22 Burst results for "Gabe Howard"

"gabe howard" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

02:09 min | 3 weeks ago

"gabe howard" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"You'll find it for larger donations. We also have a fiscal sponsor that we work with and we are registered as a five. Oh one c. Three well we at seic central love working with you. Were very glad for this partnership. Thank you so much for sending it up. Thank you so much for all that you do. Where can folks find you on the internet. First of all thank you thank you thank you thank you. I'm so deeply appreciative of having this space to talk about what we do. And thank you for inviting me on here so we have a big presence on instagram. You can find us at. This is the archaic beauty at. This is the archaic puty. I also have my personal page which people can come on and have a look at. It's sometimes it's silly things or fun things but it's usually happy things that don't really get into anything too heavy there but it's at will not diarkes. We also have a small but growing facebook. Group can just google dr k. beauty facebook group. And you'll find us there and join us there. We're going to be doing that out as well. I also understand that. Just recently you got on clubhouse yes. I've been on clubhouse since before it blew up. I've been on since last august but we recently launched our own dark beauty club on clubhouse where we host rooms and sessions which have been really powerful. I encourage folks that are interested in what we're doing to also follow us on clubhouse type in dr k. Beauty and you'll find us and we hope you join the interesting and empowering conversations that we're having on their wilma. Thank you so much for being here in a huge. Thank you to all of our listeners. As well wherever you downloaded the podcast follower subscribe to the show. It's absolutely free. Also review the show. Tell other people why you listen so that they can listen to. My name is gabe howard and i'm the author of mental illnesses and astle and other observations as well as a nationally recognized public speaker. Wouldn't it be awesome to have me your next event..

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New book tells story of 6 brothers with schizophrenia

The Psych Central Show

08:31 min | 10 months ago

New book tells story of 6 brothers with schizophrenia

"Your host Gabe Howard and calling into our show today we have Robert. Caulker Robert is the author of Hidden Valley Road which was an instant number one New York Times Bestseller and Oprah's Book Club Selection He is a national magazine awards finalist who's journalism has appeared in wired and the new. York Times. Magazine. Bob Welcome to the show. Hi Gabe I'm really glad to talk to you today. Your book is non-fiction. It's a true story. I'm GonNa read from Amazon Right now description the heart rendering story of a mid century American family with twelve children. Six of them diagnosed with schizophrenia became sciences greatest hope in the quest to understand the disease. Let's talk first about how you did the research for this book, you met the Galvin family. That's right. My career really took shape at New York magazine where I've written dozens of cover stories and feature stories about everyday people going through extraordinary situations and I really am drawn to these stories of people who manage crises come through difficulties I find it inspiring and I'm always looking for a deeper issue running at the bottom of her in. So when I met the Galvin family I was amazed, this is a family that's been through so much. Misfortune and also so many challenges and so much scientific mystery medical mystery I I met the two sisters they're the youngest in the family there were twelve children they're the only girls and they now are in their fifties. But when they were children, six of their ten brothers had been diagnosed with schizophrenia. The family immediately became interesting to scientists and researchers were trying to get to the the genetic roots of the disease. But before that happened, there was tremendous amount of denial, a lot of stigma that forced the family into the shadows, and so it became clear that by telling their story, maybe we could inspire the general public to sort of remove some of that stigma from mental illness particularly acute mental illness like schizophrenia, which so many people still have difficulty talking about and to anchor this in time they were diagnosed in the seventies. I'm horribly bad at math, but they were diagnosed fifty years ago. So there was even more stigma more discrimination less understanding. It was harder to get diagnosed absolutely and also more of a reason to hide because so many people in the establishment were blaming the families themselves for the mental illness blaming bad parenting in particular, blaming bad mothering, and then of course, the medical treatments, the pharmaceutical treatments were blunter and more extreme back then and they were just coming out of the period of lobotomies in shock therapy insulin coma therapy is all sorts of drastic treatments which are now. So questionable now the parents are dotted Mimi, Galvin their mom and dad did mom and. Dad Have Schizophrenia or any mental illness or was it just their children dated not have schizophrenia neither did anyone in their immediate families and I think part of the mystery of this book is how does schizophrenia get inherited because we now are certain that there is a genetic component to schizophrenia, but we don't know exactly how it is inherited. It's not parent to child it's not recessive. It's not like you need to people with schizophrenia to produce a child schizophrenia it Kinda wanders it meanders through families in a very tricky way and there was a lot of hope pinned on this family that they would help shed a little light on that mystery as well. What were some of the most surprising things that you learned about mental illness and will really schizophrenia from your time interviewing the Galvin's I was surprised by almost everything. But my biggest surprises were that to my understanding of mental illness was that it was about brain chemistry and that great pharmaceutical drugs were coming online that through trial and error and a lot of work. Perhaps, we'll be able to correct your brain chemistry problem and then whatever you had whether it was anxiety or depression. Or bipolar disorder that it would be corrected and that you would become essentially cured although cured is the wrong kind of word for like remission or recovery. Right what I learned was that schizophrenia this isn't really true at all that the drugs that they have the antipsychotic drugs that are very popular that are prescribed so much for schizophrenia, they are basically the same drugs that have been prescribed for fifty years. They may have different names derived from the same classifications of typical neuroleptics or. Narrow left ix and that these drugs are essentially symptoms suppressors. Help a person control their hallucinations or delusions or it might make a patient less erotic and more manageable as a patient in a healthcare setting but it doesn't turn back the clock. It doesn't necessarily add functionality. They really are just sort of good enough in terms of controlling the population but not really the miracles that we look at when we talk about antidepressants for instance, and that was a huge surprise it sounds like that. You didn't know a lot about schizophrenia before you started working on this book. Is that true? That's right. I mean I knew enough to know that it didn't mean split personality multiple. Personality which is. Like the big misnomer that because of the way we use the words get. So there's a Latin root skits which refers to split, but really it was meant to mean a split between reality and one's perception of reality a person with schizophrenia tends to wall themselves off from what is commonly accepted as reality I a little bit and then a lot and sometimes that means delusion. Sometimes that means to lose the nations and sometimes it means being catatonic sometimes, it means being paranoid and in fact, that was the other huge surprise for me for schizophrenia, which was that it isn't really a disease at all it is a classification. Syndrome. It's a collection of symptoms that we have given a name. And I don't mean to sound too nebulous or mystical and talking about There is such a thing as schizophrenia. It's just that it may be several different things in that forty years from now, we might have removed the word schizophrenia from our lexicon and we might have decided that it's really six different brain disorders with sixty screen types of symptoms, and we have found ways to treat those six different conditions differently that was another huge surprise to me. When doing your research for the book? Obviously, you spoke to the family. Did you also speak with medical doctors and schizophrenia researchers and people in the medical field? Yes. Absolutely. My initial conversations were with the family themselves who after many years of difficulty were ready to come forward and talk about everything that happened to their family in a very deep and profound way. But of course, in the back of my mind I was thinking well, how specialists this family for all I know there might be thousand families with lots of kids where half of them have schizophrenia this, this might happen all the time. So I didn't immediate round of checking talking. To major figures in scholarship of schizophrenia in the history of science, but also the treatment of schizophrenia and just to say, have you heard of this family? What would you say if I told you a family late this existed how typical do you think it is? Do you know the doctors who have treated the? Stanley because I knew their names as well are those doctors on the level? Are they quacks and everything really checked out? This is a family that is definitely unusual extraordinarily. So in terms of the numbers, they were important family to study for their time and they did help move the ball forward in a genuinely valid way an. Way So. There's a lot of hope in this story as well. Are there many families that have that many children with half of them being diagnosed with really any severe and persistent mental illness or or even just. This is a a big question that I pursue in the book itself because Linda Lee, one of the researchers who studied this family was actually a collector of genetic material of what she called multi plex families, which is families with more than one perhaps many instances six mental illness, not just among siblings but maybe parents and aunts and uncles and grandparents she made it her job in the nineteen eighties. Nineties was to collect data on as many. Multiplex families as possible. So they're out there but even in that World Galvin families extreme it's it's hard for anyone to think of any other family with twelve children where six of them had this diagnosis

Schizophrenia Galvin Family Galvin Gabe Howard Caulker Robert New York Magazine York Times World Galvin Bob Welcome New York Times Bestseller Robert Oprah Amazon Linda Lee Mimi Stanley
Does Law Enforcement Need Mental Health Care?

The Psych Central Show

04:19 min | 11 months ago

Does Law Enforcement Need Mental Health Care?

