17 Burst results for "Gabrielle Zuckerman"

"gabrielle zuckerman" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

01:35 min | Last week

"gabrielle zuckerman" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Thanks again to Mary Francis, O'Connor. Thank you as well to all the people who work so hard on this show. Gabrielle zuckerman, DJ cashmere, Justine Davey, Maria wartel, Samuel Johnson and Jen point, and we get our audio engineering from the good folks over at ultraviolet audio. We'll see you on Friday for a bonus. And we fight, we fight like hell, and if you don't fight like hell, you're not going to have a country anymore. On January 6th, thousands descended on the U.S. capitol. On Trump's urging. He had tweeted, be there, will be wild. But January 6th wasn't the beginning, and it certainly wasn't the end of the story. From pineapple street studios, wondery, and Amazon music comes a new podcast mini series called will be wild that looks into the human stories left out of the January 6th headlines. We're just going to walk through the fire is what we're going to do. We're going to stand in and run a 12 people and we are going to tell the story. It explores the four yearlong effort to bring autocracy to America. And what it means for the future of democracy. Follow will be wild wherever you get your podcasts. Or you can listen early on to Amazon music or early and ad free by subscribing to wondery plus in Apple podcasts or the wandering app. When it comes to ice cream, there are two well defined camps either you're a fan of chunky globs of chocolate fudge, or you want smooth creamy simplicity. In other words, are you a Ben and Jerry's fanatic or are you fiending for Haagen dazs?.

Gabrielle zuckerman DJ cashmere Justine Davey Maria wartel Jen point Mary Francis Samuel Johnson Connor Trump America Amazon Apple Ben Jerry Haagen dazs
"gabrielle zuckerman" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

03:43 min | 2 weeks ago

"gabrielle zuckerman" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Parts, your internal family systems and the different parts of JVM that are within your own mind. There's the JVM. We see on Netflix, and then there's the JVM who gets really sad. It seems like coming to an understanding that a lot of stuff can be happening at the same time. The full catastrophe can be playing out and it all can be okay. That seems like a very important conclusion for you. Yeah. I mean, I don't know if the conclusion that is like there can be a catastrophe and it can be okay. At the same time, I think that it's like there can be a catastrophe and I can find peace. At the same time, I don't know if I would necessarily label a catastrophe as like, and it's okay. It's like I think it's like you can find peace. Even if there's something really difficult going on or find some sort of acceptance and something even in the face of a catastrophe is more clear for me anyway. Point well taken. Is there anything I should have asked you that I didn't ask you? Anything you want to touch on that I didn't give you an opportunity to touch on? Just like, how do you deal with waking up that gorgeous? As a heterosexual man, it's like, it's like just like your hair, you know that your hair is so pretty. It's like so pretty and I was like your beard is like you're just like so symmetrical. It's fine that you didn't ask those things like how did you get some symbol how do you get so perfect why your teeth are so cute? I don't know. I floss. I'm really into skin care. No, I do think that as far as the book I was really moved by my experience about writing about the star Karen chapter and kind of my relationship with my father. I was really candid about my relationship with my dad. And I think that's like what I think about hope. It's like, sometimes I wish my dad's conservative man has historically really voted Republican and it's like I wish that I could like move his dial further left, but he always says, you know, it's like you've moved me from like a one to like a 5. I might not be like a liberal, but I'm a lot more over on the dial that I used to be. And I'm really proud of him that I let him read that essay before I released it obviously. I didn't want him to feel like really taken off guard, but for anyone out there that's listening to this, it's having a hard relationship with a family member who's voting for people that diametrically oppose your existence. That's a really hopeful chapter and I hope that people feel empowered to keep having uncomfortable conversations with people and their family and that they can use some tools in that essay and people with their life. Because really ultimately what queer people need, what queer youth need, what queer people, young and old need is for people that are allies to take these conversations into spaces that would be uncomfortable to take these conversations to members of your family that it might not go over so smooth and be able to like have a calm, clear, loving conversation with them, to hopefully move that dial. So I hope that people can take that from that essay. And an employee that in their life. That's incredibly important. I salute the work you're doing. I love watching you on Netflix. I love talking to you today. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Thanks again to Jonathan. As I told you, that was a fun one. Thank you as well to everybody who worked so hard on this show. Gabrielle zuckerman, DJ cashmere, Justine Davey, Maria were tell Samuel Johnson and Jen point, and we get our audio engineering from the good folks over at ultraviolet audio. One note before we go, I do want to do something here in support of an organization founded upon the breakthrough work of my friend, the world renowned neuroscientist, doctor Richard Davidson. He goes by Richie, Richie's cutting edge work, uses scientific principles to prove that.

Netflix Karen Gabrielle zuckerman DJ cashmere Justine Davey Jen point Samuel Johnson Jonathan Maria Richard Davidson Richie
"gabrielle zuckerman" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

03:39 min | Last month

"gabrielle zuckerman" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Many of them are on course to become much more powerful. Think about poor Graham, one of the biggest investors in Silicon Valley said the world is on course to be more addictive in the next 40 years than it was in the last 40. Think about how much more addictive TikTok is to your child than Facebook, right? So on the one hand, you've got all these forces which are invading our attention which are poised to become more intense. It won't stay at this level of invasiveness. It will get even worse. Think about the metaverse. On the other hand, there's got to be a movement of all of us. Saying, no, no, you're not going to do this to us. You're not going to do this to our children. We want a life where we can think deeply where we can read books where we can sleep, where we can have long conversations where we can look into each other's eyes. We do not want a life that dissolves the average, like I said before, the average office worker now focuses on any one task for three minutes. What is your life like when it dissolves into a hailstorm of three minute fragments? That is we all know that is not a good life, right? We have to have a movement that says, no, we were just like we needed and need a feminist movement to reclaim women's bodies and their lives. I argue very strongly we need an attention movement to reclaim our minds. We don't have to tolerate this being done to us. This is not a force of nature. This has been done to us by very recent forces, we are more powerful than those forces if we band together, we can take them on, we can stop them and we can reclaim our attention, but we're going to have to fight for it, because if we don't do anything, they'll invade us more and more and more. Johann Hari author of stolen focus always fun to talk to you. Thanks for coming back on the show. As totally my pleasure, Dan, and I meant to say that people can get the book, the ebook or the audiobook. And if they want to listen for free to interviews with loads of the experts that I've talked about, they can go to stolen focus book dot com. I also, at the end of all the interviews, a lot of people say to me, so where can people follow you on social media? And I always want to go, have you been listening to me? No, they should have followed me on social media. They can if they want to, but I won't be looking at it very much. Awesome. Thank you again. She's done always enjoy talking to you. It's a delight. Thanks so much. Thanks again to Johann Hari. Thank you as well to all the people who make this show a reality two and a half times a week. Samuel John's Gabrielle zuckerman DJ Kashmir Justine Davy, Kim, Maria will tell and with audio engineering from the good folks over at ultraviolet audio. We'll see while on Wednesday for part two of our series on focus with the Dharma teacher Shiloh Catherine. From wondery, I'm Nikki Boyer, host of the new podcast, call me curious. Look, we're all on 24/7 information overload on our newsfeeds or inboxes on TikTok. That's why I'm bringing you, call me curious, a podcast that finally gives you definitive answers to life's burning questions. Like, does intermittent fasting really work? Should I buy crypto? Every week on call me curious, I'll dive into all the things you've heard about, but don't really know about. We'll both learn and laugh along the way as we explore life's little mysteries, the Internet's hottest topics, and burning gotta know questions. Like, what are the mathematical odds there is other intelligent life in the universe? Or is it true you can't die in your dreams? You'll find out with me and some of my hilarious Friends on my podcast call me curious. Listen to call me curious.

