35 Burst results for "GIN"

The Timothy Leary Conviction

Today in True Crime

04:44 min | 13 hrs ago

The Timothy Leary Conviction

"On january twenty first nineteen seventy former harvard professor and so called priest of lsd timothy. Leary was sentenced to ten years in prison on drug smuggling charges but in september of that year. The fifty year-old academic broke out of a san luis obispo facility with the help of the weatherman. The daring escape only added to the mystique of the man president. Nixon wants declared the most dangerous man in america. But just what made leery so dangerous. Well it might not surprise you. That richard nixon may have been exaggerating for his own political game according to authors. Bill minna tag. Leo and stephen l davis nixon's advisors suggested he find a public enemy to distract the public from his own flagging approval rating the war in vietnam and the struggling economy. They leary a prominent figure in the counterculture movement and because the former professor was a proud exponent of hallucinogenic drug use. The president's ir fit right in with his war on drugs narrative timothy leary was something of a self appointed spokesperson for the benefits of drug use. Which heat enjoyed since one thousand nine hundred sixty after an experimental magic mushrooms trip. The already noted psychologist became excited about the possibilities. Mushrooms and similar drugs had on the human brain during his tenure. At harvard he conducted academic experiments on the effects of hallucinogens. Drawing the attention and admiration of other notable nineteen sixties figures famed authors. Like gin berg and jack kerouac willingly participated in leary's experiments and it was perhaps their involvement that catapulted the professor onto the national stage before long leary was touring the country speaking about his research and reportedly brushing up against the rich and famous inevitably a backlash arrived. Leary's teaching colleagues criticized his experimentation with lsd. They believed research of that. Nature should be left to medical doctors not psychologists meanwhile psychology experts who once lauded leary's earlier work now made it clear that his drug centered experiments were less praiseworthy. Despite these blows leary insisted that taking lsd was quote a sacramental ritual one that could expand human consciousness. Harvard university did not agree and fired him in nineteen sixty three but by that stage leary had a new life. He was a counterculture touchstone for the masses and a legitimizing scientific voice in the pro drug movement. He rubbed shoulders with marilyn monroe and sang with john. Lennon and yoko ono in short he was a powerful voice advocating for drug use throughout the nineteen sixties. He even appeared before a senate committee to argue in favor of legislation. That would make it legal for adults to use hallucinogenic drugs. So when richard. Nixon assumed the presidency in nineteen sixty nine leary was squarely in his sights. Ostensibly nixon wanted to eliminate drug use in the country. Leary very much did not. That made him dangerous. So it's little surprise that when leary's appeal of his nineteen sixty five drug-smuggling conviction was overturned. The government wanted a second bite at the apple but any joy nixon and his cabinet might have felt in putting leary. Away was short lived using his network of contacts. The former professor escaped prison remaining on the run until nineteen seventy three when he was detained in afghanistan and sent back to the united states. There he was jailed in the notorious folsom. Prison and briefly befriended charles manson and though his sentence was for ten years leary was paroled in nineteen. Seventy six having served just three. It's a surprising twist day given that so many drug offenders imprisoned for decades on similar offenses then again timothy leary was famous and white which might have had something to do with his early release

Leary Lsd Timothy Bill Minna Harvard Stephen L Davis Nixon Gin Berg Long Leary Nixon San Luis Obispo Timothy Leary Richard Nixon Jack Kerouac LEO Vietnam United States Yoko Ono Marilyn Monroe Lennon
Ep 128: Vice President Kamala Harris, Black Women and Leading with Charisse Jones, USA Today - burst 2

The Culture Soup Podcast

02:42 min | 1 d ago

Ep 128: Vice President Kamala Harris, Black Women and Leading with Charisse Jones, USA Today - burst 2

"Win senator. Kamala harris became madam vice. President elect comma harris the tortoise fear. The tiktok sphere the interwebs wit nuts. And there's a reason why she's our first black and female vice president elect an. She's first pacific asian islander. This is huge. What you say series. It is momentous and i think that when you talk about social media really good point to bring up is part of the reason that she got that appointment that she was picked by joe biden was black women coming together activists media personality saying we want a pay off our work right you know. We deserve to be in leadership. We're always doing the work of this political party and we want a black woman in that space and so you know her ascension represents not only her talent but all of the talents that came together from that movement to make sure that we were recognized in that way. And it culminates on this day. It's amazing because so much of what's going on in this political arena that led up to the elections and even there after because we had run off in georgia where black women played a huge role in moving the needle in some states. That weren't supposed to be blue. I think that's what's so interesting. Is that not only. Do you have kamla in the spotlight. Comma harris but stacey gabriel. Yes and all of those organizers who are getting that moment in the spotlight because it's so clear The role that we play at how deserved we are of recognition and being able to dispense power. And not just help other people attain it and so everything that happened after the presidential election. Has i think really made that clear as well absolutely. And you know the book. And i've shared it with you. Know thanks really centers on this other folks. I want you to understand that. What happens in the political sphere has everything to do with what happens in the corpus sphere. There is no separating it and you may say oh we don't talk politics at work that's not the point. It's the human dynamic and what we saw this political you know phenomenon that happened with joe biden choosing a black woman in response to kind of You know it was a large outcry from people that understand that time and time of gin black women have come to

President Elect Comma Harris Kamala Harris Joe Biden Kamla Comma Harris Stacey Gabriel Georgia
Using Computational Discovery to Build Better Immunotherapies

The Bio Report

08:04 min | 2 weeks ago

Using Computational Discovery to Build Better Immunotherapies

"Team. Thanks for joining us dan. We're gonna talk about immunotherapy compuserve and its efforts to pursue novel targets for ahmed cancer types. Perhaps we can been gin with the idea of checkpoint inhibitors what are they. And how do they work. He'd be taurus. Are actually proteins modulating the immune system responds in the context of fay affair. Kasim yuna therapy. It was identified. There is a crosstalk between immune cells and and the cancer. This crosstalk is being done through immune checkpoint and and usually these are inhibiting the immune system response to the to the cancer to the cancer cells and and the drugs the few drugs that are out there that are dressing these same immune checkpoint skin to treat cancer. Patients are actually am inhibiting. The inhibition exerted by immune checkpoint on the cancer cells in diff- therefore allowing the immune system to be stimulated and actually fight the cancer. This has been a a real revolution in cancer. Care but these still have limited efficacy. How how effective are these therapies at treating cancer today as of today about twenty to thirty percent of the patient population of the cancer patients are responsive to these drugs. It is increasing with time. We're more proven are being done with the current in hebrew tours. But i have to say that you know. Cancer is a movie factoria disease and and it's actually a collection of many different diseases and we're not in a situation where one treatment fits all basically declined immune checkpoint a drugs are addressing only few number drug targets and they're still many mechanisms that need to be a still a explored and and identified and drugs need to be developed in order to address the various mechanisms of action by which the kansas are actually avoiding the immune system. And here's actually that were. Competent fits in and see what we do. Discover new drug targets and developer first in class drugs to address. These struck targets copy. Jen has developed a computational based drug discovery platform. What is the platform. And how does it work. So the platform is is basically based on twenty years a fan and know how that was built at computation with being a computational discovery company for many years and then after we established a critical mass of discovery capabilities. We turn to be to. We are today. Pretty discovery and development company in generale with built computer systems tucson algorithms in order to be able to address the challenge of new drug targets discovery. And you biological halfway discovery. Identify new drug targets is a is a is a very complex isn't f. fourteens. Multiday mentioned effort and for that we had to develop a multiple systems. We've built a lot of know-how in the company and we've built a Expertise in what is called multi onyx analysis. We're not limiting our platform to a specific data type or a specific technology. Actually we're very flexible. Tools and systems an algorithms are really designed to address multiple data sources multiple data technologies and. This is because this is multifactorial and complex and filled to work in. An all of these are augmented with human expertise that we have in the company in the last twenty years. How do the targets. You've discovered differ from the targets that today's checkpoint inhibitors go after and it's very good question. Actually it's not very different in terms of you know still it's checkpoint but i think that the nature of checkpoints one as compared to the others those that are known and those that we discovered these are proteins. That are very different from one. Another so yes all of them. At least those are defined as negative customer tour costing military checkpoints. They're all inhibiting the immune system response against the cancer. But they're doing it in different ways and what we discovered is as i said you know the checkpoints are now have been translated to drugs that are in the market. A really only very few. I think about three or sociology for pd one. Pedia want and what we discovered. Is you know you biological pathways debts allowed us to discover new immune. Checkpoint that are still inhibiting the immune system response against the cancer but in a different way a different mechanism and this allows us to be able to develop hopefully no new treatments solutions. That will address those cancer patients the not responsive to the current checkpoint inhibitors check on earth. What are the issues with. Existing immunotherapy is the ability of cancers to develop resistance. Where are you doing to address that issue so this is actually exactly what we're trying to do. Am that in cancer. Immunotherapy is there are two issues right there. Ease the patients that are not responsive in does that with time that are developing what is called acquired resistance. We're we're trying to do in. The company is to try and focus on those biological pathways that we believe would address those patients that are not responsive to the current checkpoint blockade. So they're in different ways with different. Mechanism does cancers data and actually deliver a different solution to the problem. And this will were trying to work on. You know the leading the leading drug that is in development at is now owning phase one studies and we have owning michel data in the clinic but the days actually am supporting designs behind. We discovered so we discovered a completely new biological pathway identified sen typically that it is addressing am in. You am a new mechanism that still this family of immune checkpoint. The preclinical data suggested that it should address

Cancers Kasim Yuna FAY Generale DAN JEN Kansas Tucson Michel
Hello Fresh Had a Great Year, But Microwavable Meals Did Even Better

Business Wars Daily

02:37 min | 2 weeks ago

Hello Fresh Had a Great Year, But Microwavable Meals Did Even Better

"With on again off again covid restrictions keeping hungry mouths out of restaurants. It's no surprise that twenty twenty was a banner year for cooking at home. That's been great for meal. Kit companies like hellofresh and blue apron. Homebound customers tired of familiar recipes flocked offerings like smashed black bean to start as in meatloaf la mom already and under forty-five minutes hellofresh orders grew one hundred fourteen percent over a year ago according to a statement from the company as much as meal kits have shown during the pandemic though. There were no match for their biggest rival. The microwave twenty twenty was a record year for the frozen food. Aisle sales of microwavable ready meals in the us grew to more than twenty five billion dollars last year. Outpacing the growth of all other grocery items according to market research published by global industry analytics. This increased demand sent items. Like tinos pizza rolls. Marie calendar's is and trader. Joe's tikka masala flying off their ice shelves twenty twenty also saw gin hot pockets that came as a blow to military bases where the microwavable meat and cheese filled bread bars or a snacking staple so report stars and stripes magazine nestle owned stouffer is meanwhile celebrated its record year by debut in a shop where it showcased food themed clothing with slogans like cheese. Self care yeah. That one's a little debatable. Live laugh lasagna. T shirts aside. However microwaveable meals showed they could adapt to the times amy's kitchen which built a brand off organic and vegetarian. Ready meals enjoyed sales bumps up to seventy percent for some of its products as reported by food navigator usa dot com nestle. Meanwhile grew it's plant based offerings by forty percent in two thousand twenty on top of organic and meatless options. Healthy choices have been winners to namely the company's diet brand lean cuisine that is until december when pieces of plastic from a broken conveyor belt ended up in a batch of frozen mashed potatoes. I guess that means this time. At least the lou calorie frozen meals might actually tastes like plastic nestle recalled ninety two thousand pounds of their lean cuisine baked chicken and potato variety as we emerge from the pandemic. It remains to be seen whether pre-prepared microwaveable meals will continue their meteoric rise. Customers might be looking for a break from all that processed food. just ask allison robot celli. Who eight and reviewed thirty five hot pockets in four days for the takeout when recalling the experience she says nobody should attempt this without a note from their doctor

Marie Calendar Nestle Tikka Masala Stouffer LA USA JOE Allison Robot Celli
Boston doctor calls for more self-administered COVID-19 tests to stop the spread

VB in the Middle

00:33 sec | Last month

Boston doctor calls for more self-administered COVID-19 tests to stop the spread

"Women's Hospital is published a study calling for a new testing approach to stop the spread of covert 19 self administered home tests. In his study, published in the journal Science, Dr Michael Meena argues the allure test or a similar rapid test should be mass produced and sent out to all Americans. Something like twice a week. Stuff that we could Place into people. Tomes are called the rapid Auntie Gin test. They've been mired in a lot of controversy. But if your goal is to detect people who are currently infection and at risk to infect other people, these tests are very accurate. I don't have to. State