"Gabe Howard calling into the show today we have Gabriel Nathan. Gabriel is the executive director of eighty-seven recovery. Diaries and they produced a film series called beneath the vest first responder mental health and features police officers, EMS personnel, dispatchers, fire service all individuals talking about trauma and complex PTSD Gabriel. Welcome to the show I. Thanks for having me. It's great to be here. Gabriel. Today we're going to be talking about law enforcement reform and I know that you have a lot of thoughts on the subject first of all before I really get into the. Weeds of the question would I have found is whenever you are taking a position that is critical in any way of law enforcement or attempts to raise questions even about the way law enforcement agencies do anything. It is extremely important to establish your own bona fide because anybody who steps up to challenge law enforcement is immediately regarded with suspicion. Paranoia is dismissed as a quote Lib tarred Troll anti-cop Antifa, whatever I'm none of those things I am someone who for the last twenty years has been an advocate for slain police officers and their families through editorials commentaries in newspapers I've attended over ten police funerals in Philadelphia, down to Maryland. I have done a lot of advocacy work for law enforcement in regard to mental health of first responders. I'm very well aware of the suicide rate for police officers. I am someone who knows law enforcement culture. I am someone who has a respect for police officers and what they do, and so I just want people to know that I am doing this from a place of love and concern and from a position of someone who believes ardently that they're absolutely needs to be changed and radical reimagining of law enforcement across the board. Thank you Gabriel for say and all that, and I agree with many of your points and I wanna point out that you were a recent guest on another podcast I have the pleasure of hosting not crazy and you had so much to say, well it it's built over into a second podcast. I strongly encourage all of our listeners to head over to central dot com slash not crazy and check out that interview. Alright. Gabriel to get started. You believe that in many ways we're recruiting the wrong people and that a lot of our problems start early even before police officers get into the academy. Yes. Look at the people who go into law enforcement. Okay. A lot of people decide they WANNA be cops when their children, they're watching shows like cops they're watching shows like law and order they're watching the weapon movies even as far as Hill Street Blues I would say that this problem started with Hillstreet Blues, the opening credits of Hillstreet Blues. I, love the music and then the garage door opens and the Plymouth fury is in the garage with red lights bursting out of the graduates exciting, right so who is drawn to that Profession Action Junkies? It's people who want that adrenaline rush and then we put them in situations where they're in a constant state of hyper arousal they're always looking around they're doing the head swivel. Someone's GonNa hurt me as someone GonNa, shoot me. In a twenty five year career most police officers never fire their weapon. Never fire their weapon once. Many. Many police officers never pulled their weapon and yet that's the kind of human being that is drawn to that profession and I have had people tell me well, we pull in people who are really resilient well is that what you're doing or are you pulling in people who are craving action and are not necessarily maybe the most empathic people because a law enforcement agency can't function if a police officer responds to a call and then starts falling apart emotionally because they can't process what they saw. So maybe law enforcement is either consciously or subconsciously trying to pull people in who maybe don't have that kind of empathic response. That's not who I want riding around in a patrol car with a firearm and the power of arrest.

Gabriel Nathan Officer Gabe Howard Hillstreet Blues Executive Director Maryland Philadelphia
"gabe howard" Discussed on A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

11:36 min | 1 year ago

"gabe howard" Discussed on A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

"We're going to be talking about roles. Nurses play in our mental healthcare. It's weird to think that nursing has anything to do with schizophrenia. When you suggested the topic I was like. How are we going to get an hour out of this? I agree it really blew my mind learning. What nurses do has actually been incredible because there is so much that goes into nursing sincerely before we started this. I thought that nurses were Dr Sidekicks. I want to be completely honest. I thought that nurses were Dr Assistance. Hard stop that's it. There was nothing more that they did the end. And while was I wrong if you look at like different. Tv shows SCRUBS E R like when you're watching them it's very segregated the nurses and the doctors and you just kind of get that idea that they're two separate things you know obviously doctors what you want. That's the vibe you get from TV. Don't know who these people are. It's very interesting to me as much as we talk about. How don't learn about schizophrenia? And mental illness from pop culture and media. Representations we've had to have said that at least a dozen times over the course of inside schizophrenia. And yet here. We are learning about the nursing industry from their portrayal on media and pop culture. And it just goes to show you that. It's easy to fall into this trap. That what we're seeing on TV is somehow some sort of accurate portrayal when in actuality it's it's not it's fictitious at best all. I can say is that. Thank you to all of our wonderful nurses. Obviously we have the pandemic and stuff going on so thankfully a lot of people that don't get seen have been pushed into the spotlight and all the work they're doing so any level of nursing medical healthcare. Thank you so much right now because all those people are giving more than they should have to. I completely agree. Thank you so much for all that you do. And nurses are as a man with red hair meaning. I grew up as a redhead. I'm allowed to say this. The nurses seemed to be the red headed stepchildren of the medical industry. There's so necessary. And they do so much and yet. They're often ignored. And we want to talk about specifically how? How nurses are helping people with schizophrenia. Because as it turns out they're doing an incredible amount of work and even Osu Rachel before we started this show. We're like well I mean. What do they do like what they check us in when we get there? Take blood pressure. Yeah they check our blood pressure before you know. The real person comes in to help us. And that's really the crux of this conversation. Coming up later we have a wonderful gas woman who has been a nurse for a long time and has done a lot of work and she's a psychiatric nurse and I am excited to have everybody to her because I mean frankly she she really set a straight. Oh yeah there are different types of nurses and I don't mean like psychiatric nurse surgical nurse. I mean like there's different educational levels. Who have access to do different things? And I was kind of surprised by that as well because I. I really sincerely thought it was one-size-fits-all so the three basic types okay. Three General Basic Types. We have a are in registered nurse. That's kind of what I would say. Most of US think of in our head when we picture a nurse is what is the traditional registered nurse. A lot of times you go to the hospital. That's here interacting with. They do like the vitals. So you are talking to that person. Kind of on that level they can as we'll get into do diagnoses different assessments. Like they've played a major part because a lot of times. The doctor will only seaview for like five minutes. But it's the nurse who does all the work of. Hey this is what I think's going on then pulls the doctor in then you have licensed practical nurse or vocational nurse depending on what country state you're in and they are under the supervision of the nurses. I don't WanNa say nursing assistant but but kind of the next level down but they do a lot of important stuff also and then there's the CNA certified nursing assistant. And that's I hear the most. I guess what people have people talk about what our jobs are not here. I'm a CNA all the time. And I really didn't know what that meant but they are to do like routine daily tasks. Cna's are usually the ones you get to talk to the most that Kinda interact with you. That can help you form like I WANNA say Emotional. Bond a little creepy in the medical sense but like the ones you're like talking to you know more one on one so these are like three big ones one of the things. That of course was most impressive. In all of this is that no matter what kind of nurse you see there on the front lines which means they have a lot of patient interaction so when we talk about. How NURSES HELP PEOPLE WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA? They might be the first medical person that somebody who is in crisis sees when you walk into the emergency room. The first person that you see is not a doctor. It's not a psychiatrist. It's a nurse of some sort. Nurses often see people with schizophrenia. And start the process towards diagnosis long before you reach a doctor so in that way. Nurses are extraordinarily vital noticing. The symptoms of schizophrenia and reporting them back up the chain and I don't think many people really realized this and that and that alone shows you the importance of nurses in the treatment of schizophrenia and other mental health issues. Nurses don't just change bedpans. They're really doing a lot to keep people with schizophrenia. Safe and I was very surprised by that Rachel. I understand that. You're not as surprised as me because you see a nurse practitioner for your schizophrenia treatment. Which I did not know in blew me away. Yes so what that is though. You're you're listening at home. You're thinking Rachel didn't go over nurse practitioner as one of her three things so there are advanced nurses that they are highly trained. Lots and lots of college lots of certifications having to constantly keep up on. What's going on? These are the people that they can diagnose shoe they can actually prescribe medicine where. I go twice a month The past like eight ten years is a center. It's a mental health center and I have never met the psychiatrists there. I think there's one or two on staff but they are over the nurses so I've always met with like a different nurse over the years and I assume that was meeting with the doctor really light like just as in the past where I met with psychiatrists. You sit down. We discussed the symptoms. What's been going on in changes that I might need to take where we're at checking to make sure nothing else is going on. That might be interfering. I remember a long time ago when Gabe Howard was but a young mental health advocate. I really pushed people only to get mental health. Care from a psychiatrist I would always say some form of well. If you had cancer you would only go to oncologist and listen in a perfect world. I still stand by that. We don't live in a perfect world and I realized in many places there could be a a one two three four month. Wait if not longer to see a psychiatrist and if you're in crisis you need somebody now. I've realized that licensed nurse Practitioners. Especially psychiatric nurse. Practitioners are really pulling a lot of weight. They're trained they're specialized and they do a really really great job and do. I wish that there were a million more psychiatrists. Do I wish that you could see a psychiatrist at the drop of a hat and a moment's notice? Do I wish that the healthcare system works differently for people living with schizophrenia? Absolutely but this isn't the world that we live in and it's important to understand that psychiatric nurse. Practitioners are very vital. Stopgap and have saved a lot a lot of lives and I. It's something that I didn't give enough credit to and I imagine that when I said things like you should only see a psychiatrist. It's possible that somebody who listened to my words might have sat at home and gotten zero care because they were waiting on that psychiatrist. And that's not good. That's a very bad idea. You should always get any care that you can find before getting no care whether that's from general practitioner from an emergency room from a Walmart Clinic. All of these things are much much better options than getting zero care and the license nurse practitioners are. They're an excellent resource to be fair game. I would say most of the time you are having to get a referral and I don't think other doctors are quick to send you to nurse practitioner. Verse Doctor I know in the past. They've always been like. Oh we'll write a referral will find a psychiatrist on your insurance. That's always how it's been worded to me. So it's not as you. I would say like just the people in the offices doctors offices. They were things a certain way. That makes you think Oh. I can only see a psychiatrist. It's understandable that people would believe this and I think that's something that we want this particular show to sort of open up the idea that there is a wide variety of care that a person can get. It's also possible that when you're in crisis when you first need diagnosed that a psychiatrist is where you should go. But I'm GONNA use you as an example Rachel. You were diagnosed. What fifteen twenty years ago? It's certainly possible that now while you're in recovery and your month to month or even quarterly to quarterly med checks. Excetera don't need to rise to the level of a psychiatrist. You can be checked out by a nurse practitioner or even a general practitioner etc. It's all about finding the best care for you and the stage of your disease process. And I think that's something that we need to be open to. Let's make sure that people who are seeing license nurse Practitioner or psychiatric. Nurses aren't thinking that they're getting bad care. They're just getting different care and I think that really needs to be the message. It's not bad care. It's different care and all of these nurses that you're coming in contact with. They have a passion and they found like who they want to help like. We specialize in certain things whether you want to work with kids adults older people once you. WanNa work with like pregnant women so pediatric nurse. You have like geriatric nurse when my grandparents were both suffering very very badly. From Alzheimer's we actually had geriatric nurses coming to the house and one of them was so great with my grandfather. He was mentally gone. She I remember her telling me she had been trained to deal with that to deal with people in their eighties nineties who were not themselves anymore and I was really impressed with that. The specific part that I want to zero in on is where you said that we're she said this is what I've been specifically trained for and that's what we want the audience to understand about psychiatric. Nurses helping people with schizophrenia. Lead their best lives get their best care. That is what they've been specifically trained for and you know so often let..

