4 Burst results for "Gabriela Mira"

"gabriela mira" Discussed on Drugs and Stuff

Drugs and Stuff

05:45 min | 6 months ago

"gabriela mira" Discussed on Drugs and Stuff

"Welcome to drugs and stuff a podcast from the drug. Policy. Alliance. Hello and welcome to drugs and stuff. I'm your host Gabriela Mira's. Back in April our colleague Mary Silla joins us to talk about imprisonment and public health in the age of covid nineteen. As, we continue the fight for D car Sarrazin. Today we welcome carry blake injure to share her story. At the start of this year Kerry joined the Marshall. Project as their first formerly incarcerated reporter. She has written for years exposing abuses in the criminal justice system while also reflecting on her own firsthand experience within it. Today she is joined by my colleague Bats Sutton DP as director of media relations who also has firsthand experience of the system to talk about her personal story, how it affects her reporting and what needs to change spoiler alert a lot needs to change. Hang? Kerry. Thank you so much for joining us today undressing stuff. Well, thanks for having me. Really excited to talk with you today. I'm a big fan of your work at the Houston Chronicle and really excited that you're at the Marshall. Project now. CONGRATS on that. Thank you. It's been great. You know I feel like we have a lot in common aside from the L. A. Texan We've both been through the criminal justice system for drug charges. Oath had dogs that somewhat saved us are so touched to read that. And now you're trying to communicate these injustices to the public. This is obviously giving you a very unique perspective on the challenges that incarcerated people face and more specifically the limitations of being able to deal with a crisis of the nature that we have going on right now when confined to gentler present. How has your personal experience provided you with a unique perspective and covering these issues you know I I always hate this question I always have a hard time with this one because I feel like it's one of those things that like. You you. You know how it helps you if it helps you but if you haven't been through it, right it's a little harder to sort of explain to people how this Comes to bear in my daily work I. Mean I think generally they're sort of the thing you might suspect like I sort of know what to look for I have an idea of of. What is possible in this world and when I mean in this world meaning of like the prisons and jails that I cover, you know I think a lot of times people who haven't done time you know might hear a story and think this is ridiculous..

Kerry Marshall Gabriela Mira Mary Silla Houston Chronicle director of media relations blake Bats Sutton reporter
"gabriela mira" Discussed on Drugs and Stuff

Drugs and Stuff

15:12 min | 10 months ago

"gabriela mira" Discussed on Drugs and Stuff

"I'm your host Gabriela Mira's now over the past few weeks we've been sharing. Episodes centered around. How the covy? Nineteen pandemic has affected drug policy. And the work that we do today. We're taking a little bit of a lighthearted turn and introducing a new series on drugs and stuff that we're calling puff or pass now since we're all working from home these days we're also watching a little more. Tv movies playing more video games than usual and sometimes drug show up in what we're watching and that's what puffer passes all about how drugs and drug use are portrayed in pop culture for better or worse we watch an analyze for your entertainment and education kicking the series offer us as DPA's current intern. Brian Hackel at an episode of the simpsons season. Thirty one episode seventeen. You don't need to be a simpsons fan to appreciate this episode. Keep listening to see what I mean. Guys.

Gabriela Mira simpsons DPA Brian Hackel intern
"gabriela mira" Discussed on Drugs and Stuff