Women's Hospital Dr Michael Meena
The 7 mindsets of connectors

Industry Thought Leader Podcast

06:00 min | Last month

The 7 mindsets of connectors

"To another episode of industry thought leader podcast brought to you by industry thought leader kademi stand out the heard and influence on your highest and recross also known as the podcasting quyen. Now my guest today says the simple truth. Is this connectors find. Great success in life. And if you don't realize it yet we are now living in the age of networking. So do you want to increase your influence and impact by becoming a better connector but join no way to start with. Today's guest is going to show you. How join me on the show. Today is michelle letterman. Michelle is an accomplished speaker trainer. Approach an author of four books including the internationally recognized the levin laws of likability She was named by forbes as one of the twenty five professional networking experts to watch and a former ny professor financial executive and recovering cpa. She now works with organizations and individuals to help them build real relationship. The greater results through the company executive essentials now on today show. Michelle is going to share. Why do we need to be connected. The seven levels of connectors as well as the seven mindset of connectors. Welcome to the show. Michelle thanks for having me on. We know and of probably heard through business. That networking is so so important. But i love the way that you've said we're now living in the age of networking. It's so more important than it ever was and so today. We're really going to dive into to connecting. And what is a connector and those seven levels but what interested you. You've got a great background diverse background. What was it specifically around networking and connecting. That attracted you that now. You really specializing in that area. I always say. I teach all the mistakes ever made so that you don't make them too and i used to be that polarizing personality that's where my research started around like ability to understand. What was it that was doing that was causing either them to love me or to hate me but there wasn't a whole lot of in between and really understanding how does connection form and what enables connections to happen but what i started to learn. Was that my results. Drastically changed when. I took a relationship partisan Approach right and that's what a connector is somebody who prioritize relationships in all their interactions professional personal. It doesn't matter the relationship comes. i mean. obviously you're going to talk a little bit about. Why be connected. You've just established. It's so important to do that. Relationships what are some of the things before we dive into the seven levels of connectors. What are the things that you want us to be aware of. That might be because of what's happened in the world now while some of the things that people are still doing that would have been okay and and where you know something that we would do in the past but really moving forward into twenty twenty one. We need to realize that this is not helping us to be that connector. That person who are attracting air ideal clients and stakeholders. What are some things that we need to be aware of. Don't do this moving forward the what not to do. There's one thing in it's really interesting. This book came out in two thousand and nine thousand nine hundred and in two thousand twenty there has been a lot around the the social inequality and social injustice and there's a whole section on the book about diversifying and expanding our connections and it's great to know everybody in a certain fields or everybody a certain geographic region. It's even better when we can go broad. And when we diversify our connections we make better decisions. We have more access to information. We are further up on the connector spectrum. So what other. Things we don't want to do is we. Don't want to call out the differences. We want to call out the similarities because the differences are often obvious between us but the similarities are things that we have to look for and one of the ways to be more inclusive. Connector is to think about focusing on the similarities calling out the larry's it's not about distinguishing or disregarding those differences but that that's not where we need to start. That's not where we need to focus. It's interesting you should say that because there's been a couple of times where i've reached out to someone here in melbourne with. Just come out of area tight lockdown. So the may it's been very intentional in networking linked gin and it's interesting because some people reach and say well actually you'll not my ideal clients keeping that i've been in fray and i'm thinking well i might not your ideal client but i talked to a lot of people around the globe connected to people such as michelle let him and who is a specialist an expert in this area. And so that's the kind of thing you talking about. Is the giant. Just be so focused narrow minded. Because you just don't know who that person is connected to and can you up to a whole new area of people. Yes that's exactly it. I have always been against this networking. I'm like it. Has the word working who wants to do it. And when i was writing the most recent book the connectors advantage. My brother-in-law came into office. And he said well. What's the difference with networking in connector. And i said networking something that you do a connector. That's who you are. And that's the shift. I want people to make rather than doing something and and when we tend to network for need and we network for now and it is very narrowly focused as you said but when we think about just connecting and building relationships because we want to because we get to then we have this really firm and tight community that you can call upon and i gotta tell you it was people. I went to business school. That you got me a client at the moma and my sister's boyfriend from middle school got me into nbc so it isn't about strategic networking. It isn't about well. I don't wanna talk to you because you can't do anything for me. It's being social and curious which is one of the mindsets it's being open and accepting it's enjoying the connection for the sake of connection and knowing that the rest will follow.

Michelle Kademi Michelle Letterman Levin Larry Melbourne Middle School NBC
FDA allows use of over-the-counter home test for COVID-19

Mike Broomhead

06:38 min | Last month

FDA allows use of over-the-counter home test for COVID-19

"The U. S. The Food and Drug Administration. The FDA issued an an emergency emergency used used authorization. authorization. For For the the first first over over the the counter counter fully fully home home diagnostic diagnostic test test for for covert covert 19. 19. I I understand understand how this would work. But If they're counting covert 19 cases. This is going to ruin that. Because there are a lot of people that don't want to go get the test because they don't want to be in the database. But if they could do a home test, they're not gonna tell anybody if they test positive You know? The insurgent tests count as solid positives. I don't think they do. I think everything counts is a positive. I think if you sneeze before you die, you're a covert death. That's what I think, Boy. How many people have died of other things, But since they had covert, it was counted as a kid. I don't know. I don't keep track of the record. Okay, so don't old boy me. That's what's happening. It's pretty cool, though, to have a knack home test. You like go to Walgreens and get one right So, yes, it said it runs a liquid sample along the surface with reactive molecules to test the text fragments of proteins. The virus from a nasal swab sample from any individual two years of age or older. This is a quote. Today's authorization is a major milestone and diagnostic testing for covert 19 by authorizing the test for over the counter use. The FDA allows it to be sold in places like drugstores were a patient can buy it swab their nose, run the test and find their results in his little is 20 minutes. So as we continue to authorize additional test for at home use, we're helping expand America's access to testing, reducing the burden of laboratories and test supplies and giving Americans more testing options for the comfort and safety of their own homes. I think it's great. But what does that do to their count? Or is it gonna be after we stopped needing to count? Interesting question, right? I don't know The answer to it. To be honest, Yeah, but it is. Ah, maybe we should start putting out our own numbers. Every day. You should tweet your personal numbers in your household. It's just me. 111 negative. Hopefully, Yeah. Hopefully you're not negative. Not another negative Today, Guys update me every day. I wonder what the expense of this is going to because it doesn't say in this how much it costs. Well, that might depend on the company that you buy it from, right? Yeah. I don't know that for a fact. But I'm guessing they're selling it to this at the same price to each of the vendors, and then the vendors will charge you whatever they deem necessary. The Ellen Ellen E E L l u. M E is that a loom? Shark Cove in 19 home test uses a mid terminate nasal swab. That sounds painful. Yeah, that doesn't sound good. Yeah. Collect samples collected further back than the usual nasal swab. But not as far back as the nasal Feyerick General swab. Listen, anything in my nose is too far back. Yeah, not cool with any of it. The nasal faring geel swab. Which are only appropriate for used by trained health care professionals. I'm not jamming anything up my nose. Well, and I feel like when you're required to do the test to yourself. You're probably not. Likely tol that far, you know, like you're gonna get to a certain distance and be like Nope, That's not right. So the FDA has approved this at home test. I wonder how quickly they'll be out. And then you know there's gonna be a disclaimer on there that says that it's not always accurate. And if you test positive or negative, and will it be, Will it be sufficient? You know, like, I guess it's um What is the ticket Master? Are they the ones that are saying you won't be able to go to one of their events? If you buy a ticket through Ticketmaster without a negative test when they start opening things up a lot of places they're doing Will that count? An auntie gin at home test. Yeah. Yeah. I don't know what he's got to be from a doctor and yeah, yeah. Do you have to have like a note, right? You have to show them the physical. That like here is Yeah, Here's my negative test. It is because they're even talking about negative tests for passports now, too. Yeah, Traveling absolutely that if you're going to travel internationally, that some countries are going to require a negative test for you to be able to. If you traveled each other countries you travel abroad at all. I've gone to Mexico once. Okay? Well, I don't know that it's the same in Mexico. When you go to Europe. It is a free for all trying to get through customs. I mean, I've heard for all your herded into a room. And then you pass through the and there's no nobody's in line. Everybody's kind of pushing. So now. Not only would you have to have a passport, but you have to have a negative test. Maybe. It feels to me like the anti gin at home test is like great to have it awesome resource, but it feels less legit to me right? It feels less official. Right, And I wonder what it could be used for what an employer accept it. With the employers around here say, you know all you if you sneeze in the hallway, so the boss says, aren't go home and don't come back to you to test Could the at home tests get you back into work or do they want to see you Just go to Walgreen's after the show and you pick up a test and Right. It says negative in your leg. All right. I'm back tomorrow. I don't know if that would count. I don't know, because how many people would fake the test? How many people would not do it? A pro? Because again, this one goes back into your nose. But not all the way back. Like the other one that touches you. You know you're doing it right, right. That's a good question. But it's approved. Well, next time we have Dr Kerr Crist, our state's top public. Hello? Yeah, I would love to ask her about that at home test. Yeah. Great, classy If she would do it. Would you get the at home test for you and your fan? She's a doctor, so her at home test has got to be acceptable. She probably just can't get a test whenever she wants For, like at a moments notice I would assume and her family. They probably have the fast test because of what they do. Probably, um and I would love to ask her about Vaccines. How are the vaccinations going? You know, how is how is the rollout? Is it ahead of schedule is a behind schedule is what you thought it would be. How many people a day We got to get back on the show working on it Perfect. We what we've got to do here in this hour of the show we were talking about. Schools will probably do this at 11 30, but I wanted to bring that about the at home test. This is proof that we are seeing technology is moving very quickly.

U. S. The Food And Drug Admini FDA Ellen Ellen Shark Cove Walgreen Ticketmaster Mexico America Dr Kerr Crist Europe
Prof. Jack Burns, Professor of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences at the University of Colorado in Boulder - burst 01