schizophrenia license nurse Practitioner Osu Rachel Dr Assistance Dr Sidekicks US Cna Alzheimer Walmart Clinic Gabe Howard Stopgap cancer
Postpartum Psychosis Warning Signs

The Psych Central Show

10:04 min | 1 year ago

Postpartum Psychosis Warning Signs

"We're going to discuss postpartum psychosis and you were drawn to the specialty after you yourself went through postpartum depression postpartum anxiety and postpartum. Ocd after the birth of your first child or act yeah. There's a lot of things again. Happen in the postpartum period. I'm here to talk about one of the more severe conditions in the interest of full disclosure. I'm a forty three year old male. I've never been pregnant and I do not have children. I'm really really entry level. When it comes to understanding what post-partum anything is so thank you so much for helping to educate people like myself. It really is an important topic. It's absolutely important and a lot of people have that same feeling. I don't know anything about it. It seems like this weird thing that happens to other people and chances. Are you know somebody who has suffered through some form of perinatal mental health condition? Even if they don't talk about it which is very common a lot of people. Don't talk about it because there's so much shame around kind of not feeling well or not feeling yourself even during pregnancy and postpartum. There's all these ideas out there that it's this wonderful magical time and hopefully it is but for a lot of people in and that's one of the things that came up while I was trying to do research for the show so that I could talk somewhat on this subject. I was shocked at how many times I googled. Postpartum psychosis or postpartum anything and the articles. That came up. Were M I a bad mother M I abide parent. Am I harming my child? That really Kinda spoke to me like in a visceral way. This idea that you also have the illness. And there's all this stigma and shame surrounding it. Is that what you found working as a therapist? Oh absolutely hear comments. All of the time I feel like a bad mom. I'm not good enough for my child. Feeling Shame and the blame and confusion around. Why do I even feel bad? We are just not educated on what can happen. I think it's a great disservice to everybody who goes through any kind of perinatal mental health condition. Because they're mostly blindsided by it right. You like here supposed to be having the best time of my life. This is what my body is supposed to quote unquote and here. I am feeling like a failure and just to be clear. None of this is true. You are an excellent parent. This is just sort of the illness. And societies misunderstanding of the illness. Taking hold in an unexpected way over. Sorry this is a very treatable and very temporary condition if you get the right help and if you get it as soon as you know even if you're getting a little bit later down the road you still can feel better. And there's not a huge impact throughout the life course of you or your child however again in the more severe cases are not treated. There are some long term effects and I know that might sound really scary to people so I wanted to sell the myth that if you have a condition you're going to be like messing up your kid in some way like I said this is very treatable and also when it was very very severe there can be really life threatening consequences. So let's talk about postpartum psychosis. What is the definition of postpartum psychosis typically oppose artem? Psychosis isn't very rare Wanted to out of every thousand delivery and it is not postpartum. Depression or postpartum. Means -iety the onset of these symptoms are usually in the first two weeks but certainly can show up a little bit later. There's a really rapid onset. Meaning symptoms start quickly and it is characterized by the mind is kind of going off on. Its own in part because of hormonal changes in part because of your mental health history and in part because of sleep deprivation so people who are if postpartum psychosis are having rapid mood swings they are potentially having delusion or strange beliefs about themselves or their child or people around them they may be having hallucinations feeling very very irritated. The difficulty to sleep inability to sleep sometimes paranoia And what's really hard about postpartum psychosis is that the symptoms waxed and waned. Meaning they come and go so sometimes people can sort of the feel like themselves and appear to be like our normal cells and then sometimes people around them might observe that they don't look like themselves are sound like themselves so it can come and go for quite a few people and then for some people that symptoms on the onset is. They're just continue. So I know all that probably sounds pretty scary and Syria and it actually is pretty scary. And the're Like I said before. It's very rare and people who have a history of bipolar disorder are at high risk or if there's bipolar disorder in the family. They're at higher risk. Oftentimes psychosis in the postpartum is an indictment bipolar disorder. So let's talk about that for a moment. I myself live with bipolar disorder. And I understand psychosis from a lived experience because I I have experienced. Psychosis is it. The same is postpartum psychosis and for lack of a better phrase Gabe Howard's psychosis. Is this a similar thing or is it completely different? There's certainly familiarity in terms of symptoms of psychosis are the same. What what's very different here. Is that there is a new baby involved. And sometimes they delusions or hallucinations are in relation. To the new child is new very vulnerable child and also the perinatal person also very vulnerable. They've just given birth of had massive changes in hormone both during pregnancy at delivery and then in the Postpartum. They're really really rapid and kind of swings in the in the hormone during that time and sleep deprivation. Is You know when it's sort of like just you quote unquote. You have capacity to possibly sleep. In these cases there's Abadie involved and babies cry and they wake people up And that's what they do and that's what they're supposed to do But for somebody who needs sleep and isn't getting it and can't get it a whole other layer of complexity into into the life and into the simpsons because you're in relation to a baby a while having psychosis for some time that means that. There's like a hyper vigilant around the baby. Like it's really hard to not be around them or to let anyone else support them or sometimes it's like a kind of a total disregard like people in some psychoses. They will kind of forget the baby there so it brings this whole other level of danger and complexity also then. There's additional layer. That people around them are thinking. Oh well she's kind of baby. She's not quite herself or giving some other explanation for odd behaviors or strange behaviors. And it Kinda put people in a more of a dangerous situation because symptoms are explained away because they're not understood and it's not expected that these kind of symptoms will show up. I'm kind of assuming that the way that postpartum psychosis has played out in the media as well as How motherhood is played out in the media those two things combined because like you said we want to defend new parents. We don't just want every new mom under the bus and say oh well. You have a serious mental illness. That's the problem but of course this can be dangerous because it lacks care. I suppose my specific question is how is Postpartum? Psychosis played out in popular culture. It actually in very dangerous ways so in ways that further stigmatize apparently period. So mostly what we're seeing in the media while you see on. The news is postpartum psychosis that has led to infanticide. And this is a really really hard topic for people to hear about and also. This is a very real possibility with postpartum psychosis. I know that one to two percent of people who have term psychosis four to five percent of those mothers will kill their children. They killed their baby. It's really a hard reality to hear. And what I want people to know. Is that when this happened? Women are not in their right mind at all. They are not themselves. Do not know what they're doing. They're often being told by their delusion to do something. Sometimes there are delusions that the baby is possessed. So they can't be here although this might not make any sense but most of the time it's really out of love a lot of love like the world is too harsh for the child so they have to go and misses a very severe departure from reality. The Mon- who are in the situation do not know what they have done if they come out of it and get the medication that they need. They can't even thousand. What has happened people thinking say? Oh what a horrible person. I can't believe she done this. I would never do this to my child. And the thing is is that if she were in her right mind she wouldn't either. So what we're seeing in the media is usually the mob who have done something like this and who are being handcuffed or going on trial so there's most severe. This is the most of your consequences of perinatal. Mental Health Condition Postpartum Psychosis in infanticide. Is How postpartum psychosis is viewed. Most people are postpartum psychosis are experiencing hallucinations or delusions or some kind of waxing and waning symptom. That does not reach that level. Typically they may need hospitalization and medication. But it's not always the people who go on to have their children in this way.