Johann Hari Silicon Valley Graham Samuel John Gabrielle zuckerman Justine Davy Facebook Shiloh Catherine Nikki Boyer Dan Maria Kim
"gabrielle zuckerman" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

06:37 min | 2 months ago

"gabrielle zuckerman" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"And, you know, maybe things need to lighten up a little, maybe it's we're taking it too seriously or we're getting too bogged down or like I, I've experienced sometimes apologies that feel irritating because I'm like, you did nothing. Let it go. It's no big deal. It's kind of like don't be so hard on yourself or don't go into this sort of maybe your own sense of doubt in yourself too much. So then I can sort of whatever skillful way I can just try to support say things do things in a way that support more self confidence in the person. Well, I wouldn't necessarily say what I just said to you to them. But I have recognized that sense of irritation when someone gets too much into the expressing regrets, you know, 'cause I'm like, you don't need to feel so bad. I don't feel bad, you know? So we want to just care for ourselves and care for each other and maybe if we notice things getting sort of too heavy or too sticky, then what is it that would help? Maybe it's going for a walk and doing beginning a new on a park bench. With ice cream, you know, or maybe it's keeping it shorter, like just a ten minute exchange, or maybe it's doing it longer, more in depth. I mean, it depends on what it is that's coming up because maybe those things that are not clicking are indications of something else that needs to be attended to. Are there situations or relationships in which you would recommend against using this tool? I mean, in general, I would just say, both people should be ready to do it. And have enough tools on their own, enough sort of self knowledge that they're not going to dump on the other person. So you want to really make sure that you're not like at an 8 or a 9 or ten on the scale of intensity of anger or resentment or bitterness. You want to be at like a 5 or lower. And it's not that you are suppressing your hurt, your difficulty. When you express your hurt in the beginning, a new you May cry, you may feel the intensity grow. As you're expressing, but you want to have done enough work before you come to a beginning anew that you're not like raging, wanting to strangle the other person, that doesn't work. And both people have to kind of have some kind of awareness that we are coming together because we would really like to resolve this. But you know, there are many situations actually down where if there's any abuse involved. I mean, if there's any real inability on one person's side to respect the dignity, the safety of the other, this isn't where I would start. Sometimes I feel like people in spiritual practices judge themselves if they have a really difficult relationship that hasn't been resolved or if they hate someone. That's okay. We work on that, but it doesn't mean we go try to put ourselves in danger or expose ourselves to the most toxic most harmful person in our life. Because we're trying to practice all these spiritual teachings. Yes, we are going in that direction to where nobody is put out of our heart, even the people who have hurt us most deeply, but I think we would only do this process with someone who respected us. And we respected. And felt there was enough trust with to be vulnerable with, because if someone's being abusive or has whatever kind of psychological reality that doesn't allow them to be really stable enough to witness and be taking responsibility for their own actions, then this would really have limitations because this is about building trust. It doesn't mean that it has to be the super wonderful relationship, beginning a new can really transform difficult relationships, but there has to be some kind of a psychological stability and willingness to bring about some kind of amending on both sides. So I guess there are quite a few situations which wouldn't qualify. It doesn't mean that in the future those relations couldn't come to a place where they might be safer, but we would want to respect the limitations. All in all, though, notwithstanding my initial somewhat playful semi serious skepticism, I am fully sold, I think there's a lot to recommend this practice. And I really appreciate you coming on to talk about it. Before I actually let you go though, can I push you to kind of plug a little bit if people are interested in books you've been involved with? I know you have an upcoming book that we're going to have you back on the show to talk about in greater depth if you've got website or talks or events. Can you just let everybody know how they can get more of you? Sure. Just my website, Kyra jewel dot com. And you edited a book on children planting seeds, practicing mindfulness with children. As the book I mentioned, there's a couple other books that I have writings in. Together we are one. That's by tick not Han, teachings from retreats for people of color. I have a chapter in there and I edited that book. Yeah. And just so everybody has it. The name of the new book that's coming out in October. We were made for these times, ten ways to skillfully move through change disruption and loss. Sounds like we're going to have a lot to talk about when you come back. In the meantime, though, hardy, thank you. And great to meet you. Oh, you too, Dan. Thank you so much for having me. Thank you to Kyra jewel, check out her book, we were made for these times. Thank you as well to everybody who works so incredibly hard on this show. Samuel Johns, Gabrielle zuckerman, DJ cashmere, Justine Davey, Kim baika, Maria were tell engine plant. With our audio engineering by ultraviolet audio, we'll see you all on Friday for a bonus meditation from the one and only 7 a Selassie..

Kyra jewel Han Samuel Johns Gabrielle zuckerman DJ cashmere hardy Justine Davey Kim baika Dan Maria
"gabrielle zuckerman" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