Scientific Sense

29:14 min | Last month

Prof. Jack Burns, Professor of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences at the University of Colorado in Boulder - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we explore emerging ideas from signs policy economics and technology. My name is gill. Eappen we talk with woods leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation be color a wide variety of domains. Rare new discoveries are made and new technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new ideas affect society and help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation v seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide edited content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do a companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense dot com and displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics guests at other ideas please send up to info at scientific sense dot com and i can be reached at gil at eappen dot info mike. Yesterday's a jack boone's who's a professor in the department of ece fisa goal in planetary sciences unto colorado boulder. He is also vice president images for academic affairs in blue sage for disuse system system. Jack while thank you. Joe is good to be with you. Thanks for doing this so you at your team. On deeply involved in the upcoming nasa missions to the moon including The designed to place radiofrequency absolutely on the far side of the moon and be kevin deemed really back there for almost fifty years. Now i know that china s landed. I was actually looking at some photographs that just gained today from From their lander. I israel in india. Almost got there but Fleas land properly. And so so. What's our interest. What's sudden interest in going back to the moon after fifty years. Yeah i don't know that. I would characterize as a sudden interest i think on the part of the science community and really the exploration community interest has been there for a while but what has changed in the last decade is the cost doing missions And the accessibility of the moon in this new era in which we have now. Private companies like spacex and like the blue origin company. Jeff bezos company They've put considerable private resources in developing new rockets of with reusability to lower the launch costs and also technology which was extreme in the nineteen sixties to try to get to the moon. All hannity vetted from scratch now is relatively straightforward at gill as you mentioned Even a small countries like israel Private companies have contracts with nasa to fly payloads. Now it's it's it's realizable to Envision going to the moon at a relatively modest cost certainly in comparison to the sixties and seventies. Yes so that's a. It's a very interesting phenomenon. Now it's it's almost like a business model question. Space is Blue blue horizon blue origin. Laura gin and that is another company. Lakers peterson things. Well lockheed you ally the united launch alliance which is the lockheed and boeing Company as well they all have these new generation of launch vehicles that are capable of going to so nasa in some sense outsourcing Some of the transportation right to so captain made a selection or are they going to do essentially multiple companies. Do it the the plan is to have monk multiple companies just like the commercial crew program To the space station there's boeing and spacex And for the case of the moon for the un crude landers that Landers that are just carrying payloads nasa has identified a out a dozen companies To be able to transport a payloads to the moon and at the same time. They're also undergoing competition right now. They selected three companies to design as part of a public private partnership the next generation of human landers. So that's the same. Mostly the same group that has spacex blue origin and the third one is is dynamic which is a company in huntsville alabama rate. So it's nassar's goal here is They are they going to take contracts from other other countries do send pedal to the moon in these companies. The the way this is working now is nasa is buying services so they're no longer buying rockets or landers which they will then own operate Instead the philosophy is To buy a ride for example a seat On a human land or or by space for a payload so these companies that are responsible for indemnifying Making sure they have a proper insurance for losses They take A bit of the risk and and then proceed along those lots now. What that means is that the companies then they own the intellectual property they owned landers they rockets they own the The other transportation devices. So that means they can sell seats. They can sell payloads to for example a european space agency Or the russian space agency or individual companies. That might want to puts a payload on the moon Investigation in this kind of a lower gravity environment so it's much more entrepreneurial than what we had before and it lowers the cost to the taxpayer for doing all these things by the artist program. Which is the new human programs. The moon the Recently released cost to get the first woman in the next man to the moon by twenty twenty four is a factor of ten less than the apollo program. Yeah it's interesting. I remember jack I was involved a little bit on the economic side of the next generation. Space legal program two thousand two thousand one two thousand two timeframe and this was a program was supposed to replace the shuttle and we did not go forward with it and i guess so. What was the arranged with the russian system to get their astronauts into space station. Yeah the the problem was that you might recall The shuttle accident that occurred in two thousand three And then president. George w bush declared that the shuttle really wasn't safe And that needed to be replaced and it took a while. We're still in the process of of fully replacing it. The last shuttle launch was twenty eleven If i remember correctly so in the meantime in order to get to the space station What we did is contract with the russians to use their soyuz spacecraft to go back and forth the space station so we. What we did is the buy seats. Those seats cost about seventy five or eighty million dollars so they weren't cheap but eventually got us back and forth. He said before we get the details of the Admission stack help philisophical question so way we have technology advancing the about conflict. Television's really taking off machines. Getting lot smarter What does sort of the basis for sending humans Could be not accomplished thing that human could do with machines if that's a good question i'm glad you answered that you ask that question because Excuse me i think what we're looking for now is is Really different mode for doing work on services like the moon or mars. Excuse me in that. We unlike apollo you had a single astronaut. Geologists such as astronaut harrison schmitt on all seventeen doing classic field geology. With a shovel to now advance unit twenty-first-century. We're gonna to do. Is i like to say we're going to bring Silicon valley with us to the moon. So we're going to bring advanced robotics. Be telly operated. That will use a machine. Learning artificial intelligence And will team with the astronauts so that they will these. These rovers advance scouting. They will identify interesting places and then the role of the astronaut is to make critical decisions on what to investigate What the samples. Look like i. i still think it's true. I've been told from my colleagues who are geologists stromer But who are uninsured. Scientists in that the difference for example between. Let's say the The curiosity rover on mars. And what it's been doing and having a human on mars that the work that the curiosity rover has done last seven years could be done in two days by geologists. a that's the difference and to also bring back. You know better selected samples and so forth. So there's no replacing humans and that's not going to happen anytime soon but you you do your point being. You only wanna use humans when you actually have to. Because their time is valuable and they're expensive and also Walking around even on the surface of the moon is dangerous. Because the you know the a space where the asian micrometeorites another possible dangerous but going into this new environment. I think what we're going to be able to do is reduced risk and improved efficiency. The i don't remember the numbers but a human Mission is about ten x the cost of a non human mission. Obviously the the efficiency and like you say what begin out of it different but guess on the cost side. It's about the fact of a magnitude different you know. That's hard to say because robots still are very limited in what they can do. They're just so many things that only humans can do is a little bit of apples and oranges but yet you're probably right that on the ballpark about a factor of ten. Maybe even more. But there's also much more than a factor of ten improvement in efficiency. So you know. Those costs will balance out and obviously the advantage of a human is You know they've been. The unexpected happens in michigan learning in As long as you have heard of data to teach a machine but then the unexpected happens machines. noel exactly. The rover gets stuck. It suffers a mechanical problem. That If you have a human there at least in the vicinity can help fix it. And move orders you know i think about for example servicing of the hubble space telescope and that was done five times by human astronauts and The astronauts such as john grunsfeld did to the servicing missions was very clear that the telescope could not have been repaired in upgraded by anything other than humans because the tab the complexity of the task the ability to be able to get in and To make repairs Make on the spot. Decisions just You know there was no replacing that so hopefully humans have a few more years of Do i think we've got many years to tell you the truth. I think it's going to be you know in reading some of the literature. I think it's going to be a quite a long time if ever that. We have truly Intelligent self aware machines can operate with the same decision making kick be very good at repetitive calculations outstanding job of there but You know making creative innovative entrepreneurial. Decisions were We're nowhere close to that yet So i do that. A multiple missions being planned An international collaboration so he's the first one that is supposed to take off as leave. Yeah artists is the new name for the human missions to the moon Artemis in greek mythology was the sister of apollo The twin sister of apollo. She's the goddess of the moon. So that's very appropriate. Since nasa has already declared bet up for that first landing which nasa has been planning for twenty twenty four would Would have that first woman in the next man on the surface the first expedition by humans to the moon in the twenty first century. So optimistic applaud. Its name the program programming program. Yeah exactly right so so andrade damasio multiple things going on And so do we have sort of a space station like that is going to orbit the out. Yeah in fact. That's honored design. And we'll be under construction in the next few years has called the gateway lunar gateway. And it's it's not like the space station in the sense of being gigantic And being really limited to that single orbit the gateway is really more of a spacecraft is going to have a pulse in system using a new generation of solar electric bad is ion propulsion That will be piloted for potential for optometry use in going to mars. I have just a couple of modules that will be there it will be a place where astronauts coming from the earth on on the orion spacecraft which is a it plus the space launch system is a heavy lift vehicle that will take astronauts the moon they will dock at the gateway and then they will get into a reusable lander go to the surface. Come back in that lander and then the next crew that comes in will do the same thing so you don't throw everything away like we did during hollow in the nineteen sixties again. The reusability idea is Is key to keeping the costs down so so it is more dealer so can't be attached as as alright right. Ds change in the future. Cab edge more against it. We can in fact The japanese space agency jaksa recently committed to fly a module And nasa has invited others such as the russian space agency to think about them attaching A module as well so it definitely is modular. That way you can add habitats you can add laboratories And can can grow over time. But it's also the the idea is that it's going to be long duration spaceflight and it's away way from the earth's magnetic field so you've got the full range environment of what you would have going to mars. So i think nasa all also looks at. This is a prototype of the vehicle that would be sent to mars. Lucchese david some Conversations yet again. Remember that To go to mars you would rather start off. Start off from the moon. Is that still thinking or that. Exchange i don't think that's been decided but there's this potential real advantages of a loon. First of all launching from the moon versus the earth requires much less thrust. What what we call delta the. That's the change in velocity to Get off there. Because there's only one sixth gravity on the moon and secondly if we're successful in mining water from the minute we know now there's considerable amount of water at the polls of the moon That's hydrogen and oxygen. We can convert that potentially into rocket fuel. You wouldn't have to bring that from earth so the costs associated with launching some could be substantially reduced in doing this from the moon versus from your so people are actively working that right now and seeing if that might be the way to go i of think that might end up being How missions to To mars or undertaking so under optimus Are there plans to actually create a habitat a big enough habitat for people to stave or extended period of time. So nasa has designs. And once again i should mention this is. This is all international Insa is involved. The european space agency is involved in providing a module for the service module for the orion. It also will be working on the gateway. The canadian space agency is providing the robotic arm And the same will be true on the surface The idea is that the first few missions will of just get started That first nation in twenty twenty four is planned to go to the south pole of moon. Will we've never been to before and look at the water. Ice situation there but Over time by the end of the decade the expectation is that will have multiple habitats. And we'll have people staying there for long periods of time like the arctic station. It's run by the national science foundation. The mcmurdo station as called in which you have a number of scientists come in and visit for anywhere from a few weeks to staying for year here so salama but when the next generation space program was in progress space. Too big big project. I would imagine spacex Others cab this business plan so what's the clamps time Do that The gay yes. So it'll be somewhere between three and five days to get from the earth and you're right about. The tourism spacex already has a fide a japanese businessman. If i remember correctly who has bought a A ride not the surface of the moon but to orbit the moon on a spacex vehicle. Sometime in a in a few years but the it'll be in a three to five days to get to the gateway and then Another day to get down to the surface. So i fully expect by the end of the decade especially given the accessibility to the moon by the private sector and by isa companies That they will be selling seats to wealthy individuals to spend a A summer holiday on the moon is so if the if the gateway is expandable perhaps Taxpayers can make some money nasa. Well it might be. Yeah but but once again this is. The transportation for the most part is probably not going to be through nasa but by these individual companies who own their own rockets their spacecraft and now they will sell seats to to wealthy tourists. yeah and so You you mentioned the european space agency. You mentioned the canadian space agency of so. Is this like the space station. A larger collaboration or those are the three major ones. Yeah it is and you're right. There are Oh gosh there's probably a dozen or so. Companies countries rather involved in the international space station and nasa envisions this much the same thing And i to. I order all the countries that are involved in. The international space station have been invited to become involved with the gateway And so as i mentioned several have accepted with With enthusiasms others are still keeping that around and take a quick break jack. Benny come back to talk about the radio. Frequency of savitri on the far side of the more that you're designing you bet sounds good. This is a scientific sense. Podcast providing unscripted conversations bit leading academics and researchers on a variety of topics. You like to sponsor this podcast. Please reach out to in full at scientific sense dot com back Jack you're talking about upcoming missions to the moon Some of the manned mission some of some of the technology that you're sending up there there is a gateway bridges like the space station but attested propulsion its zone. Sorta are based entity source. And it's more dealer things could be attached to it. That may be subject is imploding. Creating that a launchpad so to speak to go to mars perhaps habitats that a large announced a mining for water mighty for hydrogen and other things and so he the program is called autonomous. So could be portal light program and underneath optimists. There are various things being planned right. So what are the The primary objectives all of those radius approved betas projects. I should say under under optimus. Yeah we'll go. let me let me start off by just looking at the difference with The apollo program because the apollo program ended fairly abruptly once the political goals were reached and it was never Really a sustainable program so Nasa and i think all of the governmental space agencies are looking for is for arsonist to be the beginning of a sustained presence on the moon and in space and using the moon as a stepping stone for human and robotic exploration of the solar system including getting the mars so the philosophy of artists is really quite different. So you're there the stay So you need to figure out how to live off the land. So that does mean as you're saying mining's water being able to grow crops being able to manufacture Equipments the habitats themselves from the From the of the regular or the soil material so using the the kind of advanced manufacturing capability three d. printing Electrolysis so that's a really different approach. And it means that what will be worked on is not just get there but a flag in the ground rather in full of soil and return on instead it means You know how do you figure out how to be there for the long haul so that means than learning how to to excavate how to build How to really maintain a life in a in a certain sense of independence. Part of the reason you want to do all that is because that's exactly what's going to be

Nasa Eappen Jack Boone Department Of Ece Colorado Boulder Gill Laura Gin Boeing Company Nassar Spacex Harrison Schmitt United Launch Alliance Israel Jeff Bezos John Grunsfeld Landers Hannity Andrade Damasio
Family: Ohio deputy shot Black man in the back several times

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | Last month

Family: Ohio deputy shot Black man in the back several times

"His family's attorney says a preliminary autopsy report of a black man killed by an Ohio deputy shows clear signs he was shot in the back multiple times Casey goods and junior was shot and killed last week in Columbus okay where did that happen Franklin County sheriff's deputy Jason Mead says Goodson had a gun outside the grandmother's house the family says he was out of character for good soon to have a weapon and he was delivering sandwiches salads cloak bloody murder good gins mother Tamela pain is demanding answers this does not happen good the thing is me or my family while he did this to my bed hello media is fully cooperating and disputes claims made by good since family I'm at Donahue

Jason Mead Goodson Franklin County Casey Ohio Columbus Donahue
Fort Lauderdale Airport Begins Offering COVID Tests to Travelers

Glenn Beck

00:30 sec | Last month

Fort Lauderdale Airport Begins Offering COVID Tests to Travelers

"Is offering covert tests to travelers to test types are available by an online appointment system. A rapid auntie gin test that gives results in 30 minutes and a PCR or saliva swab test with results within 48 hours to make sure that they're safe and they feel safe when they come to the airport. Also because of destination requirements. We feel that this is a much needed amenity, Salinas Asado, the assistant director of aviation at the Broward County Aviation Department, tells NBC six. The testing is from 7 A.m. to 9 P.m. daily. Florida is

Salinas Asado Broward County Aviation Depart NBC Florida
14 fired or suspended following Fort Hood investigation into Vanessa Guillén's death

Mark Levin

00:25 sec | Last month

14 fired or suspended following Fort Hood investigation into Vanessa Guillén's death

"Major changes are coming to Fort Hood after a Pentagon review of the Texas Army base. The investigation follows the disappearance and murder of Vanessa Gin, Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy. The findings of the committee. Identified major flaws with sexual harassment and assault Response prevention program from implementation reporting. An adjudication, 14 commanders said Fort Hood have been fired or

Texas Army Vanessa Gin Army Secretary Ryan Mccarthy Fort Hood Pentagon
First Britons receive Covid-19 vaccine, a landmark moment in the pandemic

Squawk Pod

01:28 min | Last month

First Britons receive Covid-19 vaccine, a landmark moment in the pandemic

"This month in. We'll see with the panel meetings. I think they can you know in the old days. I don't know if you guys remember following until closer remember you know stocks like center gin and they're all these these different Biotech company to are important drugs. And we've used a sweat out those panel meetings When we know that there would be an advisory panel and we'd always say of course. The recommendation of an advisory panel doesn't mean full. Fda approved when we had all these ways of following them and these are the same issue the same ones that we're seeing right now and we used to say There were a couple of times when the full fda didn't do what a panel said. That's obviously not could happen this time but it always took longer than than we wanted to as news people waiting for the panel's hope. I bet you this happened really quickly the day they meet. I bet you we hear this is this is emergency use authorization that they're they're they're going to be voting for. That's a faster process to twenty. I it's a good start. We won't getting any. But you thought i think that that tape of the individual that we saw it was receiving the vaccine. That's that's what we have to remember. And those are the people that that we're talking about that really have a big problem with covid and i. I constantly struck by that. If i go the supermarket or something and i or wherever i am and i see someone who who really is advancing years

