gentle jokes Like I mean, I'm not a journalist, but I like I also I think that if you have a latched platform outside of twitter, she get off like you should just like it really could be space where people who don't have a voice get to have a voice. But if people with huge followings than just you know you just it's a bullying pulpit. That's great. That's a great term for it. I really enjoy twitter for finding voices. The I would never likes old social media I like it's a great place to witness like. Interesting voices saying interesting things. But then if you're saying have people who already have a massive platform. Outside, of things, Dan becomes. I Dunno society to is a certain amount of joy. I think people get from jumping on a bullying bandwagon in like. Do. You know we need like something. You think the whole world loves something and then you find out two or three pay cut like at. This is great and then all of a sudden is a tipping point This is now bullying. Tends at everybody felt that I did but nobody was acknowledging. That happens a lot on twitter and I, just don't know how to find that bright with people go. Hey, hey, now there's tons. I. Just think we understand how to see when. Like where's the line? Where someone has a lot of POW a knicks beheld comfortable says something will this line right way e? An a tipping point where becomes just toxic. But that means you can't like. This must be a point at which it's helpful for the person to know that the full they have been been harmful with a speech or something I not. Like. At what point it needs to be drawn to attention you know like, Hey, you say you'll. You'll being careless with your words you've been careless with your ideas. You know thinking about this perspective, right? Mondays. this I just think is oxygen that goes into it just explodes and nobody's listening in everyone's being angry and then it's this link reduces silliness biscuit but. With draw like I. You know even if it's an argument in a room I'm like all this. This is not where I want to be. And then you get I, mean one gets I. Try Not to, but you get defensive right if it feels like everybody's ganging up on you and it's getting unfair. You Talk Internet I think in a really interesting way about feedback. Right people coming up to you after a show. That's the wrong moment to come up to me, and there is an interesting thing. Here I don't say that people responsibility to give feedback well, but those both the responsibility on the part of people with a platform. To. Be. Able to hear criticism without being overwhelmed by it. which I think is a hard thing right to hear criticism without being cowed by it because none of us like being criticized. And and not getting defensive so we can't hear it, and then also I think there's some question if at least if you're somebody who wants to actually be delivering criticism, not just throw lightning bolts. You know they're they're ways to deliver the people can hear it, and maybe it's maybe there's a bit of an ask of audience is on this too. I think defensiveness is normal. It's what you do after that lake. So what I do after I, you know I created shows which have pretty much a crafted response the then they will becomes entertaining for a lot of fatal. To to talk about it like I don't feel the need to go back to every person who makes me feel defensive high high. High that's on. It just that's exhausting. Also people project themselves and what they think. You should be guy I disappointed so many people because they think I speak for them and I don't count and I've done understand why they think that Kurds. So. There are people in the community who don't like what I say, and there are people in the Trans Community. He doesn't like what I say and they are Laura men who don't light when I say. This like Lord like what I have to say. But. I'm still are guy a more boils down like I believe in what I'm saying. I believe. And I believe that Meyer is not caused home. By raising speaking is. You. Want to. I want to disrupt people's engaging in order to. Get them. To. Have a different. Different way of thinking about things already think about day I'm not in the business of changing people's minds in the business changing. How people make their minds. You know I don't have the end point. I don't have the solution in my like I don't I don't want to go. Should think but I really do want to you know I liked to shake out the rooms so people. Think about how they think that because that's the reality like you have autism you have to think about how you think. That's what do a near typical stunt do not. They just assumed the way they think is right. The way that you think not the endpoint, not what you think. But how you think so like when I get. Pulled up about the specifics of what I saying things like that like listen I. Think it's interesting. But ultimately, what I'm in the business of is to demand people be more aware of. How unwinding think not what I think. I think it's a lovely place to come to a close So let me ask you with a final question here which is. What are three books or having done this before audiobooks? The or paintings for that matter that you would recommend to the audience the you've loved. Unlike Louis Bourgeois. Saint Sebastian as a woman that is pace of hot. I would like people to know, bow. Net, and I can just go google at. And go on their own adventure. Saint Sebastian was a woman is a great recommendation. Not that I would know but but I'm excited to go look it up myself. Yeah, he should. Also it's an evolving so she did many. She read it's something she revisited ended evolved in the story of the evolution of the piece is really fascinating ulcer. I love the hidden life of trays it's inaudible. Listen to all the time I liked trays, trees, trees, prissy cool situations, and you're listening to on a lot and it's really weird one. I'm just going to pull out the not as a recommendation as book dom. Shorts Pretty. Great. But. It's the The sleep makes me feel calm and I think speaks. The most to. The idiosyncrasy of my your biology. It's a book about Putin. Biography of Vladimir Really. When I'm feeling stressed. The book about third known and I don't listen to. I there's something about it I guess. I. Guess You know I listen to once paid attention to it. But then now it's just become a book. The I duNno, it must be. Very bizarre like he's the worst right is, is not a good guy. And he stories not good and he's abuse of power is not right. It's the new by Stephen. Lame is the rise and rain of Vladimir Putin. That's. That's how you know that I'm not. Typical of the the variety. Have Gadsby. Thank you very much. Thank you. Thank you to be for being here Tours Karma for Researching Jessica. Gould. For producing his or Conn show is media podcasts production.

Golf Tasmania Douglas Executive Hannah Gadsby apple spotify hockey Smitten netflix Jordan CONSCIO Gulf Daria Gulf Representative Tilson iggy Joe Biden
Implicate Nuns & Frame Your Friends

Am I Doing This Right?