03:07 min | 2 months ago

"gabrielle zuckerman" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Nobody would possibly read the book, right? We do live in a bizarre time where there's this idea that ordinary or average is failure. And you know, unless we happen to be in a certain part of what is at Minnesota like, what would be gone, where all of the women are strong, all of the men are good-looking and all of the children are above average, we're doomed because we're going to be below average half the time. And if we've got to be special, oh my God, what a painful and difficult burden that is. And as you say, social media has so amp this up. How many times do you see an Instagram post or Facebook post where the person is basically saying, woke up this morning? Had the runs again, afraid I'm going to get a bad performance review at work, and I think my girlfriend's gonna leave me, right? No, it's like, here I am at this fantastic place with a fantastic party with curated beautiful people and you're not here. That's what we see all day long. You know, if we were nation states, it would be as though we're reading our own crime and poverty statistics and looking at other people's travel brochures. But this is the world of social media. And I found adolescents hard enough without social media. Just imagining what it would have been like to be alone in 8th grade or 9th grade and watching images of all my friends who were at the party that I wasn't at or even kids who weren't my Friends, but just the people at the party. Oh, the horrible pain of that. So it's gotten much worse. Roy bow master who's studied self esteem as an academic psychologist for years. He said, after decades of research, I'd say, forget about self esteem, put some money into self discipline and effort and engagement. That's a pretty good place to leave it before I let you go. Can you please plug your book and any other books you've written in any other content you put out into the world that you think people might want to access? Well, if you're interested in exploring this further, the book is the extraordinary gift of being ordinary, finding happiness right where you are. There are instructions in the book on cultivating a mind from this practice. But if you want to go more deeply into that, there's another book I wrote some time ago called the mind from the solution everyday practices for everyday problems. It's really a practicing psychologist look at how to apply mindfulness practices throughout your life. So those are probably the two that are most relevant to our discussion today. Ron, thank you very much for coming on. Great job. Thank you so much for having me. Thanks again to Ron Siegel. Thanks as well to everybody who worked so hard to make the show a reality Samuel John's Gabrielle zuckerman, DJ cashmere, Justine Davy Kim bike and Maria were telling Jen play out, also our friends over at ultraviolet audio, who do our audio engineering. We'll see you all on Friday for a bonus. We have an incredible offer just for you, starting march 23rd, get a two month free trial of one plus by subscribing in Apple podcasts..

Roy bow Minnesota Facebook Ron Siegel Samuel John Gabrielle zuckerman DJ cashmere Justine Davy Kim bike Ron Jen Maria Apple
"gabrielle zuckerman" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

03:04 min | 2 months ago

"gabrielle zuckerman" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"What do I this is my question? What do I need right now? How am I doing? How's my mind? How's my body? What do other people need around me? These are just questions. Here's a question that I keep very close to me as much as possible throughout my day. You know, because I know that if I am not resourced, then I'm just not helpful. Now, if I go over a line of just being really exhausted, then I just shut down. It takes days for me to come back online. If I am just shooting right through my boundaries, and many of us live entire lives of shooting right through our boundaries because we don't have the practice to give us the self awareness to know when we've shot through them. Exactly. It's always a pleasure to talk to you. One truly last question, which is, I know a lot of the people who said the show know you already, but for people who want to learn more about you, where can they find you on the Internet, your books, any resources you've put out that you want to let people know about? Well, you can definitely find me at my local target down the street. Which is one of the ways I take care of myself is by going to target. You can find me online, my website is Lama rod dot com. And I do a lot on Instagram so that's at Lama rod official on Instagram. And if you go to my website, you can sign up for my newsletter. I have lots of things I offer throughout the year, particularly courses that I host on my platform based upon my book, based upon meditation, work, and so forth and so on. And I'm also featured on the calm app. As well as a content creator there. You mentioned your book, the book is called love and rage. You are also a contributor to another book called radical Dharma. Right. And my third book, which will be out late. Next year, it's called the new saints. And it's an exploration of what being virtuous looks like and a contemporary world. We come back on the show when that book comes out. Yeah, I don't think I have a choice. Now, what do you mean by that? I am more than happy to come back on the show. Diplomacy. I just heard that. I'll have that out with you over text. But for sure, I would love to have you back when that book comes out, if not earlier. And just thank you again for doing this. Yeah, absolutely. Thanks again, to Llama rod always love talking to him. Thank you as well to the people who work so hard on this show, Samuel John's Gabrielle zuckerman, DJ cashmere, Justine Davey, Kim bike and Maria were tell and Jen point. Also, our comrades over at ultraviolet audio, who do our audio engineering. We'll see you all on Monday for a brand new episode. My name is Harriet. I'm a 10% happier user and I was a guest on the 20% happier podcast. Speaking to a meditation teacher was very different than what I anticipated..

Lama rod Instagram Llama rod Samuel John saints Gabrielle zuckerman DJ cashmere Justine Davey Kim bike Jen Maria Harriet
"gabrielle zuckerman" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

03:13 min | 3 months ago

"gabrielle zuckerman" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"What is it two or three, 4000 years of human civilization? It's not always the most popular thing that happened. And my favorite example is like some of the great from Macedonia at that time, nobody had even really heard about that part of the world, and this comes conquest Greece and then conquest the whole Persian Empire. This is a little bit as if a country like Carnot some Latin American country would come and conquer USA in Canada together. It's completely out of dimension. It happened. And our case is not as improbable as that situation. So I do think that there's a possibility for us to mature out of this crisis and to becoming better human beings don't have to be Buddhist, but step out of all these ways how we are now harming each other. I just mentioned racism, wars, I mean, you just look at the news and you will get enough examples of what I'm talking about. There's a need for us to be more mindful. I think mine can be a key here. For us to learn to live together mindfully with mutual respect towards each other and towards nature. It's possible, but it depends on each of us making our contribution. Each of us taking a position. What potential addition to your argument is that while it may not happen that the climate crisis leads to the next step in human evolution and we become improved as a species, while that opportunity may not be seized on a macro level by humanity and nonetheless provides an opportunity to us as individuals. In line with what I see, I pick up the trash no matter what other people do. Is there something I should have asked but failed to ask? I think your questions were lovely. And I think we touched on the most important topics. Well, it's a pleasure to see you again, and I really appreciate you taking the time to do this. I think it's going to be fascinating and helpful for the many people who listen to the show. So thank you. Thank you. Big thanks to the anal, I really hope he comes back. Great guest. Thank you as well to the folks who work so hard to make this show a reality. Samuel John's Gabrielle zuckerman, DJ cashmere, Justine Davey, Kim Baikal, Maria will tell and play out. And the good folks over at ultraviolet audio, who do our audio engineering. We'll see you all on Wednesday for a brand new episode. We're gonna be talking about humor in what is often quite a humorless era. Everybody has something that they would give anything for and unfortunately there's people out there who will exploit that. There's nothing that can stand between the two. Nothing at all. From wondery comes a story about true love. I love you so, so much. I love you. Power. You're going to have to completely submit to me and give me your complete and utter obedience. And how far some people are willing to go to get what they want. I'm.