FDA
Coronavirus among health workers: Exposure, lack of testing

All Things Considered

03:38 min | Last month

Coronavirus among health workers: Exposure, lack of testing

"Workers are still having a hard time getting coronavirus tests and as NPR's Laurel Wamsley reports, the lack of testing means there could be lots of asymptomatic healthcare workers caring Pretty sick people. In a recent round table with Joe Biden. Mary Turner, a nurse in Minnesota, told the president elect something he found surprising. Do you know that I have not been tested yet? And I have been on the front lines in the ice to you since February. You're kidding me. No guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control say that healthcare personnel should be tested if they're symptomatic or haven't known exposure to the corona virus. But treating covert 19 patients while wearing personal protective equipment, or pee pee Doesn't count as exposure that warrants testing. A recent survey by national nurses United, the nation's largest nurses union, found that only 42% of registered nurses in hospitals said they had ever been tested for covert 19. It continues to amaze me that we are not doing this. Michael Mina is an epidemiologist at the Harvard School of Public Health. He says, Well, PPE generally offers good protection. There have been outbreaks of hospitals at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, where Minna runs the virology Lab. One outbreak involved 42 employees and 15 patients. Hospital blamed patients not wearing masks, staff without eye protection and employees failing to social distance while eating. Now that is an outbreak that shouldn't have happened. I believe very firmly that we would not have seen an outbreak grow so so quickly and it wouldn't have even been able to get started. If we were doing frequent testing. There are so many ways that hospital could be doing this and they're not Ministers. Hospitals could either use rapid auntie gin tests or pool PCR tests to do screening for the virus more cheaply they get Have ever on swab and put 50 swabs that a time into 12 and run that one tube and cool the test for very, very cheap. You could do a whole hospital departments with one Past for 50 Bucks a day. California State Health Department announced new guidance two weeks ago that strongly recommends weekly testing of healthcare personnel. But hospitals have struggled just to get enough tests for patients. Susan Butler. Wu is associate professor of clinical pathology at USC, and she directs the clinical microbiology lab at a large hospital in Los Angeles. So we were to take something like this recommendation. Where, Okay, let's say we screen everybody weekly. There's very few clinical hospital labs that would be able to have that much testing available to be able to do that. Color. Woo says that her hospital there are 10,000 workers that would likely need testing under the new guidance, and she says, without operational support from the state, the new protocols are going to cause problems. Including greater testing backlogs, but as a country because we don't have a national plan or national strategy, these air this This is the situation we find ourselves. Football players can get tests people choosing to socialize and wanting to feel safer doing so, even though it's a pandemic can get tests but a program to test the country's health care workers. Nope. Many nurses and doctors suspect hospitals are worried that widespread testing could reveal asymptomatic cases and then result in quarantining critically needed staff. And for Mina, the Harvard epidemiologist, The lack of regular testing of health care workers raises other questions. There's a clear problem when we're saying that the greatest risk people, the people who are at the greatest risk to themselves and to their patients or the health care workers, and so that's why we're going to give them vaccines before anyone else. But then when we don't have a vaccine, and it's just testing, we say, don't worry about it. It's not a big deal. You don't need to be tested. It's an approach, he says. That doesn't make sense.

Laurel Wamsley Mary Turner National Nurses United Brigham And Women's Hospital Michael Mina Joe Biden California State Health Depart NPR Susan Butler Harvard School Of Public Healt Centers For Disease Control Minna Minnesota Boston WU USC WOO Los Angeles
Scottish leader says she could seek 2021 independence vote

KCBS Radio Midday News

04:35 min | Last month

Scottish leader says she could seek 2021 independence vote

"Appears headed to another independence referendum as soon as next year. First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said today that she would campaign next year in the Scottish elections to hold the vote in 2014, Scotland, voted to remain in the UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson has said that he won't agree to another vote being held. Form or on all this. We're joined live on the case. CBS Ring Central News Line by Sky News reporter and a Brady. So, Andy in the fast forwarding from 2014 to today, we've had Brexit Debate. We've had covert 19 of those factors. And what's bringing this back up again? Yeah, massively. So I've been working in Scotland the last few weeks. I've been in Edinburgh. I've been in clouds Go and let me tell you People are talking about Scottish independence again. Two reasons. Exist, means that the United Kingdom on January the first will be pulling out with the European Union. Gotland in that Brexit referendum of 2016, Scotland voted overwhelmingly 58% in favor off staying in the European Union. So Scotland is being removed from the European Union and all the benefits. Freedom of movement travel around Europe, No passports, no visas. You know none of the hassle and Scotland's being dragged out of Europe against its will. And then feed in the corona virus situation. Where Nicholas Star gin, her leadership she has every lunchtime. Since the pandemic started here at the end of March. Really, she has hold hosted the daily TV and radio updates without fail every single day. Boris Johnson missed meeting after meeting news conference after news conference sent deputies sent assistance. People in Scotland have seen strong leadership. They see it in Nicholas Sergeant, and that is fed into this. Is we mentioned? UK Prime Minister Horace Johnson says he doesn't want another vote to be held. Does he have the power to block that from happening? Yes, he has. So that's the problem for Nicholas Sergeant and everyone that wants Scottish independence. Gotland being part of the United Kingdom. It does have the Scottish Parliament. Those of the elections that are coming up in April. Now Nicholas Sergeant Hart Party, the SNP Scottish Nationalist Party. They would be the odds on favorite to be the overwhelming Party of power again in Scotland, and I'm sure they will be so she will be hoping from mandate from the Scottish people for her leadership and her dealing with covert but also for her manifest off discussion dependence on if she wins the elections, as she surely will in March. On April. I mean, it's it's with never going to happen that the other parties they're going to be there because our numerically historically her party is being so strong. She will then say to Boris Johnson. The people have spoken here. We want another referendum. His party, the conservative Party in Westminster. They've already said that the 2014 referendum was a once in a lifetime opportunity and people voted to remain in the union. And is this strictly an internal debate within the UK or do European allies way in one way or the other on this? So ultimately the decisions will be made and taken and decided in Britain, You know, in London, it will be the prime minister's call. As to whether or not there is the referendum on then, if there is a referendum, you'd be looking at the tail end of 21 into 22 on it will be the people of Scotland who discovered that decide their future if they won't remain the United Kingdom or they want to go on so long beer. Independent Republic of Scotland If you like. Well would be external factors. I mean, you know a lot of countries around Europe a lot regions around Italy. Take Catalonia, For example, in Spain, Barcelona being the capital there, you know they would look at Scotland. And be envious of a country that has that kind of opportunity. These regions that want to go solo and become independent republic, So it's huge. It's fascinating, and I'll tell you one thing. You do really sense when you're in Scotland. Working is Very, very distinct separate identity, You know, from people's accents, even the cash the money you use. It's still a pound sterling but Scottish banknote. And everything is different, and it's really interesting. I mean, this will be a huge 12 months. Big election. Nicholas Star Jin will be confident. I mean, she speak so clearly everyday people in Scotland lots of rules and regulations to follow, but because of her leadership and how distinct she sounds an hour, her clarity off communication the whole way through the pandemic. People know who she is and what she's done for.

Scotland Nicholas Sergeant Boris Johnson European Union Cbs Ring Central News Gotland Nicholas Star Gin Nicola Sturgeon Prime Minister Horace Johnson SNP Hart Party UK Europe Sky News Brady Edinburgh Andy Scottish Parliament Conservative Party
Seattle-area's Pierce County studying rapid COVID-19 testing in schools

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:45 sec | Last month

Seattle-area's Pierce County studying rapid COVID-19 testing in schools

"County Health Department reported 411 new cases of the virus Saturday. That's the highest one day total since the pandemic began. So for now on Lee kindergarten and first grade students will continue in person instruction. The district has also asked any families who traveled for Thanksgiving or attended a gathering outside their immediate household to keep their child home for two weeks, just in case there were exposed. This is a very difficult pandemic for for education Starting today, Assistant Superintendent John Hellwig says. They're going to be offering the auntie gin chest to the roughly 2000 students and staff who are attending in person. They would get that test weekly. It's a pilot program with a goal to have 100% participation. But if not enough, people buy in the county says it would probably end the program.

Lee Kindergarten County Health Department John Hellwig
The Apollo Library for GraphQL

Talking Kotlin

03:23 min | 2 months ago

The Apollo Library for GraphQL

"For folks that don't know anything about this. What is apollo. how does it fit with roth. Qu'ils can you give a brief overview of that. i can take that question So how doing oscar. Much since the beginning and we have open source implementation of logically. Things are off curiel. Stacks maybe i should say oh god stop would be good. Oh so rescue allies I like to think of it as a rest on steroids. So it's a way to communicate with your back. End of that allows client to query specific fields as a need so unlike at traditional rest. Api you query. Jesus and you have off seems so some of the things you might want and some of the things you might not use we've got you l. You can clearly hea- quest only the shells and that as to unit so it's It's a nicer bathroom. Mincy women and its way to model your your data your back Which moves a lot of patients between kids and and on top of that. The nice thing we ask you this. What's a started. What made me love got you all is that it's a completely totally tight. It's actually. It has some similarities with coach because it has features such as a note safety and all types. It's it's a computer type system. So i think it's a very good candidate are good companion to have a when writing quran. So it complements kotla nicely basically right. Yeah there's a to walk city well together because of the same concept and being able to have type safety from your beckoned to your funded is a super useful and as a korean developers are really okay so now tell us about apollo. Where does this sit up. And the way it is Actual clients for and Also falls a jvm and for coaching. They took that later. So it's named envoy because this is where most of us use it so issue haven't annoyed that and you have acura beckham apollo android Will generate models typeset models. That mucho back. So in a very high level it's a adultery gins that generate some code and sauce. Feis that you can later use with a one timer is at two does fascinating and also all kinds of things like jerry quest gushing so essentially you give it an end point and then it generates everything needed to talk to that endpoint right. Yeah give it an an point and customer fight so you would you fight your language. So you'll give goth terrell. find your. give us chemo. Defines orders types in your back end and that put the models for that

Curiel Mincy QU Kotla Roth Oscar Jerry Quest Terrell
The Simple Yet Transformative Power of Breathwork

The Essential Oil Revolution

05:46 min | 2 months ago

The Simple Yet Transformative Power of Breathwork

"Hired him here with jin broil who is an essential oil specialist breath. Work instructor am health coach. She helps individuals restore and optimize their health by calming the nervous system reducing stress and awakening their inner healer. She recognizes that in over stimulated nervous system compromised gut health and suppressed emotions lead to imbalances throughout the mind body and spirit. Jin combines the healing power of breath work essential oils other holistic modalities to help clients create a lifestyle of health vitality and freedom gin and welcome to the show. It's so great to have you here. Thank you mantha here. Who i really wanted to have you on the show because i love this topic of breath work because it's a tool that we all have ray like you don't have to buy anything you don't have to go to the store or train for however long hours to learn how to use your breath to feel better right. It's so powerful it is. It is one of of the things that we have built with. Anna's and you know we just haven't been taught how to use it in certain ways that promotes healing and restoration but yes life giving tool and when we bring awareness to it and consciously breeze we can we can spark so many benefits from that and like you said it's available to us all the time it's free. It's it's an us south one of the easiest things that we can incorporate absolutely so it had a new come to discover breath work in your own life. Yeah so. I got into the holistic health world about ten years ago and like many of us that start down that natural help path oftentimes. It's when we're trying to solve our own health challenges or that of a loved one and that was the case for me. I have been at the time experiencing chronic digestive shoes for a number of years and just never did anything about it just managed at the best i could. And then it started kind of stemming into other symptoms anxiety and hormone imbalances and other things. And at that time you know the my late twenties and i was working in pharmaceutical sale. And i knew. I really believe in that conventional model medicine. That's all i really knew. And i thought it offered all of the solutions to all l. mets. But when it didn't for me i was kind of forced to look elsewhere and i started reading books on nutrition and that led into this whole world of alternative medicine and vocational medicine. Integrative medicine and holistic health and it opens my eyes to all of these other options and solutions and it sparks passion in me and i ended up going back to school to study integrative nutrition and from there i discovered essential oil to j. incorporated into my own daily practice and then currently use my clients because i find them to be so powerful and then through all of that to you know it really is a journey. I stumbled upon breath work after coming up in conversation multiple times and making okay. What exactly is breath work. Like i've heard of like deep breathing and in certain style of breathing what is an actual bradford practice. And so i was out in california. The time and i attended a few different styles of breath work classes and was blown away by the power of breathing in certain pattern for an extended period of time. And what that can do for your mental wellness your emotional wellness physical wellness and just calming the nervous system. Just truly leaving. You feeling just restored and lighter and free and happier just through breathing and though i dove into my own personal bradford practice and through that really felt the call to become an instructor. Share this with other people. Because i think it's something that is not why as widespread needs to be and it can offer so many benefits to just anybody. Yeah i really want to dive into a central breath work and go hand in hand and i know that it's such a beautiful relationship between the two and it can be but but i tell me who could benefit from from breath work and do they need to know anything coming in or you know what can it help. And what can help. It can help so much honestly. The type of breath work that i teach is called. Soma bre you don't need to know a whole lot coming into it. You don't need to train for it. You know you know. We're we're really breathing in a rhythmic diaphragm. Matic form for most of the practice. And then we do some breath holding as well so in terms of what it can help with and and who it can help. I mean everything from from supporting physical health along with emotional health and mental health. So it really helps you know through calming the nervous system getting out of that fight or flight. Response that survival mode. We are able to activate appear sympathetic nervous system and thaddeus estate in which we heal k and and that's a state in which we restore and so so. This breath work really help. Balance the nervous system and get