39:06 min | 1 year ago

Implicate Nuns & Frame Your Friends

"Forget it. Yeah. Okay. Figure that I'm glad he figured out easiest smart and so small look ego. You've figured out the problem. Twenty minutes after we started recording instead of doing a whole episode. Okay. Am I doing this, right? Mood. I haven't been totally came out that was so funny, just like so uncomplimentary name. And I love that uncomplicate. I'm compliment beautiful. I'm compliment to you. Uncomplicate. I really like how you wear greasy hair is what you could say to me right now, because my hair is disgusting. It looks great. Oh, good. Not kidding. Good. Okay. Touch. It though. Youth touch my. It's not good. No good. I'm good. It looks good. Then I. Well, because I also I was in a pool yesterday. That makes us on tablets the pool, I have not our pool has been open for like a week. And I have not been in the end, it is extraordinarily difficult to go to a pool in a in a in a complex that you pay money to live in. Yeah. Four the pool. It is extra ordinarily difficult to go there. Use the pool by yourself when there are trademark hot girls sitting over in a corner, tanning judging you as well as parents and grandparents, they're given me the fucking stink. I just because I wanted to go to God damn pool and get a goddamn swim workout workout, in, because I thought that my writing something's up with it. I've got shocked up left me can I just for the love of God, have some sort of resistance training without people staring at me? No. Because even if you had your own private pool unless you have like a privacy fence built around it your name. Would still judge you. And I'm really sorry, swallow that water stops pushing it, it was just frustrating. Clearly that's why haven't used our pool like ever. Because I don't want to go out there by myself, and it's like I don't even I don't even want to resist it's trading. I just want to be in the water. But also just like what do I do know here? You know what, what we're having our next production meeting in your pool or my pool. Do it. Yes. I want to do it now. We're doing perfect is been decided key keep us on this guy's because we'll tell you, if we do it or not, we'll have to Instagram it. I'm sure does your pool allow pool float? He's yes. Because I've seen children carrying them out your pool doesn't allow pool floating, unless it's for the safety of a kid like you can't, you can't just have the, the adult ones where you just sort of lay in a pool. Oh, so you can't do like the floats. I'm almost positive. I saw kid was a giant Flamingo in our pool. Excellent which took up about a third of the pool because there's a there's a blow up Donut out there that I want, and it's not like one of the obvious Donut ones where you know, it's, it's Donut. It's around two, then you have sprinkles and frosting, and there's home in the middle Donut. No was hoping. Going to be no I want, like 'cause there are some that are like full don't it's insights filled. Oh, I get scared with inner tubes because I am short. And I often already lake Bob under the water. I don't wanna have an inner tube around me where I have the possibility of falling, and then being stuck with an energy around me, and then just like can't get it off because it's an inner tube out. So I mean, let's be real here, though, that's happened to me before. But also, I don't get stuck because it's like thin plastic filled with air, you can lift it pretty easily. Sure, sure, you k- you you're lifting. Breath. Don't you know that I know neither do I. Apparently just inner tubes. And the against the only thing I can live one rubik's. Screaming push. Welcome to aim I doing this. Right. A weekly comedy podcast where to millennials Amanda and Rene sit down and talk about all the multifaceted millennial bullshit. We have to talk about, and I should say that is the fourth time that I've gotten a chance to do that intro. Very proud of myself for doing it correctly, the four-time today in one sitting today within the hour within within the half hour. Whoops, but listeners out there might have heard someone will different. I'm rebranding. It's very strange to say that like myself, I like to. I liked it in the recording that we had where you were like you are reprinted, because that was her Ganic you reap Brinda. And this is just me going, and she knew me name, you know, what it makes me think of new girl when Schmidt wants to rebrand after breaking up with CeCe the third or fourth time. Yeah. Sitting around the fire. Learn how to spin it. You didn't learn how to stop. I'm just glad you didn't bring fire into my home. I would never bring fire into your home. It's pretty shaded lighters and may bring laters into your home, but they're not like turned on all the time. Not spitting them, when they're don't know. No, no, only for my birthday at your home, you can learn. In your own day of apartment. Just don't bring here. I just want your plants. Give me your plants than leave, that's because I'm a nerd side. I'm not a fire sign. We did find that. That's a fun. New facet of me, not being depressed, and anxious. That's is that there's you want to spend fire. No, I'm sorry. I'm still back on. That is that I have range now sometimes you're gonna get a soft chill me. And then sometimes you're not soft chill son's like a setting on your refrigerator, soft-shell soft chill. I would say is my, my static. Yeah. Soft shift. I just wanted to be soft and I'm cold. So make me warm. So what would you feel like a millennial this week? But it'd be not even this week. Just what made you feel like millennial sometime and can't be something. You've already told the people I had, like three things just run through my head of, like, well, this kind of made me feel like mulling onset of this, instead of this, all three of them had to do with my cats, all three of them had the same attitude of, like I was pissed off when it happened. But it's just dumb. So the branding did not make you feel like a millennial. Oh, you don't have to bring it up now that I brought it up. But no that does make me feel lineal. Well, I'd like to take a hot moment to, to sort of explain like I'm doing it because my face and my person, my voice our the business. I'm investigative. Yeah. It's this what we're doing with the with the you can't see up moving their hands and arms. But that's part of it. Now you're petting the fuzzy on the Mike. Some people like this. Okay. Some people really enjoy this. I don't sure I don't what if I keep doing it. I think stop what, what if I keep doing it might vomit on your maintain? I'll eat your. Feet now. I'm doing this because, like as, as a internet storyteller, I would much rather use my middle name, which is Rene as the stage name pseudonym, whatever the hell, you want to call it. Yeah. Plus, it sounds better. I like my middle name, but I don't think I could ever use it as stage name because it makes me sound like a country artist because think about it this way. If I if I did Jimmy knitted me. Nickelodeon. They don't use that anymore. I know they don't so please don't. Hear that Nicole Odeon? I can't. One penny one. So if you use my first and middle name, Amanda Ray, which is definitely an upcoming female artist Lambert, Mirandola. Well, I'm pretty sure Lambert is her last name. Yes, lambert. But you know what I mean? That ring. Yeah. Amanda ray. Amanda Ray Miley Cyrus. Billy ray. That's where it comes from. Yeah. But then if you use like middle last name, it's Ray Fogarty. It just doesn't ring. It would ring better, if the last syllable in your last name was different. I don't know how it should be different enough. Anyway, it doesn't work. I love my middle name. I love my full name. Amanda Ray Fogarty. I took out my used to have two middle names. Let. Yeah. I took when, when I got married. Nice. Yeah that's too sounds like too many it was, what was it Elizabeth? Yeah. It's too many now it's just I it's it's too many complicated syllables. Well, we're they worked through because renamed makes me think of red, because, you know, are you want to know what Renee means in French do it till rebirth, I'll stop it. That's too good. Right. That's perfect. Right. The spelling of Ray are why is I think it's another meaning for a female chief. So in you an e w e. Makes you feel like. No. Talk about the fact that the thing that made me feel like a millennial. Yes. Is you've got me hooked on this new channel called lady, like, which ladylike alum it. I so much. Enjoy one of the most recent episodes, they did was one of the chicks because there's like five of them in one of them decided to take mushrooms for their anxiety for an entire month. And she got them from trader Joe's. Yep. She I mean it's not like shrooms. Yeah. It's like what was it, right? She. Yeah. It's some sort of powdered, mesh rigs, a specific type of mushroom that apparently does something to. You're not your sympathetic. What is it payroll sympathize para sympathetic? Okay. So it was sympathetic nervous. Yes. Ma'am, it's some it's somehow affects that so that, you know, you can just feel more centered and all that. Hippie language bullshit to be like, I feel less anxious and she has an executive disorder a pretty sure she mentioned that. But it's just a Devon is actually where I got the idea of like everyone is their own drum, and most people operate at like a steady simple. Whereas people with, like, beings ID disorders are uptempo crazy. Tempo, erratic. And that's that's all time. It doesn't stop niche sucks. I'm sorry. It's fine. Anyway, but I did get that from Devon, I watched her video on it. Unlike the millennial in me that was, like, I want a quick easy fix for my life. Also. I love the idea of mixing bitter mushroom into Allante casts. Yummy whoops to the house on, again, I like the idea of mixing, a gross bitter mushroom into my law Tatum. Make it taste yummy. The melting away all my anxiety. I like that most problems away, literally though, and I was like super close to be like, I need to go to trader Joe's and get that right now. And then they were like and by the way, this isn't the most financially feasible, this should last June entire month. But this trip to the grocery store, Kosta hundred eight dollars and I was like, no yeah. To be fair, though. I wouldn't have like LA tax. That's a real less than one hundred eight I'm sure, but not by enough, not, not by enough. Not to do it every single day. Yeah. Also, I would never get up early enough to do that every single. So there was a millennial omega. I can have like a totally natural herbal way to calm fears and executives and then the other half of my millennial. Nets was like you ain't buck and getting up to do shit, and you have no money you have one penny. You have one dollar what, what are you gonna? What mushrooms are you gonna buy without one penny? Also. They did through in the caveat that like it doesn't work for everyone island all that money. It's not going to work for me ham. That's what made me feel like millennial is I was this close to doing that. Like futurama mean we're just like shut up taking money just empty. Mushrooms, fix me? Mushrooms, notice me notice me sent by notice me mushroom. What are we talking about this week to Jay? We are going to be day. Yes. I should do. I ever say what are we talking about this week for the entire week that people might listen to us? But there are so many other great ways to get in contact with us, like our Instagram, or Twitter and our Facebook all of which you can search a podcast and fine or you can go to our website, ADT are blueberry dot net. Guess net just getting that out there now. And then we'll do it later on. I always liked to do the because it catches people off guard. Oh, you're oh, so now. Today. Cool, who said, I wanted more of you me. I said a good you want. More of us, of course you do. Well, what else would you be listening to us? Don't tell me the real reason why you wouldn't want to be listening to more of us because you'll hurt my feelings. So today, we're going to introduce a new segment. Yes. If you call it, it's I to make a new jingle for new little segment in plead over your word snail. Yeah, no one's going to hear what I'm saying. What are we going to do for it? I don't know. I'm going to have to like listen to this clip from my life greens that turned into the Nickelodeon piece. The. The. We'll I hope we all know what a tip of the hat is not just Milady. But it used to be tipped your head to folks, especially in westerns. If you're Clint Eastwood to show it's, it's like today's nod. Yeah. Or like today's like I don't know you well enough to actually say hi, but I'm going to do like that half smile at you. Whatever I think of a tip of the hat I always imagine like eighteenth century American businessmen like walking through the winter in Pennsylvania with their big coats. Big top hats. See another pair of businessmen walking to them that they know they don't really know. So they like tip there up. Yeah. So that's what the segment is about. So it's not quite hotties and noughties. No. But it's swanning to point out some really cool people that we know that. I mean, celebrities, mostly will do the hats for friends. But you'll know they're our friends because he'll never Curtis them that's true. It's difficult to do a tip of the hat to people that no one knows. I mean, we could still tip our hats to them. That's just what friendship is just constant. Tending to just hang out, look at, like those birds that are constantly like dipping in the water. Just what you didn't see it. But we did the exact same our motion. You know, the, you know, you know, you already if you've watched loony tunes, no, it doesn't even have to be a looney to just anyone cartoon we're doing tip of the hat. And we're starting in June, especially because we wanted to do shadows for pride month. Yeah. So all of the people that we are giving tips to our people that are figures in the queer community. He and I know none of this because I, I walked my happy ass in here with my equipment and all my shit to just walk in and record. I didn't prepare anything bad news to these people. You know, and one of them, you won't know to Sarah, specifically the rest of you. I don't know. How dare you assume what I do do not know I almost, I'm almost positive. I'm excited to be pleasantly surprised. Okay. Well, we're not going to start with that one. Yeah. So I picked just three celebrities. I knew off the top. My cranium that are involved with activism today, in and around the LGBT community. Otherwise, they identify as a member of the community, I wanted to do more historical figures in it didn't happen. So, well, that to out now that will, and that's not your fault. I would say that it's more of history's full. Yes. I'm going to blame my public school education on that one. I'm just going to blame all of the white western historians that wanted to pretend that gay people didn't exist. Who's I I I'm gonna talk about Hannah Gatsby. Is an Australian comedian writer actor and TV presenter, and I didn't know anything about Hannah Gadsby until I think it was about last was almost a year ago. Ninette. Yup. She had a comedy special on Netflix called Ninette. She blew up after that. Oh my God. It was amazing. If you've never seen it, I would highly recommend it. It's amazing to watch her tear down comedy. Yes. Set had like torn her down to the past, and then still make it funny and found a way to make it funny. Also, like all the like, like, what is it like eighteenth, century, painter jokes or whatever this, oh, the Pablo Picasso jokes? Yes. Like just a lot of great humor. But then a lot of real raw emotionality that went into it at the very end. You're not laughing your ass off, you're uncomfortable. And you're like, oh, I have to sit with us now, I real quick before we move on when I watched him that I wasn't uncomfortable. I was never uncomfortable. When I watch. And I was super appreciative of all of the things that she spoke out on. Yeah. And like it was still funny. It was still very funny to me, and it still felt like yes, this is a heavy thing, and we're talking about it, and we need to need to address it anywhere. But the big thing that Hinna had addressed in. It was the fact that like she is a lesbian, of course, have Australia from Tasmania, which is very conservative place to grow up. Yeah. And so, in there are there are some gay people that, like they can pass a straight. Yeah. No problem Hannah is very masculine looking person much not one of those guys that could pass straight, not just not which nothing wrong with that. But like that made it harder to grow up kind of community that place to debate on. So they internalize a lot of hatred towards themselves. And in this comedy, a belief it or not in this comedy special. They like talked about it. They addressed it, and they put it out into the world to be like, I'm not. Carrying this anymore. You can carry it if you want, but I will no longer be the person that has to deal with this emotional labor, which was pretty amazing. And so I found a couple of Koufax about Hannah because she she was very yeah. She wasn't well known in the US until that, right? I clearly she wasn't very well known in the US, although she did get her start when she won the rock comedy competition for new comedians. Ooh Mackin it was either two thousand four two thousand seven. I didn't write the. Oh, wow. Yeah. So I don't know if I remember seeing commercials for raw comedy, competitions on comedy central. Oh, yes, I remember seeing those, I don't remember, we're watching them, because they were always hours at school, or I had play practice or something else going on. But I remember seeing the commercials for it because the commercials would come on during the daily show. Yeah. Exactly. Which for some reason as a child, I watched. I didn't understand it. So I was like a, but I watched comedy central for future almost so it's. Yeah. And then another neat thing Hannah Gadsby was actually diagnosed with ADHD in autism in twenty seventeen. Oh, wow. Yes. So pretty pretty recently in her life. Yeah. Yeah. But mostly the thing that I know about Hannah. The most is heard the net comedy special, and like it was something that I had never seen before or experienced. And it was quite honestly, like breathtaking it was amazing literally watching a woman stand up in front of everybody and talk about how it's very frustrating to be angry about things, but since she's not like an angry old white, man, that comet that type of comedy doesn't fall in her sphere. She can only make lesbian jokes like that. And. Because lesbians, often do fall into this, sexist misogynistic, and very aggressive stance of, like the angry, lesbian all lesbians are just angry because they can't have sex with men, clearly, something like that. And oh no Ono. I can't have a penis. I have to have sex with a woman terrible guests. I'll just take my lot in life. Guess? We'll just take my lot in life and go live in a convent yet, because there's lots of nuns there. Yes. And going to sex up at somebody. That was the implication. Yes, I had to say out loud for the people who couldn't. That was the implication. Yes, so, yeah, I, I do agree. Because I watched it first, and then I told you to watch, right? Yep. Then I watched it one day, and then after that I also watched a comedy special buy a nother gay comedian who is that hig? Oh, yeah. Ticks pretty great to, to put on the list. What I what I really liked about net as a special wasn't just the like she. She talked about coming out to her mom and all of that. And how it was like it became a part of her comedy routine because that's what you do take aspects of your life and make fun of it yet because if you don't then sometimes it's just sad. But, like she definitely touched on what happens after that, that talk like what happened to after the joke is done. Yeah, once the joke is done, and it's like it's a tense relationship. Sometimes it can it's gonna be hard, depending on where you come from, and you hope it's easy. Oh, yeah. I love. Annette as we, we also should stay. We kinda took something from Hannah Gatsby. What do we do quite gays? Yes. We did take her bit about quiet, gays because I think at some point in the podcast or in the special because, you know, they are talking about being a gay comedian what, what her exposure to gay culture was more, you know, really quite understated that they themselves was gay producer was. They saw like videos from pride. And they were like I don't. That's not me. That's not me. That sounds like a good time. But no, like I'm not. I love the idea that there is a place for quiet gays for people that are gay. But still like to, like, don't always like to party don't like to go club, and don't like to do things that western media has portrayed homosexual as yeah. I mean, I think that was pride in Australia that she watch western world. Australia Australia's still counts as the western world, because the English crown governs them, okay? Showed unquote. They're still owned by the English crown. Okay. But I liked that there was that she stood up and was like we exist as quiet as that was just a very heartwarming. Yeah. And now we've taken that to tip of the hat to you Hannah Tippin pack needs. So next person, I have is somebody that I want to learn more about its Hayley Kiyoko you know what that is. That's what I thought you didn't know never mind. I was wrong. I have heard of her a lot. She is an American singer, songwriter, and actress she right now is big in her solo career for music. I think I've, I think I've heard some of her stuff on, like my Spotify radio platelet there's a good chance. You have one of her really popular songs. Now it's the one that I know her by best is curious. And so she sings a lot about, you know, her her sexuality and being attracted twit, which is something that she is wanted to normalize in an you know, the media. Yeah. Because also it's, it's accepted socially to talk about anyone sucking dick like like you can say that as like a joke, you can put it in song. It's not gonna be like radical. But, but the moment you say that you like to eat a girl's pussy. See right there. It's, it's very free zone. You're you don't hear it. And then it just creates a very str-. I love that. She's doing that. Yeah. I on so she has been not necessarily that she's talking specifically about the act of linguists, but still days imply. It. You so uncomfortable. Moving on. But I think she in the Wikipedia article I read, apparently, she's known that she's been attracted girl, since she was like six. Oh, yeah. She came out to parents when she was in the sixth grade, and then throughout that time. She she's been acting since she was little. She was discovered by Nickelodeon to do little like short features and voice overs, which I think, is what where I recognize her name from could be. 'cause she was she skateboarded a lot. So she was in, like all the all the videos about girls doing skateboarding because it was also like really popular in the mid two thousand two thousand remember rocket power raw power think that's on Hulu. I think you might be right, but she apparently she also learned how to play the drums at a young age and by age eleven she was selling like drum charts at leg a music music store. I love her. She, she sounds like she sounds like the person that I desperately. Want to be friends with and to like keep in my circle. Right. And she for some reason, sees something in the simplicity that is me puts like you are the real creature. You knew it six that you were. You were you knew Andy were confident. Didn't let people sway you well to be fair. She was a child through that, and she said, she's carried a lot of that feeling of, like, I don't know, if people will accept me. She's cared a lot of that with her, and she's only two years older than us. She was born in ninety one. Well, okay, so three years to you, fine. Just give her a ruin out there on the internet member the're already did that anyways. I think in one of her more recent songs she's written. Don't ask me, which one it is. Because I can't remember she was talking with producers, and they were trying to write out songs song lyrics, and everything. And like one of our producers challenged her. Like what's one thing. You're you're scared about singing about, and they like wrote earlier about it. And said, okay, do it just do it. Sing about it. Yeah. She just sounds so brave. She also called out. I think it was Rita. Aura when she did girls on girls or a song like that. And so she's outspoken about people who use who use like it's queer bait. Yeah. Like I kissed a girl, and I liked it. Yeah. Well, even not like that. Just like playing at the idea of bisexuality or, or, or liking multiple genders to make to ingratiate you into a community that you don't actually belong in. Yeah. Yeah. Or it's like you're on your sales. Yeah. You're profiting off of this, when it's not something that you that you do. And I'm always in a weird spot with that, because like right now Arianna Grandes going through the same thing 'cause she has constantly said I do not label myself. I'm not gonna put labels on myself, but she had a song a couple of songs recently, where even in the music, videos, she's playing hetero and homosexual relationships. So a lot of fans are like you have to tell us or this is this is considered, you know, we're baiting and everything like that. But I also don't think even celebrities should be forced into outing themselves. Absolutely not. But also, I don't want you to get credit for relationships that you've never had and you're you're you're normalizing in your profiting off of it. Normalizing this wrong word. I want it to be normalized, for sure. I just don't want you to profit off of that when like, yeah. They're like actual queer musicians are able to well, what I'm saying, then it when it starts getting to the point where you question, whether this is something that they've always felt in themselves or something that they're being pressured to do by the record recording label right? Is this helping you make record sales, or is this you actually helping the community and being a person? And sometimes, sometimes it is very much like I'm just being offensive clean Mead, this just a new place that I'm going to, and I think it's interesting that in twenty nineteen especially with celebrities like this, even when they say I don't label myself I don't label my sexuality I don't label my gender. I don't label any of this stuff, which is fair that are people out there that do not label. Or find I'm speaking specifically about myself. Yeah. Like find the US celebrity. The most umbrella term to just to be like, I don't want to explain myself to you every fucking time. Yeah. So I think it's I think it's rough that a celebrities sometimes get boxed into outing themselves. Yeah. Maybe before they're ready. And that even artists within the community have to be on the defensive because Haley is absolutely like within her right? To be like, defensive of the community in like, of content. That is an music that has made like referencing that because she loves it. Yeah. Which is remembering that there's always love behind that protection. Yeah. Is what is what people need to remember. I I love her. Yeah. I I'm I'm to go download her albums on Spotify. Now, I know the very least I have one of her songs on my girl power list, because through in clean that out because there's some stuff I need to take off new things I need to put on, but she's a great, I like her tip of the hat to, to the had to Haley Kyoko for sure. Let's see. And then the last one I have. Was Kerama Brown. I love Koroma. Oh, he is, then don't get me wrong. I love all five of the dudes from queer eye. Yes. I think each one of them were amazing in their own rights, but I think Koroma might be my favorite that, and that's fair. I tand is my favorite I do left hand which is why I feel such a kinship with promo because one of my favorite things about him, is that he had one of his favourite pictures of tan, France. Into his home, and his kids were like dad. What are you have a picture of tan France doing with the rest of us, and he's just like mine business mind? Your business move along like he don't add me, his family. It's will it. It's just hand. I know it's none of the other bad because I remember it. Picture picture. Exactly what you're talking about. Because if one of my best friends took a picture that gorgeous, I will, in fact have someone professionally printed, and then frame it for me. Excuse, you, I have sent multiple gyms to you. I keep them due to, I don't delete them even the ones the ones where you look like Molly ringwald are my favorite is that her name. Molly Rigel maybe with the curly. Yes. Yeah. Yeah. Took from sixteen candles. Yes. Yes says Molly ringwald. Knew her so hot love it. But the little talking points, I have about Caramba Brown in case you don't know. Yes. He's an American TV host reality TV personality, author and activist something that I didn't know about him. I don't remember what year this was, but he co-founded six Inten dot org, which is an organization, which combat's HIV stigma and mental end like supports mental health awareness in black LGBTQ communities. That's amazing. Yeah. So he I would say he's the one that like really had a filled out. Activists section in his wicked yadda like he, he does a lot for different communities. And like this is a guy who's been on, like, MTV a while. Yeah. He I think he is credited as being the first openly black reality star, good. Yeah. The first openly gay black. Yes. Okay. Cool, cool. And so the big thing that I know him from is, he's in the queer eye net flicks revival. So he is seven watched. Get on that guys. Yeah. Definitely give it up. Give it a good watch because it's interesting for sure, and his label because there's the guy that like helps with fashion and the guy that helps like skin care and hair and design design food. Karama which is just labeled has cultural expert, culture, which really translates to why are you living like this? Yeah. He's like, has, like, okay, so you're a mess like vix that you are an actual mess. You know, do you know that you're a mess? Do you know that you're must now one of my favorite things about queer eye? Is that this is like, what is it like an hour long episode? Yeah. About it's about an hour long episode forty minutes. At least they spend about a week with the person that they're helping to make over. Yeah. So there's a little more time and effort that's put into it. They get to know the guy a little bit better or person because they don't just do guys. Now, they don't just do guys, but, but whenever they show his bit, because, you know, there's always just seeing more or less. Okay. It's Antony here. We're going to teach you how to cook this salsa dish Squires. Improv, here's Bobby. Let's talk about what the design of your home is going to be. Let's have you walk into it. And then, of course, there's Jonathan who comes in. It's like oh, yes, Hannay, and he was like doing the whole makeover. In every ten gets his bit. They're always in a different like store, and he's showing them how you can shop on a budget. And then there's Kerama oh, and he just gets, like five minutes on a couch like it's literally five minutes of him going. So why are you the way that you are? And God, if I could get paid to ask someone that question are you the way that you are? And how can we make that better? How can we keep what's you? But make it faction. So, like he's the he's the, he's the psychologist basically, I don't even think he has a degree in sociology, but he comes in and he's basically at Koroma. Oh, I don't know if he does I didn't find that out. I'm just saying, I'm not even sure if this is something that like majored in highschool in and he's the guy that comes in and he's like the one that holds your hand or she gives you the kick in the butt that you need. He's your Joe leader. And I think that's why I kind of love him is because in this Roma Brown and cheerleading uniform, the Stein hot, you're, you're putting you're making a mess with. Jonathan with Jonathan's really long hair. Is he wasn't cheerleader in pigtails, though? Yes. But they're both in, in the in the little skirts, of course because they look good enough. Whoever is in charge of the photo, maybe media for queer eye. I want them to be in cheerleading uniforms, because I think they'd be really cute. I just think he's so cute. Yeah. Like, oh, no. I think that's already happened. I think that's why I said it. Oh, no. Was it from battle? Oh shit. I think you just broke this is what happens when you don't have cable isn't all my God. Yeah. I, I can't I can't we have to talk about this. Sure. So another thing about Koroma is he, I think he came out when he was like sixteen or so, to his parents. And so he was not only dealing with coming out, but, like in a predominantly black community where it could be a little harsher to come out. It can be harder yet from and the only way that I know anything about this is because I've watched where I I've watched Koroma talk very openly about it. Yeah. And as well as like talk to other people of color that are getting out to their families, where it's because they're because families of color are pressured by society to fall into the quote unquote standard. That is being white, and like there's a lot of pressure to overperform so that you could add she certain standards that other people can reach easier. Yeah. So I I love that. Koroma's is very open about all of this pumped up. Yeah. So him I don't know where we started with that sentence. Anyways, he unlike the other four has two children, the excuse me. So one of his, his biologically, he didn't find out until that child was like ten and I was back in, like two thousand seven and then he gained custody of that, same here. So it's like by the way, your dad, and then he adopted he formally adopted that kids, half, brother. And so now he has two children of his own, and he is recently engaged to his fiancee, which is really great. They they're just all one. Big happy, family. Listen, I wanted to say Louisiana, but it's Los Angeles. Yeah. Definitely definitely LA. Both of those are L A, though. No one's going to look at you and say what do you mean? When you say LA, shh, no one's going to confuse you saying, LA for Louisiana. No one's going to do that. But to skip ahead and touch on another point of activism, that karama was is a part of. So he actually grew up in Florida. And he graduated from high school in parkland. Marjory stoneman. Hi. Yeah. I think that's how I think that's the whole title of. And he graduated in one thousand nine hundred nine so, you know, this is something that happened like nearly two decades, after he had graduated, but now he's like, totally on board with the whole. Oh my God. What is call gun control? Yes, he's, he's totally on board with gun control. They had a March for our lives. That's what I was trying to. He has spoken out about how amazing he thinks those kids are, and he's provided his port in any way he can we just, just another really amazing thing is, you know, some of them night, you know, they just get your free beer similar ni- like show up to your activist protests. It's amazing. You know, if you're an alumni of high school, probably shouldn't give those high school students beer. No, you probably should not probably shouldn't Koroma, rob. We shouldn't chrome. Oh, Brown would never do that college. Yes. There you go. That's a different story. Yeah. I, I love all of these, that's why I wanted to tip my hat to all three of them. They are in. No means a definitive list of the import Agno, queer people in today's society, let alone history. But they were the first three people I could think of that we have the minute you were like, okay, let's do a tip of the hat for these people. And I was like, I forgot every except Ellen and that's because we did it episode. Is like, oh, fuck Linda generous is the only lesbian Linda generous is the only gay only only only. I. Yeah. I loved all of these. I also hope that you guys enjoy tip of the hat. If you like it head on over to our Instagram, our Facebook, Twitter, and our webpage, where also at a webpage. You can subscribe to keep up to date with all of the episodes. The moment they get uploaded. Yeah. Yeah. And that is, again, a our podcast at Instagram, Twitter Facebook, and then there is the website itchy our podcast stopped, blueberry bluebell. You be no fuck. There are no es L, U, R, Y dot Nanu bird. You can also just go ahead and straight up old school. Email us at a T our podcast at gmaiLcom tablets down, tablet down. I dropped it also how crazy is that we say, like you can old school. Getting contact with us at mail. Yeah. It's literally electron ick. Male. The per hour. We not always in shock and awe. It's pretty amazing. So we're all of these people. Yes, they are. And if you have another amazing person you'd like to have talked about on tip of the hat because we're always interested in learning about new historical figures or current people that maybe we have not thought about much go ahead and send them your name send us what you think about these guys and send us their name yet. Please send us their name because otherwise we'll never know who you know, I'll never. No, no. And we'll never get it because you're sending it to someone else. That's how that's how that's how that sense came out. Whoops. It's been am I doing this, right? A weekly comedy podcast to millennials Amanda and Rene sit down and discuss the multifaceted cried that we have in all of these people with our little tip of the hat. Look you go slip on Friday at the end. The first one has to be the same seconds, always different. You never know how it's going to get spiced. That's why he got. It's why you gotta listen to whole episode. Wow. Look at you go or guy. See later. Am I doing this, right?