Macedonia Greece Samuel John USA Gabrielle zuckerman DJ cashmere Justine Davey Canada Kim Baikal Maria
"gabrielle zuckerman" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

07:13 min | 3 months ago

"gabrielle zuckerman" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Jeffrey, welcome to the show. Mister Daniel. Good to be here. I should say welcome back to the show. You're a frequent flyer, which I'm happy about. I think I might be getting up there in the points department. Yes. The rewards are basically nothing, so. Don't get too excited. Oh, my friend, Tom's been with you. A deep meditative practice all on its own. Continually coming back to principles of equanimity. Yeah. But enough about me, you had a chat with the boss of this show, Gabrielle zuckerman, and there was a sentence you uttered in the course of that conversation, which made its way to me, which was your whole life can be a practice. What do you mean by that? Okay, we're jumping right in. Well, okay, I guess this is what I mean. That typically we meditate, those meditators out there, we find a time in our day to do a meditation practice or every other day. And it's practicing how to exist. And we're trying to learn how to exist in a way that's more awake open, compassionate, and the benefits of that start radiating out slowly to other parts of our life. And there's sort of this sense in which we kind of just have faith that's happening. And we can be deliberate about applying the skills in action as well. So that's kind of the typical framework of how people think about practice. And I share that framework. But I also think that we can be even more intentional about filling out the whole of our life with goodness. And what that looks like is getting interested in how every single thing that we do can become a practice. Not in this boring, eat your vegetables kind of way, but in this really fascinating, oh wow, in this area of my life, I can remove the suffering and increase the insight and joy. And it's just a question of learning a practice that kind of helps me do that. So for example, the practice of communicating with you. It's true just implementing simple skills of mindfulness, being more open being more concentrated. These things are all going to help. But then there's also the value of, say, learning from a nonviolent communication person or some other communication specialist about specific framings of how a conversation can happen. Specific techniques of ways of making space or listening and that's just one example. Another example is falling asleep. I could just fall asleep or try to fall asleep or just sit there and figure out about my worries, or I can decide to make falling asleep practice. I can learn about good sleep hygiene, I can kind of ritualize falling asleep. I can maybe do a little protection practice before I fall. Something like that. There's no area of your life that you can't make more intentional and awesome by just learning some key practice rules or orientations around it. And I'm really interested in that as just part of how to live a good life. That's what I mean by making your life a practice. And then I'll say one last thing about it. If you think of the first thing where all you ever do is the seated practice. And you don't do anything else. It's sort of like the seated practice becomes this volcano that's rising out of the sea. And it's like it starts to get higher and higher and more and more of your life starts to feel connected to that practice. And that's totally one way to go. But another way to go is to make lots of little volcanos. So you have maybe your volcano you're sitting back to the center, but you have lots of other little volcanos, and they're all slowly rising out of the water. And very slowly that archipelago of tiny separate islands becomes a single unified landmass of more awesomeness and clarity and openness and intentionality and joy and free flow. And I'm interested in how to help human beings do that. And doing that myself. So there was a phrase you used in that I love everything you just said. The phrase you use was there's no part of your life you can't make more awesome. I love that. And I'm guessing out of a semi educated guess that a lot of people lose to the show are either meditators or aspiring meditators, but perhaps a lot of like one volcano people. And maybe that volcano really is quite pervasive in that you're integrating mindfulness and compassion into lots of things you do. But this more holistic capacious understanding of turning everything into a practice, that's really interesting to me. I think there's something very joyful about it that it's a kind of form of existential play that you don't have to just take this situation, take this part of your life kind of, you don't have to be unconscious in it. You can actually begin to get interested in what's happening in it and begin to play with the dynamics in order to make them work out better. And I just think that's enormously, it's a very empowering message. It's been a very empowering message for me. And it's also been something I needed to hear, I guess, as someone who does have this ADHD struggle. I have a ADHD diagnosis that my kind of furious curiosity about all these things, which can have a jumping around quality that if I frame it in the curiosity about things become an interest in how to make those things more of a liberating practice, then having that problem in the first place is less of an issue. Do you see what I mean? So I think it's a kind of philosophy of practice that actually suits a lot of the contemporary world, because my issues with attention are issues that a lot of people share. I mean, I'm just sort of an extreme form of what we're all dealing with our technology with the kind of fracturing of attention span that's happening. So I think this is a way to un fracture it, to reseal that up, to work with where we're at. But in the working with where we're at, it's like you're slowly sealing out the whole landscape of your life to be more whole and more complete, more awesome. I want to signal to folks because we've had some incoming interest in ADHD. So at some point, we'll take a deep dive into that. But in the meantime, I just be curious to get you to describe more examples of practice. You talked about going to sleep, communication, by the way, while you were talking about going to sleep, you said a protection practice. What is that? And what are the other kinds of practices that you would recommend or that you might have personally explored? Yeah, okay, so this is a useful segue to one of the ways I'm trying to put all this into action right now. Is I start to conscious explorers club like ten years ago or something in Toronto. And that place was always a place of kind of like ecumenical exploration. Explore different practices. We got different teachers and experts to come in and we do all kinds of stuff there. And I'd always been interested in how to turn that into a podcast. So I've just done that and I spent a couple of years working out with my friend Tasha schumann, she also known as Tasha, the Amazon. She's a phenomenal practitioner and rapper. Hip hop artist. And so the whole idea of this podcast is to basically give you examples of what you're just asked. We get different people on from different walks of life. Often the many meditation teachers, but also movement teachers,.

Mister Daniel Gabrielle zuckerman Jeffrey Tom archipelago ADHD un Tasha schumann Toronto Tasha Amazon
"gabrielle zuckerman" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

02:33 min | 4 months ago

"gabrielle zuckerman" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Ready to let go for that final time, all the training in letting go of unclenching the fist of grasping. I think Steve Armstrong used that phrase, like unclenching that fist. We've practiced that a million times just sitting or in our life and then I imagine the end of our life is the kind of grand surrender of control of ownership and so I don't practice with it in a very explicit way of contemplating it very actively in a rigorous technique oriented way. But it's just everywhere in practice too. That's a pretty rousing send off here. I think you give all of us, especially those of us, which I have suspicion, it's most of us who haven't tasted what you've described. It's a good motivating sentiment to get us to keep putting our butts on the cushion. Before I let you go, can I get you to plug if you're comfortable any resources that you've put out into the world where people can learn more about you if not maybe even contact you? I have a website that just Matthew Brent silver dot org my full name dot org and that has recordings and links to Dharma seed and audio Dharma places where there are talks that are freely available. So people are welcome to that, of course. Thank you, Matthew. It's a pleasure to meet you. And thanks for coming on. Thanks so much. Yeah. Big thanks to Matthew Bren silver. Thank you as well to all the folks who work incredibly hard to make this show a reality. They include Samuel Johns, Gabrielle zuckerman, DJ Kashmir, Justine Davey, Kim baika, Maria wortel and Jen pont. We also get our audio engineering from the good folks over at ultraviolet audio. We'll see you all on Friday for a bonus guided meditation with Diana Winston. Here at 10% happier we value you our listeners and what you have to say, we'd love it if you could tell us a little bit more about who you are. You can do so by filling out a brief survey at 1° dot com slash survey that's wondery dot com slash survey. Do a solid. It's a part of our ongoing.