Jin Broil Mantha JIN Anna Mets Bradford United States California Matic
Warriors' plan aims to allow 50% fan capacity

KNBR Tonight

05:03 min | 2 months ago

Warriors' plan aims to allow 50% fan capacity

"Year. We should have something to cheer about. But now, of course No fans or will there be? Or in the ESPN. Ramona Shelburne. Warriors have a plan a very expensive plan. Get 50% capacity at Chase Center this year. If you might be saying deter, how the hell are they going to do that? And I asked the same question. And I'm still pretty skeptical that they can pull this off because as of yesterday or maybe even the day before that, I believe they just rolled back. Lot of openings that we were doing here in the city of San Francisco. Situation is not getting better. Getting worse. We're not going to get into the nitty gritty of that. Because that is something I'm not fully qualified to do, Nor probably are you unless you are. George Rutherford, Dr Jordan Rutherford Police feel free to call in Anyway, KNBR. Warriors want to get 50% capacity. At Chez Center. And here's How Joe Lake up who, by the way Bio tech billionaire public health. Degree from U C. L A nose a little bit about. This has a little bit of expertise in this area. I wouldn't say he's epidemiologists or anything like that. I wouldn't put him in charge of the Coronavirus task force. Or anything like that, but certainly more qualified than myself. To figure out how to get 50% capacity. At Chase Center. Now bear with me hear it does get a little In the weeds. But when we're talking about this, we need to be specific about what the hell's going on. This information is important, even if it is a little dense. I'll do my best here but bear with me. The plan is Lakers going to spend $30 million Which you might say That's chump change. That's an Andrew Wiggins. The test every fan employees and player Media to be determined. I would imagine that he's not going to spend the money on us Can't really blame him. Of course, you will have masks and you will have distancing. But the plan is they're going to use a rapid PCR test. So the PCR test that's the deep one right where they get real up in the nose. Those were supposed to be about 99% accurate Now, Joe Lake Up, says he's gotta read. He's got a He's got a guy. He's got a plug. You can get him rapid PCR tests. That means 20 minutes or so you could get an answer, as opposed to what we saw with Major League baseball, where it's 24 hours later, which worked out great at the end of the World Series. I mean bang up job. Think about the amount of times that baseball had a problem this year because of the delay. We're going from 24 hours to 20 minutes. And you might go. We already have rapid testing like that, Peter, we do. There. Auntie Gin tests. Now this is this is the difference. The PCR is the 99% 1. So that's finding any kind of the virus. In your nose. Going up in there finding some of the virus. And then through technology being able to figure out, you know. If you have it or not, If you can't find it after the amplifying, amplifying, amplifying, amplify you don't have it. You got a little bit it. The anti Jin tests are different. They're looking for something that is bound. To the virus. Basically, you have to be shedding the virus in order for the anti Jin test to succeed. Now, those tests are very fast. Take like 10 15 minutes, right? You could get a result. If you're shedding the virus, you probably are showing some symptoms. And so it's estimated. But there is a 30 to 50% miss rate. With these rapid auntie gin tests. Which at a certain point you're like, Why are we bothering with him? Why are we spending all this money? The PCR is the way to go to believe to be 99% accurate. If we could have a situation where the PCR test He's going as fast as the anti gene tests. I don't know about you. But 99% is a lot better than 50% or even 70% on its best day. The Joe Lake up once rapid PCR tests for every fan player and employees. On day of game. Now. I don't know what it's not like You could put everybody in a room in test. Um, just sit around. Mean Chase Center has a great filtration from everything I heard. I heard that well before you know, we really cared about filtration because that was something I cared about him. Big fan, big fan of ventilation. I think they can change out. The air and Chase Center four times an hour like change out the entirety of the air, which seems like a pretty good thing to do. You could also have nothing but outside air coming in. Really let it flow. And I say that would be a good plan. But these rapid PCR tests are the difference. And then George Rutherford. The After mentioned George Rutherford public health expert saying This is as close to a perfect plan as I've seen

Chase Center Joe Lake Ramona Shelburne George Rutherford Dr Jordan Rutherford Chez Center Coronavirus Task Force Warriors Andrew Wiggins Espn San Francisco Lakers Major League Baseball
"gin" Discussed on TechFan

TechFan

07:32 min | 6 months ago

"gin" Discussed on TechFan

"It's the dumbest concept in the world. It makes absolutely no sense. It's like you know if you've got if you've got missiles and tanks and planes and that sort of thing, the idea of building a really big awkward humanoid robot that's GonNa Fight. Other big humanoid things is kind of stupid. You're absolutely right. Be called Oneida fact that. Machine fight each I like that. This is only cool. If they actually have sixty foot giant robot boxing matches that's the only time as we cool. But Pacific Rim. Stupidest concept in the world. Okay. Aliens come through some kind of a portal in the ocean up they start attacking for. Yeah they don't. On the whole point, is they all giant momentum's they offer some? Gold seal regular weapons don't work against them, but yet a giant robot with a sword though that's The whole world gets behind this. It's the dumbest shit ever. Really. Do The people that made this movie not realized how fast and powerful. Sabatte shout out of a m one tank is and what it could do. Took effectively what their armor on the the natural armor on these monsters are such that that's going to penetrate but a giant robot. Has Enough power. It's got more power and it's punch than a tank. Sabatte round are you retarded? I mean it's just the Albert. I'm sorry. What what I find most amusing about this is not your critique of the concept behind Pacific Rim is the fact that you as a siphon. Fan. Will Watch ships flying through hyperspace stores. Yes That stuff you know guys with lasers loads. And then having special powers that they can move things around the room by sucking on an energy field. You you you. You you all down with that but giant fussing robots. That's the step far. Because the problem, what they set to be modernized defeated the emperor with a giant fighting robot. You would change your cheering my I would not. Use The dumbest thing ever. I and I look I I get iron man. I answer array as long as you stay diddy of you blow him up to sixty foot. Well, that's just unbelievable It's not the fact that it's a giant robot. It's a fact that. Modern weapons don't hurt this. God's Zilog Guy Blizzard things but yet a fist robot that's that's the way to go. The science behind David it's office yes science. Yes. I mean facie. You can shrink at a nuclear accidents, the size of a chess and give it know feel and it can powered armor plated man for hours and hours and hours, but you come come on now yet these discharged credibility if you were going to build a robot that sixty four in size or a baby, even bigger and heavy fire giant, Monster Basil and Tomo Joy that's just ridiculous because what they're saying and they even said it is the conventional, weapons. Don't hurt the monsters. That's the part I have a problem with and that the only thing that they could come up with is giant walking robots. Sold Duffy. Sword. Let's Champs. It's. Just, strange Craig givens. Everybody knows if you're GONNA FI-, China monster giant robot Diane. A giant robot. Yeah. That's right. China Chime onces down with that right but let's listen. We're GONNA watch some F16's with some Sidewinder missiles and we're GONNA have barbecue. Gun. The problems? That doesn't work for some reason. The these rockets. Going at Mach Twenty hitting the same with an explosive charge does nothing. But at this giant fist holding a sword, that's the way that'll take it out. You know what? They didn't need the whole robot. All they needed to do with strap the giant fish with the solden it to missiles. Fired at him why? Why why does it take to people together to power this thing a sixty foot. So what do you expect? You expect one guy to do that is not a load lifter for God's sake no a full truck have to be imperfect sink. It's so smart. Yeah. 'CAUSE 'cause you have have you never have you never participated in a three legged race is basically the same thing as a sixty foot robot COMP- trouble to. member. You've got. Three legged rice and you're think you ain't going. Out so his his that will be cooler if they fought the giant monster with a thrilling C.. Don't get me wrong there. There are some aspects of the movie that are enjoyable. Now, three legs, there's no big sex sociologic. If this would have been set in some kind of alternate world where we have tanks and jets. Sidewinder missile say the it's it's so much in the real world with sixty foot robots and giant monsters coming through spatial. Documentaries remotely alternate universe and so on. But they tried to set it in modern times that this is the world and then these portals start these giant robots or giant. Aliens Comfort Start Tearing Shit Up, and there's just nothing we can do. I. Think if anything the last six months is pretty is that whatever huge will threatening challenge? The world changes the the the world is not remotely capable of doing last. The most simplest thing to actually fight it in a knighted manner. Because, what would happen in real life visit nobody were build John Rabaul each country would trying to build its own John Ribot. Ya. Probably find the other ones at the same time, and then there would be people demonstrating saying we don't need John Robots because they to be used to oppress the people through. Don't use the tanks. That's Don't don't use the Apache helicopters to center this thing. Just fully issue. How does the tank attack the giant monster win this hour see. Coming on the land if they just stayed out at sea who gives a shit but they keep coming down the Landau because they tend to treadle thing. Yeah. But if even if they do while there's much tanks there this is going to light Mike it's Christmas tree and. I. Believe that you are over smashing the power of the average time You know maybe if they built a giant tank into a robot and then had to go find them, they did that come on let's be honest they they made the giant tank robots transformers. You know they came out with a new transformers on A. Net flicks and Alex Jones be watching the he clinton joy you I washed it. It's not bad You GotTa forget everything. You know about transformers..

Pacific Rim John Robots Oneida Monster Basil Craig givens Sidewinder Landau Duffy John Ribot John Rabaul David China Mike A. Net Tomo Joy Alex Jones Diane clinton
"gin" Discussed on TechFan