Postpartum Psychosis Psychosis Bipolar Disorder OCD Syria Depression Artem Abadie Gabe Howard
"gabe howard" Discussed on A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

08:42 min | 1 year ago

"gabe howard" Discussed on A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

"Everyone and welcome to this week's episode of the not crazy podcast. I would like to introduce my co host Jackie Zimmerman who with major depression and anxiety disorders. And you know this guy gave Howard who lives with bipolar disorder. Jackie we've been friends for a while. Now we've been doing this show for several months and I decided that I want to risk all of that by talking about the one subject that causes more fights than any other subject known to man. And what would that be money? I want to talk about money. Money money money so in a recent poll. The three things that married couples fight about more than anything else are family religion and money and I would argue that money is at the top. Because nobody's taking people like onto the People's court or Judge Judy to sue over political and religious differences. Money is everywhere. If you talk to anybody literally just go grab a stranger on the street and be like. Hey you ever lost a friend over ten dollars. Almost everybody will have a story of a friendship. That just imploded over what we would consider a small amount of money. Money just creates an intense amount of anxiety in our society and the thing that I think is unique about money and anxiety is that it's something that I would assume everybody experiences not just people who are prone to anxiety not just people who live with mental illness but everyone has had some kind of issue with money that is given them anxiety. When I was younger I used to watch golf with my grandfather. And do these expose on the on the multi-millionaire golfers and they were interviewing one of them and they said. Hey when you have a PUTT and if you make the PUTT you win. One hundred thousand dollars and if you don't make it you lose one hundred thousand dollars. Does that caused you anxiety? Does that make you nervous? And the Guy said you know the most nervous I've ever been playing golf is when I bet another golfer a hundred dollars that I could make this. Putt and I didn't have one hundred dollars in my pocket. That really spoke to me because it wasn't the amount of money anymore. It was the awkwardness of discussing the money. Finding the money figuring out the money like this is what gave this guy anxiety and again. He's famous I don't know maybe he was just a cute story. He was telling bit. But that makes sense to me. You ever been in line and a dollar short. Like how embarrassing is that when you thinking that everybody in the store is like over on register five. There's a tall fat red head that does not have one dollar to pay for his groceries. I can feel that because if you've ever had your credit card declined for any reason your debit card and you WANNA justify it. I know there's money on there. That's so weird. I just used it like I just got paid. I swear I'm not a poor person race. There's this like panic where you want to justify. Why didn't work and my assumption is all of. This comes from the scarce any model right. We're all afraid of not having enough what happens when we don't have enough. So how do we have to work to get enough? What if we're working really hard and we still don't have enough and the anxiety around all of that of how much do you have? What happens when it's gone? I think is something that is underlying in our society and in everybody but amplified for those who live with any kind of illness because for me specifically when I worked at a big fat corporate job and I made all kinds of money all I thought to myself was. I'm staying here forever. So that way I make so much money that never have to worry about what happens if I actually can't work again because I will just bank so much money. I'll have so much I'll always pay my health insurance. Always have all of this stuff and spoiler alert. I don't work there anymore. It didn't make any money when I did work there. But when you have an illness whatever kind it is you're worried about money nitrous because of normal reasons but you're worried about like what if I can't work forever. What if I can't pay my health insurance? What if I can't afford to be healthy? That works its way around the Internet. That always says that. We're all three bad months away from being homeless. I don't know if that's true for all of us but that really spoke to me because it took about three bad months to really put me in a bad way where I started to need help on an interesting side note. None of us are three months away from being millionaire. So I think that we need to take that into account when we're determining how to like maybe structure our health insurance and things like that but but wrong wrong show. We'll just put that aside for a moment but think about this. The whole world is discussing being three bad months away from homelessness whether or not that holds up is really irrelevant. I think that does speak to the majority of people now. Let's apply that to people living with mental illness. People managing a lifelong and chronic disorder. Because I know that if I couldn't afford my medication if I couldn't afford therapy if I couldn't have afforded hospitalizations and on and on and on Gabe Howard would not be sitting here. That's just a hard fact. Yes I worked hard. Yes I have a loving family but you know what really saved me resources and that resource all boiled down two hundred dollar bills and that's sad. The catalyst for this was episode was from about a week ago. I sent Gabe text and basically I had a full blown anxiety meltdown because my husband had called me and said Oh my God our health insurance doubled on my last paycheck and I said wait. What do you mean it doubled? They didn't tell us that like they obviously would communicate that because that's what normal people think happens in the world But they didn't they just took it out of his check and it was doubled and I panicked and I have not an actual panic attack. I can't tell you how long but I felt it was the heart racing soul crushing. Can't breathe like Oh my God. What are we going to do because we are people right now? Who ARE LIVING PAYCHECK TO PAYCHECK. And that is even questionable. Because I don't know when my paychecks are coming in because I work for myself and I don't have regular paychecks and my husband took a pay cut a year ago to take the job. He's at now so all of this spiraling around my head and I'm like how are we going to do this? This is four hundred dollars. We didn't know we needed an. I could just work harder. But where am I going to find the client? Just you know. Anxiety spiral talk in your head and I reached out to Gabe because we were already talking to said. Hey I know you're telling me something important right now but I'm not really listening honestly because I'm worried about this health insurance thing and I realized in that moment how money is something that can cause high anxiety and within a split second like he sent me that text about our health insurance doubling and almost immediately. I was in a full-blown panic about it. There's so many directions that we can take this and that makes me excited. I love it when Jackie says. Oh my God ex and I'm like Oh my God. We can do Y. Z. Bat Symbol. So we might have to create multiple timelines. And let me ask you multiple questions about this because the first question that I'm going to ask you is if your health insurance would have doubled and you had a million dollars in the bank. Would it have bothered you at all me today? Thanks no but I also think that people who have a million dollars in the bank are really good about money and any sort of unexpected expense. That comes up. They're upset about it. Also I understand what you're saying because paying attention to our resources is a vital part of money management but a year ago. I was sitting on my couch at like two in the morning and it was storming and I felt a drop of water on my head and I looked up and the roof was leaking like leaking a lot and I saw all of this damage and I thought oh well. That's a bummer. And I went to bed. I just went to bed. That's it. There's nothing I can do about it. I couldn't stop the rain. I don't know how to fix a roof. I don't know how to fix a ceiling but the reason that I didn't freak out panic is because I had the money I flat out had the money. I knew that I could afford to fix it. There was nothing I could do and I slept well and I think about this because I think about Gabe when he was in the little. Six Hundred Square foot apartment living paycheck to paycheck with a thirty five hundred dollar deductible and anytime my car made a noise. I white knuckled because I couldn't afford when oil change time came around. I thought shoot. Where am I going to? Get THIRTY BUCKS. Because it was hard. It was so hard and I wanNA point out and this is where I wanna go back to the time line again. You're perfectly healthy. You weren't having a medical problem. This was just an expense that rose in price rate correct. So now imagine if the text message you got was from your doctor that you needed to go on a different medication that wasn't on generic and therefore cost five hundred dollars.

Gabe Howard Jackie Zimmerman anxiety golf Judge Judy bipolar disorder Putt Hundred Square chronic disorder
Panicked Over Finances? Why Money Influences our Mental Health