Steve Armstrong Matthew Brent Matthew Bren Samuel Johns Gabrielle zuckerman Justine Davey Kim baika Maria wortel Jen pont Diana Winston Matthew Kashmir
"gabrielle zuckerman" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

03:48 min | 4 months ago

"gabrielle zuckerman" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"The shift in the way I had it taught to me by a great teacher, her name is spring, wash them. I did a 9 day retreat with her, just kind of one on one. It was a great privilege. And instead of starting with sending good vibes to yourself, she starts with an easy person. And so she'll have you do days of just what I did too easy people my son and our cat and it was extremely easy to send good vibes to these two beings. And very enjoyable and there was a lot of concentration that got built up and a lot of physical sensations that go along with that, which could be a little narcotic, frankly. And as soon as you get the engine revved in that way, springs technique is to shove yourself in. And then it will get dry because we're hard. And then you go back to the easy person. And that was very, very helpful for me. I think I would need something like that. I mean, right before you said your cat, I was thinking, well, I would start with my dogs. You know, dogs, they're so easy to love. So maybe that's where I need to start. So maybe I'm salvageable on the loving kindness front. I believe you're salvageable on all fronts. And I would just close by saying that in terms of averting the apocalypse, mindfulness meditation, I'm Foursquare in your camp that that would be very helpful. I would just say that this kind of practice too can turbocharge the whole system because you're starting to bring in, first of all, having a kind of relationship to yourself changes changes the game and some pretty significant ways. And then that can allow you to bring in people who you've regarded as an enemy. And without condoning their behavior to start to see it start to see them in a more sympathetic light. Yeah, I used to be disdainful of the idea of self compassion, I guess, but I'm more and more come to see the wisdom of it. Yeah. I don't think self compassion. I think sometimes people say you need to love yourself before you can love other people. I think that's you can prove that not to be the case. We all know people who are very hard on themselves and are extremely kind and effective in the world. I do think it makes it much easier to be kind to other people if you are kinder to yourself. And the science around self compassion seems to be from what I can tell very convincing. And having road tested a lot of these techniques, both on the cushion and my sort of free range life. I am a deep believer. Yeah. More and more I am too. I'm always a step behind you. That is also demonstrably false. But before we go, can you please plug all of your offerings, your books, your podcasts, slash video blog, your newsletter? I'm glad to do that. The newsletter is called a nonzero newsletter. It's substack. The title comes from a book I wrote called nonzero, which I also wouldn't discourage you from checking out. The Buddhism book is somewhat obnoxiously titled why Buddhism is true. I mean, some people find it obnoxious, but it's not dogmatic in the way it sounds. I like to think. So the podcast is called the right show. I really appreciate the chance Dan to engage in crass south, even though the self doesn't exist. Exactly. Exactly. Bob, thank you for coming on, appreciate it. Thank you. Thank you. Thanks a lot. Thanks again to bob. And thanks, of course, to everybody who makes this show Samuel Johnson Gabrielle zuckerman DJ Kashmir Justin Davey Kim Baikal, Maria wortel and Jen pont, and we get our audio engineering from the good folks over at ultraviolet audio. See while on Friday for a very special bonus, we're gonna be dropping an entire episode of our newest 10% happier show. It's called childproof. It's incredibly good. The host yasmine Khan is amazing. So we'll see you all on Friday for that..

Gabrielle zuckerman Justin Davey Kim Baikal Maria wortel Jen pont Samuel Johnson Dan Bob bob yasmine Khan
"gabrielle zuckerman" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

05:49 min | 4 months ago

"gabrielle zuckerman" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Having a set of criteria that are decided on ahead of time and then looking to see if that candidate meets those criteria is one way to formally decrease the influence of bias on decision making. Every organization is going to be different, but a larger question for any organization to really ask itself is why is this important? What is our fundamental motivation for trying to achieve an unbiased workplace or an inclusive workplace? And what do we hope it will achieve? So there's a classic study by business professors Robin Ely and David Thomas. David Thomas is now the president of morehouse college. But he was a Harvard Business school professor along with Robin Ely when this classic study was published. And what they were interested in was understanding why some organizations functioned well in the context of diversity and some organizations did not function well. And they found that there were three different motivations or expectations for what diversity would achieve in an organization, one set of motivations was really about justice and equality and the idea was these teams were interested in pursuing diversity because they thought that it would help the organization live up to its ideals. There was another set of motivations that was really about business opportunities that it was important to have a diverse set of employees because it would open up new business avenues. And then there was a third set of motivations, which were about the fundamental functioning of the organization. And in these teams, they felt that diversity was important because it was essential to the future of the company. It was essential to the functioning of the company to have all of these different perspectives and have them integrated well and included. And the first two examples, the first two kinds of motivations about pursuing justice and equality and opening business opportunities did not function that well, actually, it was the teams where the motivation was about the fundamental functioning of the company, teams where they believed that it was important to include everyone's ideas and make sure that everyone felt safe and that people had influence because those ideas were essential to the company that those perspectives were essential to the future of the company when the leaders at that organization felt that diverse perspectives were essential to the functioning of the organization and that this was a source of wealth. This was actually a source of essential resource for the organization, the organization functioned in a better way. People were able to have disagreements and move beyond them, resolve conflict, learn from one another, sort of, all of the benefits of diversity were able to be realized. And it really had to do with the fundamental motivation. So I think that's something that's really important for organizations to ask themselves. What are we really trying to do here? And do we believe that all of these perspectives are fundamentally important? I think that's what organizations really have to start in order to make these changes. It's a fascinating point. And what it brings to mind for me and you'll tell me if this is an appropriate association is an article in The New York Times Magazine I read several years ago by Charles duhigg about mad dash, a long, frustrating internal research project at Google where they were trying to figure out what was the common denominator among the teams that functioned the best. And for a long time they couldn't figure it out until they arrived on an answer, which was something called psychological safety, which is the feeling within a team that everybody was willing and able to speak up. And so I, for years, was terrible at creating psychological safety and still struggled to do it. And seeing that was such an eye opener for me and really put it on my radar as something I need to continually strive to do. So anyway, with that came to mind for me as you were talking, does that make sense? Not only does it make sense, but psychological safety is actually the link between diversity and performance. So people talk a lot about the benefits of diversity that organizations are more creative and have better problem solving. That's not actually true necessarily because all of the power dynamics that exist in the real world can just be recreated in a workplace. But research does show that if everyone feels psychologically safe, if everyone feels they can learn from one another, they feel safe enough to learn from one another, then diversity becomes this huge resource that allows for better performance. This has been such a fascinating conversation. I want to congratulate you. I know that your book I've said this a couple times of just marveling at how much time you invested in producing this book ten years of research 6 years of writing on the book. I think you mentioned at one point off mic to me that you spent four months doing fact checking alone. It's a monumental achievement. It's such an important subject. So congratulations on finishing it and putting it out into the world and thanks for coming on the show. Thanks so much, Dan. Thanks again to Jessica. The show is made by Samuel Johns, Gabrielle zuckerman, DJ Kashmir, adjusting Davy bike Emma Maria mortel and Jen with audio engineering from our good friends over at ultraviolet audio will see you all on Wednesday with the aforementioned Robert Wright. Who's going to talk about some of his own attempts to challenge his own biases and tribal instincts. That's coming up on Wednesday..