TechFan

08:20 min | 6 months ago

"gin" Discussed on TechFan

"He's doesn't some really good movies and inception thought was exceptional. And another one you know I think he does movies that really stand up to repeated viewing. To me I think that was That's one that people didn't seem to really liked the ending I thought the ending was perfect. Exactly the way should been. and I'm looking forward to tenant, but here's my problem. And this kind of a big problem for me. Christopher Nolan is a firm believer of the movie going experience. He still shoes a lot of stuff on seventy millimeter. you know he's a vivax stop sign. He wants you to go to a movie theater to see it because that's how he makes his movies for movie theater and I get that. That's cool. Except in the middle of fricken pandemic in hundreds of thousands of people are dying and he's pushing movie theaters to reopen as soon as possible. So people can watches movie. I have an issue with that I think that that is amazingly irresponsible. Well So. He's a thing I've got the theme for this week's. This week's episode really is, is it Christopher Nolan pushing it? Yes. He's done interviews. He's actually come out and talk to the press. He's not want this movie to go right to video right? That's well, that's a different point. Yeah. Is he pushing for it to be released now? Yet, or is he just saying whenever it's ready? I want it to be seen in the movies is at the studio is pushing it to Really Been Royce now or is it or is it Christopher Nolan himself saying I wanted to be released. Now I think they're on the same page. Everything, I've read I saw like they're more on the same page I am not so sure and this is where. The problem is it comes down to con-. Bad reporting really is the hulk of these stories is that they want to get this movie theaters. They conflate that with they WANNA, get the phases I've missed quick as quickly as possible. Therefore, they want to get this this movie theaters as quickly as possible, and then you have the story of the theaters who really want to reopen because they're not making any money groped, but they're terrified of putting off people by by making a lot like again the they're being irresponsible. Yeah, and the problem is is that is the way I'm in look hey, we go his his a headline that just kind of under steitz this this is from and says Christopher. Nolan movies. Ranked by with I'd risk my life to see them. That's horrible. Now is horrible. Yeah. I think that going oaks. Is really behind this number experience you know criminal than pushing to have his his movie put out. You know in the middle of a pandemic Christopher, Nolan just trying to kill everybody in the pandemic just for the sake of his movie. That's the narrative that's being put out there I'm just not convinced from the level reporting. I've seen about this because I've seen very few quotes from Christopher Nolan seen a lot of people saying, Oh, you know, and it's certainly true that tenant has had several release dates of all been in the middle of the pandemic. Originally, it was GONNA be June, July and August, and now it September and. You know and certainly you know Nolan is clear that yes, you said. He feels the these movies can't be can't be put straight to video there had to be seen in the theater, but whether he's pushing. A weather in Warner brothers pushing it just not make clear in these stories and then I think that's Reporting friendly. Well, that doesn't surprise me but here's the thing. In here, the broader question. Is it the is this the end of movie theaters. it depends how long it goes. Awful. However. Here's the thing for. How long have we been talking? We can go years back on. Tech Fan. Where were you and I have had brief conversations About video on demand and how you know it's it. We think forget putting the pandemic site without that. That's a better way to enjoy movies for a lot of people. It's a lot less expensive. Yeah. Your in the. Privacy of your home, you can pause to use the bathroom. It's just a better experience now with stuff like sixty, five inch televisions in four K. under five hundred dollars Y-, you're not getting a sub-standard viewing experience at home, and this isn't people watching on their phone. They're watching on big screens at home with really decent audio. So at what point is a movie theater just simply done because more and more people are going to say you know what I'm just going to wait till comes out on video that's been going on since a vhs grace started and that hurt the movie but no eight has an no, it has i. Know that situation has been going on I remember very early on the movie theaters chains being concerned about the impact on viewer figures and the uncertainty I think during the nineties, there was a general. Steady decrease in in in overall viewing figures, they kinda turned it round towards the end of the nineties. And and really mid-2000s onwards then exploded again because they've started doing good movies that well, these big these big ticket popcorn movies that people want to see The the the question yet does not. So to me, there's no question that people enjoy going to see these big movies at theaters. Yeah. The difficulty is, is that Do they enjoy? That experience marched they prepared to risk their health for it and to me the question is independent of the movies themselves and is more about the movie theaters and what's going on at the moment. Basically while cove it is is around you compaq a movie theater and I don't think it's going to happen. Moving forward. No I'd I can agree with you. It's clearer and clearer to be honest if it's clear to me right from the beginning but certainly the what's been happening the last couple of months, which is a loss of for various different reasons whether the economic with the political with an ideological the right around the world, we've seen a phases of countries that have done a lockdown and then have released wrote lockdown and some of them have. Released lockdown in different ways some of them have just basically ignored the problem gone away like in your country A, my country they've been kind of conservative in that sort of thing, but it doesn't matter where they've done or how they've done it in pretty much every company no matter how they dealt with code. As soon as they've released their measures, we've seen a bounceback of the virus, which is obvious because it's not an away. And this is a contagious virus, and as soon as people start mingling more than the virus spread small. No matter what. What what controls you put in place the the only real way of stopping the virus from spreading keeping people upon so. Movie theaters face a problem because their business is packing people together and I I don't think even if they they had perfect moss compliance and with social distancing yet, they would be able to get enough bums on seats on a regular basis for movies to be particularly viable. and so the reality is, is that while this crisis continues to go on in it but to me, it's becoming clear that this is this is a thing we're gonNA be living with for a few years at least. Is. Community theaters operate in a way that that they can stay open and I don't think like can I think the? The mechanics of the movie industry a look at the the reason they're pushing hard for tenant. I'm talking about Warner Brothers now Christopher Nolan. Spent two, hundred, million dollars on that. You're a big chunk of that money is marketing and they need to get it back and that means they need to have this. These comedies big opening weekends with a long tail and.

Christopher Nolan Warner Brothers compaq
"gin" Discussed on TechFan

TechFan

06:10 min | 6 months ago

"gin" Discussed on TechFan

"This week David. Yeah McKay. Bataille tired ad spend the day in the hospital yesterday it gets my daughter suspect illness which turned out to be nothing it was while. It's nothing serious nothing Siri yet it could have been either appendicitis or an infection tenants being. Like. Well, it's not as it's nothing serious. Now, if it was two hundred years ago, disinfection could have turned into a life or death situation. That, that's true and. I look at stuff like that. Sometimes people go. Oh, it was nothing. It was this diarrhea killed more people two hundred years ago than almost anything. Yeah. Now Little Hill and we're fine. Yeah. As, well, the the other thing is that it meant going into all spill in the covid situation, which is interesting, but they actually had that really well sorted now, they just my dentist I told you that you know I had some dental work done some pretty serious dental work and you know before you even walk in the building, they're coming out to take your temperature and asking you some questions and. Exactly what they did for us and I like that to be on it I, want to I'm not worried about me because I take my temperature for two days and actually might temperatures usually lower than the average human I don't know what's up with that I'm usually under. Like I've been at ninety, six six. Ninety, six, ninety, seven, one, the the I read I read something A. Couple of a couple of months back. They said actually they think that the Average, shall we use his wrong because it went when it was when when it was first taken, the thermometers went as accurate. They either win is accurate and also the changes in temperature that everyone goes through during the day wouldn't really understood so. You know nowadays I find that unless. I mean, they weren't even talk about you being favorite unless it's like at least one half degree centigrade above the national averages But this was one of the things yesterday's that Charlotte had had a temperature. So they were very cautious with as they. She had a separate one, they put anybody. Even though is irony assessment triage and all that they they put on the separate ward and a separate room for anybody who had a temperature in cases of Covid here say they went mixing all the people good. One of those people that you don't have code, but you've got an infection like she does now you're put on the word with other people covet now no this this was this was the yeah. But the when it was award, it's all separate rooms. It's Ashi on award way share that was precisely the thing normally in accent in the UK, you go to a Sadler as you've seen them on the other side, those cubicles with the curtains that come around but you know actually physically separated from the other people. That's where you would normally go for accent emergency that because of covid they base anyone in temperature goes into a world where we have separate rooms for everybody. And and that basically Yukon can't go anywhere until I tell you can go. So you all complete gaslight did not have to se. `Ok never seen all spills cleaned. Enough spent a of time in all spills with my kids over the years and. The. Cleaning regime has really been up which is. A good thing that be they should awards been not really. Really clean here in the US. Yeah. The no hidden here. Are they they switch trim? They switch from the nurses cleaning them about twenty five years ago to contract cleaners and the way contract cleaning. Gaza courses the goes to the contract cleaning with the lowest price and then you get the people who are. The least interested in doing a good job and so you end up with lousy cleaning. It's A. Cleaning and hospitals always been a very serious thing here in the US. I'm sure there are some older hospitals that aren't the best but most of the hospitals that I've ever been in. I've always been exceptionally clean. Yeah. So anyway on. Cutlass. Let's talk about some geeky stuff. This is Let's stick with Kobe situation going on. This is kind of bothered me. There's a there's a move new movie coming out. called. Tenant. And had spy Christopher Nolan looks very interesting and let's be honest. Christopher Nola makes great movies. No question yeah. I don't WanNa say he's the modern day Steven Spielberg I. Don't think that's quite what he does. But he does make blockbusters in their the thinking man's movies for the most part. They tend to I mean he's much more involved in the rising creation process and just being the director wrote and so he's project for Star and yes, he does have stuff that tends to be. The cerebral or even if it's popcorn in's taken, it has it has a depth to that many other movies don't have and obviously you know he's responsible for the Batman. The BATMANS, their revised Batman series stuff like Dunkirk, which was a you know a very you know very different. I mean everyone praised the the world will we saw last year? What was I was? Nineteen Something, anyway I never watched which. which was shot in real time or was shot as if it was unreal. I ate well, it's not but it it. It presents an illusion that it is and it's very cleverly done and all of this thing and they do skip forward by using you know people being unconsciousness or thing, but it's a great to be honest with you emptiness. Great. Great movie. But dunker catch Lee kind of did something a little bit similar earlier in the they present he present the whole story of Dunkirk from three people's viewpoints and every time you see them, it's kind of moving in real time and the interlinking between different peoples very cleverly done. Here that they used to to do it and it was really clever. Yeah. Yeah, and it had it had. What's his name? The Guy Played Bane? The Tom Tom Hardy Tom. Hardy. Wearing a mask and speaking through a mosque and that's always good entertainment site. So I think..

Covid Tom Tom Hardy Tom US BATMANS Bataille Siri McKay David Christopher Nolan Steven Spielberg Little Hill Yukon Christopher Nola gaslight Batman Charlotte Ashi Gaza UK
"gin" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

07:34 min | 7 months ago

"gin" Discussed on FoodStuff

"Typhoid fever so probably to help the situation, none of those things now. But catch on. They did and the Spanish basically had a monopoly on the proven crops, so they made a mint. Legend. Has It that it was sometimes referred to as bark from the fever tree? I see I see. Yeah, meanwhile throughout the seventeen hundreds, your would go a little bit nuts about sparkling mineral waters I taken from natural springs, and then artificially produced through various carbonation processes. It was a health trend and also physics fun but these healthy sparkling beverages were sometimes called Tonics and Johann Jacob. Yes what that SCHNAPP. founded the first carbonated water manufacturing company in Geneva in seventeen eighty three. Sparkling water aside in eighteen twenty after decades of scientists searching for the compound incident Kona that makes it such an effective medicine. These two French pharmacists by the names of do it for me Anne Pierce, Joseph Pedophilia and Joseph Benami, Kevin Tall. I think. That's all see. That's a lot better than I would have done. the the two of them isolated a clean and set up a factory for its extraction in Paris. And this made it possible to eat slightly less tree bark, while attempting to not get malaria, which share a lot of people were very fond of. Meanwhile as this was happening, the Spanish colonies in south. America were fighting for their independence, and afterward they would attempt to control the lucrative sin Shona Industry by limiting or flat out outlawing the expectation of seeds and cuttings. Plants, but despite the price, all of the conquering empires, including the British were on board with Sin Kona, and Queen and used it to start a radical malaria in Europe throughout the eighteen hundreds, however, malaria was still huge problem in the tropics which is largely where the conquering empires were getting their conquer on because of sugar and other stuff sugar and this all came to a head in British run India during the early eighteen hundreds of people were taking daily doses of cleaning to prevent malaria because it's so bitter, folks were starting to mix it with sparkling water and a little bit of sugar, and thus tonic water was born. which brings us to the GIN and tonic? I it brings us to a word from our sponsor. I. I'm Bertam Date Thurston. I'm a writer, activist and comedian. I wrote a book called how to be blast gave a Ted talk about white people, calling the cops on black people for no good reason and feel like we're having a moment in the US right now. You probably feel as to. When officer Derek, Chev and killed George Floyd something in America broke. Where this moment goes! We can't say yet, but right now. Something big is happening involving race and in particular policing. So I'm going to try to explain it. From, the covid connection to WHO's allowed to protest to what de-fund the police actually means. When. Mitt Romney the man who tried to keep Barack Obama's. That can turn away from. US. Join the black lives matter March. WHEN NASCAR FANS, the confederate flag when Donald Trump of all people encourages cops not to joke people. We're having a moment. You can listen to. We're having a moment on the iheartradio APP apple podcast and wherever you get your podcast. Back! Thank you sponsor. Okay now that we've got a GIN. We've got our tonic. Where did the idea of mixing them come from? Well, it was kind of Mary poppins situation. A spoonful sugar helps the medicine go down. Around Eighteen, twenty five British soldiers in India started adding Jin to their daily required Quinine, tonic water, and also as an added bonus, the British news squeezed in some lime juice to prevent scurvy, and this is the nickname for the produce slimy comes from. Oh, I! Know I should have guessed that a long time ago. I feel very silly now. Okay, that's fine. by the eighteen forty S. the population in India was using in fact within seven hundred tonnes. In Kona per year to fight to fight malaria there, wow. And in eighteen, Fifty, eight, the British, took over governance of India from the British east India. Company following the violent support revolution also called the Indian meet Ni a bunch of other names, too, but those are. Those cover the basis with more British soldiers and their families, in India than ever the demand for tonic water increased, which led to harass bonds creation, the first commercial tonic water that same year, which you can still buy I've never heard of it means, and that led to Schweppes the Indian Queen Tonic in eighteen seventy, and both of these went on to find success outside of India in Britain as well, meanwhile Charles Ledger. Ledger an Englishman who became an pokka farmer in Peru, smuggled Sin Kona seeds out of Peru to his brother. During the eighteen sixties because at the time, it was still illegal to export the trees. Are the seeds break? He actually had a history of smuggling. He also smuggled a pokka out of the country. It was just a smuggler, apparently better at it than Han Solo. He didn't get caught. That's right. How Vergamo, GIN and tonic episode. anyway the British government would not by these these seeds that he that he smuggled out, but the Dutch government would end did and they said at plantations on Java which was one of their colonial outposts. And so by World War One the Dutch pretty much dominated the coining trade, and by the end of the century they controlled ninety five percent of the world's supply. That's quite quite large percentage. This epitaph reads by the way Charles. Ledger he gave coining to the world. And the GMT was also thought to play a role in world. War Two when the Japanese forces took over Java and all those in coconut plantations which equalled most of the world's supply in Nineteen Forty Two oh, according to Amy Stewart's book, the drunk botanist to protect absolutely want to read. The last American plane out of Indonesia had four million crain's seats on board, but to no immediate avail because the trees would take too long to grow to be of any use during the war. But that didn't stop the allies from planting trees in Africa same time putting scientists to developing a synthetic replacement. And both succeeded to this day Africa grows natural coining and the. Synthetic version is used in some prescriptions because it's still used as an anti malarial. And for some other things, but that's different episode. Entirely it is, it is that's pretty much the history of the GIN and tonic. We obviously. As always had to shorten it especially. We didn't talk about how you still thin or can it do that? Future Yeah Yeah, yeah we should. We should definitely do a whole episode about more..