A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

07:56 min | 1 year ago

Panicked Over Finances? Why Money Influences our Mental Health

"Everyone and welcome to this week's episode of the not crazy podcast. I would like to introduce my co host Jackie Zimmerman who with major depression and anxiety disorders. And you know this guy gave Howard who lives with bipolar disorder. Jackie we've been friends for a while. Now we've been doing this show for several months and I decided that I want to risk all of that by talking about the one subject that causes more fights than any other subject known to man. And what would that be money? I want to talk about money. Money money money so in a recent poll. The three things that married couples fight about more than anything else are family religion and money and I would argue that money is at the top. Because nobody's taking people like onto the People's court or Judge Judy to sue over political and religious differences. Money is everywhere. If you talk to anybody literally just go grab a stranger on the street and be like. Hey you ever lost a friend over ten dollars. Almost everybody will have a story of a friendship. That just imploded over what we would consider a small amount of money. Money just creates an intense amount of anxiety in our society and the thing that I think is unique about money and anxiety is that it's something that I would assume everybody experiences not just people who are prone to anxiety not just people who live with mental illness but everyone has had some kind of issue with money that is given them anxiety. When I was younger I used to watch golf with my grandfather. And do these expose on the on the multi-millionaire golfers and they were interviewing one of them and they said. Hey when you have a PUTT and if you make the PUTT you win. One hundred thousand dollars and if you don't make it you lose one hundred thousand dollars. Does that caused you anxiety? Does that make you nervous? And the Guy said you know the most nervous I've ever been playing golf is when I bet another golfer a hundred dollars that I could make this. Putt and I didn't have one hundred dollars in my pocket. That really spoke to me because it wasn't the amount of money anymore. It was the awkwardness of discussing the money. Finding the money figuring out the money like this is what gave this guy anxiety and again. He's famous I don't know maybe he was just a cute story. He was telling bit. But that makes sense to me. You ever been in line and a dollar short. Like how embarrassing is that when you thinking that everybody in the store is like over on register five. There's a tall fat red head that does not have one dollar to pay for his groceries. I can feel that because if you've ever had your credit card declined for any reason your debit card and you WANNA justify it. I know there's money on there. That's so weird. I just used it like I just got paid. I swear I'm not a poor person race. There's this like panic where you want to justify. Why didn't work and my assumption is all of. This comes from the scarce any model right. We're all afraid of not having enough what happens when we don't have enough. So how do we have to work to get enough? What if we're working really hard and we still don't have enough and the anxiety around all of that of how much do you have? What happens when it's gone? I think is something that is underlying in our society and in everybody but amplified for those who live with any kind of illness because for me specifically when I worked at a big fat corporate job and I made all kinds of money all I thought to myself was. I'm staying here forever. So that way I make so much money that never have to worry about what happens if I actually can't work again because I will just bank so much money. I'll have so much I'll always pay my health insurance. Always have all of this stuff and spoiler alert. I don't work there anymore. It didn't make any money when I did work there. But when you have an illness whatever kind it is you're worried about money nitrous because of normal reasons but you're worried about like what if I can't work forever. What if I can't pay my health insurance? What if I can't afford to be healthy? That works its way around the Internet. That always says that. We're all three bad months away from being homeless. I don't know if that's true for all of us but that really spoke to me because it took about three bad months to really put me in a bad way where I started to need help on an interesting side note. None of us are three months away from being millionaire. So I think that we need to take that into account when we're determining how to like maybe structure our health insurance and things like that but but wrong wrong show. We'll just put that aside for a moment but think about this. The whole world is discussing being three bad months away from homelessness whether or not that holds up is really irrelevant. I think that does speak to the majority of people now. Let's apply that to people living with mental illness. People managing a lifelong and chronic disorder. Because I know that if I couldn't afford my medication if I couldn't afford therapy if I couldn't have afforded hospitalizations and on and on and on Gabe Howard would not be sitting here. That's just a hard fact. Yes I worked hard. Yes I have a loving family but you know what really saved me resources and that resource all boiled down two hundred dollar bills and that's sad. The catalyst for this was episode was from about a week ago. I sent Gabe text and basically I had a full blown anxiety meltdown because my husband had called me and said Oh my God our health insurance doubled on my last paycheck and I said wait. What do you mean it doubled? They didn't tell us that like they obviously would communicate that because that's what normal people think happens in the world But they didn't they just took it out of his check and it was doubled and I panicked and I have not an actual panic attack. I can't tell you how long but I felt it was the heart racing soul crushing. Can't breathe like Oh my God. What are we going to do because we are people right now? Who ARE LIVING PAYCHECK TO PAYCHECK. And that is even questionable. Because I don't know when my paychecks are coming in because I work for myself and I don't have regular paychecks and my husband took a pay cut a year ago to take the job. He's at now so all of this spiraling around my head and I'm like how are we going to do this? This is four hundred dollars. We didn't know we needed an. I could just work harder. But where am I going to find the client? Just you know. Anxiety spiral talk in your head and I reached out to Gabe because we were already talking to said. Hey I know you're telling me something important right now but I'm not really listening honestly because I'm worried about this health insurance thing and I realized in that moment how money is something that can cause high anxiety and within a split second like he sent me that text about our health insurance doubling and almost immediately. I was in a full-blown panic about it. There's so many directions that we can take this and that makes me excited. I love it when Jackie says. Oh my God ex and I'm like Oh my God. We can do Y. Z. Bat Symbol. So we might have to create multiple timelines. And let me ask you multiple questions about this because the first question that I'm going to ask you is if your health insurance would have doubled and you had a million dollars in the bank. Would it have bothered you at all me today? Thanks no but I also think that people who have a million dollars in the bank are really good about money and any sort of unexpected expense. That comes up. They're upset about it. Also I understand what you're saying because paying attention to our resources is a vital part of money management but a year ago. I was sitting on my couch at like two in the morning and it was storming and I felt a drop of water on my head and I looked up and the roof was leaking like leaking a lot and I saw all of this damage and I thought oh well. That's a bummer. And I went to bed. I just went to bed. That's it. There's nothing I can do about it. I couldn't stop the rain. I don't know how to fix a roof. I don't know how to fix a ceiling but the reason that I didn't freak out panic is because I had the money I flat out had the money. I knew that I could afford to fix it. There was nothing I could do and I slept well

Gabe Howard Jackie Zimmerman Anxiety Golf Judge Judy Bipolar Disorder Putt Chronic Disorder
"gabe howard" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

14:01 min | 1 year ago

"gabe howard" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"To inside schizophrenia. I'm Rachel Star withers here with my wonderful co host. Gabe Howard this episode. We are exploring schizophrenia. In women next episode going to focus on the men but this whole episode is for the ladies often. We don't really consider gender dynamics in treatment or medication and this is a chronic across. All health. Not just schizophrenia. A lot of medications etc are only tested on men because of risk they don't want to impact a potential pregnancy etc and on one hand. This sounds good. We're projecting pregnancy but on the other hand. This means there's whole drugs that have made it to market. That may not have ever been tested with women so I think that it's exciting to consider how schizophrenia impacts the genders differently. Obviously we want to state unequivocally that if you meet two people with schizophrenia. You've met two people with schizophrenia. Tends TO BE THIS IDEA. That all people with schizophrenia are exactly alike and and we hope that this show has done a lot to dispel that misinformation. If I meet two guys named Gabe. They're probably both different. Probably probably repeatedly you hear the difference between men and women with schizophrenia. The biggest thing is the age of onset. Women are said to develop it later than men on average they say four to six years later than a man would be diagnose. Let's go be diagnosed with schizophrenia. And that's one of the things. They've noticed repeatedly in research across the years. Is that women get schizophrenia. In life later sometimes you know late twenties. They'll even say it's interesting because as you said it's diagnosed with we know from research. That people are born with schizophrenia. So the question becomes and we don't know the answer to this because research is ongoing. Do Men and women become symptomatic at the same time but men get the diagnosis faster or do women not develop the symptoms of schizophrenia. Until later and it's difficult to discover that and some of it is social engineering if a woman is behaving erratically. Well of course she's a woman and this is the kind of thinking that we have to prevent and get over to make sure that everybody gets the best care but it's on one hand it's interesting to think about when we're diagnosing people and how we're diagnosing people but on the other hand it's kind of sad if men and women are showing symptoms at the exact same age but it takes women an extra four to six years to be diagnosed. That's also scary. Yes they do say however that it's less detectable in women which I could totally see because I grew up having hallucinations but I didn't even realize myself that that was weird until my late teens than I that I stopped talking about it so I didn't get a diagnosis either until my twenties so I could easily see. You know yeah. Women tend to be more social. They tend to be more active than men. Who Have Schizophrenia? So yeah probably fly under the radar much longer. It's interesting how you put that Rachel. You said that as soon as you notice that you were having these hallucinations and issues you hit them but you remained social. You remained engaged in talking to the people around you whereas men when they notice them. They tend to retreat. It's that retreating that I think makes people realize that. Perhaps something is wrong you know. Why is this person? Stay in their room. Why does this person not have a job? Why is this person talking to themselves whereas because you remained social people? Don't say well. Hey we like it when Rachel comes over Rachel is Funny Rachel is Nice. She must be hearing voices in her head and experiencing psychosis and elucidations. And and all of the other symptoms of schizophrenia. I I can see how it could mask. It is especially to our friends and family who are not trained psychologists or psychiatrists and the flip side of. That coin. Is FAMILIES THAT SCHIZOPHRENIA? Tends to run in. There actually is no difference in the onset of age between men and women so brothers sisters. And that's because yeah grandma had it if mom has it you know so cousin. Has you tend to be looking for those symptoms and recognize them earlier. Whether it's a boy or girl growing up you send notice that. They have acknowledged that if the family and friends are aware that there could be a potential problem on the horizon. They are noticing it and much much sooner. There's also a study out of India that is found no difference in the average age of onset between men and women and I think that really does speak to the social dynamics between cultures because if people in India are all having the onset of schizophrenia at the same time it would really be unusual to think that there's some sort of genetic difference between Americans and Indians. It's it's sort of speaks to this being a social construct and again research is ongoing. We're not one hundred percent. Sure of any of these things. In a lot of countries having a mental disorder is looked down upon even more so than I would say the Western world. They don't have statistics on those kinds of things because unfortunately it will go. No one is diagnosed until much later in life where they can't function at all so it is interesting when you look like how people grow up. What's expected of men and women? I do think women could fly under the radar longer. Sometimes just because you're not like well a guy eighteen. He needs to get out. He needs to get a job he needs to at. Yeah I feel like my family. They're going to be little softer on the girl in the family and the boy so I can easily see like that flying under the radar to your point Rachel when we talk about the social differences between men and women Which there's a lot I really think of. People who have battled schizophrenia for a long time and when I work with those people they say hey look. I haven't had a job in five years and all of the men very much want to know what to do about their resume. They've got a five year gap of five year gap five year gap and many of the women are like well a five year gap. No problem I was raising kids. I was a caretaker for family. It just nobody is questioning their five year gap whereas people are questioning a male's five year gap and and all of. This is just a tie in that. In some cases the differences between the treatments and the symptoms of schizophrenia have considerably more to do with our society than it does with the actual disease. Now all that said there are disease processes and symptoms processes that work differently in women versus as as we get into the symptoms. The fine saying this you know like well Rachel. I'm a woman and I don't experience it that way or I'm a man I totally have. No no no just like across the board which symptoms tend to flare up in different genders women actually like we said are more sociable so different things like the flat affect pretty much where you don't experience emotion. You have a very dull. Expression is not seen as often in women. Women tend to even have more emotions and I know that's like Oh of course we've been emotional but with schizophrenia. A lot of times people have blunted emotional response so they don't really react the same way quote unquote normal people do but women we come off a still acting more emotional to those around us inside. We might not but we're able to kind of fake it much better. Our speech isn't reduced and I found this interesting. Gabe women with schizophrenia are actually more physically active than men across the board and also under that it can be more hostile. You know past episodes where he's talked about violence and schizophrenia. If you were to picture a violent schizophrenic I don't think anyone pictures of woman not only do I not think that anybody pictures a woman. I think that the way that society response to a male who is being aggressive and a female. Who is being aggressive is very different. And there's a plethora of reasons for this. Listen I weigh two hundred and seventy five pounds. I'm six foot three if I am being extremely aggressive and loud. That's going to look a lot scarier than if Rachel who is considerably smaller than Gabe is yelling. Also people tend to be more willing to de escalate a female than a male and again a lot of these things fall under social constructs and our whole society is set up this way right. It's not just in schizophrenia. Where this is important. We see this in policing we see this in jobs. We see this in you know I could never scream at a server in public. But you know there's a whole Internet trend of calling women who scream at servers Karen and everybody thinks that that's funny but sincerely the humor comes from somebody yelling at somebody in public and because that person's a woman it's considered funny you could never change the Karen memes to John Well Jaundice stands up and starts screaming at a server. People that's not funny. No that's like yet so everyone turns around and it's like robots call the police thinking he's GonNa start swinging. The perception is very very different. And because schizophrenia is an illness that is based on self reporting based on observation based on behavioral patterns so obviously society's perception of what they're observing is going to determine the diagnosis that you receive and to that end because of the different ways that we perceive the genders. Women are often misdiagnosed with schizophrenia. More often than men are when it comes to self reporting. I feel that men and would probably also report different symptoms more often. I don't think I ever went and was reporting. You know I just don't want to go out with my friends. Oh I just want to like stay inside. I talked about depression and that was the initial diagnosis. I got repeatedly was just that I had depression and I was too scared to even bring up hallucinations and delusions. I kind of you get used to just okay. You're just overreacting. Oh you're overthinking so. That never occurred to me certain things. I was having was a delusion it was just Oh yeah. I just soon. I'm over thinking things so I think across the board. It's easy to see. The women would be diagnosed with different things. I do wonder if doctors are quicker to Label Min- schizophrenic that women it's important to point out how difficult it is to research and study this when we exist in a culture that is an actively discussing it and as we've been talking about this whole show culture and society impacts our outlook so when a male is looking at a female patients some of those biases are bound to creep in. I do think that we have made great strides now that more women are in psychiatry because while they have biases to they at least have interjected more understanding of women and I think that's very very good now one of the things that's interesting to me is when we plotted out this. Show Rachel. I was shocked at how much was just society. How did you feel about that? What were you thinking when you were researching the show it made me look back on my own life and kind of think You know how I like self reported you know certain things and then like the way they were responded to and I think back the more physically active in hostile thing. I was very very hostile towards my father specifically when I was in high school and I don't mean I was like trying to hurt him or anything but I would have these breakdowns and he would try and restrain me which just made it worse. You know not necessarily going. What's the best way to deal with someone having a psychotic breakdown and he was still much bigger than me in able to kind of like grab me and control me but I think now had it been my brother who was bigger than my father? There wouldn't have been any controlling. It definitely would have escalated to police or we can't deal with this on our own situation much quicker than it did with me and it just makes you think though. Wow all heck. Yeah if if I've been guy or even just more physically different. My life could have played out. I don't WanNa say worse but it would have had a different impact. Rachel Wallace is an awkward question. Do you think that a female menstrual cycle has anything to do with schizophrenia? And why or why not? Oh I think it absolutely does. I've long thought that menstrual cycles and the woman type stuff definitely affects my schizophrenia. It frustrates me to no end that at least once a month I know for three days my schizophrenia is going to get a lot worse. I'm going to lose touch with reality. I'm going to kind of get more spacey. I have to really be very careful. I get more delusional. I know my hallucinations get worse. I pretty much have to anticipate. These days are coming enduring these days. I need to live in my room as much as possible to avoid potential issues. And it's right before my period and this has happened over and over and I brought it up to multiple doctors and it's not like you can just okay. Well you know up your medication for three days. It doesn't work that way you know. They'll just be like well. You know make sure you track it and do your best..