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Hamilton & Douglas

The Nix

35:26 min | 9 months ago

Hamilton & Douglas

"Welcome to the next where we talk about pop culture until we can't stand it anymore and we knicks it I'm Fanny Darling and I'm Justin heart tongue as always a quick warning. There might be spoilers for anything we talk about this podcast, but we will do our very best to let you know that they're coming this week we're talking about the film stage version of Hamilton, which recently debuted on Disney plus to remind us that service still exists. Okay. So welcomed this week and this is our weekly I was gonNA say bi monthly. But no, we do this every week please rate and review us on the PODCAST APP of your choice because that would make us happy and very few things are making us happy recently. So do that and that would be fine. What did you do in pop culture this week Justin I still been watching what we do in the shadows, the fx show on Hulu I am full on obsessed with this show. It's made me laugh harder than pretty much. Any other comedy this year I find it just ridiculously silly watching it with Dave and he said Oh my God I know. This, there's so much Elvira in this DNA. And he's not wrong. It's funny. I can see watching it all this are Germane comment, Taika Waititi stuff I am really happy that they've sort of mostly removed themselves from. You know the cast for the most part and I never show up in little bit parts. They don't do too much directing because I think this cast is so spot on. They are so consistent working together. The whole sort of. Season Arc. Spoilers for the first season of what we do in the shadows one vampire by three them by yes I did that. There's a van healthy character that shows up and surprising way as it is delightful makes you care about these ridiculous characters. It's the you know the little tiny side characters subplots Vanessa Bayer, showing up as the emotional vampire as a foil to the energy vampire, and then then falling in love and teaming up is sheer brilliance. Since my favorite part of the whole first season, I know that there's a lot to love about the season, but that is my justice, just his realizing Oh, my God. She's a vampire to she stealing all of my energy because of her pity. I have worked with people like that. So totally, and it's funny because the show definitely has a little of the office and it's That guy was a character on the office at some point which I remember it all. But it yeah. That episode veered a little I was like Oh was just going to be office, but it sort of keeps evolving the on that. It's so so funny and I can't wait to keep watching and see where it goes. Also, go look up the actor who plays. His name Narda Nardello was free. Not Dondo. Thick that's a fried. Chicken chain. Name. Me Is smoking hot. used to be just google him in his past roles. He's smoking hot. That's a tree. Okay Wow. Did Not expect that. I know Dave was watching it and Dave was my husband was like, oh, he's so hot and I was like really then he's like, yeah, because I looked him up at dinner. I've been reading still. On, a new books I also got to give a shoutout. Bragging braggers to Libby E. The IPHONE APP that lets you plug into your local library check out e books and things. Be Them Light. Yeah. It's a library. Yeah. That makes all right. I'll take it. It is the greatest APP. It makes everything so easy. It's like boop cards already in there you find something it's on hold you get a notification when it's ready. I'm currently reading the Changeling by Victor Lavalle. This book that came out I believe a year or two ago. It is horror fantasy but also is really fantastic at just a character study of. A family living in New, York and just dealing with. Some crisis stuff that is gets more and more orioles goes on, but it's also very funny. It is rare to see a black author. In. Horror Genre I don't know that it's rare, but it's it's nice characters in this. It's also just about the experience of being a black man and a family and a new father and his friends it's it's I don't know I really appreciating how detailed it is around characters and character interactions that you rarely see in this genre generally. No matter who's writing it I really recommend it's of our I don't know where it's going. It is getting more and more horror horrible horrifying read it, which is freaking out because so funny and sweet in the beginning. Definitely is a bit of a sucker punch that way but yeah I recommend it and I will keep you updated when I finish it. I also wanted to play a song this week This is a band called man on man. Can you guess? What. Subtext that is there's no I can. Roddy bottom from the band imperial teen one of my favorite. One of my favorite bands, but they're great band and I saw them rape before the code lockdown. So they have a special. Spot heart right now. Right bottom was also the keyboardist or that nineties kind of prog rock band faith no more. With the flopping goldfish member of you know if you remember that video. But. He has started a quarantine ban with his boyfriend joey? Holman. Air called man on man. The first single released is called Daddy. It's super sexy gay ridiculous. Fun of one of the things I also love about it is everyone should go check out the video maybe we'll tweet going to that. It's Is Super. Body positive it's him and his boyfriend. Pretty much address this tiny Whitey's, and they do not have in any way shape or form perfect gay whatever bodies and it's sort of sensual, but it's also play full and. It's it's kind of. Startling to see that Sir representation of Gay Culture and. Music video for an incredibly fun and rocking song. So let's take a quick listen to daddy by man on. Thank. You. Thank you. Zero. Data. Okay, and finally I wanted to talk about him. Hannah Gadsby? Special. Douglas. On Netflix to which I know we've abso-. So that'll be a good segue This is her follow up to the insanely. End Loved A. God why can't I remember the name we were just talking about it now break knackers now that's that's the name. We talked about that go back and listen we both love net I was I got to admit I was worried whether she had it enough. Not that I didn't think she'd have enough material but because nenet was such a sort of formal. Feet of sort of you know, Melvin comedy with personal story and release challenging everybody that I was like. Oh. Is it more like how's this going to evolve? That was so striking. So unique. I have to say I thought she completely avoided the sophomore slump with this. It is in some way funnier and looser. Itself Referential About. Net. About how all that sort of set her up for this special. But at the same time completely just dismisses that with it's brilliant wave. It also. Is a deconstruction of the way comedy works and yet doesn't feel pretentious somehow. I found it completely charming and I just. Crazy talent to be reckoned with then I can't wait to see what she does next. What did you think absolutely and I feel like I want to go back and watch it again now to. Really. GonNa remember some of the stuff that she said I. I thought it was great. I loved her. I didn't know you would be so excited about trauma. When she asks everyone. The end of you haven't seen net. Why are you here? She's wonderful I. Adore her and I will watch anything she does anything she's in and I. Wish her nothing but the best of success. Just. Go Watch both of her shows. They're they're worth it and they might make you cry and places but. They're they're necessary in their great and speaking of have you finished please like me ever. Talked about on this podcast that I finished it and I was angry with you remember. Oh, right. Because the last four episodes are hard I yep Yep I yelled at you there was yelling but that was before quarantine so. New to Hannah Gadsby go back and watch that show just another plug for please how good she is on that. So. So good. Start. With the crappy thing that I did is I watched the good liar this is not a good movie. SNOTTY. Bad good movie Helen Mirren Your Fabulous I. Love You same with you Ian mckellen. Russell Tovia and your ears. You're all fun and this should have been way more interesting than it was and it wasn't and moving on I. Got Bored, I did make a mean. It has a surprise ending which I saw coming. But. I. Don't know if other people did spoilers for the good liar this is like you know your chance to back out now she's playing him Oak Nazia. You can see it turns out that she knew him when he was a Nazi and he raped her and ruined her life and Oliver family died, and so she's taking him for a ride. Can I say one thing about the problem with that movie her she? I think what was boring the hell out of me very quickly was and made me think there was going to be some kind of twist like that was because they show his hand so early. that. Not only do you kind of it's fine. If you know that he's up to no good because sort of just the nature of these stories, but you have these. Long scenes with him being up to no good right and so that dramatic tension is not there. You're just doing what is the point of us? Yeah. Except maybe be trying to set me up for some twists. I. Mean. It killed two hours in quarantine. Thank you for that moving on. I listened to while driving up to the farther along in the Russian river than my ipod and I had been to before my co-pilot, Oliver, Ni- We listened to the Guru podcast. This is you can only listen to I think three episodes so far out in the podcast world. But if you download a free trial of day because you will become addicted as we did, you can listen to all six episodes of this podcast. It is about. James Ray Arthur who was Like A. Self Help Guy Allah kind of landmark forum, but also involved in the secret that Juggernaut and was like was on Oprah Anyway He. Had People die at some of his retreats, and if it's a deep dive into a Colt and this particular guy and it's Tickled all of my little fancies when it comes to colts and self those self-help Colt things and it's out there listen to it. It's fun I also watched all begun in the dark speaking of tell a true crime like we did last week you can go Delvin guess two weeks ago. horrible people good good stuff about horrible people which reminds me you also watch the Roy. Cohn. Documentary. Oh. It was excellent. You're not wrong I loved it. It is great. Really look at it people. It's really good anyway Michelle. McNamara who has since unfortunately passed was Obsessed with the golden state killer. Case unsolved rapes and murders that this that happened in a while up in our area Sacramento all the way down to the bay area and was working on a book and wrote an article about these things. This is on HBO, and it is basically kind of a retelling of the book copy gone in the shadows. Many. Many interviews. It's. I read I read the book and I. Liked it. I think this is a good representation of it they. They are super involved with patent Oswald and I feel like their reverence for Michelle McNamara. May Be sort of clouding that the story is about. Sort of this heinous unsolved now, a spoiler alert. If. You haven't been watching the news recently, this guy has been caught. He was caught not terribly long after Michelle. macnamara died and he has recently pled guilty but. Because Patton Oswalt is so involved feel like they may be looking at her with a reverence. That isn't super. Clear. They're not looking at her very objectively an I like Michelle. Mcnamara I. Think she was a great. Sleuth and very honest about herself but I feel like possibly the documentarian. Crew. Weren't being as honest as she was about herself because they wanted to keep Patton oswalt involved he her widower and. The father of her orphaned child and. And also, very famous in his own right. So I, feel like there's a little bit of stars in their eyes about this and I wish that that kind of I think it has a slant that there's only two episodes so far that have dropped the and I think there's going to be eight I will keep watching I. think it is well done but. A wish they'd gone into a little bit of her. I don't know maybe they do a little bit. into her darkness and why she was so obsessed. With this particular case and what it may or may not have done to her. She suffered from depression she when she passed away, it was from an accidental overdose which may or may not have been from self medicating due to this depression and I wish they were slightly more clear about this but I do think it is a well done document a. Much like most of HBO's thing I think it's I think it's well done I. Just am not sure that they aren't. Paying too much attention to the patent Oswald side of things, right. So I did that and I also watched both versions of the STEPFORD wives. I got on a kick about. How Jordan Peele was influenced by the STEPFORD wives to do get out I'm not sure wet Y. my brain will up obsessed with this morning but it did so and both versions are on Amazon prime for free. So I watched the nineteen seventy five version and the twenty four version with Nicole Kidman and Matthew Broderick. And by the way, Mary Stuart masterson is in the nineteen seventy, five version as an adorable like seven year old child. I found it interesting to watch them back to back. because. The two thousand and four version is so obviously a satire and trying to say something. That I think. Ira Levin who wrote the novel probably would have respected and the nine hundred, seventy, five version went kind of straight horror. You know it didn't. Go there but when you have bette Midler Jon Lovitz and Glenn Close and Christopher Walken. Nicole Kidman Matthew Broderick and. Oh. My God and they do just enough twists to it to make it really about where we are in gender relations and gender politics and I thought it was very very interesting to watch them both that way. But also that I hadn't realized when I saw the old version I knew that they had changed it a little that they were trying to say something about our culture but. I don't think I paid super close attention to it at the time and I. Back, it's good. It's good and it's on prime. I and I knew that there was you know some Influence on Jordan Peele? There's Yeah there's so much in there that I hadn't even. Connected because I haven't seen them in so long since I've seen get out. There both were worth checking out and that's all I didn't pop culture. That's a good amount. So. Let's talk about Hamilton Lynn minerals, roles, juggernaut musical, which as we mentioned debuted on Disney plus over the fourth of July weekend, it was supposed to come out in theaters next year. But they decided to rush release it because of it and we're all super board. So thank you Disney plus you get props for that one. It stars the original Broadway cast even now everybody's all pissed. Because they a canceled their free trial right before they dropped Hamilton everybody's very angry. Who Does it start stars the original castle memoranda who's obviously the writer and Creator to. Lead the junior. Burr telepath zoo. Debbie digs and Jonathan groff. First of all fanny why don't you tell me just remind got we've probably talked about this in the podcast, but just for those who don't remember having heard. Like what your relationship is to Hamilton Before this and then tell. Loves Hamilton. My son loves Hamilton that's my relation to Hamilton. have a picture of my son in the seventeenth. Thorough. Of Hamilton, his friend took him to see it for his birthday That is really my relationship to Hamilton that and my fear that I wasn't going to like Hampton because I thought it was going to be like Oh white people rap even though I know that these these are not white people doing this I get that but that was my fear of Oh nerdy. Preparation of rat yet rap for white people. Thank rap for Nerdy theater white people at that. Is. What I what I feared. An, how'd you listen to any of the music at all like the contract? Okinawan very I mean I'd heard it but not like. where I'd paid attention, I had been on in the background of things that was it I feared badly that I was going to be. At the very least indifferent at the very worst. Hating this means and I was watching it with people. Again. Lola. No every line and this was very a we had spent two weeks planning when we were all going to get together and watch and it was a big deal and you know we made cook and it was very exciting and we sat down on, I have this fear of what if I hate this? I did not hate this I absolutely loved it. I found myself adding. Several parental, just being touched in general but then a lot of parental empathy and really sort of losing my. Shit but. I thought it was wonderful a really really enjoyed it. That's my relationship with Hamilton us. Good. What's yours? I saw the San Francisco production in two thousand seventeen. And I. Kind of had some of the same fears I remember when I went to go see it I. Thought you know I I don't tend to like modern music musicals like whenever they try and be like a rock musical or a rap music or whatever I just end up not liking that because I'm such a music. I same thing like that so authentic appropriation of those sounds. Even like you know. Spring. Awakening which everyone went crazy for speaking of Jonathan Groff. And they like that it got us Jonathan Growth I. Guess totally. Soothe. This production blew me away in San Francisco. I just was completely riveted from the job. I. Think it's so. It's so efficient in its storytelling it. Its point. So clearly, and yet manages to sort of feel fun and not like a history lecturer. Music is actually delightful and really varied and. You know even when it's sort of leaning in the full on battle raps. The founding fathers it sort of does it with a little bit of a wink? Knows it's not you know authentic rapper whatever that is. It's it's a covers. It's ass all that in that regard. I found the CASSIDI saw. At that point, the touring cast it started Michael. Luoi I'm. That's how you say his name. He's Broadway that fuckers that he was great. Incredible. which leads me to that one point of I think that Lin Manuel, Miranda. While being an amazing author, he was definitely the weakest voice. Absolutely. I totally agree and he's charismatic and he's fun. But he? I will say, Michael Away had this intensity that the scrappy nece the like whatever the line is about young and hungry in that song is you felt like leaping off the stage whereas nights Limo Miranda your little like you've already a huge success with in the heights as his previous musical. That same urgency, but he's very charming and he's very funny and I think he engages really well. I'm not taking anything away from him. It was just he. I couldn't keep my eyes off of digs. Now I know that you know look he's an oakland boy and I was going to be proud of him. No matter what. But I literally even when he was in shadow, he drew the I and his voices. So amazing and autumn's waste is incredible in all of the women were so good it was like, oh Lynn. Yeah. I just thank you for writing it now go over there. Really Liked Phillip Assu as his wife Elisa she. It's a little bit of a thankless part I. Think there's been a lot of talk about how some of the women in the show it's like they didn't quite know what to do. They tried to do something. And I think that would lead them a little short sometimes but she really thought made the most of what she had to work with. Oh. Absolutely. Absolutely. And graph I liked I have to say it's my least favorite part of the show you could cut. The two reprises of that number and be just fine of like the they wouldn't graph. God. I have so much affection for him that I was fine with it and you know we did get to see him drool. God drooling was disgusting. I knew you were I was like Oh. That's where they may have lost Justin. Right there may have been. The pimple popping. Girlfriend. That might be where we lost him I. I had heard he was like a spinner but the. The rule was just At, the disgusting. But Yeah I just I was so fun to see this show and. Put. The subtitles on because I'm GRANDPA. And really sort of pay attention. I'm watching it again with them yet was no I don't watch it again with those subtitles because. I was with people who knew the show so well that I know I missed so much as as much as. Being with those people who knew it so well, and who were singing along with every line may heightened my like excitement and my appreciation and my moment of Oh I'm sharing this with you but I know I missed so much that I'd like to see again. And so I'll go back and watch it for that for sure. Definitely for sure. I feel like we should talk a little bit about the sort of the new you know. Reconsideration of Hamilton I think post black lives matter. Post everything we've been through in the whatever you know sick five years. Davis is five years old now. There's been a lot of sort of think pieces about this show that came out in the Obama era we obviously. Gone into the twilight zone and turn everything upside down. Do you think I don't know. So a lot of the criticism is around the fact that the show is basically having actors of color playing people that were in real life slave owners at the very least. and. Is that appropriate bothering you? I don't. Has Not. Bothered me. In fact, I found the subversiveness of it. Sort of empowering in were taking. This reverse appropriation of you know what this this is actually ours. So we're going to take it from. You know this is very much how I feel about. WE'RE NOT GONNA get into it but how I feel about the Harry Potter? Series. You have now left this behind and for those of us that it meant something to were taking it. and. Look you ignored people of Color, in the history of America for so long and the only voices that you have said that mattered are of the people that wrote the document. So we're GONNA, take that, and now it's ours. And we're gonNA write something from it now. Think. That criticisms are somewhat valid. Of the pieces I get what they're saying, but I also do not. necessarily. Agree I think that the that the that it was done very much. All of that in mind and With an eye toward it. And so I think it's I think it's to his manuals credit that it. I think it's a topic of conversation. Then he thinks of this show is a living breathing entity that it has to be reacted to and maybe. Yup. Absolutely and that has been his reaction to all of the think pieces and all of the criticism is your right. Your opinions are valid. Let's talk about it. Right? You know not not no you didn't understand what I said but YUP. You I may have missed what you're what you thought. You WanNa talk about it. All I will talk to you about it. That's great. Let's talk about it and That's where we need to be is let's talk about it. I also want to give a shoutout to, and I think this is sort of related that Hamilton mix tape that he he released with like a bunch of of real pop and hip hop artist doing covers of all the songs but even. Like, interpolations remix is they'll take one line from a song and build it into a whole nother kind of song. So this is very cool Kinda remix. Approach. To a musical which I think is sort of in the spirit of talking. Right. This is an ongoing conversation like even. So the constitution is supposed to be a living breathing document. Maybe. Maybe, Hamilton could be to right totally. Yeah I really love this and it couldn't have come at a better time because I just. I needed something a little I needed little uplift I also needed to be reminded that people can sometime in the future go together and sit in a space and enjoy life theater together I know that that will happen. When but it will happen. Anything gets. No I think that's about aunt I'm GONNA go watch it again with the subtitles in Nice. I wasn't going to do next but now I have an ex. Because I haven't done one in a while, I'm sure not it's not that surprising. I'm always scrimping about something so. So the Harper's letter. Well, we're talking about, okay I'm not GonNa talk too much about it, but it's in service of something else that I feel much less ambiguous about. Letter. Basically a bunch of sort of. You could say older generation academics and writers and journalists. Printed in Harper's magazine, it was basically. Call to cancel cancel culture. Or Knicks Knicks. The Knicks Knicks Culture and it was received. Very, divisively the lease across the twitter sphere and among other younger journalists. I'm not here to debate whether or not that was in itself. Next worthy I mean personally I thought it raise some interesting points, but it's also highly problematic timing getting into it now J. K. Rowling was among letter signers justice acknowledged. There was a lot of sort of like what kind of Weirds of Anti Trans kind of. Outreach happened here and why is this? You know referring to a lot of things that are not being spoken explicitly and so I think people are rightfully obviously very upset with that. So but ultimately, mainly, very like my first reaction was I hate canceled culture and it is bad. Even we named talked all the time we name the spot gas, the Knicks I do think it is a big problem and I sort of appreciated the spirit of where some of the letter at least came from but I Right now. Kanye West. Oh, God? Yes please. We're talking about this. Before we started recording, there was an interview today that came out I don't even remember where, but he's pretending to essentially be done with trump and. Announces. Presidential run and I mean it's crazy. It's all these will connie stuff. But it's like leaning extra hard to a God and the devil you know the only way to live and basically. I mean it's really like if you were president, it would be even worse than trump I'm also highly suspect that he's working in tandem with trump. To try and disrupt the Biden campaign, which he doesn't even totally deny in this interview. Just. Made me think after all this week of defending this article about canceled culture and how it's bad I'm I he's canceled. Next. was made for anybody that's Super Fair. It just I I've defended. I, think. I. Defended Him like a week ago or so was a brilliant did yeah artist. But I I mean I can't. Now it's like I don't know what to say like I'm just beyond words. There's nothing more say there's no coming back from this and it's sad because it's he's an artist that I really did love at some point. and. It's it's really I. Think made anything. He's ever done toxic to me like I can't go back and listen to it, and that's it's hard. So. That's all. That's my next Khaneh. Your firmly next Harper's letter you're being evaluated still. Bats Bear. No I don't think we ever this week. We're not on well, you can find us on twitter at the next podcast everything else send us an e mail. If you want at emotion the Knicks g dot com everything else we are boycotting and avoiding because the world is on fire and everyone sucks I've been dipping toes into twitter a little bit. You can probably tweet at me at Justin hard tongue on twitter I might not respond that probably won't respond but. You can find me out Fannie Darling I will respond. We'll talk to you next week.