Robin Ely David Thomas morehouse college Harvard Business school Charles duhigg The New York Times Magazine Google Samuel Johns Gabrielle zuckerman Emma Maria mortel Jessica Kashmir Dan Jen Robert Wright
"gabrielle zuckerman" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

05:05 min | 5 months ago

"gabrielle zuckerman" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"And I think when you could be of a service to someone else and you see the joy on their things and you see their mood change, you inadvertently will change your own mood and you will start to feel their self love start to rebuild your own self love because you're now on the same page. And so I do believe in the interpersonal community base of building up your self esteem. I mean, that statement I said about, I need you to love me a little bit louder. Doesn't just apply to me saying that to other people. I encourage other people to say it to me because when people say that, it's that active, please be in service to me right now because I need you. It's an ability to ask for help in a new way than saying I need help. It's a clearer way of saying, I need love right now. I actually need love right now. And I need love through different supportive avenues. And I know you can provide that for me. And so yeah, it's important. And again, there's evidence here. Being of service can remind you of what is great about yourself. It's rewarding in the brain as well. There's just a lot here. And it really points to something very, very deep, which is that the line between ourselves and the world is blurry and porous. So let me stay with new year's. We're heading into a new year. This is a time of year when people kind of make these resolutions. They're going to change something about myself. Maybe I'm going to reinvent myself whatever it is and I just wonder what your thoughts are around self love as it pertains to new year's and new year's resolutions. Well, you said at the beginning, I really am, I'm not a fan of resolution. And I think that sometimes this whole change myself can become very self destructive. I believe that a 100%. I do believe we all have the ability to grow to learn more and through growth and learning more through being capacity to ourselves. You inadvertently do find yourself becoming a better version of yourself, quote unquote. But I don't like this whole thing of like, I'm going to change this resolution is for me to change because then you start to get to this place of like hating who you are now as you are on that journey to where you want to be. You know, like fitness apps for me get on my nerves a lot of times because I'm like, you're telling someone to hate the body there in right now. And the body I'm in right now, I gotta fall in love with it because it's here. It's where I am. It doesn't mean that it's where I'm going to always be. But I have to fall in love with it now and appreciate where I am now so that as I am on that journey of growth and change, I can appreciate everybody along that growth. Instead of getting down on myself and saying, oh, you know what? The body I have right now, I hate because if you hate this body, you gonna hate the body you have in two weeks as well. And you're gonna hate the body you have in four weeks as well. And you're really gonna hate your body if you take a break from doing the work that you had set out to do. And I think, you know, you start adding this element of self, hey, the guilt, all these things that come with when you can't love where you're at now. And so I don't make resolutions. You know, I make I don't make any of those statements at all. What I do is I say things like in this new year, I'm going to trust myself more. I'm going to become more compassionate to myself. You know, I say a lot of those type of things. But I don't make resolutions. And I don't put a marker on goal setting because I think goal setting is a beautiful thing that you can do at any time of the year when you prepare when you make proper choices and when you know that you can ask for help. Resolution sometimes don't have the clarity of goal. And so you end up finding yourself not following through, you end up finding yourself not doing what it takes, not asking for help. So I would just recommend that people make more emotional goals for the new year versus telling yourself things like I hate where I am now. And I want to try to change it in 12 months. You know what I mean? One of the things not to be labor this, but I tell people, this is your journey. Design it how you want, walk it at the pace you want. Like, don't feel this pressure like 12 months. Things have to change. And if I get to that 12 month marker and I haven't, then I'm a failure. Because all you're doing is heading yourself up for not loving who you are and not loving your journey. Be more compassionate with yourself, be kind of to yourself. And love yourself a little bit more as you're on that journey and things will work out. I love you on queer eye and I love having you on this show. Thank you. Thank you, my friend, big fan of yours. Thanks again to karamo. Glad we got to rerun that. Thanks as well to the folks who work so hard to make this show. Samuel Johns, Gabrielle zuckerman, DJ cashmere Justine Devi Kim baika mama Maria were tell and gen poynt, and also the good folks over at ultraviolet audio who do our audio engineering. We'll see you all on Friday for a bonus meditation from Anushka Fernandez..

karamo Samuel Johns Gabrielle zuckerman Justine Devi Kim baika Maria Anushka Fernandez
"gabrielle zuckerman" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