Drugs and Stuff

11:41 min | 10 months ago

"gabriela mira" Discussed on Drugs and Stuff

"From the drug policy alliance. Hello everyone and thanks for tuning into drugs and stuff. I'm your host Gabriela Mira's today we're continuing our series of content focused on responses to the covert nineteen pandemic but keeping things a little more personal this time. We wanted to take a moment to share with our listeners. What this time has meant for DP specifically beyond the fact that all of us are now working from home and yes. I'm recording this from my bedroom. Right now how is it affecting the essential work that we do? So I asked Cassandra Frederique DP as Managing Director of policy advocacy and campaigns. To come back onto the podcast and break that down for us. Let's listen in all right. So I'm here with Sandra Frederique. Who IS DP as Managing Director of Policy Advocacy and campaigns? And CASSANDRA. I just wanted to ask you. I mean obviously we're in a really challenging moment right now worldwide But you know DP A as an organization has also never faced anything quite like this and I was wondering if you could say a little bit. About how deep is responding to this? Covert nineteen pandemic and what about? Our work is staying the same. And what about it has had to change? And what does that mean for future of GPA? I think this is an incredible moment. Just vast mess in. Its pervasiveness This moment where so many things are being elevated excavated in society were seeing the role of racing costs and access Play out in such dramatic way. It is very difficult to wrap your head your mind around the different ways people are being impacted and I think that's the case for us here at drug policy lines as well. I mean personally you know. Our whole operation has moved remote When not seeing each other I think some departments are having to adjust in different ways. You know there's a large portion of our staff whose I'm job is going to state legislatures and meeting with people and Seeing people face to face. And you know we're all having to figure out how can use technology to continue to push You know right now like on a bread like should we do or car. Protests in front of the governor's Office on because everyone's social distancing but New York City where no one has a car was like. Well you know I like me. I'm like I can't do a car. Pro can't even drive so you know there's a lot of that happening But to our programmatic work you know one of the things that we discovered pretty quickly as that. Armand's in our ass are very much a similar. If not just bigger right and so I think for us. We have always been organism that has focused on Carso region on one of the first organizations focusing on getting rid of mandatory minimums and saying that people who are involved should not be in the criminal legal system. I think in the moment of Kobe. That ask is being elevated. Everyone is talking about decarbonisation. I'm an ambitious something that we have for For a while he look at work that we've done around thirty six if you look at the in California or the work that we've done in New York around getting rid of the mandatory amendments for Rockefeller drug laws the push for US consistently to get off accusers to define acid shoo. I'm drug charges in the work that we've done drug policy action worked with allies around An Election Oregon and in Albany and ethica on in New York City. You know we've been pushing this conversation. Not No drugs should not be dealt with in the criminal legal system jails and presents are an inappropriate place for people who are drug them up and and you know I think this moment rightfully is calling question of jails and prisons are inappropriate place period right. I'm GonNa Parts Important and our work has always focused on the fact that people shouldn't be incarcerated for what they put in their bodies right and more recently through the publishing of our report about rethinking the drug seller. You know it's also recognizing that people who sell drugs are a part of the system around your prohibition and if we got rid of prohibition would we be at people who deal drugs in the same way and really calling to question in our movement the arbitrary lines between sellers and users and like how the actually come up with a set of demands has actually more responsible reflective of the moment of the system drug prohibition that were navigating the conversation. We were already having eight when we publish the report in December. A now here in code. Nineteen recognizing very quickly that that's mine is a lot shorter where it was like. No people who saw any drugs should not be in jail here. Yeah and that is the work that we were coming to an an arguably different parts of our organization have been but I think more Organizationally incomprehensively. Baddies the thing that people dug involved should not be incarcerated and they need to get out And so we've done that. The car situation where moving towards criminalization really focusing on declining to prosecute decriminalizing marijuana pushing for the conversation around decriminalizing drug possession and low level drug sales. You know we are part of the coalition of people in Oregon during an exciting ballot initiative. That should he point. Oregon voters in November around equalizing drugs literally prosecutors across the country are saying we're not going to We're GONNA declined to prosecute drugs. We want a law enforcement to not arrest people for drugs. We already had about initiative there. There are multiple states that we're talking to right now for criminalization of drug legislation. We went to Portugal two years ago. Or actually it's three years ago to do a study trip on Portugal. We are having the conversations we are talking to folks on. We are in conversation around Doing hydromorphone mortar phone Trials in different parts of the state. I'm having study groups. Around regulation and save supply. Are All things that we were? We were doing I can cope with nineteen creates a the urgency for us to get to ask I. We are in the middle of pandemic the people that we work with and the people that we are. We have never had the luxury of slow-stepping reform in pushing but we need to recognize that. This moment requires a different level of urgency. And so the things that we have asked for were asking for again and we're asking with more people and I think that's what's different about this moment. Is that more? People are recognizing that we don't have time to waste. We don't have the time for perfection. We have the time for now. I think that is a lot of what we're seeing where we're signing onto different sign on letters public health ones criminal. Justice Wants User Union recovery. One really get heart community here. Supporting our allies harm reduction coalition a vital strategies and And Slovenia Harm Reduction Conference to really push forward the kind of health infrastructure. That is folks. Need you know one of the things that we also Padova. Work is bringing dignity where elevating the dignity of the people in our community. And I think that you know as people talk rightfully about the healthcare workers that are risking their lives right now fighting on the forefront of the pandemic in hospitals. I think people also are recognizing that there are health care workers that are not called healthcare workers. Those are homeless outreach. Folks right around the syringe exchange those the people that run the Methadone clinics the doctors that provide super nothing. Our movement has a shadow healthcare system. We are another healthcare system that complement in supplements the current healthcare system that we have because our current healthcare system doesn't recognize our folks People who use drugs starkly are not being respected in hospitals and medical clinics and so they're getting their primary care asteroids exchanges. They're getting primary care at the homeless shelter. They're getting their primary. Catch the maximum credit because these are Bekker's Healthcare Fox unity and I think in this moment as people recognized in this crisis which is laying out the different Structural inequities and lame balances where people are realizing homeless. People can't social distance people in jails prisons and detention centers can't social distance. You know we're having this fight in Pennsylvania where they closed the liquor stores and people are saying alcohol withdrawal. Actually the is one of the only withdraw that people can die from. And that's why supervise and we actually do have to keep the alcohol stores open as a matter of public safety and a matter of public health. Right these are all the things that are being elevated to this moment because they have to take our people into account right. Because everyone's trying to flatten the curve and can't flatten the curve without flattening the curve inside of jails prisons and detention centers. You can't flatten the curve. You can't add and ask people to social distance if people are homeless right And there are many drug laws that make it very impossible for people to get. Housing can't Social distance if people are congregating to use drugs or to Because they don't have syringes and so they're sharing syringes which create which exacerbates endemic within a pandemic around each IBM aides or on the overdose crisis there so many things that our community our community health and dignity and respect is integral to us being able to flatten the curve to be able to manage nineteen. These are the ask that we have always had right. These are the demand that we have always had and I think Kobe. Nineteen gives us the ability and the urgency but also the courage the okay for the relentless determined unapologetic advocacy of the idea. That this is not you know we have always these issues like indefinite people do not believe it until it was about like that guy and this is my hyperbole at this is actually the situation everybody is realizing bill and so you know we're most of DPA's employees are in New York City to be exact right so we are literally in the epicenter of Cova maintain as a national organization fighting for the health and dignity of our community. And you know it does.