Hamilton Justin Michelle McNamara Knicks Disney Hannah Gadsby Hamilton Jordan Peele twitter Taika Waititi Jonathan groff Dave Vanessa Bayer google Fanny Darling Narda Nardello Elvira Victor Lavalle Netflix
Monica Lewinsky and Hannah Gadsby Talk Trauma

Inside the Hive with Nick Bilton

33:56 min | 2 years ago

Monica Lewinsky and Hannah Gadsby Talk Trauma

"Welcome to inside the hive. I'm your host, Nick Bilton. I have another very special mid week treat for you this week. The show your about to listen to recorded live at the Vanity Fair new establishment summit last week in Los Angeles and the guests that will be actually taking over the podcast. This interview are none other than the award winning stand up comedian and creator of the show, the net Hannah Gadsby. You have not seen the net on Netflix. You have to watch this incredible grabble show, and she is being interviewed by social activists, contributing editor, Vanity, Fair, Monica, Lewinsky. What they're going to be talking about is what it's like to deal with trauma and the public eye about comedy about social media, social activism, and the landscape world find himself in today. So sick around, it's going to be a great show. Thanks. Thank you. People are coming back. They left with the birds. Protests. Hi, Hannah along. Natural conversation. Exactly. Thank you so much for being here with no seriously, but thank you so much for being here with us at the Vanity. Fair new establishments summit. Thank you to like that's not obliged. I think I delighted to hear. Huge fan. In fact, I'll just start tweeting so but like to kick off our chat with a couple of quotes, there might be a few people here today who surprisingly have not yet seen your standup special net on net flicks. I technically haven't seen it. Okay. Yeah, thank you. Thanks for the appeal understand that. I have a hard time watching myself. I feel like a no. I think I think I know the twists. So I thought that I would actually share a quote from an article in the New Yorker sort of describes your show, and it is in the course of the hour, long set which was filmed at the Sydney Opera House and transforms into a commentary on comedy itself on what it conceals and on how it can force the marginalized to partake in their own humiliation. Gadsby who Wentz considered Bill Cosby her favorite comedian now plans to quit comedy altogether. She says, because she can't bring herself to participate in the humiliation anymore and quote, and there's another quote which is for me that hasn't been published anywhere yet. And basically, this is what I told everybody that I knew after I was privileged to see your show over the summer and that was that I have never gone to a standup comedy show and bawled my eyes out as much as I did and given my history that was pretty surprising. So just kind of opening up the conversation. I wanna know you been beloved in Australia and New Zealand for many years now. And what's it been like to become globally loved for what you've brought into the world, and have you coped with it. Yeah, look, I able to process to be honest and. Find it funny now that I'm I'm in the in the law, a win of people in the US. And I keep hearing that I disqualify from being able to call myself a successful comedian because they haven't heard of me before, which I love. I love being. Told my in business visibility to someone who refuses to engage in another culture is my fault. That's fun. But you know, I think that's what's given me the ability to to make the impact that I have know a much bigger audience in the way that I have is because that I almost because people. Looks like of emerged fully formed, like Venus, like a fully formed at a moment. And it's my first step and it's not ten years of graph that went behind it, but it does look like that. I've come out of nowhere. But the tension on getting his Luca. Comfortable. I wrote a show pretty much from the from the pain. Being invisible. To the world was born into calls me. I'm not. I don't have the skill set all the sense of entitlement that comes with. Being seen so thoroughly as I currently in, you know, they're feels nice on some levels but also very foreign and quite. I feel some discomfort with. I think it's interesting because I know while very different circumstances, I came to understand some of the my own experiences almost from an energetic perspective of, if you think about thoughts and feelings and emotions being an energy which can be directed toward you, that to sort of go from a certain amount of exposure to people's thoughts to suddenly many people's thoughts. It can be distabilise ING in some way to just the experience I think in in life, at least that's what it was for me. So on supposed to the overwhelming postitive response to be, I didn't have that. But I am very glad that years. This positive as it should be. My shame the shame in formed Mike's -perience with something. That I endured. On my own and was more of a. Culturally cultural in fiction that I was given. It was a purse. Ashamed. By world who didn't see me. You visibly by world. Soley and that you'll shame in someone was public property. But yes, one hundred percent. But I think at the same time I was both visible and invisible us right. But but equally the parts of you that would denied visibility with those parts that denied people's responsibility to consider you whether they're empathy or consideration. That's an active active choice with the stores. We write about people. We collectively on some level decide. L.. Problem. We do. We do this a law, not you and I. It's. You know, one of the things you do in net is you talk openly about how you manipulate the audience. So it's very meta and you kind of break the fourth wall, and you basically asked the audience to observe reactions their own reactions to you telling your stories of trauma and then kind of make them sit in it. So I think one of the things to which I think is so brilliant about you and the show and what you do there is, I guess what I kind of came to call the Hannah hangover, which is in anybody who's seeing this year, we'll know exactly what I'm talking about, which is for at least a week after I saw the show, I would find myself in conversation zoning out or just even by myself, and I would be reliving this sort of moment of transformation which you created for me on stage. And, and I think that was that Hannah hangover, but we're gonna throw to a clip that well, good throw. I just learned that today, so I'm going to throw to a clip of Hannah's Ninette. So the whole thing. I'm not sure do think I'll have to quit comedy. In seriously, it's probably not forum to Mike in announce is it. What is it. In the middle of a comedy show, but I have questioning this whole comedy thing. I don't feel comfortable in it anymore. Posterior have been questioning REEs, and I think it's healthy for an adult human tight stock Paul's and recess. And when I first started doing the comedy over decade, got my favorite comedian was boo Cosby. You got very healthy to raise this, isn't it? And I built a career out of, so f- deprecating human. That's what my career on, and I don't want to do that anymore because you understand. Do you understand what dip Rocatien means when it comes from somebody who already exists in the margins, it's not humility. It's humiliation. Put myself down in order to speak in order to seek permission to speak, and I simply will not do that anymore. Not to myself or anybody who identifies. I do something to Bill Cosby in that he's really gave me confidence to to know that my slow cadences. Is acceptable. Comedy and comedy is very coming, very fast, the pressure to really impress people. We do wit quick. Right. So. I wanna talk about him anymore. Did you been so mentioning Bill, Cosby? Did you win? Did you start writing net? And did this sort of the cultural landscape that began shifting in the last year or maybe even less two years to that, have an impact on how you were writing about things or how you were thinking about things to change things at all? I mean, I can only realize understand it in hindsight, but I think I was reacting to landscape the. Has activated a lot of different people. To express the frustrations in ways that have become a movement. Like, I think I'm just, you know. You know, I was deeply frustrated with a lot of the show is written from the place where I felt like I wanted to say something constructive. I wanted to undo Demi felt like I'd participated in in stuff like that, but a lot of it was also driven by professional jealousy. Like, are you frustrated by the rise of mediocrity was happening around me, you know? And I try not to say it with arrogance. Although I do believe firmly, I was so much better than those. Dies getting bright because just forgiven for the media critic because people trust people closed on is are asked to think of a comedian more often than not just tight their idea of a doctor and taika fees suit and put on jeans and a t shirt. And he's the same gone signed guy. As soon as straight white guy walks onstage people conditioned to trust them to take care of the comedic needs and and that trust is being betrayed. That's an understatement honestly has because by just trusting. You know these so many comedians who think that you know. It is the place to not consider what they're saying. And the only thing that they need to end to the loft they getting. That's the justification. They all the justification. I need to know that they they, they are doing this well, they're being good comedians because people laugh at them, but only I happen to believe that just because an audience laughs doesn't mean it's funny. It's not actually a good reason. It's not a good measure of, right. What you're saying. The worth of what you're saying because you you can be infected by those. You sit in seat amongst an audience can be infected by the by other people's laughing and often laughter comes from discomfort. An often people when particularly when jokes aimed at those that tell the jokes. Think of lists punching down as we call it. When those jokes get lumps. What you're hearing is not. That you'll joke is funny, but. Those people who agree with you feel feel. The. Inhumanity is justified. They, he stereotype that they believe an invest in and think of as reason to think someone else's less reasonable because other people are laughing at these stereotypes and so person went up. Performing. I was horrified just by how many COMEX use rape as a subject matter. In the material as a young men often. And it was the most the most horrific use of that subject was a throwaway punchline. So something that tag onto the end of an idea and I would have to perform to the same audience laughed at at something laughed at not just a subject matter, but at a joke that made. That file to Mike. Rape. The tug about laughter. So people we using as the shock as a tool to create tension because people like this thing, we know to feel afraid of talking about in public spaces. Like it's not something where able we have a great framework to talk about in public. So as soon as a comedian brings it up, people are automatically tents. As soon as you make people tents. It's so easy to make them laugh. And that was the only reason I spoke about it. They didn't use it because I thought, hey, I want to turn right culture on its head because they didn't even know rape had a culture. They refuse to acknowledge that the tension that people feel when they bring it up. Is a reflection of not their skill is a commune, comedian affliction of the. Unspoken, an unemotionally damage that these kinds of salt cools in our community. Like there's this sorry to interrupt, but this is sort of brings up for me. A question I had experience kind of to be interrupted. No, no did because. You're going June around good guy on the debris. I so I, I saw your show in the SoHo playhouse over the summer, and then I also watched it watch the Netflix special, and one of the things that you do in the net is you kind of take people through stories as a joke, and then later on you take them back through the same story with a more traumatic reality connected to it. And so sorry, this might be a bit of a spoiler alert, but. I was wondering, especially when I watched the second time you, there's a very important story in your show around what happened to you at a bus stop one night. And when I saw it live the first time I laughed with everyone else and I cried with everyone else. When you talked about what had really happened and how you were assaulted. When I saw the second time, what came up for me was I wondered what it was like for you the first time or maybe at this offer house with a huge backed house. What it was like for you the first time you told the first part of the story where it was kind of joking about it and you heard people laugh at your trauma. It's. It's an interesting one because that story. Is one that I've always held. As. Two distinct stories. I have two versions that I hold as coherent narratives that don't feel like they're the same story, even though I've created the around the same thing. So I've done I've done and that's what drove me to do this to to tell both sides of the story was the challenge for me to be able to say, could I tell the story the version of the story that I see? No humor in that I can only triggers pain and trauma? Can I share that with an audience and win comedy and the and I knew I couldn't. I knew that only way I could share the story in a way was to make it funny and just tell it in a way that suspiciously going, oh, look how stupid dumb dumb ignorant. Homophobes on that was it. And there was no actual violence that. Ignorance. Was put up night, but. When I decided that I couldn't. Tell a story like that and shit. The actual bits that happens to me that made it clear to me that it was a story that. Is not one people. Note. We can only laugh at store, things that we all understand. So that said to me is like I've been telling the story. An I'm as much to blame for people, not understanding stories like this because I have a platform where I can hope. Tell stories that we refuse to listen to. And the reason I stopped myself from telling stories that like that is because I felt my first responsibility was to make people love. And so in my mind that then maybe think I am no better comedy than those that don't consider right everything that they say. So I, I it. So when I tell her story, no, I don't think about because I, I hold it as a distinct. Interesting. And that also is the root of. Wiles on able to. Fully extract the effects of the troll involved in that incident of therapists? I say that all you need to get rid of. The effects of trauma is to find a cohesive narrative to put it into. And I had not just one, but two, he's narrative and it still had a grip on the. The reason I believe is that an individual alone cont. Can't ext extract. The effects of trauma. If it's part of its roots. Built into the shame that the world demand you feel about who you want. So I was, I was raised to believe I was less than the person who beat me up. Is. Young guy. I was a. Queer fat quay go on. You always listen potent and him. We were both culturally conditioned by the same story and what freed is freed me from this from the trauma. The grips of the trauma, the effects of trauma from that is not the the cohesive narrative that to understand that both me and that guy were infected by the same story, and we both damaged. By that. Right? You know he was let down as well. He was taught that he's with justified. He was told that. And so you know. By creating story where I. Can hang my. Trauma only worked if then was heard by the world that I lived in the world helped hold that trauma because I created a story in a framework that they that was acceptable to people to share. The burden of my pain. And when when the world you live in shares the burden of your pain, you feel safe and safety. Feeling safety in the world is the only thing that can defuse the pain of trauma. Well, and you did that for me. So. I know some people may be wondering why we were haired and now I get to throw to a cliff again. So I think this will explain things little can it's both. We used to, you know, throw away jugs about pre Spink pedophile and Trump rap on the poles eight. Tom for that sheet. It used to be a easy punchline, Monica, Lewinsky. Maybe if comedians have done they job properly and made fun of the men who abused power than perhaps we might have had a middle-age woman with an appropriate amount of experience in the White House. Instead as we a man who openly admitted to sexually assaulting moderable young women bit goes eight code. I. I wanna. Thank you. I really wanna thank you for that. And I've seen on social media actually, I've noticed even if people don't reference Monette that there have been many more people who have referenced their regret at having seen me as just a punchline. And I think that that has come from what you put into the world. So I'm, I'm so happy that you. It was a risk not even more. So when you were in the room. General you knew you knew you knew I was there. Yeah. Yeah. Can't trust it. That's what you know. Is something that is constructive. You like it was how I believed. And I'm so great. I'm so good. I yielded, but yeah, you nailed it. Hannah. But you know, when when we have an easy punchline. You know. I think we have to acknowledge that would do humanizing, actual human beings. And I just I don't want this is what people think ruined comedy, you know, but. Coat. You know, we'd fill the gaps. That's what we do is humans like something's missing Mike, something the birds like they like. We need a new way to not walk. We've we fill gaps. It's interesting for me because I, I didn't know if you knew I was in the audience, but I knew I was going to get to meet you after and walking to your dressing room. I was actually thinking about what would happen after and my fear that I'd walk out of your dressing room after meeting you go. Now I have to change my show them how would have been a disappointment. Oh. Though on anymore spice. So it was knows it was a real nice moment. It was amazing moment for me. Somebody who you know. Was a genuine attempt to make to extend an apology from a. An art form that profited of shaming like there's so many people like that. Amy one houses. Another example of a person we found so easily easy to laugh at in the midst of witnessing. Something quite devastating, and we, we, we keep doing this and we have to work out. He's. I think your show is actually gonna is really going to change that I already have needs to be less series. So I really. Okay. Well, let's serious. So would you. Would you? This is kind of random fire question. Would you host Saturday Night Live if you were? That'd be less serious. It's it's not a real question because I want asked. Off. Why do you think even I am not a friend of, okay. All right. Next question then Sephora work, really, that's fun. No, we'll all code. Plus a bit slow for live TV. Okay. See that. I, you do something incredible in the show that is one of the parts of Ninette which stuck with me a lot. And that is sort of your take down of Picasso. Yeah, and so really sort of bringing to people's attention and reminding them how in his forties because, oh, had been with a seventeen year old young woman whom he thinks to quote you had said was in her prime at seventeen and I, I was really interested to know just kind of the evolution of that place. You have an art history degree which you talked about, and if that. Like, did you have a negative reaction from people the first time you tried out that section of, oh, can't go after Picasso. Not much in comedy, negative reaction Picasso. Give was born more of listen bit up like it's not. It's not a thing. Often explored. In stand up. So that was new influence, you know what informed resistance. But yet people don't like, you know, when we demand someone, we adults, take responsibility for their actions or for us to take responsibility for elevating toxic destructive humans into positions of power that deny them. Any responsibility for the. Their actions. We, we take power as immunity. You know is something that that not only gives a manpower gives the right to diminish the lives of the paper actively do that actively participate in the diminishment of another humanity. But we also do not wait deny that that power is taking a toll on their humanity. It's power that make someone blind to those. He wields it over power power is the problem. Not the people. Abundance too. So. So you're saying that you think anybody who is given power would ultimately end up behaving in a certain set of where we're capable of bankrupt power, especially when with not conditioned to recognize power when we have it, that's why often you say people who you know. You know, to find power after having numb struggle to extend. Everyone is vulnerable to power, especially when they don't recognize it. And I think power is something we need to fear more than we design. Should be seen as something that is a responsibility that is a burden them when we asked people. To step away from their power, they, they need to feel that it's an. It's not an attack. It's, you know, it's help like relieving someone of a burden instead of taking something they believe they have a ride to see like, it's we put people in power so that we don't. We can live in the larger community than the individuals capable of administrating sure we need. We need people to have power. But those people need to be relieved of that burden if it's fucking them over and on that note with that swear word varies. We are out of time a lot to ruin things at the end. Always good to end with the fucking so. Oh, God. Please cut that day. On that note, comedy, their school komo's. Please my brothers here. Please tell him. I am funny. I would be. I think he has enough to judge that. Hannah. Thank you to everybody. Thanks to my guest this week, Hannah Gadsby and Monica Lewinsky. If you enjoyed this conversation, be sure to listen and subscribe to other great episodes of inside the hybrid. Nick building. You can find these on apple podcasts, radio dot com or anywhere else that you get your podcast and don't get to leave a review while you're there. Thanks host cadence. Thirteen production work, my editors, mainly fair and thank you to the listener. I will see you all days for another great.