Schizophrenia Rachel Gabe Howard Rachel Star Rachel Wallace depression India Karen John
Simple Psychology Explanations with Dr. Ali Mattu

The Psych Central Show

03:47 min | 2 years ago

Simple Psychology Explanations with Dr. Ali Mattu

"Have dr ali mathu from the very popular youtube channel. The psych show ali welcome to the show gave absurd excited to be here. Thank you for having me. I am very excited to have you because we have have the same mission and that's that's genuinely rare. Believe it or not because i believe it and when i say we have the same mission we both really really value correct and accurate information. We want people to have the facts when it comes to mental illness mental health and psychology <hes> absolute but we know that it's dry info yeah it can be and what i really like about your youtube. Channel is that you've taken concepts like what is schizophrenia what is psychosis. What's the difference between a psychologist and a psychiatrist. These are things that people are thinking about and put them into these little snippets with graphics and in your shining face and you answer all of these questions in a way that i really think that the general public response to <hes> i agree so let's start at the very beginning. I your a psychologist correct yep. Yep it is unusual for. You're a learned man somebody with a p._h._d. Your doctor you have you have a doctor and you're also a professor. So youtube is not your day job. You know it's not but you're on youtube and you're explaining this to people and that that is incredibly rare. Youtube has a lot of people like gabe howard a lot of people living with mental illness talking about not living with mental illness. People like me are well represented but there's not a lot of people like you. So what gave you the idea to do this. It goes back so the the long version of the story is. I've been toying with this kind of stuff for a very long time. If you wanna go way back i was very socially a anxious kid. I've lived with anxiety. I was probably selectively mute as a kid in certain situations. I didn't speak and i accidentally enroll in public speaking in high school and that class changed my life because it took me from a kid who believed that i was weird. I was strange and and no one else was like me and it helped me to understand that these fears i have sitting in everyone else has those two to some degree and so i i took public speaking i did speech and debate in high school and it continued that in college and i had a amazing introductory psychology class us in community college is actually not a good student in high school didn't do that well and went to community college which kind of opened up the whole world for me and so i really loved that class and one of the things that really motivated me about going on getting a p._h._d. As i wanted to teach other the people as well i wanted to do for others what professor gosling did for me at the ends a college and so <hes> i did teach a lot in grad school and todd a lotta the introductory psychology and then as i moved forward and started to do more clinical work being involved in in the role i i am now. I was moving farther and farther away from that original goal of teaching wide variety of people in introducing them to psychology so that's one one thing that happened the other thing that happens at sets up the story so it was lead to dozen fourteen and i was working with a teenage patient of mine she in one of our sessions said hey. I saw this youtube video. It really helped me really motivated me. I wanna share it with you as awesome amazing. Oh my gosh. Let's watch it together. I wanna understand what it was about. This a helped you only three minutes long.

Youtube Dr Ali Mathu Professor Gabe Howard Gosling Todd Three Minutes
"gabe howard" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"gabe howard" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"You know the real criminal activity protecting and serving also means protecting people from themselves when the time comes if people want to do harm to themselves or because of some kind of destabilization in what's going on in their world. Maybe doing harm to others so we do intervene in those situations as well because it's the safety issues go well beyond just protecting people from militias encounters from other people and we want to talk about specifically what Texas is doing and other states to help people like Gabe Howard people who live with severe and persistent mental illness and have been crisis. Make sure that we get the care that we need because as you pointed out a lot of police officers aren't trained and Houston's look into fix that and is fixing it. We are certainly trying. We are not alone in that effort. We have you know agencies all across the stating all across the nation. We have an international association as well where we are trying to get officers better prepared to deal with these situations because it is something we are encountering and we are encountering it more and more as time goes on. I don't have an interest why that happened but it's happening and we have to prepare both both our officers who are responding to situations as well as our community members so that they better know how to give the information needed so that we can all respond on in a safer more humane way to people who need help so a concerned person calls nine one one because somebody is having a mental health crisis. They suspect that somebody is having a mental health crisis nine one one responds by sending out a police officer so now the police officer is on the scene. What's the next thing that happens wins. Well it varies from one situation to another the first thing you have to take into account. Is anyone safety at risk. I mean do you have other people who are at risk are being harmed or the officers..

officer Gabe Howard Texas Houston
"gabe howard" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"gabe howard" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"My name is Gabe Howard. And I'm here with my fellow host, Vincent, m Wales. And today, we have a very I'm gonna go with unique guest. Not because he himself is unique. Although he's he's a rather rather cool guy because his experience is unique to mental health shows. Let me give a little background early in the early days of the psych central show VIN and I used to do Gabin VIN. Only shows remember those VIN way back when and one of the first episodes, we did was then interviewing me about my experience in a psychiatric hospital. I was in the psych ward of hospital again as a patient and how I felt about it and then year or so later with the launch of bipolar schizophrenic, and a podcast me and Michelle hammer who lives schizophrenia, we both talked about our experiences inpatient, and we got a lot of feedback from a lot of people that said. Yeah. It was traumatizing patient socked everybody was mean to us, and it was just an awful experience and Michelle and I said, yeah. Yeah. It was terrible. We didn't like any of it. And then I was talking to my friend, Gabe who will introduce here in a minute. And he said, you know, that that's very one sided people who work there. They have an opinion. And the exact freeze that he used was psychiatric hospitals are traumatizing for everybody. There's nobody that really is scape. The trauma of these places. They're just scary places for everyone and that really is worth investigating more. So without further ado, gave Nathan welcome to the show. Hi, thanks for having me. Thank you. Now. I in interest of full disclosure, you currently do not work for a psychiatric hospital, but you work there for a number of years. I guess I worked at an inpatient crisis psychiatric hospital for five years and impatient. Is people they're admitted there, sometimes volunteer. Sometimes against their will. It's the locked door. They have to be pro baited to leave. They sleep there yet there. There are many lock doors and at our facility, it's a free standing independent locked crisis metric hospital, and the majority of our patients were involuntary..