India malaria US Typhoid America Africa Charles Ledger Mitt Romney Tonics Kona Barack Obama NASCAR Donald Trump Paris Charles George Floyd Johann Jacob
"gin" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

07:12 min | 7 months ago

"gin" Discussed on FoodStuff

"Vocal bomb and today. We've got a classic episode for You about the GIN and tonic. Which is one of my very favorite both drinks and episode, because it has one of my favorite cocktail facts about cocktails that I probably of this backs the many facts. We've learned throughout this journey. It's one of the ones I use the most. That probably annoys my friends because they've heard it before and every time I'm like. Did you know malaria in the tonic insert story? Yeah. It's well. It's a good story Yeah, this. This is a very early episode back from a twenty seventeen and Yeah, yeah I. I usually don't drink gin and tonic. It's kind of like a treat for me I. I try to avoid sweetened sodas in in my cocktails. I'm more likely to order a Jenin Soda. Probably probably with some bidders in it, but and it is agenda tonic is is delicious. It's so shing. and I I know we've talked about it before, but I was. Jan is one of my favorite. Alcohol's now. It took me so long. Come to gin and tonic, I know it has are at least my friends. Tell me as a reputation as an old drink. But I never had that association with it and I didn't come along until fairly recently. And I just I adore it's. An and I know we've also said before, but we. From this episode we got to do two videos, not one but two. We got to make Gen with old fourth distillery. Our friends over at old fourth distillery and we got to have a nine am. Eight hundred twenty one bidders. Yeah, yeah, it was both were incredibly delightful. Those videos are still available I believe on Youtube and Other places as well. Maybe yes. And Oh, it was. It was really spectacular. Get both both processes not just the the having cocktails at nine am part. Of the way, no, no! It was fine. It was fine eighteen twenty one bidders is is shipping by the way, and they do really spectacular I'm not sure at the last time I checked. They're tonic. Syrup was sold out but yeah. Oh, they do a great great line, a better, really beautiful stuff. Yeah in the tonic, Syrup is amazing. It's so good and really really just increases year your capacity to put that that Queen Flavor into various other things. But yeah. The the GIN and tonic in general has been seeing a bit of popularity right now. especially in canned form like even outside of the United Kingdom. Off I know a canned cocktails in general are rising in popularity, especially in the US and Japan I'm sure you've seen all of those Seltzer which I am still a little bit perturbed by but that's that's okay. apparently after an episode of fleabag aired that featured leading characters, drinking canned gin and tonics, specifically from marks and Spencer marks and Spencer, GIN and tonic sales spiked twenty four percent. That's excellent. I love that I must have this experience. Immediately. Right Oh it's beautiful and I'm also seeing a lot of buzz about pink gin and tonic out of the UK and Pink Gin being Amgen with Angusta bidders added. Pets, because there's also. At the many food festivals. We used to attend when that was a thing. Oh! Always always I think it was beef eater would be there, and they would have like a pink, just everything pink booth. And I guess it was for their Pink Gin, but I always assumed it was sort of A. Sort of is but yeah. I mean it turns a lovely color. Pink and pink has been very popular color these past few years so. I don't know they also hand out I have. Several a pink fanny packs from. because. They give them out at these events. So I am the most stylish. I'm so ready to spend summer being so stylish in my apartment. Everyone's GonNa Miss L. Pants. I demand instagram photos. Oh it's going to be. I'm going to be so happening I want let around to see any style corner. Yeah, yes. Oh and and also I. Guess I guess after eight that that Nestle brand that makes the little the little after dinner chocolate. Yeah they released a gin and tonic and mint flavor. I think in Germany, but the packaging is an English. I'm very confused Interesting Yeah I guess all that too seemed like it was well reviewed. I'm struggling to imagine meant going particularly well in that combination of flavors but But you know. I'm happy if people are happy. We always want that law when I did my cursory gin and tonic search. I think the two things that stood out to me. was. One this Australia distillery accidentally. Filled bottles of what was labeled as Jin with hand sanitizer. Oh no, but luckily it was all fine. no one was seriously injured, but one I think. ginge anchor lifter of review that said it was horrible. Oh No. Oh dear, yes, but it all corrected. It was fine, and then not gin and tonic related at all, but made me giggle. A result came up. That said Delta is introducing. Beer and wine flights which. I'm very curious about, but also interesting timing. But Hey. Want your beer flight on a flight. Okay? Yeah, yeah, well I did see that. Yeah, they're. They're opening. their opening backup, because for a while. They weren't doing any boost service or drinks service I think other than maybe bottled water on flights, and so I know that they're opening backup, not cocktails, but beer and wine on flights now. but Yeah I don't know..

Pink Gin malaria Spencer Youtube Jenin United Kingdom Nestle shing. UK Delta US Jin Germany Seltzer Angusta Australia Japan
"gin" Discussed on The SodaMonk Show

The SodaMonk Show

08:33 min | 10 months ago

"gin" Discussed on The SodaMonk Show

"Hi Guys May who opti Hosta gone shot and this is the high spirits show on sorta month fought gust in this show. We talk about different types of drinks and experiences related to them are combat. Greg Jenky jewel. Who Paul Not that Jerry? Rela Janea but drink gin from the medicinal use in the sixteen. Hundreds do sparking riots in the seventeen hundreds do fuelling grounds distilleries in the nineteen twenties. This humble juniper base spirits has a fascinating history around it to lead Gen. Keep it on each generation. Me Distillation goes back to the nine th century where Arabs have loved Olympics still that produced extremely crude alcohol which were mixed with herbs as so. Let's Medicine Jon Allen Big Still Cape Rosinsky body image but thank you Monica witchcraft. Qualify as much illegal you. I see those big boiling board and the riches adding different ingredients to it. Do you think Olympic still ethic. Donnie practices inspired welcome. Anyways this was used all over as a medicine but Dutch will using a similar spirit. But Dave Oh using juniper plant as base and this developed later to become the mortgage in the bribery develop the strength to fight Blake. The twelve hundred engine was a combination of malls wind and Jennifer blood and it was also called general spirits at dine but only consumed by the rich afternoon. Nostra's would dissolve in Britain. People started making it at home though. It greediest YOGI DISCO DOT COM by seventeenth century commercialization of genetic it. Me We look up eighty after all. It was a medicine pleasant cheat Ebay anyways. Doing the debt advocates. All the sites loved effect of this drink. It Nicole crabby a bud. Jin soldiers could relax. Att Or is he JC. Jim was conditioned as a stress. Reliever Medicine Zaid. After the Var district was no longer rich person event it became cheaper and popular. It was an easy rail forgetting the struggle atrocities of war and killings. Warsi lookie psychology if we affected the give people stack finding easiest of the ways to get out of this situation and Jin was doing exactly the same thing. Giuseppe hilly inland. May French Brandy kristaps. But Jeb. We they're drinking. The product of own sworn enemy was deemed unpatriotic. We'll see some it I- Hamadi. Just go with summit Madame Geneva Begajah ously everyone from queen add. Two members of parliament became committed. Gin Drinkers in sixteen. Eighty Eight Gang William. The third saw an opportunity in this book bill addity. He introduced taxes on June so they could make money to fight the French by south. Asian Ki- production go and Greenwich Vob Aching Volume Argue Strategy Cape COD UP. Gingrich. Getting Ebola. When the intoxicated GENTA had no clue what was the logic conspiracy hit. They never knew that the drink that they were consuming chill is intended to be the field for the war in London that Gene Craze Hobby Jin Greasy Thumb Bunch got up the Jin. Krys led to loads of debt from alcohol poisoning or alcohol related mishaps as is Lee. Hoda Hotak Yuki logo opne basement names. Banenky quality control K. Jingo benign jar by the mid. Seventeen hundred the government was trying to be with the problem by bringing in a number of acts to crack down on meakers sellers and drinkers of GIN. This temperance movement against Jane Craze was getting traction but unfortunately targeted toward gender sub Nikola gave Vesey to society cut off but Israing to live in Kobe. Could he be God is in that Arrhenius hit particular gender Baccarat or Kobe as for the People? That drink jen led to ruining of women and I grew up to be oppressed at that day. Ganja Bonilla this circulated story saying women were selling the children's for Gen dropping their babies in fired after getting drunk feeding the children Jane instead of male and a GPO goody Botox Vijay Jingle number. Mother's milk mother's death and even mothers win convenient ladies Golden Akiba Beginning apnea but took login Valerie. Poor knows what happened at that time but this was totally. One sided thing isn't it? There were countless baseless arrests at that time due to this women were getting arrested and not the man who are also engaging in similar dangerous and neglectful behavior. I'm up nick. Ep Maze Joe Ducky Jenky Peachy. Give me party but come Ghanaian. This story in particular is the reason why some believe that gene is the lady's drink way to finally end. This horrifying gin craze. A new act was passed which raise the duty. On this drink and forbid the distillers grocers Chandler's jails and woke houses from selling gin. I'll be thank you finally gum. Is Jim coup up? Nick cubs they made at the Bottleneck. Dalia but is still missy finally dougie Ed Toddy Duke of Ellington Nip Bosque. This sale of BEARD ACT IS ACNE. Bill taxes hooded move guardia and permitted anyone to open a beer shop at avait cheap beaming. This bill was born as it were actually ended the traffic in June smuggling arms in human party John John Exclusive Basis Majority Justice. Or a me look at eighty nine gradually. This act washed us into this gin and finally Jane was considered as one of the socially respectable drinks to consume up jenky. But he the Gin and tonic a concept guests who skipped by mid Budka Doniger Medicine Valley Villa Mugabe data but later on. I got to know that. Tonic is an all new game together? Belhadj Yadav on the rocks need data yet and Bonnie kiss up but the South America develop. Who Sky was got bad dominic? It was made from the back of single. Naturally it was powdered and mixed with water and Sugar Eighteenth Century Major. God wanted water invent Wa. Though IS TONIC. Myth Biscottis Gallagher. Do you know thin KUNA. Tricky but gives us the Malaria. Treat Guy. Make Elliott Jhangvi Medicine Tonic. Water Medicine to his CO. Mix Keeping Monaco blame Google now after all ordering Juicy Syndrome. Did you get my wordplay? Jane says send real bad jokes. Back any spirit when consumed in large quantities without considering your medical fitness will make you in so Gino yuk-oi Aubrey drink drink with full responsibility to initially tonic. Was consumed all load but soon a little bit of Jane was added to give a nice gig as a bullet. The heke combination India amendment were but as there is no documentation of this fact abuse or Chit Jin Kitchen. What it medicine say of automated relaxed Nicholas Soldiers NASC- consume KIA diction donahue. Arche look is Gerber. Non Government Navy SCUM ISSUE SKIER KILLINGS. We chaos while women got pinpointed for drinking.