Hannah Gadsby Bill Cosby Mike Monica Lewinsky Netflix Vanity Fair Sydney Opera House Los Angeles Nick Bilton contributing editor US COMEX Rape Wentz Australia Demi REEs
Podcast: Coal Miners, Protesting Unpaid Wages, Block Train Tracks 2019-08-01

The Takeaway

39:31 min | 1 year ago

Podcast: Coal Miners, Protesting Unpaid Wages, Block Train Tracks 2019-08-01

"Has Trained M._B._A.'s by Bloomberg BusinessWeek recruiter insights. It's an investment worth making learn more at choose. Georgetown Dot Com the takeaways supported by net W._n._y._C. Studios is supported by Georgetown mcdonagh's M._B._a. Program which delivers a transformational experience that helps you exceed expectations ranked number one for best joining me now are two journalists from the Ohio Valley Resource News Collaboration Sydney bowls as a reporter would W. M. T. in eastern Kentucky covering economic transition Sydney welcome to the takeaway hi thanks for having me and we also have Brittany Patterson Energy and environment reporter for West Virginia Public Broadcasting Great to have you on Britney glad to be here all my life so far. The protesters said they aren't going anywhere until they get paid but the fate of over a thousand workers and of this coal company remains unclear here so Brennan. Let's start with you. Why did black jewel suddenly file for bankruptcy so on July first the company filed for bankruptcy and basically basically they cited adverse market conditions. Which is something that we've been hearing from a lot of companies in recent years that have filed for bankruptcy? <hes> basically the so glad you're with us. Let's get started to Wednesday August first. I'm Tansy Vega. Coal miners in Kentucky are protesting and hoping not to be a casualty in a declining industry coal production is at an all time low and is projected to continue to keep falling. We had fewer miners working last year than we did in the last checks bounce. It's a symbolic moment in a declining industry. That's still holds a place of importance in this country's mythology and in politicians talking points on July life. I the West Virginia based mining company black jewel filed for bankruptcy and laid off more than one thousand workers in its eastern division across APPALACHIA before the bankruptcy Jeez to grow your profits at net sweet dot com slash takeaway. That's net sweet dot com slash takeaway. This is the takeaway for Thursday that same you don't see the forest for the trees or you. Don't see the trees for the forest. I think my experiences spectrum is icy. Forest and the trees were offensive. The economics are coal have been harder to make work and so when were the workers last page Britney so workers have not received their last their own hands and organized protests. They set up camp on the train tracks and have been preventing coal trains from getting in and out of the plant near the town. Nathan Brown is the owner the restaurant Jon Evan Jacks in Corbin Kentucky and on Tuesday. He decided to lend his support. We have a mobile food truck and we just we just adjusters short. This started pretty organically Monday morning with five miners getting up right in front of a Coltrane to prevent that train from leaving scripts black jewel was the sixth largest coal producer in the country but many workers still haven't received their last paycheck so Monday some miners and Cumberland took matters into were issued paper paychecks <hes> and those have subsequently not been allowed to be cashed for the Western employees in Wyoming because we should note to not submit to this wholesale attack on their lives and their humanity here plus comedian Hannah Gadsby opens up about being on the autism spectrum a set coal miners are protesting and southeastern Kentucky after getting laid off earlier this month and then having their paychecks took get there so we tried them up some catfish and cheeseburgers. You know just to just to be able to give him a hot meal fresh off the grill. <hes> leaving the the washing plant their their intention was was basically you know to keep the coal from leading the station until they got their paycheck. They have since <hes> US paycheck. Those were issued on the Friday in June before the July first bankruptcy <hes> for our eastern employees in Appalachia the workers suite by Oracle the business management software and the world's number one cloud business system right now net suite is offering valuable insights with a free guide seven key strategies. The company has minds in both Wyoming and Kentucky West Virginia in Virginia in Wyoming. Those workers were issued money orders. <hes> there was a Snafu with those and food fresh out of the friars. Nathan is able to see firsthand just how these miners have been affected by the bankruptcy. You know talking to the families you know I talked to one yeah. He had he had multiple kids and his biggest concern with school starting back next week. You know what are we. GonNa do. How am I going to buy supplies and all that stuff and his his little boy running around buying on the train tracks while they're playing cornhole on the train tracks. It was just that was probably the most powerful image I ever saw. Company said that as the demand for coal fired electricity has dropped <hes> and the prices of renewable energy and natural gas have become less expensive does but most of those have now been cashed and didn't you've been reporting from the protests. Give us a sense of what it's looked like over the past few days. What's the mood there among the protesters last year the Obama administration the President has repeatedly vowed to protect coal but the markets say otherwise and we examined the widespread violence against African Americans ends at nine thousand nine hundred nine thousand nine hundred red summer really one of the defining characteristics of the red summer is the determination of African Americans to would even porta-pottys tens picnic tables all kinds of snacks. It's really been incredible to watch members from all across the community <hes> grown from a group of five to sometimes upwards of one hundred a rotating cast of minors in supporters from all across the community and folks have really shown up to bring bring food natural gas has become very cheap and renewable energy solar and wind that continues to fall and many utility customers continue to ask those utilities do China and Asian countries so largely speaking no the regulatory rollbacks that the administration has tried to do have not really helped the industry utilities to put on renewable energy and cheaper forms of electricity and that just can't compete with coal and so I think in some ways you hear reaction all time low and is projected to continue to keep falling similarly. We had fewer miners working last year than we did in the last year of the Obama Administration so in West Virginia. We love it. We are back. The coal industry is back does that track with the overall health of the industry so folks talking about climate change have said which is that <hes> we need to get rid of. Cole altogether out. We cannot work this out the time it but it seemed like an important base for the president and I'm wondering if that could potentially affect his <hes> support among this group in two thousand twenty a little bit of a challenging uptick in metallurgical coal. That's cold it's mind to make steel but those upticks have been mostly driven by exports abroad and mostly to engine question to answer on the one hand certainly some miners especially those working in these met coal mines may have gone back to work over the last few years <hes> that has allowed families and communities here to flourish and there's a real fear of what might happen when coal is no longer a strong enough economy to drive agency. We've seen rollbacks replacements of a lot of different cold related regulations but the federal data show that coal production is at an all industry here in Appalachia Brittany. I'm wondering if <hes> if that also has influenced just not just this protest alone but the broader picture of the lives of coal miners. Shen for minors feeling a little bit like there's only so much the president can do <hes> and on the other hand we haven't seen resources for things like job retraining far so president trump and the trump administration have really tried to help the coal industry by easing regulations namely through the U._S. environmental protection being increased here in the region and Sydney last night in the democratic debate Jay Inslee. One of the candidates echoed with a lot of folks so in the thermal coal market. That's called. It's used in electric utilities and power plants. We've definitely seen that continue to drop here. In West Virginia. We have seen a little the region since the trump administration took over. I mean have their lives gotten better and is there a sense that I'm not going to assume that all of these folks voted for the president. I'm on the other hand. You know all the regulatory rollbacks in the world can't really change the underlying economics that are affecting the coal industry and that is that these these communities but at the same time I will say there is a growing understanding that there may need to be a diversification of the economy many many former firework that they've already done Britney <hes> during President Trump's campaign and and beyond once he was elected president. He's championed the coal industry. Many of these folks are third or fourth or fifth generation coal miners and there's a sense that it runs in their blood. It's a it's hard work. It takes a lot of skill and miners feel replaces across the region. Some folks really do feel that you know going back. Generations Cole has really been the only industry that has supported this part of the country and you watch what happens if I win. We're going to bring those miners back. You're going to be so proud of you. You'RE GONNA be so proud of your country lean beautiful. The planet that's going for that is something that would obviously have a severe impact on this community. What do workers <hes> I in this industry to help create a more diverse economy here and <hes> if you could expand a little bit on that I mean Sydney. I'm wondering what the history of black jewel is in the region and also just st think about that and do they see any alternatives in when they look at their future. I will say there's a broad spectrum minors that I've spoken to both at this protest and in other mealy really proud of doing this hard work to take care of their families but over the course of history mining has also taken a real toll on communities here both more miners and even some current miners are interested in renewable energy jobs and are thinking about ways to find other forms of work that can build on their skill sets to to all across the political scrap spectrum show up to support these guys but underneath it all there's still a real anger and a real commitment to stay on these railroad tracks until they get the money just the culture of mining and coal mining in particular in the region and even across the country. It sort of seems like it's a big part of our cultural <hes> mythology policy in many ways yeah absolutely. I think the first thing I'll say is that there's a real sense of pride. Among among miners who are working in the coal industry time is up. Our House is on fire. We have to stop using hole in ten years and when you're not president to do it or won't get done that hit off. Cole save this country in other sorts of challenges with surface mining and underground mining here too so I think there is an understanding that mining comes with a cost so over the course of history miners have in terms of minors health through the black lung epidemic and accidents in the mind as well an environmental toll with <hes> you know mine runoff and to pay these miners. We've just had their owed that may or may not happen. That's kind of the planet this point so that may determine what happens next with this protest but no matter what time of day I talked to miners who are camped out on these tracks no matter what mood they're they're in the sentiment is the same they're not moving for. West Virginia public broadcasting the Ohio Valley Resource. Thanks to you both for joining us. Thank you thank you this year marks one hundred years since what came to be known much renewable energy utilities should produce <hes> similarly while. Ohio has an renewable portfolio standard a bill passed last month really and I'm curious <hes> Britney what has black jewel said about the protesters have they responded. We haven't seen a lot of direct response to the in renewable energy and make it easy for large companies to attract and I think that's important because if you want an Amazon <hes> even an Amazon really guts it <hes> and so we see here that not necessarily our policymakers have put into place the policies that would bring sort of packing center or any of these big companies they all have renewable energy mandates and if they can't get that energy than it makes it a harder sell to get them to come here really speaking our policymakers have not got on board with putting policies in place that would make renewable energy a really viable and vibrant option here protesters. I will say during the entire bankruptcy proceedings that have occurred over the last month the lawyers representing the company have expressed their in Appalachia for example both West Virginia and Kentucky <hes> do not have renewable portfolio standards as you're basically standards that set a target for how renewable energy and and beyond <hes> that might be able to replace some of the the losses here in terms of the coal industry yeah I would say largely <hes> and at this point considering the chaos at has been this bankruptcy. The company says they just can't make that happen right now. Sydney when you hear that and you are until they get paid Sydney Bowles is a reporter for Ohio Valley Resource and W M MT in Eastern Kentucky and Brittany Patterson is energy and environment reporter. <hes> are on the ground talking to protesters and folks who have not been paid. What's your sense of where this goes next for them at least just last week so there is a long history in this region of minors understanding the cost of the work that they're doing and working hard as a community to try and make show violence one of the worst periods of racial violence in American history where you have nearly three dozen riots massacres <hes> AAC working conditions a little better Brittany Appalachian state's been able to attract other industries and we talked a little bit about this earlier but I love to drill down a little bit more like our sympathies and have sort of repeatedly said that they understand that minors are hurting similarly. The judge in the case has also really expressed a lot of concern about this <hes> on taxes than that's just owed to employees in Kentucky Virginia and West Virginia so it's pretty significant amount of money that the company would need to come up with <hes> <hes> but at this point you know the company says it doesn't have the money to pay these owed wages and we're talking about nearly eleven point eight million dollars in payroll during those months. Chad Williams's chair of African American studies at Brandeis University. It was a period of really truly unprecedented racial well. The the goal at this point is for black jewel to use money from sales of mind which is actually <hes> scheduled to happen today. <unk> Harlan County where these protests are taking place was the site of bloody mine was back in the nineteen thirties and actually the anniversary of the nineteen seventy three seventy four Harlan minor strike was taking place throughout the country literally every corner of the nation the wave of black activism that met this violence bolstered organizations like the end of Lacey Pe- winning the war had worn off and it was replaced with tremendous anxiety about what was going to happen what was going to happen to the United States in terms of labor coined by James Weldon Johnson who at the time was field secretary for the A._C._p. And he used the term summer to signify the blood that flowed known as red summer a series of violent attacks in riots against African Americans across the country over many months in nineteen nineteen return bread summer was have banded together to stand up to to the companies that they work for the government to ask for fair wages to ask for safer working conditions actually and helped lay the groundwork for current movements like black lives matter but Chad Williams told me why the end of World War One created the conditions that led to that violent period you have the United States just having fought and won war sensibly to make the world safe for democracy but by the spring of one thousand nine hundred ninety euphoria a relations in terms of race relations and that really coalescing into these very local but it'll be spectacular forms of racial violence that we see happening across the country and black veterans are at the heart of that conflict. Now you say anxiety. This was anxiety that white Americans were feeling terms of labor relations. There's tremendous tension surrounding the shortage of jobs again you have American soldiers literally tens of thousands but then when we kind of drill down at the local level we see how those local dynamics really play out in different ways of thinking about the differences between a place across the street from the White House. He's doing nothing in terms of federal troops and sometimes they help to quell the violence but in cases like we know that Black Americans have not gone quietly in a lot of these instances there has been a history of resistance in the African American Black American communities war effort and they expected to be treated as not just equal citizens but for human beings and those expectations really worth so there's a tremendous strangers on labor job opportunities and the competition that ensues so there's anxiety surrounding that there's anxieties as like Arizona and Arkansas for example and Chicago where you do have police who are sometimes participating in the riots ladies. Tell us what it looked like during red summer that was really one of the defining characteristics of the red summer is the determination of African these surrounding the so-called returned to normalcy this desire on the part of Mini Mexicans to try and return to pre war status quo and how much of this violence was either ignored by the state <hes> local or federal law enforcement or sanctioned if you will by those entities when counter to the desire of many white Americans to instill a sense of normalcy in the form of white supremacy can't that summer <hes> he essentially turned a blind eye to what was happening so literally during The Washington D._C. Riot as African Americans are being beaten and killed directly across estate of normalcy that things were going to be different they had just fought a war to make the world safer democracy they had contributed their labor their lives to the American but then the National Guard steps in and they really help kind of quell the violence and keep the peace so the local dynamics. I think really important to to consider as well. There's this kind of larger national story of the state really turning its back on protecting a group of American citizens form of African Americans and that coming into conflict with expectations particularly among some African Americans and black veterans in particular that they were not going to return to a thousands returning back to the United States on a daily basis returning back to their home some not returning to their homes relocating to other areas largely in the north african-americans to not submit to this wholesale attack on their lives and their humanity to engage in active conscious yeah. I think that's a really important point that African Americans could not expect protection from the state right and that's something that we're obviously still grappling collective resistance self-defense we see this <hes> manifesting in a number of different places in a number of different ways certainly physical. Self Defense Mike in Arkansas they were active participants and contributed to the violence and the same can be said for for local police as well <hes> so on the one hand. There's two white violence. How do you connect or can we connect the black resistance then to where it is today certainly one of the most he like hogs slaughtered. We're going to fight back and we see that legacy that spirit of resistance of collective determination board or around the beginning of the time of black lives matter and that wave of black resistance red summer also marked a new era of black resistance particularly to we are nearing the anniversary of Ferguson and the events that happened there a couple of years ago many would argue that that was the beginning if not what spurred lean towards black-americans certainly and you see this manifesting in different ways in both the north in the south and it plays out in terms <hes> the <hes> the red summer as an opportunity to demonstrate its commitment to protecting African Americans <hes> and their their civil rights its own as a national organization I in large part due to the efforts of James Weldon Johnson during World War One and in the aftermath of Wilma one so they use <hes> eight people <hes> in the process but you also have a collective resistance in the form of civil rights organizations like the A._C._p. Really comes into during The Washington D._C. Riot during the Chicago Riot. You have black veterans who are taking up arms who are setting up defensive positions and taking out a white queen with today in many different forms at the federal level and when we think about the role that <hes> which a Wilson played or didn't play in the violence of the red most iconic legendary poems coming out of the summer of Nineteen nineteen was by Claude McKay. If we must die and you know we said if we must die let it not be breath century. Anything manifest itself in the form of the black lives matter movement that is still certainly active today. Tad Williams is professor to resist white racial violence whether it's in the form of individual Atlanta violence whether it's in the form of state violence continuing throughout the twentieth. Thank you very much last summer. Comedian Hannah Gadsby reached a global audience when her special Nannette premiered on Netflix <music>. The net didn't resonate with viewers because it was funny. Although it was very funny the special was also deeply personal and found Hannah wrestling with trauma autism and the framework is an autistic mind everything that I do in the show before I even talk about autism is autism. It is all is there's pieces of puzzles to pick up listening to the same audio book for the last two years right. That's you know surprises on what I mean sonate because I was going to ask you whether that was part of at the beginning of the show you spell out for the audience what's going to happen and was that part of that experience also autism and she told me that her diagnosis is a part of the show's. Very D._N._A. The central premise behind the show is that you know the those quit before you call it not comedy in many ways. Douglas picks up where Nannette left off with Hannah going far beyond the normal confines of comedy show being able to speak in front of a live satistics in town and that is incredibly important for me. The people not necessarily understand words too. I didn't know that culturally lear aware in my life has changed but also a theatrical conceit. I understood the criticisms that we're going to come in. I cut them off at the path said yes. I know you're GONNA call this. Not Comedy Habit I quit avoidance is an incredible opportunity and I don't think it should be restricted to the theater situation or comedy situation elements in the show at least the medically that were interesting to me. I want to talk about anger about rage and how it played in that. It was a big part of net. It was something uh-huh my bag. So this show is sort of like oh there are no surprises but there's a journey and if you walk the same path every day you see everyday's rage and even the conventions of comedy itself do think comedy in seriously probably not a forum to make such an announcement near later. Hannah's back on stage performing a new show called Douglas but she told me that doesn't mean she isn't quitting in a sense in a sense. I have quit what I was doing wanting people to understand the autistic mind to a certain extent but also this show is for people on the spectrum so that's four Papon spectrum people bits come later in the show that divulging the diagnosis and you know how the world sees me and how that affects me but the entire show is about autism. Day's a new day with an autistic mind you know. Is it a set saying you don't see the forest for the trees or you. Don't see the trees for the forest. I think my experience aware enough of how to talk about the autism experience but I won't people experience it and I think getting it across that's it's fascinating something that inspired us here at the takeaway to examine the role of a rage in particular and women and at some point. You said you didn't think anger could be productive and but you could watch it. Three or four times still pick stuff up. That's the fun for it. It's a puzzle a have written it for my- myself and people my side of the spectrum in mind to say. Oh took yet people are laughing. You spelled it all out. There were still moments of surprise in the show even though you laid it out for us so let's talk a little bit about some of the elements. I don't explore that necessarily in Douglas. I'm not exploring the reasonable rage. I feel like Nenet was my reasonable rage. Then it was as much about autism as Douglas and chair of African American studies at Brandeis University and the author of torchbearers of Democracy African American soldiers in the World War One era Chad. Thank you so much Hyundai. Is it in the middle of a comedy show but have been questioning this whole thing. I don't feel very comfortable in it anymore. One the spectrum is icy. The forest the trees so too busy mind. It's like there's a forest is also treaties with lots of trees. Did you see the forest and that's what I'm trying to people. Not on the spectrum will enjoy it and go oh that cheeky but the show is loaded it is it is loaded. It feels like it's just skipping across and I think there's something to be said about being able to stand up as an individual on talk to a group of Papal one thing Hannah talks to audiences about in her new show is being diagnosed with autism the room to be angry and I think you need to be angry needs to be heard and that was incredible thing about the journey evening that is I didn't and what I took away in Douglas and tell me if I'm wrong is that it feels like they're you found ways to channel that anger into something that there was a phrase used called unreasonable rage about that I think reasonable rage is that <hes> you know is to find a reasonable way to express frustration and douglass but I didn't say it expressly but also known it was a lot to do with trauma and I think we don't allow people who are traumatized. The expects my anger to be received very well. I flee expected it to be rejected but I can't claim. I authored that experience completely lately. I put the work out there but it was also in the Zeitgeist something something something something with Douglas. I'm playing all my the hang. Douglas is mock with it comes a lot of privilege and opportunity but language for me. Then is a way of distancing myself and playing with that from neutral when you face it full on like I did and also I couldn't ignore the room every time I put that in a room as as a remove but also language does shape culture and those who get to choose the language get to choose how to shake culture. We know so true what why why was that something you wanted to talk about now why was language and cultural imperialism and male dominance of language something with all my tools but I know how to use so that's the decision behind it and the name thing is quite language. itself is a distancing tool. You know Ninette I wasn't I was just ask just really bits myself open. I felt so vulnerable and I still feel vulnerable with that and we can see in you know in effect this you know social media. Is You know the way we hate speeches a lot freer on social media now like that like my performance Internet. There was genuine pain every time I performed because you don't get to just petition yourself off mm-hmm. I felt you know this is a misunderstanding about autism that we don't have empathy. I think if there's a lack of empathy stick with my skill set you know I didn't go make a T._v. Show now 'cause I said I could. I don't know how to do that. <hes> so. I thought I I would do the next thing as a journalist. I'm very interested in the language and the words and you say that men particularly white men have named all of the things right and when you think about it it's so and it's farm. It's very <hes> one of the things that was fun was also how you have theme throughout which focuses on language like the world's carried me away. I'm not in control of my own life and that house Ninette yes. Yes you know like not necessarily in a bad way of opportunities but changes which is not a great easy thing for me to navigate <hes> and my life is moving up faster the night really understand how to navigate but that is all fine and so the very very different beasts in that sense in how I sir talk and an express anger soon douglas when I say you know anger is that is that is the way it is people feeling more brave about not being more caring <hes> and so that is fascinating thing for me and I did get a lot of hate often side <hes> it's not like the anger in in it was real and visceral and because it was tied up in my own trauma it wasn't I wasn't removed from like autism and being open about that is more acceptable or do you think it's just necessary. I mean how did you make the decision to say eight and so words every word is waited for me because I don't waste time. Are we in a moment now. Where talking about site specialist so to speak you know? I'm going what are the roots of these things and that took me on the path of of language that reptile also in the way that people frame autism think an ice. I like it. I enjoy when other people you know dense around what they want to say. That's rich but that's not how I communicate okay. I'm ready to talk about this now. I took made that decision knowing that it was a huge risk. People don't get to talk about autism and create you know I had I felt to me that like either had to disappear and be good to for more work but I don't. I don't know what else to do and also I wanted to stick spectrum so in a room full of people who have put in shock I feel that that affects me and that you can see in my performance of it and Tangere is playful although I have I have received feedback that people think it's just anger which makes me laugh so much I dead inside. I have reasonable anger. That's Ninette. That was a reason let's all reasonable but Douglas it is all just play. Everything's Okay for me. It was interesting is when people were wrapping it up in hate to my mind then goes why because I'm a historian a hindsight and people who engage with the net in a critical way that didn't use hateful language this fine. I'm really forming. I don't think I'm everyone's cup of tea and no should I be in it and a lot of hates is disguised as critical feedback but the language was hateful. Tim a lot about you know. Sometimes we can be really blunt because we don't use metaphor. You know just like this is. This is the thing I think it is because we have to lock ourselves off from it because we've basically we don't have skin with not my experience of it and then a lot of people's experience but it is that you thought needed to be a part of this. Well I think afternoon. I wanted to do another piece of work because I knew the world was watching and I you work. That is autistic that important like I'm not just going. Hey I'm autistic his me talking about autism in a way that is the whole tone of what I do is is. We don't get to speak for ourselves much. It's it's often. Oh here's what it looks like from the outside in. I'm trying <music>. Michael Cultural Jenga like my voice is not counseling out anybody else's that is I can't express that enough. I hope that it's poking into attack deeply in this show but it it is a risk in your work you also in this show in particular in Douglas you talk a lot ought about <hes> not just the dumb male dominance of language but the male dominance of comedy and the rules of comedy and how they've been shaped by men and I think even today today when I scroll through looking for stand up comedy. I love it the majority of the options that I see our men and it's usually a sim very similar type poking a hole in people's expectations. I don't want other people to do. Shows like my some spectrum. I don't understand are the people I rely on other people but that's not enough like with poor for this dearth of voices and so I hope that this means that people can play a little more culture that sorrenstam saying that's wrong but for someone on the spectrum that is incredibly distressing so what I'm hoping is I'm going. Oh we can get a nudge out into to this other place where other people can play with their own forms of expression. I think it is actually very patriarchal idea and you see it a lot in modern. Do you think it'll resonate or has it been resonating outside of the U._S. Australia because they know the U._S. was a surprise for you but going beyond this sort of Eurocentric people to tell me what they life is like and said that is why I'm so angry at history because all I've got is your eurocentric white male of comedy you on the other hand are creating a new genre that that combines all of these things and in this latest performance with Douglas it was even visual as we awesome <hes> but also personally I come up more more scrutiny. Does she even have does it mean anything. Is that important ten to work out. What rules work for you and your story. My story doesn't fit into setup punchline and also being autistic. I do not do well in competitive move forward with this craft of the work that you're doing. Are you expecting that there will be more people breaking the traditional male comedy Auden history of Modern Art. It's like Oh one voice cancels out the other and it's like oh come on guys. Come on. Let's not play Jenga historical. Hannah Gadsby is performing her new show Douglas at the Daryl Roth Theater in New York through September seventh and thank you so much thank you. It's pleases me greatly. I don't know what it's like to be from those places so I'm delighted that there's something about my experience that speaks to people from comedy rules. I hope that's what I want. The rule like I love rules. That's the irony of it. I love rules and I make my own rules for comedy. You know when I set so that's all I've got to go on and I'm like no. I'm poor forward ironically. I think a lot like straight white man it out to right Douglas. I set my own rules are tree and sometimes I had to ship them but I really like Rolt but I think with something especially with the expression you have to our tech team includes Vince Fairchild Claire mckean and Jake Howitt. Thanks so much for listening. I'm Tansy Vega and this is the takeaway matic not in like. Oh a snowflake actually yes I am. I don't like the competitive combative gladiatorial culture trick white dominated society. I'm delighted to say that I have a lovely huge audience. In India and in South America this and women even have autism you know because he's so entirely gendered and that's why talk a little bit about biology in the show because it's like it's it's wrapped up in <hes> arenas so doing stand up in clubs was really painful for me. In my early days like it was really traumatic into the other way round at that comes with a huge amount of pressure a I can't speak for everyone spectrum because it's the spectrum it's it's wrapped up in the misogyny of medicine being so there's a lot you know that. I don't necessarily have time the scope and that's all for us today. Amy Walter is in tomorrow and I'll be back on Monday and the people who make the takeaway include Lee Hill Alexandra not Israel Angel <hes> you know I love life performance but Netflix opened my workup to places that I would not have been able to do on my own steam so now I'd be delighted to see that perhaps I light a fire under some voices that get to spread in places like that so I think that's something to say about either. Obermann Rob Gunther polly Goo Jason too risky David Gable Chico Burma Danny Louis Andre O'Hara Meg Dalton and Joss Christianson.