Gabe Howard Vincent Michelle hammer Wales Nathan five years
"gabe howard" Discussed on A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

04:38 min | 2 years ago

"gabe howard" Discussed on A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

"Well, there you go. My mom's sister takes antidepressants. Just my mom is still was it denial. Yeah. Probably it might have been. I it was denial. It was lack of understanding. It was ignorance, and it was the Australian buried again. Against her. I don't hold it against her that she didn't see it. I think maybe it was a denial thing. She didn't look into it. She really thought it was a learning disability because she always said that I don't read if you don't read you're not smart, and like all I read some books, but what was hard for me about reading that. I was so busy in my head all the time. It's hard to read a book when your mind's racing back and forth. It's all over the place. Michelle, what are we want to leave our listeners with? I mean because we've we've covered a lot. I mean, this is this is this is not our normal. I hate Michelle Michelle hates Gabe. And then we start screaming at each other show. And that's for the best really is for the best just to leave listeners with suicide is not an answer. And like I said I tried that seven times and I failed seven times. It's not even an easy thing to do. And most likely you'll end up in a psych ward where that's not fun to be in. So. Really weigh your options. And then just don't do it. It's not a good idea. You're going to hurt more than just yourself. You're going to hurt the people around you hurt the people that love you. And if you keep going going with your life things do get better, my life has just gone leaves him bounds better than I ever thought would ever happen in my life. I never thought I'd be recording a podcast with Mr. Gabe Howard and talking about mental health like I do. Now. I thought I'd be pathetic my entire life. I couldn't would never the two are not mutually exclusive. You can be recording a podcast with me and still be pathetic. I guess, but I never really emblazoned a future because I never thought I would get there at that point. I'm still it's still hard for me to envision a future. That's almost my own insecurity, thinking, nothing we'll ever really work out. Of course. Of course, Michelle there's. I want to leave our listeners with a couple of quick things one as we said before suicide doesn't end the pain transfers it to somebody else. There's another quote that I really like that is suicide is a permanent solution to temporary problem. Yes. But the thing that I keep in my head probably fourth most of all after where I can find diet coke at two AM is. Looking back. Now, I realize that I didn't wanna die. I never wanted to die. I wanted the pain to stop. And I didn't know how to make the pain stop. I just didn't. And the only thing that my battered bewildered. Diseased brain could come up with was suicide that is not a good option, and it's far from the only option and once I got treatment, I found all of these better ways to make the pain stop, and that's all I ever wanted. I never wanted to die. I just didn't want to suffer anymore, and I would say to anybody who's thinking about contemplating it has in the past or maybe in the future. You don't wanna die? You want the pain to stop? There are much better ways to make the pain. Stop please. Please invest in yourself and look into them ask everybody that you know, for help go to the emergency room. Call the suicide hotline talk, your general practitioner, go. Oh to the local urgent care. I hear that. You can go to the drugstore and WalMart and see a doctor now, do whatever it takes your life is valuable, and we want you in the world completely agree. Thank you. Everybody. For listening to this week's episode of bipolar, schizophrenic and a podcast. Please review ranked share us everywhere. Facebook algorithm has gone. I don't know schizophrenic. Can we say that because it just it just motions everything down? So at this point. I think you're going to have to share our our website via smoke signal, maybe like tattoo it on your arm and show people. I don't know. But whatever you do it for Michelle, and I to maintain our high luxury standard of living. We're just we're going to need. We'll see everybody next week. We love you. You've been listening to a five polar a schizophrenic and a podcast..

Michelle Michelle Mr. Gabe Howard Facebook WalMart
"gabe howard" Discussed on A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"gabe howard" Discussed on A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

"I don't think. So because I'm terrible. But really I can't I can't strive to be as good as the best like every single person when when they sit down in their chosen career, they should not look to whomever. The best is an aspire to be that good just because you're a Spiring to be as good as the best doesn't mean that you think you are every single rookie basketball player when Michael Jordan was playing. They worked really hard to be as good as Michael Jordan. Nobody hit it. But somebody eventually did hats off LeBron. But there's a difference between wanting to be as good as somebody and delusional thinking that you are. I never once said I'm already as good as Dr king never said it, I still don't say it. And I am a fantastic. Public speaker work really hard to be a good public speaker. And I strive every day to be a better public speaker. But I would never say that I'm as good as Dr king. That's not for me to decide that's for an audience to decide that's true. That is for the answer. It's how much you you like touch them in the audience, not bad touch. No good touch bad about that. But how it's the what they learned from what you're saying. And how powerful it is if people pay attention if they're engaging in all of that. I remember when I told my doctor that'd be public speaker. I said I want to be as good as Obama. And he kinda sent to me. Well, that's that's a, you know, a very that's someone to look up. So yes, I know he had a lot. He said that he has a lot of experience, and he has helped with his speeches, but strive to be as good as Obama it's going to be a challenge, but a good personal up to I guess, see them. That's all I really wanted. And what really bothered me the most is for me. It was kind of a throwaway statement. I was just looking for an example of somebody who's career I wished to emulate you were looking for encouragement. I really was. He just shut you down. Did you get rid of this guy? Yes. Good. Yes. I did good. But it still took a couple of weeks. I went for a couple of sessions, and I brought it up again because I wanted closure. I thought that maybe he misunderstood. So a couple of weeks later. I had another appointment and I said, hey. I want to talk about this Dr king thing, and he reiterated he asked me if I talked to my doctor about my grandiose thoughts, if I was Hypo manic, and no matter what I said, he wouldn't get off it. He really truly believed that the best help for Gabe Howard, at that time was to make sure that I understood that wanting to be a good public speaker and wanting to be as good as one of the best public speakers in history was an example of grandiosity. And I just I didn't say that. I was I said that I wanted to be and I was willing to put in all the work. I'm still willing to put in all the work. But but listen dream of clerk dream. I have a dream. I don't understand why we can't learn from the people above us. You know, people talk about how we don't learn from history and history is doomed to repeat itself, and I come in and sit down, and I say, I'm learning from history. I'm respecting the people that came before me. I'm learning about the people that came before me, and I really respect that. Dr king was nonviolent. I really respect that. Dr king did not intact his enemies. I respect that. Dr king didn't call people names. I respect that. Dr king spoke up at great personal risk to his finances, his personal life, and ultimately his safety, which I do not think that are causes quite as right dangerous, obviously. But I mean, yeah, you do everything that you can do to be a better public speaker. I mean, once we're talking you said, you even watch preachers speak do. Yeah. I do pretty good for eighth east. Right. Yeah. 'cause I I was watching TV on like a TV that barely channels..

Dr king Obama Michael Jordan basketball LeBron Gabe Howard
"gabe howard" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"gabe howard" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"Welcome to the central show where each episode presents an in depth look at issues from the field of psychology and mental health with host gave howard and co host vincent m wales welcome to this week's episode of the psych central show podcast my name is gabe howard and with me as always vincent and wales and we are very excited to have a guest with us today who literally wrote the book on moving forward past trauma specifically says thriving in the aftermath of trauma can welcome to the show how are you been vince undoing well are you guys we're great we're doing fantastic can introduce yourself a little bit okay well are bent twenty one years in the name after failed attempt to play specialize her you had high school and majority disposal and specialist then i got out of the news and started a small company that ended up doing fairly well and and we sell the company and now today i'm spending most of my time as grandfather for granted in lance attached and really trying to change the way that we treat people specifically right now in combat veterans although the book that will a little bit about today is really focused on this billion community we keep the massive on the outcomes of convent convent recovery programs have been really good and we keep it at the nasa line or the tactics and techniques that we use prevent you know will they work on various and we we send gas and we noted for couple of reasons one of the civilians the program including a former nfl football and two is seen as outcomes measures this outcome so we feel pretty confident that the reason larger audience we thought it was the by that would be a great way to reach a large.