New York City Kobe Cassandra Frederique Oregon Portugal Sandra Frederique Managing Director of Policy Ad Managing Director of policy drug possession Gabriela Mira DPA California Padova US Carso Armand Albany
"gabriela mira" Discussed on Drugs and Stuff

Drugs and Stuff

05:21 min | 1 year ago

"gabriela mira" Discussed on Drugs and Stuff

"Mm-hmm. Welcome to drugs and style a podcast from the drug policy alliance. Blue and welcome to another episode of jugs and stuff the podcast from drug policy alliance. My name's Gabriela Mira's, I'm the manager of multimedia design here at DPA, and I'm so excited to welcome my colleague, Dr Sheila Ikaria Sheila is a researcher at the office of academic engagement here at DP. A and she has such an interesting background. She started as social worker and moved into academia and finally ended up here at DP. A and she's an incredible asset to the organization. Thank you so much Sheila for taking the time to speak with me today. I'm happy to be here. Thank you. Great. So Sheila, you have a really interesting background kind of the road that you took to get here. So I'm just going to dive right in and ask, you know. How did you end up in your current role at DP like what's the road that got you here? Wow. Well, that's a big question. I feel like in. No way was it a straight path or one that I could have envisioned or imagined for myself. I feel like when I look back and try to leave a cohesive narrative to really understand how I got here. I I sometimes have to stop and reflect and think about what was going through my head when I made that decision because actually my background is in clinical practice. So when I was growing up, I thought I was going to be therapist. And so in thinking that believing that seem natural to me to choose a bachelor's degree in clinical and social psychology and to dig deep into these different theories of human behavior to learn different clinical counseling skills because that really just felt like where I wanted to be. I wanted to help people wanted help people solve problems, and I wanted to build relationships with people, and so clinical psychology seemed like the best fit. I had lots of internships over. For the summers. When I was in college at different clinical placements, I had his summer internship in London at the detox at the Florence Nightingale hospital, which I was really formative for me because I think it was really my first exposure to working with people who use drugs and people who are trying to figure out how to live lives without drugs. And prior to that, I really hadn't had much personal personal exposure to drug use let alone perhaps problematic or chaotic drug user addiction. And I felt like it really opened my eyes. I and so many different kinds of people received services that detox all different walks of life, all different kinds of experiences, and here they all were receiving treatment together. And although it was a really interesting experience. I still hadn't even after that experience necessarily decided which population I wanted to work with clinically. But it definitely was one of those things that stuck with me. And then it was time to go to grad. The school because unfortunately, at least in the US, you can't really do much counselling or clinical work with a bachelor's degree. And it was then when I heard of social programs that I realized that a lot of my internships, actually were with social workers MSW's people who were doing the clinical work, I was interested in, but who are also committed to addressing social Justice issues who understood the role of race class gender structural oppression and various other systems, and it seemed like social work was the way to go. And so I got my MSW and again funny enough my second year, internship, ended up being in drug and alcohol treatment setting where I was working in an outpatient modality and folks were coming in for treatment. And I was there to do a Susman's in groups and again very much in the clinical work. And then realizing, you know, why it maybe maybe working in the field of addiction is actually something that I'm actually really interested in maybe these are my people, and I did that. But the challenge of working in that setting for me was that I was realizing that most of my clients were mandated to treatment and being mandated to treatment and meant that they were often choosing treatment over jail, and or often choosing treatment over having a lose their kids or choosing treatment because it was a way to get access to the social services that they needed, and I realized that that wasn't really choosing treatment at all. And that people aren't really being given choices and that I was complicit in systems that we're using treatment as as a means for control and part of how we were also providing treatment was really grounded in twelve step orientation, and there's nothing wrong with twelve steps. And a and a However I felt like that was the only tool in our toolbox for teaching people how to think about their drug use and their experiences, and I really struggled with being provider who was telling people they had a disease and that the only way to address their disease was through. Rendering and accepting their powerlessness and going to meetings, and that they could never use any substances ever again. And I was really getting disenchanted,

Dr Sheila Ikaria Sheila DPA Gabriela Mira researcher US Florence Nightingale hospital Susman London