Douglas Hannah Gadsby West Virginia President Kentucky Sydney Britney US Tansy Vega reporter Cole Nathan Brown Chad Williams Georgetown Netflix
Advice I Would Have Rejected Ten Years Ago

Developer Tea

15:53 min | 1 year ago

Advice I Would Have Rejected Ten Years Ago

"Something difficult to accept is the fact that you will probably the change and you're probably going to change much more than you think you will. There's some good evidence that says that change happens not only when you're young but throughout your life whether you're eighteen or fifty eight you can expect to change pretty significant amount in the next decade or so and so it's useful and perhaps <hes> provides a bit of humility to take time to remember remember the way that you were and how you've changed in today's episode. I'm i'm going through that exercise publicly by giving you advice that i probably would have rejected ten years ago. My name is jonathan control and you're listening to developer t my goal in this show is held driven developers like you find clarity perspective and purpose in your career and the truth is i'm probably going to have new advice in ten years from now that i would probably reject today. If we imagine that we are done changing then we're probably going to cut ourselves off from growth but that change is going to occur and we have to prepare for it so one of the ways that you can prepare for it is to start accepting that. It's likely that it's going to happen and to remind yourself that. This has happened in the past that allows you to feel safer. Feel safer when you recognize that you're changing that you have some new information that is prompting you to that. Change these changes happen because of a variety of things but most often because we learn new things about ourselves we former the new beliefs based on our experiences and so there are times where we might feel like we'd like to travel back to our younger selves and provide some advice. Yes and that's kind of what we're doing in today's episode. I'm mentally taking myself back to ten years ago and trying to give myself a bit of advice that i can take forward over into my career and while i might not be able to benefit from this perhaps the younger developers who are listening to this or really anybody who's listening to this may be able to take this advice so we're gonna start with a piece of advice about learning but it's not just about learning. It's also about making decisions making decisions about what you're locking yourself into as humans. We have a little bit of an aversion to choosing something that destroys troy's are optionality in other words locking ourselves into a given choice. This makes us have anxiety when we think about losing using our options but the truth is research and experiences will show you that you're happier once you've made locked-in attend decision now. Some of this is because of our post rationality in other words. Once you make that decision you convince yourself that that it was a good decision but beyond that for developers specifically when you're learning a lot of the deep knowledge that you have in a narrow zero area is likely to be transferable in other words. If you learn very deeply about performance in one language it's probable that the information that you learn about performance in that language will transfer at a deep level to another language and so your intuition may tell you that you need to learn a broad set of things in necessarily when you you start learning that broad set of things you're likely to only go to a shallow depth. My advice to you is to narrow the things that you're considering learning many times on this podcast. I've recommended learning one language for six months just focusing on one language language for at least six months this may sound like a short amount of time but when you spend that focused energy especially very early on on in learning that one area you'll realize that you can take a pretty good step into the depth of that thing and even in six short months so this is something i recommend because i experienced this feeling this need of trying to learn everything you think trying to get some familiarity with everything and this feeling comes from the sense the incorrect sense the everyone else is learning everything and we get this. Maybe because we expose ourselves to social media <hes> maybe hacker news or something like that and we see all of these different technologies and we have the perception that all other great developers that we respect and admire they already know all all of these tools they already know all of this information. They're experts in algorithms their experts in data structures. They're experts in ten different languages and the end they've architect scaled systems all of them but the truth is very few of them have done something across the board and almost all of the ones that have careers have focused in some area for a significant period of those careers so that's my first piece of advice care less about your optionality and instead be willing to commit the power of commitment admit will <hes> will be felt in your kind of personal contentment. You'll appreciate the fact that you've committed and no longer. Do you have to kind of keep your head head on a swivel but you'll also realize there's a compounding effect if you can if you can commit to a narrower range of things <hes> there's a compounding effect when you start building true deep expertise and that expertise is most often transferable. We're gonna take a quick nick sponsor break and then we're gonna come back and talk about two more pieces of advice that i probably would have rejected ten years ago. Today's episode is sponsored there by stack bit static sites and the jam stock are growing fast front end developers pretty much already get it. It's fast secure and as a developer oliver you still have full control over the markup and the design but convincing clients to go static is a little bit harder to do. How will they update update their content. This is kind of the <hes> the main question that comes up in these conversations. Where's the c._m._s. Mainstream mainstream adoption of <hes> the g._m. a._m. Stack in a commercial context relies largely on solving this particular issue of content management and this is where our friends from stack baked come in stack that lets it's you build and deploy a jan stack site full jam stack site <hes> with a static site generator and a headless c._m._s. In just a few clicks you can already choose from dozen prebuilt themes aims for hugo jacqueline gadsby and connect to pretty much. All of the headless c._m._s. is that you're used to using <hes> like forestry or netla fire contemptible on on top of that stack bit just released custom themes now you can import your own themes built on any static site generator including the ones that we've already mentioned but also <hes> from view press grissom and others just add a stack bit dot com afoul and define your content models your themes ready to connect to any headless c._m._s. p._m._s. stack that allows you to test strengths and weaknesses of the popular headless seem as quickly and explorer which one is the right fit for your client or your project most of all the source code for sites provision to stack bit stored right back in your own get repos so you can continue to design and develop locally without compromising your developer workflow workflow. Go and check it out stack. The dot com slash developer t that stack bit dot com slash developer t was what you think so. We're talking about advice that i probably would have rejected a decade ago and you should have your own list of these things that you've learned in a decade imagine yourself giving the advice to that younger version of yourself and the way that you can think about this. What are some of the major mistakes thanks you made and how would you go about hopefully rectifying those mistakes if you could replay history out of course this isn't a fail-proof way. All of this advice comes with a grain of salt as does everything that we say on this show but this is a way to kind of post mortem the past ten years a long term version of yourself <hes> a post mortem over the last decade. There's a lot you can learn in that so we're going to run through the next two pieces pieces of advice that i probably would have rejected ten years ago. The first piece of advice is to view every job. Have you have for the rest of your life is temporary and this is actually more in line with reality. Not only <music> are people very likely to have many jobs. I think the average is somewhere around. Six or seven jobs in their careers may have changed since i looked at it last but not not only are. We very likely to change jobs. Very few people have long running careers in a in a certain workplace but we also eventually all leave the job zhob one way or another right <hes> we are temporary as humans. We aren't here forever and everything around us is changing. There are are so many things about your job that you can't even control for example. It's possible that the company that you work for will fold so this has deep deep ramifications into your behaviors and the way that you operate with the people around you the way that you collaborate and and all of the ways that you kind of set yourself up in your career right treat every job is temporary now this kind of clashes with our previous piece of advice of i've committing right and and being willing to kind of let go of optionality and our point here isn't to say that you're always keeping getting your eye out for the next job. The the advice is still kind of cohesive with staying in the moment and and working to the best of your ability in the in the job that you currently have but there's a big difference in viewing your job as temporary and still committing to doing great work at that job versus viewing your job as the last job that you'll ever have when you view your job as the the last job deliver have then a lot of the things that otherwise might be possible very quickly become impossible. A lot have good habits that you may develop like for example taking time to <hes> build good documentation paying attention to the impact. Take your work has on the people that are using your software or paying attention to the kinds of interactions that you have with your teammates. All of these things are necessary to building a long career. That's full of change and so if you imagine that your next ex- job is going to be awarded based on the behaviors in your current job or based on the accomplishments in your current job you're much much more likely and this is kind of the paradox here. You're much more likely to do a good job right. You're paying more attention to the work. You're doing today because it has ramifications on your future. You're taking nothing for granted in a lot of ways when you see your jobs as temporary the final piece of advice is kind of along the same lines and really comes out of the second piece of advice we just gave about seeing your jobs as temporary and that is this that you are not a good predictor of your own future and this is not only true based on the things that you think you will do but also the things you think you will want the way you think you'll behave the kinds of problems that you'll want to solve or the kinds of personal issues that you'll have a lot of the things that we expect to happen probably won't and a lot of the things that we don't expect to happen might of course when we say it this way. It sounds obvious it's hard to predict the future but a lot of the things is that we think we're good at predicting. We're just as padded predicting those as we are at predicting random things that have nothing to do with us. We like to think that the things that we want today or the things that we envisioned for the next five years. Today are likely to come true or likely weekly to stay the same and they aren't and so when we imagine the future and when we try to put our minds insights into that future we very often create these worlds that are never going to exist and very often we also forget these imaginations. We forget the world that we thought might exist as we move into the future interestingly enough. It feels like a lot of our imagination about the future ends up getting wasted. It's not that we shouldn't try to think about the future in fact highly recommend that everything you do be done with the future in mind but rather that we don't tie our happiness to some specific picture of the future that we've kind of imagined for ourselves instead. We keep the future in mind. We take everything day by day. Thank you so much for listening to today's episode of developer t. I hope this was helpful to those of you who are early in your career especially but also people who were kind of facing these changes and looking back and trying to remember or trying to remind yourself that you have changed <hes> i highly encourage this kind of activity this kind of exercise because i think it gives you a moment <hes> to to remind yourself that everything is temporary. Thank you so much for listening. Today's episode wouldn't be possible without are awesome. Sponsor stack bit introduce stack bit dot com slash developer t check out the magic today. Thank you so much for listening to today's episode. It also wouldn't be possible without spec dot f._m. Mm-hmm today's producer jackson. My name is jonathan cottrell until next time. Enjoy your tea.

developer jonathan cottrell troy hugo jacqueline gadsby producer oliver c._m._s. grissom ten years six months five years
Hannah Gadsby and the point of no return