gabe howard lance football vincent wales convent convent nasa nfl twenty one years
"gabe howard" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"gabe howard" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"Welcome to the psych central show where each episode presents an in depth look at issues from the field of psychology and mental health with host gave howard and co host vincent m wales hello everyone welcome to this week's episode of the psych central show podcast my name is gabe howard and with me as always vincent and wales our guest this week is dr linda myers who earned advanced degrees in the nineteen seventies and we bring that up not to give away her age because we would never do that but because we're going to be talking about how difficult it was for a woman to get advanced degrees while in the nineteen seventies she's written a great book she has a great stories to tell and we're just riveria excited that you're here dr meyers how are you i'm fine thank you i have i have one little correction to make please and and that is that i received my doctorate in nineteen eighty two not in the seventies well you probably had earn most of it in the seventies correct correct i that that's right i'm being stickler that's well we appreciate the honesty and the up front information there's there's even more than that you were raising children at the time you were earning your doctorate that that correct i actually started undergraduate college when i was thirty and i had the three little kids and and i was going to school and i was separated from my husband and i was i was trucking along that seems to be a hard road to truck on back then because well let's be honest you know sexism was pretty rampant it still is but even back then it was just much worse so how did you deal with being a woman going for an academic degree in an environment that wasn't exactly conducive to that.

gabe howard dr meyers vincent wales dr linda myers
"gabe howard" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"gabe howard" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"Welcome to the psych central show where each episode presents an indepth look at issues from the field of psychology and mental health with host gay powered and cohost vincent m wales hello everyone welcome to this week's episode of the psych central show podcast my name is gabe howard and with me as always is vincent wales and this is part two of two for the healthy voices panel discussion we hope you listen to last week and if you didn't there still time everything lives forever on the internet considering advocacy from your personal points of view what is the hardest aspect of advocating and how do you deal with it i was told not to talk over people at a not interrupt until people go i i'm gonna keep my mouth shut you did none of those things totally doing full blooded italian i'm like biting my tongue up here okay so i guess we'll go down the line then what is the hardest part about being an advocate for me i'm extremely hard at myself i believe i have the world on my shoulders and that somehow especially in orange county where there are large large group of hispanics but the booboo religious factors the cultural factors keeping people quiet i have no shame and i have no filter to and i have no edit button that sitting next to the hardest thing is when i'm hurting i don't know how to show it when i'm scared i rather get mad.

gabe howard vincent wales orange county
"gabe howard" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"gabe howard" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"Welcome to the psych central show where each episode presents an in depth look at issues from the field of psychology and mental health with host gave howard and co host vincent m wales welcome everyone to this week's episode of the psych central show podcast my name is vincent m wales gabe howard is out in the field doing an interview with today's guests our subject today is nimby which is an acronym for not in my backyard basically what nimby is nimby ism is it's an attitude where people in a community do not want a particular thing going into their community this could be anything from a power plant a prison or it could be a facility like the one run by our guest today her name is juliet doris williams and she's the executive director of the pir center in columbus ohio and i'll let gabe takeover from here hello juliet welcome to the show how are you today and well thank you all right so i four the first thing that we should probably say is that i work for the peer center so your literally my boss just in the interest of transparency i wanna get that right out there so people know that i'm not exactly unbiased in this conversation but before we get started can you tell us a little bit about you and a little bit about the peer centers so i'm juliet doris williams and the executive director of the pir center which is a drop in wellness and recovery center in columbus ohio we operate into the captions we are open every day including all holidays and we are a small but growing nonprofit in our area and we also operate a daily warm line and we see about two hundred people a day that come into our.

juliet doris williams pir center ohio gabe howard columbus
"gabe howard" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"gabe howard" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"Welcome to the central show where each episode presents an depth look at issues from the field of psychology and mental health with host gave howard and co host vincent m wales hello everyone welcome to this week's episode of the psych central show my name is vincent m wales with me is gabe howard and this time michelle hammer now you probably don't know this but the two of them have another show without me which isn't really to cool but agreed to be on this show and we can talk about all of that so hi everybody welcome hello i also let you be the sole host for this episode and i have relegated myself to guest status which you haven't caught on yet is actually of higher status because our guests of the most important parts of the psych central show podcast oh i know that they are and now i'm a guest yeah i picked up on it michelle this is your first time here welcome thank you said that if he here with you guys so nice i'm loving where we are wish we could like being somewhere this nice of time loving it did it wasn't option 'cause you're your show a bipolar schizophrenic podcast is not recorded from the comforts of your own home is it no no no not at all it's recorded after midnight in a vacant location and vacant just means empty i think maybe we picked a poor choice of words definition the word.

michelle hammer gabe howard
"gabe howard" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

AM 1350 WEZS

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"gabe howard" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

"Welcome back to think america with jerry gilbert isn't it true that you meet people that exhibit such upbeat frenzied kind of lifestyle and they go go go go go go go their way over scheduled and then they appear very down in the dumps that was gave howard my interview from the last segment and he is bipolar you can find him at gabe howard dot com he is a speaker on the subject i was just delighted to have him spend ten minutes i'll have him back because one of the areas frank i didn't get to in the interview was telling me about the drugs you have to be on to keep your more steady and not have this way way way high and then this crash crash down so we'll do that next time what did you think well i thought he was wonderful he answered all your questions directly and i think it's it's wonderful that in this day and age we can identify and diagnose these issue issues especially in children and then treat them before they get out of hand that's that's a real blessing because you know they didn't have that in years past and it was treated as a disciplinary issue yes true but when you say children we have to distinguish what he said it starts at about sixteen so it's not a child per se this would be a teen okay but you asked about the ad in the deal with that that's true but i'm back on bipolar because i'm trying to distinguish for our audience that when you see somebody that has add you might think oh well i heard terry's interview and they must be bipolar no they they're just add or adhd they have an inability to concentrate their mind is gonna mile a minute they don't want to.

jerry gilbert terry america gabe howard ten minutes
"gabe howard" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"gabe howard" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"Yeah welcome to the psych central show where each episode presents an in depth look at issues from the field of psychology and mental health with host gave howard and co host vincent m wales welcome to this week's episode of the psych central show podcast my name is gabe howard and as always vincent m wales is hanging out with me and we have two very excellent guests that are going to talk to us about well just in a ray of things we have dave bronco known online as e patient dave and we have his doctor dr danny sans well known online as dr danny sands dave and dr sands are involved with what is known as participatory medicine but before we get into that part dave i understand that you have been active online for many many years and your participation in certain things helped you with a very serious illness so i got online on compuserve on nineteen eighty nine i was initially involved with desktop publishing forum and then was one of the founding ups on the ad for them and eventually i played a role in helping the run six different communities and ultimately many years later that fact played a role in my surviving of pretty much unbeatable tensor and the thing that's worth realizing is that there is a side from the social value of community and there's a lot to be said for that including when you think you're dying but they're also there is a dynamic of the flow of useful information.

vincent m wales dave bronco danny sans dr danny sands gabe howard dr sands
"gabe howard" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"gabe howard" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"Yeah welcome to the psych central show where each episode presents an in depth look at issues from the field of psychology and mental health with host gave howard and co host vincent m wales hello everyone welcome to this week's episode of the site central show podcast my name is gabe howard and with me as always vincent m wales and this week we have not one guest but two and both our guests are writers of the standing ask the therapist column which has been a mainstay on psych central dot com for quite some time please walk into the show marie hartwell walker and dan tomasulo dannon marie welcome how are you fine thank you gave is pleasure to be here yeah thank you gave invented thank you so much for having us on the show cruciate it all the pleasure is all are so let's start with marie marie can you tell us a little bit about yourself while you're qualified to write the column just maybe a hobby something so that the listeners can get an idea of who you are okay i guess what's most rose is i've been doing this work for over forty years which gives you some idea of how old i am and i've been working in the course of that forty years i've worked in a variety of settings from fine practice for well over twenty five years i worked for a time as the director of middle hope clinic and most recently as the area's psychologist for our geographical area would department of about mental services for here in massachusetts went that gives me gave in vince is very large spectrum of experience age groups foam children who've been gone by their parents to elders who have caught up to college students or a wide variety of diagnoses and included in that as a quite wide variety of disabilities so that's provided me with a nice.

gabe howard vincent m wales marie marie director middle hope clinic massachusetts vince marie hartwell walker dan tomasulo forty years twenty five years
"gabe howard" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"gabe howard" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"Welcome to the psych central show where each episode presents an indepth look at issues from the field of psychology and mental health with host gave howard and co host vincent m wales hello everyone and welcome to this week's episode of the psych central show podcast my name is gabe howard and with me as always is vincent m wales this week we have a great guest who is going to well she's going to tell us about life speak which is a total wellbeing platform that helps organizations keep their employees present productive and thriving yes i'm of course reading that right off their website so we're going to introduce an amid tag tell us all about this platform what it does and how it helps people thrive anna welcome to the show thanks very much happy be here great let's start rate off with obviously i just read the description of life speak but but what is it put it in layman's terms what is your platform do okay this is my most dreaded question because i find it very difficult to describe in twenty five words or less but i'm gonna try we at life speak have been going out into the world and seeking out leading experts who are willing and wanting to talk on a really wide range of subjects that affect people in their lives every day so we look for people who have written books on mental health or on parenting or communication skills or what have you or are leaders in their field are thought after by the media for their opinions on various topics and we've bring them into our film studio we film them talking about their expertise and what they're passionate about and we chunk those film segments down into really easily consumable digestible video modules which we house on our digital platform so we have close to two.

gabe howard