08:21 min | 5 months ago

"gabrielle zuckerman" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Now fast flash forward to now in America. Shannon and I recently were speaking to a group of people in Kansas City, Missouri. Very divided. The town is very divided, but there's a group of people who are insistently getting together intentionally crossing party lines and crossing lines of economic lines and so on. To figure out what are the problems here in Kansas City, and how can we fix those, those are people who right now in America are emulating doing the same thing as their predecessors more than a hundred years ago and we know it worked a hundred years ago. That's where all these great things like the high schools came from. There's also a lesson here for a practical lesson here for people who are somewhat older. Remember, the last time it wasn't people in their 50s and 60s who were solving these problems. It was young people. So don't just give lip service to young people. Listen to what they're saying and let them be leaders. That's what it took last time. When I hear the term heart work, I mean, again, not the kind of term that I personally would use, but I think I know what you're pointing at. When I hear it, I think of it a very broad way capacious way and absolutely the things you're describing, getting involved locally and also getting to know people with whom you have differences and seeing what lies beneath the slogans, et cetera, et cetera. All would be included. But I would also include, and I think a lot of the listeners on the show would include things that might be labeled quote unquote spiritual sort of inner work. Is that something that the two of you also envisage yeah, I mean, for sure when you look at the social gospel movement, that was a movement of Christians challenging other Christians to look at the spiritual foundations of their faith. At the time they were living a highly individualistic form of spirituality, a spirituality only focused on what was in it for me in the life hereafter. And focusing on my personal sins and whether that was going to exempt me from heaven. And the social gospel was asking people to say, now, wait a minute. I don't think that's actually what the gospels are teaching. And what we need to look at is a spirituality that begins to focus us on one another. And that is really interesting in terms of it being a critique of spirituality coming within a spiritual community and directing it toward itself. Again, that's that moral indignation, directed inward. And I definitely think though there's also this interesting point, which of course dovetails with your work, Dan, which is that both the industrial revolution and the time that we're living in now were characterized by overwhelm by just like a complete like it was fascinating because it was my job to dig into the Gilded Age and into that era and to really paint a portrait of what life was like then and it was astonishing to me. The extent to which on just a day to day lived experience level, people described it very much the way that they would today. This relentless pressure to get ahead. Substance abuse was rampant. There was a real sense of consumerism. People were being bombarded all the time by advertising. When you look at the social commentary of the day, these are the things that people are decrying as problems, right? This relentless sense of agitation and activity and we can never keep up. That was what the industrial revolution brought to Americans who a generation before had been living these more rural existences that were much quieter. And much more centered. And now we had this sort of frenzy of the industrial revolution. I think that we experience a lot of that today, right? The frenzy of the digital age and the sense in which the individual is sort of lost in a system over which he has no control. And I do think that there was a real call in that time for a re centering on values. And when you get into a debate about values, of course, a lot of people might say, well, isn't that exactly what's causing our biggest cultural arguments? Is the question of morality and the questions of values well when you talk about morality in terms of abortion or those choppy surface level forms of morality that get talked about in the public square? Yes, those can be quite divisive, but if we get down to a deeper center underneath those choppy politicized versions of values, we actually find quite a bit of resonance. Across all forms of spirituality, right? And so there's a sense in which dropping down into something that is not defined by the noise of the day. But that's actually defined by a deeper sense of values. Puts us directly in touch with the morality that we are calling for, which is a morality of mutual obligation. It's not a morality of one particular religion. It is a morality of relationship. And that's really the hard work that we are talking about. And when it comes to racial reconciliation, how far are we willing to take that morality of relationship? Are we willing to just take it into a circle of moral concern that includes people who look like us or are we willing to take that into a much more universal sense of who is our neighbor? Who is our brother and who is the other in which we are engaging in relationship, particularly as that's expressed in a democracy. And so to me, that's what I see is necessary. I think we're so responsive to the noise and the choppiness on the surface of what we're experiencing our society that we lose. The depth of our values that are actually always there. They always have been there. And we're in a moment where we need to call ourselves back to that center. I'm sticking on the subject of spirituality, but I want to draw an analogy to the history that we've been talking about here, which was in the earlier period the period of the social gospel. What was crucial was not just religion, per se, but what kind of religion that is, was it an eye focused religion or a Wii focused religion? We made that clear in our historical account, I think. But now let's say the same thing about spirituality. Because I think there are two kinds I'm simplifying here, but there are two kinds of spirituality too. There's this kind of spirituality that media is self focused. I'm spiritual and I want to be in touch with the larger universe or however one would describe that spirituality. And then there's a spirituality, which is we focused, which is focused on connections with other people. And so just as we would warn about not all religions alike and you can have an eye focused religion or we focused religion, but I think that it's important to not just say spirituality and leave it at that, but to say, right, spirituality focused, we focused. Community focus, connection focused spirituality. And one fascinating thing to point to is what was Tom Wolfe describing in his famous article, the me decade that came about in the 1970s, right? He was focusing actually on this form of spirituality. It's a really interesting artifact, this moment when the Wii turns to the eye in our IOI curve, Tom Wolfe writes this essay detailing this movement and spirituality toward an eye centric form of spirituality. And we are living in a deeper form of that today. And so the question is, how do we take that movement of looking inward, but use it to help us find an expression in the outward? In our relationships with one another. I think that's a beautiful place to leave it. This was absolutely fascinating and I thank you both. Thanks, Stan. It was a lot of fun for us too. Thank you. Yeah. In honor to be on this podcast, you've had some really fascinating people and you're doing awesome incredible work. So thank you for the opportunity. It was great. Thanks again to my guests fascinating conversation. Thanks as well to the people who work incredibly hard to make this show happen. Samuel Johns, Gabrielle zuckerman, DJ cashmere, Justine Devi Kim baika mama Maria were tell and gen point and also the good folks over at ultraviolet audio who do our audio engineering..

Kansas City America Shannon Missouri Dan Tom Wolfe Stan Samuel Johns Gabrielle zuckerman Justine Devi Kim baika Maria
"gabrielle zuckerman" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

02:16 min | 6 months ago

"gabrielle zuckerman" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Just as many changes. And mostly, those changes have been good. We get lost less often. Technology is making our lives better, but there are traps for each one. So it's great that we have so many shows we can stream, but the fact that the next episode starts automatically is potentially a trap if you don't have the self control to turn it off. Can we close by can I just nudge you to plug your book and anything else that you've got going on? Well, the book is called nudge the final edition and it's about two thirds new rewritten from cover to cover. And we hope people enjoy it because we wanted it to make it fun. Well, it's fun to talk to you and I appreciate your time. Thank you. And congratulations on the newish book. Thank you very much. It's been a pleasure. Thanks again to Richard, and thanks as well to the folks who work so hard to make this show a reality, two and a half times a week. They include Samuel Johns, Gabrielle zuckerman, DJ Kashmir, Justine Devi, Kim Baikal, Maria were tell and Jen poynt. We get audio engineering from our Friends over at ultraviolet audio. We will see you all on Wednesday for an unusually powerful episode, which includes both just an extraordinary personal story and some incredibly practical advice about how to be stronger. That's coming up on Wednesday. Also, I just want to give you a heads up about something special that's coming on Friday, as you know, we do bonus episodes on Friday. And this week we have a really special bonus. We're gonna be dropping a full episode of a new podcast that you may have heard me talk about. It's called 20% happier and it's hosted by my friend and colleague Matthew Hepburn. And in this episode, you're going to hear Matthew work with a meditation student. It's a kind of mindful eavesdropping where you get to hear Matthew work one on one with a student, and the issue of this student has is one that I think will be familiar to many of us. It's about striking the balance between ambition and peace of mind or calm or happiness. So can you be ambitious and happy simultaneously? You're gonna hear Matthew and his guest explore that coming up on Friday..