Conversations

52:23 min | 11 months ago

Hannah Gadsby and the point of no return

"This is an ABC podcast. If you go to a comedy show, you want to laugh maybe to think definitely to be entertained. Hannah Gadsby stand up shows do all these things, but they do more than that, too. And his comedy can also make you cry and push you to see the world differently. She has a new comedy. Special called Douglas out on it flakes in Douglas. Hannah makes a bunch of very funny jokes about renascent paintings. She also talks about getting a dog noises of autism as an adult. Douglas follows on from the big splash might Hannah's lost show the net in the net. She spoke about the deep trauma and shine of growing up gay in the small town of Smitten, Amano with west coast of Tasmania Hi Hannah. and New show is is partly named after your dog Douglas. What kind of dog is hey? Look daughter. Luther Romano attention like Oh, I guess is A. Description de servicio bully situation a woolly situation. HOW BIG IS! I. Think Douglas is bigger. THAN SHOULD BE A. At the service name. got. Jasper's a rescue sir. Strange dog, the experience of living with logo is you never learn the just always watching and have a slightly human is a friend of mine described it best. It's like the the people trapped in dogs, bodies and were trapped there by a witch who've never mentioned actual dog. Does that get on no ving. Having those human is inside of the dog watching new. Yeah, yeah, this. This says sort of an extreme of. Consciousness to them that sort of off vague out and. And then I'll. Come back to reality and I'll just be staring at me on my oh sorry. You know that we do impeccable research here on conversations and my producer show has consulted amrried. God, which apparently says the LLEGADO are affectionate, keen and undemanding. On demanding main, they need to be fed every day in walked and they let you know if you haven't done all those things as some demands right that they like socks. Very Qena on a bit of Sauk. which are great for full because I I have friends who dogs who chain on on the underway. But My. My boys are just. Can't say hello in the morning to Douglas Without Him. Going for search for soccer's a gift I think of all the things that adult could bring you a sulk. His is one of the least offensive one of the less offensive ones, and so I know that you had. When you're a kid growing out. What made you want to get dogs again? As as a grown up with the very, you know a career that has moving around all the time. Know I just I, just like the company elect oaks, alike hanging out with. Like parallel play with the dog. Beta. In the in the House and sort of good company without it. Being conscious could human existence. You not living with someone else. You have to be Gubbay good guy all the time, and that's you know. Two good things are aimed for but I just find. else team. You talk in your new show in Douglas about getting a diagnosis of autism. When did that Happen Hannah? How old we? A guess. Get a bit muddled on how old I was really keep track of fats, I'm not like a normal woman. Forty cents? Spe By ten forty inside. I'm forty and then mom's like Foodie one. Think, it was it was two thousand fifteen five years. Guys are steady seven, but he's study seven. And what was it about yourself? At thirty seven, like what kind of characteristics or experiences led you to to going down that path of of looking for diagnosis? There's a lot you know it was a you know a career of people telling me. I just dismissed it back. I only had a you know. A passing understanding of autism meant, and that meant was Prone to believe the myths. I didn't fall in inside the realms of the. Of what autism dismiss it? And, it was also. My yoyoing with mental illness, I worked out. Had suffered with depression and anxiety, but you know as I got older, I begin to why about it? Because people who suffered bouts of depression long periods of time, but I would just have this intense lockdowns institute with a my doctors that sort of like it's basically you know, have these extreme bouts of depression which really made been overwhelmed to the point of known functioning, but as soon as I. Find you know a calm quiet and stay still for what bounce back a hundred percent. And that just sort of didn't fit with any of the what I understood depression to bay. And once I was sort of common. You know we're COVID neurobiological thing. I couldn't access I. Just couldn't access the right narratives of what had pushed me to the point until I began to understand that it was often environmental and. So I. Began living with myself and my rules and got a dog, and then was happy as a land. And it was yes. Oh, one. The the the critical of it though was I was I was described the pill. By Dr. seuss was hormonal, whereas exact, it always struggled with mid with them. Extreme, premenstrual distressful it. And I'd never had I I kept getting my home tests to deny like inaudible thia normal whatever that needs, but it felt like they will select trading while they were turns out. Is that people in the spectrum of very sensitive to hormone fluctuation, so my fluctuations were normal. But. I'm sensitive to it, so it seemed. At your abnormal to speak. So I can trying to investigate. This is my doctor and he just dismissed it. Describing the pill and I did what I was told. And I'd always been on the pill, I've been on the pill in the past to try and help CETERA hints. I always went into this sort of depression, and soon as I stopped, technically lifted so I've made that connection I told the doctor. That he dismissed it, so I went back on the pill added disparition more anything to try and get some stability and. I get depressed. Went into this really dangerous place. suicidal ideation. That I'd experienced a full and border. What bought me add? That was Douglas with a bit of a pop of that time to staring at me. While I was eating porridge of wooden Spain at eight PM at night. I don't like this is not living. And a was that sense of this. Empathy that I felt from my own. That I, sort of gave me an about face because some link I identified is staring apnea sympathy. I didn't really necessarily experience. From humans. And that's really the triggering, so that sent Mesa looking more closely at at at autism at so interesting because I think as you know, you mentioned in myths around autism and I guess one of the myths, often there is that it's connected with a lack of empathy, a lack of of connection with other creatures, but it sounds like it was that sense of connection or concern. Concern that that allowed you to start looking at the way, your mind might be working in. How might be working differently? What was the process of getting a diagnosis like like? It obviously had a pretty crummy experience with the doctor. Who prescribed you the pill? Was it better when you went to talk to doctors about thinking? Hey, should we look at whether? I might have autism. It's a dangerous situation in a way because you don't WanNa late a for diagnosis. He wanted genuine. So? It but it does. It does take a while. You have to festival. Find a doctor. GPA WHO's sensitive to. This. So I founded J with sensitive Near logical. Divest basically That's the drink, and then you know they're they're. Different kinds of. Basically specialists in notice them. And then just follow the lawns based you can. It's not incredibly accessible and I don't think I could have chased that. Is successfully had I not seen in sort of like middling famous comedian. That's that's a pretty big REQU, and if you're GONNA face some. If you're going to look for diagnosis, you've got to be middling famous. Comedian that a lot of people out. It does and it's. More to do with the confidence that comes with that. I never had that. Confidence Bill To. 'cause I think even if you living within diagnosed autism time, it can feel like you just roll, and it can means the are the compensating people tell you steffan. It doesn't feel riot that you just served. Will I'm wrong all the time? And so you don't get the help you name you don't ask for the help. out of shame or confusion isolation and it wasn't until that time in my life said I was. In a Point of confidence that I could. Push a bit further after people you know. Dismiss him, and was it a really thin Hannett to to be told you there is something going on. Relief though so a lot of grief because you've got to, then you. Look back three life and understand it differently, and you know that that's a huge undertaking because it just means that. He's got to reassess everything you've got the civil. That wasn't that was used thinking differently, not being wrong person or that perhaps miscommunication relationships that went by the wayside because I did not stand. Stuff! I didn't have that understanding that I didn't understand stuff. So what? What's it allowed you to do differently? Or what's it helped? Make clear out, but we were about yourself. I'm becoming more reclusive and I'm enjoying it. What what does a happy reclusive timetable? Adobe gardening a dove it I take the dogs for a walk. I'm learning the piano I'm writing I mean you know, engage in the world, but at a distance So lot like rating in. Thinking about current affairs and things like that. I have a lot of alarm time. So the the more learn time. I have the more able and actually. Effectively engage with the world, but if I was to, you know I was younger. Trying to do what normal people do, which is like going out and. Hanging out with large group so. Looking forward to Friday nights. None of this makes sense to me anymore, but I tried. And it was just you know as an exhaustive loop. So. It's like this this term diagnosis autism has let you take some of the pressure off yourself to be certain way, yeah! And I'm in a an incredibly lucky because I stumbled into a career that allows a certain amount of ECCENTRICITY. I think which certain point that I could then get the diagnosis. I often think about. They. Like a life before comedy was really kind of grim. And you know I. I'm. Just very grateful that I've enabled to find the popular I have. But I do too I just. A huge amounts of sadness because I know, there's so many people who don't get through that. You shouldn't have to go through, but you shouldn't have to be. Done in order to feel a sense of belonging. Part of this is around the fact that you a woman with autism, and that's already not stereotype that a lot of us have about one person with autism looks like. Visibility into section of. Money's autism being badly misunderstood, but then those expect women should bay be are incredibly narrow and women with autism Do not function within that narrow. Area! We're supposed to be empathetic. Communicate is, but we tend more toward being. Black and white, so to speak, but that doesn't mean we lack empathy That's on the. Driven. The spectrum that I of have had that same night one to do the right thing. With, driven by a very strong sense of wrong right in, it can be annoying to pay. Their like just having fun. I'm like no that that's wrong when I go away unlike happily happily a band. Her. It sets a you know it's kind of. Find that intersection? They quite interesting between what's expected of women, and what's expected of people with autism and women with autism I. do either Iran as well as as talking about autism in. You talk about he stray. Actually out. History is a big part of Douglas, was also a big part of ninette which I guess is not something. We usually expect from a standup showed. How did you first discover art history? is in highschool. This up books in the library and I found our window into the will the safe and accessible exciting for me like I. Think is very lost. I just didn't understand the world at all, and I knew that I didn't understand it and looking back. I realized that might be is also didn't understandable oiled, but I didn't necessarily know that I. didn't I seem to skip the arrogance of us And at history was really safe way for me to think about the world and history in something out I struggled a little bit with written. History my comprehension legs a little bit I mean get eventually and I've been covering most, but it really is a slower prices, so many younger. That felt like you know as dumb. But seem to be able to get a lot of insight and understanding through visuals. And things like that, so it's sort of just inspired me to think along all than most other subjects is school. What sort of books do you remember looking at at hostile today? Look lie for a little. It's really funny because. A. Little a little, like and Hudson's brief histories of united concepts of modern maps and I and I still look at them and I'm like not sure I understand now. The. Just full of really deliberately obtuse language really. And Black and white reproductions and I just think it's really funny. That was drawn. Out He street, three black and white reproductions, but it was baby steps. You know I sort of understand this thing and then. Later on in life. You know they opened up Abramov when I see them in galleries in. Quite old, before really went to a gallery, but I'd already knew all about. History cited manual before we had to drive the car or something pretty much pretty much. And when he said I, kind of gave you a way of looking at the world. What sort of story did studying those paintings in? You know you went on and studied history an you. What story of the Will They seem to tell you. What was this strange thing where? I grew up in was dismissed dismisses. Fluffy rubbish really to? You know like. A, very practical place in the world. Town Smith them as a practical. Practical town full of practical people. You know there was that sort of. Thing. You often get in in regional places where the outs surfacing. Go thank. The football club before will worry about. Other things, so it's fine. That's just a place all. That's just outgrow. But then you get into Erie history books and the justice. Out History. Just as condescending. And dismissive. Of the other was intrigued by this impenetrable language and exclusiveness that history sort of. Represented and I really wanted to understand. maybe in the in the beginning the way to escape where else fromm. Alan as I got older, it was more of a to bring wells from. To spayed, you know I get annoyed. With Tau. A. Elitist out history writing is in how your own I. Try to exclude people in order to justify tiny existence episode I was always driven by like. This is really fun and exciting. Why using so many was. Taking work as a guide in a in a gallery or museum watts had it that guy. No I used to work at a bookshop. An I did a few comedy. Tours for the Melbourne comedy festivals, celebrities hostetter mental working in the book show. At the National Gallery in can burned the head of monae exhibition. As well like he's sort of just like the fact that he built garden, painted I just really love that saying he just built garden and painted. The garden worked on the garden time to the gap I am all for that. But anyway this woman will pass the shop. Those of US, who No, you don't saying. To the patrons. Lawn just? WHICH WAY TO THE MON WHY EXHIBITION! I'm like it's it's Monnaie and And she's like. Like urinating. By isn't say that to face, but then she came back afterwards. She didn't remember that she'd had this conversation with. But she was buying her mon Wa bulk of me and she pulled out a panacea will. That's a lovely Walwa. Love that man, but she was thinking. It was a monet. Renoir Exhibition and she was just Kinda like colliding them. Yeah, maybe stews to needy. would be the other interpretation. And we a funny keyed. Will you a kid schooling at harm? Who was trying to make other people laugh? I learnt it as a deflection message. Attention? which is kind of a funny way like things like people enjoy attention, human comex from like this is a good way to make it so often is aging, and people would laugh, and then I'd have to work out why it was funny. And then once I've done that I do it again. I was a wave showing people that I was participating, but I Wilson. as a way of being involved that thing involves like a fine following conversations really difficult. I can do a coal back in conversation and people laugh, and then reminded that I'm actively engaged, even though I haven't said anything for a long time. And ice to get woods mound road map a lot when I was a kid. That's my family told stories about me. It's about that and I still do it. United the Amend Kid story. Mom tells like I couldn't think of like the Stanley. Nuts is a town on. Stanley, and as he spoke camp, situation called the nut. But I always. Associated with going to this swim. Jobs out of the ocean there. And trying to get take. Advocate calling it the beach pick. An I and I did it recently to friends You know as soon as podcasts and. Excited about it, so I lost my words and she was about. Miss Ms and it was about. Pollution and smoke. Yes so I still have that thing where you know like some visual think, basically so might thoughts, thoughts and ideas occurred to me as visuals. And then I have to scramble find the woods and inner. Makes People Laugh so it is funny I guess. Way would lunchtimes find you than it at school? Where you likely to Bay, I was really bad at luncheon. Lunch was A. Time of real sort of anxiety for makers love school because at school. You knew had to be in what do in. If you didn't pay, would tell you until lunchtime. Old Little Lynch. And Soy I always found myself sort of on the outside and trying to join in very clumsily ends. It took me quite a long time to work out what to Memphis. The school I tried to join in my brothers Cricket Games. Win At home. That's all we did. We just used to play cricket in the backyard until it's time for dinner. And so I just thought that that's what would happen. And then my brother, who's older than me is like the Anna his off. Fair enough but also brutal. When? You're a kid so I just. I graduate worked away Sometimes I would just walk to look like I was heading somewhere for the whole lunchtime. Then I discovered the library. People think. But really I was just studying indexes all napping. Actually read. Being the index slob indexes like I, didn't actually read the books I just 'cause. The index is a great way of getting a sense of what the book thinks is important. At sort of the same as getting the manual before you drive the car he read. The index is in use like okay so this. This is the oldest subject, but that are important as. These conversations. With Sarah Muskie. PODCAST broadcast. And Online. How `bout apart from the the Games of cricket in the backyard. What kind of atmosphere was airtime? especially, your mom K.. What kind of atmosphere did she try to create among the five kids and her dad? Brother, Tommy cameras the youngest five I think. My Mom was trying to create anything. I think she's a survival together. Yeah, so you know we didn't have a lot of money. MOM was working a couple of jobs that. A mess patron when one of my older brothers went to university, you know mom and were trying to support him through that things got real tight. Why wasn't overly aware of it? I just realized that. Suddenly cooking county meals at the local country club on fraud I, said So much I guess child labor remember beginning by. Out To yeah, yeah I, did the salad. The iceberg lettuce in tomato. Beetroot and then like an orange flies with split new twist, and a separate of currently pass. It was fine. It was just you know getting on with it. But at Hun was. Chaotic because five kids I like the because, there's a sense of place. Back on that time timing for someone like me. Who didn't know how to find a place in the world without being told. Thing a member of a large family was. WHO's really? I guess great bright for that. We do look back Hannah. Do you think that your family somehow acknowledged Dole made space for the the differences that you now know come from all. The was was the way that you are given room in that. Family Yeah. I think inside the family. It didn't nate a nine. rbis just. A little offsent. But, I think I think we all were in our ways in the large family. It's very hard I. think wants to fold. Kid comes out I think parents just lose that sort of you just get one description so John. Justin was declined one Jessica. Was the ball see one? Ben Was the funny one and I've been with the quiet one. Hi, Mitch was the funny one and I was house just Hannah. Will I'm number seven in my family Hannah, so that even run out of adjectives. Ninety. Nine. I always that over there I someone pick up at crying baby exactly so you say that the family started working at the country club. Is that where you were introduced to the the ancient and noble game of golf? Well been cleaning was cleaner at the golf club. So I've sort of grown up often on the weekends, a gun help help site at in the loosest pulses, just basically just hanging out on claimed occasionally Two year cakes APP because. Just a real a real privilege. Success with urinal cakes for way too long. I just think I thought they were cake adjacent. I held onto that even though there was no actual proof of that I really hope you never tasted one just to confirm that now. The very very toxic to the smell of them, quite sensitive of smells so. I knew not to not try that, but I still thought that would cejka Jason, so but yeah, I remember helping you know like I, said helping them wasn't really helping. You didn't see encourage you to stop playing golf. Like in the institute, and this is kind of town. If you didn't place for, it got into trouble. This is kind of release, strong sporting community, but this also. Roughness around the edges. It's tough place to live. People are doing best, but the frayed edges the. Miami parents are very keen to mitral the. Extracurricular activities were Good thing about spoke team. Rachel Australia is Ya pitching kids into communities that include adults, not just kids and I think this is a lot of good to belonging to a club in a sense for that. Providing the the club is in toxic. Situation. So, we will play school. My sister did gymnastics turns Justin played hockey. Played. I would go to. Hockey and I was kind of good tiding goals, which you know classic autism. In the team but slot. And also there was lists options I knew what I had to very obvious what I had to do in a very limited part of the field to move in Zozo alive. Reflex jungle cat. Quite good to. Eleven I played in the Northwest Tasmanian at the stains. Hey, you still have a ten into the the trophy. Cultivate Marie Fish, who was the silver medal coli? In. Common Wolfgang's Olympics account remember. This is picture of me with in the Lego pipe, but isolate so goals rose only Lebanon the padding that was designed to protect. My legs also left me legally. But I one point I riding a bike and I fell off Weeden I. Hope My. Have a total neighboring construction and my name just didn't recover until his twenty-one. No surgery on it I just had really believed. Unstable name would just dislocating collapse, and so I couldn't play hockey anymore. Else quite devastated by that and mom said. Forget it. What did to play slow hockey? GOPHERS. You, you became a bit of a champion that I think. He captained the state junior team. Will you competitive? Yes, to a point? I always knew when not be headed like dine have that champion added cheated. Dislike! Going out I just look I'm not echoed. Was a bit of a hassle like I knew I was better at playing matchplay stroke-play getting. Technical Hannah. Lead, I wonder lancair right so. So which took place when you just play on your generally, what championship golf as but match when you pitted against one person in the team? So when Tasmania Played New South Wales Queensland. As. A member of team played victory against. You know some of the other team so I was good Thursday because I think. I sensed. Want someone really bad tempted? That there was weakness and then I just I did something to further up the not really sure what it was, but one someone was playing. Bad I could make them play west I think it was. Goldman. Knowing I think that's what it was. I think because I'm annoying. What, how is women's golf and men's golf treated differently? I mean I remember when again visit my Navajo Golf Club like they would die. There were lady days, and there were certain times that we were supposed to. Golfing may not like. It was quite a segregated will go F- off that just trying to be a wife I've I can play competition on the weekends unless I think. We've got a time early very early. Saturday mornings, and only if we didn't disrupt the men's competition. Women couldn't be members of the club. We were associates. If ever, we played in a mixed mixed sort of competition, ladies have to bring plate. Whenever I WANNA competition. I won things like casserole dishes. A want to buy. It makes once the closest to the pin on the. Hand blenders like unlike fourteen. What am I gonNA Today. This is my brother to shock fluffy shock! Cover out so your areas. Wanted that those sort of differences. You did that bug your mom as well, but she talked about that with you. All the time. All the time I didn't invent my feminist drake Well and truly scolds in that she saw and cold, and all out, and she's allies lab disruptive women used to. Clean the bar. So so golfing was what you wanted to and you. Did you add history degree in camera? What kind of jobs did you get after you finished your study Hannah? I worked in a job in the gallery book for a little while and also cinema projectionist. Sounds like a fun job? It was good. Perfect perfect is just light, but can the dock alone. Watching movies great kind of watching, but not in the normal way just. Like the index and then I sort of worked started to drift a bit me for while having no way up to domino effect dictate cinema day night. I really wasn't very woods. As good as good predictions in the cinema, all toll team, an earring NATO's very nice I. Sort of lack initiative in so. Unless someone really was going to mentor. Take Man always struggle after that I just sort of drifted very badly I was a kind of found labor. Working with either table out of prison, immigrants on femme was that up in the territory to back in. Sort of wait. Regional News Files Speak Toria Tasmania really dragged with where the work took me, and it's not. It's not a living wage by any stretch. It's a cycle of poverty. That's almost criminal. Was it a a stressful or a kind of anxious time for you that that period of drifting? Yeah you know like I, didn't I? Think is busy, just sorta disappearing. I didn't have a future that I could identify it or. ANYTHING ABOUT I didn't think that I had a place in a well-deserved when. I think is a lot of troll Moran that time, which makes it very difficult to make it. Look back into his. Memory works. Or doesn't work. When it comes to trauma, so it's kind of A. The most famous get at the moment the more. Worried. I am about at time life because people. Just really want a straight line through my narrative that time of my life represents. Real trauma and with that comes a difficulty to. Understand or even recall like it's muddy and it still frauds had to do. Start to plug away at or find a way out of that. Time does truth things. Vote me out of it. A Momma's I found comedy. Just such an unexpected answer I really think about the post joined. I just entered the role comedy competition. That's all it took just entered into a had a gun. I didn't do well in the first and I continued to struggle for year, and then the other thing that helped me get out as I. Reconnected with my family in a meaningful way. And a look! Back on the time the. Ito between started doing comedy and really a until two thousand fifteen, the ten years, my sister, my brother really supported me. They let me live with the while ago myself. I can't even say go back to my fake. 'cause I was never on my fate, for while I lived in Adelaide with my sister and. Her family and Incredibly generous and but they never made me feel that way. Stan when I moved to Melbourne. Lived above my brothers, fruit and vegetable shop. and. That was sort of. Again an incredibly generous. Thing to do, and I was able to slowly gather my adult phages best as I could. What allowed you to reconnect with family? When he said that was important. How did that happen? Was it from you or from them? I? For, help and they. gave it to me on. That was the biggest trauma. Snakes were coming out I think. I. I sort of Hsun died didn't belong will and that was never the case, but it was. I just didn't know how to belong, so I drifted out in away. But there are waiting for you when you're ready to come back. Absolutely owning I'm incredibly lucky in that sense, there are people who don't have that luxury. And the other part of that ladder out being committee. Is it something that felt like? It was a good fit right away i. mean what was being on stage like for this woman who liked to go home at? And sit in the projectionist. Not Not an automatic fit in head well, it is in a sense because you know it's. It's being part of of a well with dating slightly apart. You know like I'm talking to a crowd, but I'm not in the crown. And you understand I'm talking in listening. And so in in in day to day, conversations I'm not really sure how things go and I make lots of mistakes and very anxious about it on stage, and like they want to be entertained. And we haven't go. Comfortable on stage. It was. It wasn't until I got management that of able to relate. Do Okay, because it's an enormous amount of work that goes into being a working comic who looks after themselves like? It's a real struggle with my hat goes off to to pick blue Jay that you and I did it for a couple of years, but I wouldn't have continued I would not. If I hadn't of got representation I would not have continued I. couldn't I another half navigate? Administration, how are you feeling about you comedy career when you started rotting the net? I failing a bit lost because I didn't understand who head to say to them, and that was because I was just about to be diagnosed in that. Once, I was diagnosed with autism I understood filing. That's the point which was able to write a net. Suit of sudden sense of I was I'd never had before, and I could turn my eye to the outside world. A little bit more confidently and I was a big time as tied writing new show every year I felt like. My career was starting to slide backwards. I felt like I knew when I started steadily. Making the most of every opportunity I just felt like it got to the point where I wasn't getting opportunities. Even I made the most of all my opportunities there was role long felt you know I didn't I couldn't touring in the way that I was because it was Exhausting every festival season I would collapse. Some be unable to function, so I wasn't. I wasn't getting anyway. And said he that give you kind of to to write something that could be really different. Really knew well. The freedom came with the idea of quitting and by that I meant. Really I'm prepared to lose my career. as prepared to alienate everybody just to decide what. To say. And I'd I'd basically just decided to be comfortable whereas at live small. In maybe supplement my creative with a few ships. Brothers show like I just really that sweat. That's where was when in it. I don't think I can make it in this industry. So I might as well got the bang. Bang with definitely. How many times did you perform that show? What was that schedule like? Started off as my usual schedule so I, did all the festivals Dad was unusual in that I started in Perv. Usually start at the Adelaide fringe festival, but for some reason was I did Adelaide Brisbane has made and then Melbourne Sydney so all that was the same, then added Admiral Dark breakoff Ed Murphy So in that sense up until that September everything was the same except that I was always adding shows. Selling out Wednesday's, which was unheard of in life, and then adding shows at the end of the comedy facilit- always done really well at the Melbourne comedy festival, but the weekend. I add had extra shows during festivals. I did the comedy theater after two. Not just two shows in a row in thousand seats announced massive for me absolutely massive, but then later on A. So it. was huge and so just. Building and it wasn't until I filmed that there are really I did the most unusual bit? Night filming the President I did a second run in London, and then I did a running needle, and that's when things started to feel. Really am because even a different level, I'd still Dullard all the same, but then I did these other things. That's when I really started to feel frightened. What do you mean frightened? Because I didn't understand what was going on around me, I knew those during something. It felt important felt like I was doing. Something different, but also. Be. Experiencing, the highs point in my career, but felt I couldn't enjoy it in the way that I always. Assumed success would feel because the show was traumatic to perform. And then everyone was really excited, but I was just so exhausted. I wasn't engaged. In ammonia, just starting to sort it out now I think anyone who's seen in it. Has that thought you know you this so much to laugh at in the show, but as you say the heart of it is, is something really painful and I think anyone who watches it is thinking. What toll could this take on this person? Not after not sharing these stories mean. What did it do do you like? What did it do to your body? And you mind after you'd come off stage I? Just sort of shut down in the middle like I just really kept my world really really small. I lost some friends. You know because I think I. Think from the outside people. Sir, all. You're experiencing success in now. You too good for me, but really it was like I. Don't have anything next Matang in even after the you know. The climax of the success is taking nateing. Psych I. Don't know what to Let's talk about your future like I'm exhausted on a Husk. Tights meetings and I had nothing to say I had nothing to pitch because. Gone into that shirt, put everything into that. and. I didn't think it was GONNA work. So I did not have a plan the so, what was the payoff I'm hoping there was a payoff beyond the success, and beyond the opening of potential doors as a performer as a storyteller. What with the positives out of sharing that trauma? The CFASF is the Ketosis. Look the long game. I. It was brutal, traumatic night after night, but in the wash. I feel like I'm on the other side of trauma. I didn't think I was a candidate to be able to escape the trauma. Luke. But, there's also you know. Like I. I'm still sort of working out what? Water down to myself I think. I think I'm hell I have a healthier. Sense, of so when I went into it now that the exhaustion starting to. Wash away. Did the way that the audience embrace that show responded to it. Did that help with that? was that something that you could kind of feel or taste the real affirmation appreciation that people have for that? Show a you know. A copy underestimated. Often died of trauma is something that people have to get through themselves and I? Think that's a very dangerous in limited idea. When you feel traumatized by something, you feel unsafe and. That slack of safety is something that other people have told me feel as well so it's not just a matter of you. Making sell feel safe. You have to feel safe in the community you live in. This kind of false need to reckon with in my audience is like I, said the thing and much to my surprise, my community said. Oh sorry and that. That is he late you? Mom came along the not that the show was filmed at the Opera House. Could you see her from onstage? Could, it was such a mistake given felt so bad, but my mom has such distinctive hair. A shock of white hair at night gave a good seats potisk. The lights are up slightly for the filming affect. It's complete. Darkness is just meant that I could say I. Try not to look. He's like Fronton said to. Win? The! Really tough stuff united status Talk about really tough. I saw his shoulders slum. WAS INCREDIBLY AFFECTING ME I. Think if you watch the special, I have two special attack need to. Thank you? There is. A, If you know if people doubt the sincerity tomorrow performance I just know that. Lake just remember. As being this really difficult moment. Did. Put you off your game. Did you feel taken out of it? Oh what did that do? Not just heightened I. What's the word that I'm looking for Intent I guess, would you know? When I, first started doing this show, it was urgent yet urgency. And, then I threw performing at you. Agencies NC sort of get so of tanks Satan. It's just being in the room. I wouldn't say guaranteed emotions. It was never going through the motions with that show, but I I understood I. I got into a patent. I, could could do the sense of safety, but with my mom and the crab. Oh, fellow performing for the first time and I felt so vulnerable and. But I had to say would have to sign that. A head in the beginning with just returned in a flood, and that's that's what comes across in the filming of it. I think what did she say to you afterwards Hannah about the shy. Film to shows so I didn't get to see his straight afterwards. My brother and my sister with day with her. A good friends. some while I was on stage. Doing all again. Numb. sat on the steps of the Opera House and an had papa cigarette. And cried a lot. And then after I finish the second show. We all had drinks. And had a nice time and went to bid. Is Performing Douglas. was that a very different experience? It looks like you just have a hoot on stage in Douglas Yeah. That's what the show was designed for those main the audience it's supposed to be. Fun Not Stressful and Casaus assaults, and also a way of saying comedy can be lots of different things you know this is inherent contradiction in any form of expression so I I wanted to make something that stockley different could be coming from may still had to me true to who I am so. Not suddenly starting to do. Mime, and is that is that Douglas? I can hear in the background. They're ready to go and take a song. Play. A better late go. And it's been really great to speak with you conversation. Thanks so much for coming on the show my pleasure, thank you. You've been listening to a podcast of conversations with Sarah and ASCII. For more conversations interviews head to the website I base, say dot net dot. US slash conversations. Hallo conversations and Hannah Gadsby Fans I. You missing live, stand up comedy. Yes, same well good news for us every month. The ABC comedy presents podcast brings you. A live comedy. Special just behaved phones and this month. It's Me Cal Wilson. You can get my show. Gifted underachiever recorded at last year's Melbourne International Comedy Festival. ABC Comedy Presents here now on the ABC listening wherever you get your podcasts.

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