Samuel Johns Gabrielle zuckerman Justine Devi Kim Baikal Jen poynt Kashmir Matthew Hepburn Richard Maria Matthew
"gabrielle zuckerman" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

01:39 min | 7 months ago

"gabrielle zuckerman" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Your people and unjust world. It's available wherever books are sold. And most of my work right now is doing stuff like this. And teaching from that book and spending a lot of time taking care of my kid. So not doing a whole lot of public teaching now, but I am hoping to do a longer course around the cultivation of radical friendship, starting probably in the new year. So I'm thinking something like something between like a book club and like a lab. If people can experiment with practices from the book in their own lives, come back, reflective of the people who are also practicing in that way. So if you're interested in something like that or just knowing what I'm up to, you can check out my website and sign up for my mailing list. And that's where I usually let people know what's coming next. Kate, thanks very much for coming on. Appreciate it. Thank you for having me. Thank you for all. Thanks to Kate. I should say to practice cultivating radical friendship, you can check out the related meditations for this podcast episode in the 10% happier app. If you're listening to this podcast in the app already, just scroll down to the related section of this episode to play the meditations on friendship from 7 day Selassie or J sofer and Joseph Goldstein. If you're not already a subscriber, download the 10% happier app wherever you get your apps and then click on the podcasts, tab, to get started. The show is made by Samuel Johns, Gabrielle zuckerman, DJ Kashmir, Justine Devi, Kim baika, Maria wortel, and Jen, poignant, with audio engineering from our Friends over at ultraviolet audio. We'll see you all on Friday for a bonus meditation from Anushka Fernandez..

Kate J sofer Joseph Goldstein Selassie Samuel Johns Gabrielle zuckerman Justine Devi Kim baika Maria wortel Kashmir Jen Anushka Fernandez
"gabrielle zuckerman" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

03:23 min | 8 months ago

"gabrielle zuckerman" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Or so And we'll be we'll be looking for healthy normals for our trials because we're doing basic research so you know. The government maintains a list I forget where it is. But there's a website of all clinical trials And you can search it by drug or condition and and you can simply apply And i've met many people who've managed to find their way into one of the legal trials and that that would be the safest way to approach it. It's not necessary to have a guide. People have good experiences without one. But i think that Gonna be using a high dose Again the lessons of the native americans and other indigenous cultures are there should always be an elder involved. Someone who knows the territory You shouldn't do it alone You should do it with a clear sense of intention and this'll sound weird but it should be surrounded by ritual People who use drugs of all kinds in a ritual way and this goes for alcohol as opposed to a want and way Tend not to get in trouble with them. the rituals themselves are protective. I mean you know like our our social rituals around drinking that you you don't you don't drink alone you drink in the evening with other people with food all these kinds of things. Have you know. Culture has its own rules and those rules often are the result of trial and error and can be very protective. So i think you know paying attention to those lessons and that's The the lessons from indigenous peoples on how to safely use these drugs because they've been added a lot longer than we have michael's. I hope you're doing amazing work. You've had an impact positive impact on many many people including your current interlocutor. So thank you for taking the time to come on the show. Dan was my pleasure to be here. Thank you we do have one last order of business before we let you go here. And it's a little invitation to participate in this show. We hear on the ten percent happier. Podcast are very busy preparing a series of episodes that will be posting in the coming weeks about how to navigate one of the most complex and dominant forces in many of our lives work. Many of us spend more time with our colleagues than our family and yet sometimes we forget to treat these relationships with any level of intentionally add into the mix the changing nature of work at will employment remote work the gig economy and you have a recipe for frustration burnout and more so in this series of podcast episodes were and explore how to better handle your co workers to boost your resilience in the face of What can sometimes seem like a sisyphean a mountain of work and how to cultivate skills to handle the combination of these two dynamics. We don't want to do these shows without your participation however so were right now officially inviting you to send us some questions so that we can learn more about what kinds of challenges. You're facing so that we can better craft these episodes to help you out. And we'd like to hear your questions via voice memos so that we can play the questions right here on the show for our experts to submit a question. Just follow the five easy steps that are listed in the show notes and yeah thanks encourage you to participate. Thanks to michael really enjoyed that. This show is made by samuel. John's gabrielle's zuckerman dj kashmir justin.

michael Dan samuel gabrielle John kashmir justin
"gabrielle zuckerman" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

03:11 min | 9 months ago

"gabrielle zuckerman" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Terms of the basics of language they can pretty much structure sentences perfectly grammatically. Well the old saying Wrong the past tense wrong things like that and show they acquire much bigger vocabulary during the rest of the childhood and teenage years and they can learn how to structure much more complex sentences. Tell much more complicated stories if not basic understanding of the principles of grammar and how to converse with people is in a pretty much adult level by the age of five at the age of five is still got another twenty years of learning how to cope with this impossibly. Complicated sexual will in which you have to live annetta professor dunbar. Before i let you go can you please plug your latest book and any other books and places on the on the internet where we can find you and learning more about you. Oh well my first book. It's a lot of people still like actually is grooming gossip evolution of language which is published heavens twenty-five years ago lest another world away. That was kind of fun to do. It's still widely available at other kind of later worn on the science of love which was published probably about two thousand fourteen. Something like that but the one. That's just come out. Which kind of puts all of this stuff together and dictate research over the last twenty five years really and tries to put it all together in one place and show how. It's all interconnected. It's the book that's just come out In in in europe anyway called friends understanding the power of our most important relationships. It's due to be published in the us in january. I believe by dental brown. But i show you can buy digital versions of it in in in all good digital shops close to you in the meantime professor. It's been a pleasure to get to know you a little bit into here here. Becher your work. Thank you for coming on. Thank you for having me on. It's been great fun. Thank you robin dunbar. Great conversation before we head out. Let me just mention again. The ted lasso challenge it starts on tuesday. September seventh over on the ten percent. Happier app just downloaded the app. That is wherever you get your apps and the way of course get ready as Checkout season two of which is airing right now. This show is made by samuel john's gabrielle. Zuckerman dj kashmir justin davey. Maria were tell. Jen poignant with audio engineering from ultraviolet audio special shoutout to kim bukamal. Who's no longer with us but did a great job in her brief tenure here on the t. p. h. Podcast and i should say she is the one who brought a rub and dunbar to our attention so big. Thank you to kim and as always a shout up to ryan kesler and josh callaghan from. Abc news. we'll see well on wednesday with medusa akinola who's gonna talk about optimizing stress shoes. It incredible professor from columbia university. She's been on the show before and she's got a lot to say especially about stress during the pandemic and stress. That might come up when you're talking about diversity issues. That's on wednesday..

annetta professor dunbar robin dunbar ted lasso samuel john Becher justin davey kim bukamal europe Zuckerman josh callaghan kashmir gabrielle medusa akinola Jen Maria us ryan kesler dunbar Abc news