Jane Craze Jin Elliott Jhangvi Medicine Tonic Greg Jenky Medicine Zaid Rela Janea Water Medicine parliament Jon Allen Budka Doniger Medicine Valley Cape Rosinsky Chit Jin Kitchen Joe Ducky Jenky Peachy Google Nicole crabby Paul Madame Geneva Begajah Gino yuk-oi Aubrey Hoda Hotak Yuki London
"gin" Discussed on Dr Wilko's Campaign For Better Beverages

Dr Wilko's Campaign For Better Beverages

08:23 min | 11 months ago

"gin" Discussed on Dr Wilko's Campaign For Better Beverages

"Good evening and welcome to the baugh tonight. We're going to do something a little different. I'm not going to mix you a particular cocktail but instead walk you through one particular spirit and what better spirit to start with the Chin before there was Jin the Dutch distilled. Another juniper base spirit known as he ain't never in English you might call this gender or Geneva you can still buy it today in both an old style and a more modern style. That is closer to GIN. This drink was originally given to Dutch. Troops as medicinal ration and gained popularity among English troops when fighting Louis the fourteenth France by the time William of Orange became king of England a shorter name. Jin was being used by the English soldiers. It is also responsible for the term Dutch courage as a shot of giannetta before battle gave the Dutch soldiers courage to fight. It was in London though. The Jin found its home with lax distillation laws in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. The British capital experienced a gin craze and London dry. Gin was eventually born. Cheap readily available. Jin led to drunkenness in the streets as well as underage drinking as Jin fully took hold gin joints allowed women drink alongside men and it was thought that this led to mothers abandoning their children and earning it the nickname mother's ruin at this point the equivalent consumption was two pints of Jin for every Londoner William hogarth created a set of prince cold beer street and gin lane at this time to showcase the evil of Jin compared to the happiness of beer. The continuing gin craze was having negative effects on the local populace with rising crime and violence. Leading to a movement to stop the prevalence of GIN. The following poem by Townley was presented with the print to help convince people to change the Law Jin cursed with fury fraught makes Human Race. Apprai- attended by deadly draft and steals our life away virtue and truth driven to despair. It's rage compels to fly but cherishes with hellish care theft murder. Perjury Damned Cup. That's on the vitals. Praise that liquid fire contains which madness to the heart conveys and rolls it through the veins to down on the evils of GIN. The government tried passing multiple laws. It wasn't until the so-called gin act in seventeen fifty one that they managed to curtail the problem. It prohibited selling to unlicensed merchants and put restrictions and high prices on retail licenses as an alternative t was encouraged as was drinking for men. Jin however began to be exported to the world on the back of the British Empire and the British Navy despite the ubiquity of London Dry Gin. He doesn't have a protected status. You of Brown's London Gin. A very specific on both the purity of the alcohol ninety-six percent alcohol by volume initially and then only from agricultural products and it was also have minimum. Ab thirty seven point. Five percent in the end product. If you're interested in the other provisions check the show notes for a link to laws but importantly none of these provisions covers the distillation location so you can happily stale London gin in Madrid all Luxembourg and still call it London Gin. The dry is optional. As far as protected Jin's go in the UK. It will likely surprise you that there's only one. Pm Jin while the distillation rules very similar to those of London. Gin they must be produced in the port town of Plymouth. It's not a surprise. That Plymouth with its links to the navy has famously good gin. At the moment the only distiller is the black fries. Distillery THAT MAKES THE FAMOUS PLYMOUTH. Gin Aptly named indeed one of my earliest reviewers is of the Plymouth distillery tour. I heartily recommend anyone visiting the South West of England with a few hours to spare further afield another protected. Jin takes us to Germany. Despite my many travels across Germany I only encountered Stein hak-jun last year as part of a Roth a generous leaving gift. I was presented with a delightful bottle of sixty year. Old Schlichter Jin. Despite being juniper heavy Jin it has a much smoother taste than London dry and no citrus flavor at all there are currently only two manufacturers and operation. But it's definitely a unique. Jin that is worth seeking out. The smoothness makes it drinkable on. Its own or is a good base for the more ingredients. Heavy gin based cocktails. Although I don't think I'd waste the sixty year old variant cocktail. It's definitely worth enjoying on. Its own as I'm doing in the BAA rights now in more recent is you will have seen a veritable boom in the production of Jin while. Gmt's have never truly left us. And John has been poorly. Maligned is the drink of the middle aged as unexciting since around. Twenty ten the thoughts distilling process leads to quick innovation. You can distill gin from the initial alcohol and around eight hours and so you can integrate varieties far foster them whiskey or any other spirit that requires aging. This is seen an inevitable. Uptaken GIN drinking as it can be flavored fashionably and there's plenty of it about the GMT which has never truly left us. Come back to leading to a requisite boom and tonic varieties. There really is something for everyone in the Japan market. These days pairing a particular. Jin's flavors teutonic can be quite the art. There are now a number of Jin delivery services to send you measures of different Jin's to try alongside the boast tasting notes whether it be Jin works. Well with tonic a particular mix of Rosemary and lemonade or just best enjoyed over. Ice The standard. Gmt can overpower the taste of Gin with will that Queen so does definitely worth investigating. Oh Pallet with a small soup song of Jin served of rice will perhaps in a cocktail that brings the flavor to the four which brings us to the humble Martini. A perfect Martini should be made by filling a glass with Jin then waving it in the general direction of Italy. No coward if you do want a cocktail to showcase your favourite gin. You can't go far wrong with the Martini. Traditionally a mixture of GIN and the move that is stirred not shaken. Mr Bond you can limit the Vermouth to ensure that you can enjoy the taste of unique modern Jin now. Don't get me wrong. A GIN and tonic. Another excellent libation. But you need to Catholic match that tonic to the Jin career. They want to bring the Jin to the four the Martini as the way to go though I suppose you could just drink neat gin. As we've discussed I might recommend that you at least do that on the rocks. Though at that point you're surely just an olive away from an old coward. Martini might as well head. Your bets and Enjoy Martini. Mixed masterfully at the bar for you. I hope you've enjoyed this visit to the bar as I describe the history of a particular spirit in detail. Join me next time. Feel Bakili scheduled programming while discussing that very Martini and how to make one see.

Jin Gin London Gin Schlichter Jin London Plymouth Germany Martini baugh Chin England France Louis government British Navy lax Plymouth distillery Townley Perjury
"gin" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Menu

Monocle 24: The Menu

13:21 min | 1 year ago

"gin" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Menu

"It's easy to think that the current Gina Boom in Britain or GINA's are some want to call. It would have been going on for long. But actually it's a prissy recent phenomenon. And the Genie Brent zips Matthias much to do with it seeps. Matthias been celebrating. Its tenth birthday this year a bit earlier I met Sam goals worth go phones roof. The distillery and mustard is dealer jared brown sam start by explaining how he and he's business partner. Fairfax Hall decided to launch the company. The idea that came when I was living in America and I saw this amazing so kroft movement. This sort of seismic activity of consumers looking very differently differently. You know how they can seem they wanted to see where it was made and how it was made and actually bite by whom it was made. That was really really important. And then you come back to London. We were from Fairfax and I grew up together in Coleman he was even the US during different thing me and we we. We look back at London. which was the home of GIN is historical birthplace of gin and there was only really one single brand operated distillery and we were so convinced that consumer movements of how people on picked brands and shows brands that mindset would exist in in London Magen an having wonders theory? That was not good enough. That was never going to satisfy a need state in London pundits who were desperate for anticipate and storytelling. And so with that remind thefts and I said Bite trying to establish GIN distillery again but this time having yet accessible having people come in and learn about how jen is made because I think it was the time a great gap of knowledge I think from what Jin was and how it was made and so we quit our jobs we sold flats and we went all in on that and so we went to the government. We said we would like licensed to set up a GIN distillery and they said no exact with is that you AH. We couldn't believe it you know by. Then we'd jobs with salt flats we all in and so we have a very quickly screw around nothing there's the adage of you know if there's ever been a really good good idea and business someone's already had it before you and I actually. That was definitely the case with Jim. I see but they haven't pursued that. No they've taken. That known walked away so there was a law that said you couldn't own a gin distiller in London. Unless you're still was bigger than eight hundred hectolitres which was Y- prohibitively large. So we set might on a you know a year and a half journey of trying to overturn that law which long story short we did. We managed I get up. MP's and and the light to change and in the two thousand and seven Finance Act. The no change wants theory and SIP. Smith at that point became the first GIN distillery in London for two hundred years. And that was when we met jared and has been all sort of true north ever since well if you recap what's been happening in the last ten years they would have be the biggest milestones. The I was getting up and running and getting a still in London when we began. It was just three of us in a tiny west London garage. Export was outside the twenty-five distribution moped. We blew our AD budget on the sticker for that moped. Oh ped- the early customers still remember Sam arriving case of Gin one helmet under the other and to go from that to being in fifty five countries. Now still fifty these county but yeah I mean I think that was a massive milestone. We won some huge awards awards along the way I certainly look at Cyp Smith and I think when I think about what's really distinctive and stand out about it you know notwithstanding the the gin which we've always made it used to be in the way it should be. It's our team. I think we've been very good at developing a really amazing team. Kroft agenda tell stories. I think that's been a prolific also. So what we've seen. The last ten years has been a massive massive boom when it comes to the gene industry not only in the UK but internationally enormously. You've been playing a big part in this. Why do you think this happened now? I think there are lots of different influences and forces that have moved in category. Ready to where it is today I think first of all I referenced that seismic activity of consumers that shift in the way they buy and the motivations for you know taking away the layers of the onion nion to understand really what's in Nebraska. Why brand exists in? Its reason for being. I think that's part of it. You've got bartenders prolific. Botton's Auden's which is now I think since we start really become a true true recognized profession whereas I think you know twenty years ago it wasn't quite as exactly now. It is prolific global profession and quite rightly. Say it's an art form. And I think the direction which bartenders mixologist. Call Them. What you will they have pushed the boundaries of Gina's which way that people are really interested interested curious and excited about it? I I think there was a pent up. Need Jin to do more in premium is. This was exactly why it was good timing. I'm for us. Frankly when we came along people were getting bored with vodka. The Vodka Soda was ubiquitous. Drink and people ready to actually taste something and so to come. Along with eight true uncompromising craft gin made as it used to be made on a corporate still was is a huge leap forward from vodka. Now there were. I believe twelve distilleries making Jim. In Britain at that time primarily on the basis of the SIP Smith legal work. There is now a thousand brands of GIN in Britain. That's here it seems huge until you look at Scotland where I believe. There's a ten two thousand really recognized labels whiskey out of the total of one hundred thousand so Jin used to have at one point about equal standing on the shelf with risky when we started. Walk into a bar. There'd be fifty whiskeys and forge ins and the bartender would immediately CEO. We don't need another Jin. Considering the equal standing that existed back in the day. Do you think there's a risk that people may decide to go for something else. Leave Jin again yeah. Well I think there's always there's always a risk and I think I think what's actually happening today that consumers actually have more of a repertoire of drinks that they drink neurologist. Okay I'm around drinking or a drink actually what you people share even worse. Give it a round that actually in turtle in aggregate drinking and consuming last alcohol. But what they're doing is expanding their range that broadening their mine and trying to get more experiences. What what they drink? And I think that's what six month fits in so perfect because as more people come in they're accepting Jin as part of that said and we tell such a great story. I think people looking for stories exactly the way. So you've been sharing stories as William you've been sharing inspiration as part of your ten th anniversary celebrations. You released a book. It's called tape one hundred gene cocktails only three ingredients. Whatever made Sir Takeaways for of that book this goes back to the fundamentals tolls of creating great drinks? You don't need a load of odd ingredients. You just need the right ingredients in the right proportion Russian and that's what this book is about. It goes beyond just having recipes. It goes into really the fundamentals of what it takes to create a great drink of balancing these ingredients of working them and also of creating personal drinks out of this foundation of primarily great classics. But also some of the new drinks that have come up within the distillery. What kind of evolution has there been when it comes to say Jean Coke folktales? How experimental do these recipes for example? Get oh I would say that you'll find some very experimental drinks in here but you'll find that they are the ones that were very good. Perfection is achieved in the words of Antoine to Sun Tzu Career author of the Little Prince. Perfection is achieved. Not when there's nothing more to add when there's nothing left to take away and that's really what this book is about is finding great drinks and some non in traditional ingredients as a historian of drink of course a lean toward a lot of the traditional as well can make samples. Oh the bee's knees cocktail tale a favorite example. Gin Lemon honey. That's it right now if you look on Wikipedia it says that it was invented by a speakeasy bartender tinder. In the states during prohibition to cover up the taste of bad gin which is what drink writers rate when they don't want to just say I have no clue. The truth. Truth is that drink was invented in Paris in the nineteen twenties in a women's only bar by a widow named Mrs. Jj Jj Brown of Boulder and Paris. It took me while to figure out who she was. It turns out that she was immortalized on Broadway in nineteen sixty and by Hollywood in nineteen sixty four as the unsinkable. Molly Brown married to a poor gold miner and Colorado. WHO's the largest gold vein in history? And then she survived the titanic and was partying on both continents. Amazing amazing stories. Amazing just one of the stories that you'll find in this book. I tell you what I was thinking about. Marcus this book really is for people like me. North jarred he may have been the principal author of it but actually did book is designed for people who can't really make that sophisticated a cocktail. I really can't and so you know this is sort of the Jamie Oliver of the GIN cocktail world weather. So it's really simple. The ingredients never far away from you and you can good at home making it and actually I think these days things do need to be made simple for people use again. I speak very much for me. This book is designed for me in Kapit Guide to making. We'll talk about what people want. And what people need How do you see the future of the industry but what is happening over there? Do people want different. I kind of James. What did they actually want? It vary from one country to another. Will I think it does. I think with globalization nights all come a little bit smaller and say the influences of very prolific Olympic. Do think this I think there's a real danger in the world of Jin. Globally about where it goes from here I think the different names of Jin methodologies Adagios of genetic ingredients that are going into Jin threaten the very fabric of gin and how it is perceived and whether there becomes sort of fatigue in the way some people look at it at the moment. We're not seeing that and actually I think what we're hearing. You know jared and I have the the amazing provisionally travel well talking about listening into retailers and consumers alike who are saying you know juvenile would be a part of my life I. It does get confusing. Can you help me navigate gin and actually we we always bring them back to our classic uncompromising London Dry Gin which is the sort of the base an epicenter of all jains and actually helps tell the story of what a True Chin is and actually I think sometimes the category does and should be simplified. A little bit to really help understand what it is would it really stands for because I think there are some risks there Jin's that are risking people. Go Walk Him on. What is Jin today? And they're all that many rules and regulations around it so there's some self regulation people talking about bringing in. We will never as a brand SIP. Smith ever ever compromise from our original of making gender wage in used to be made and the way it should be made and so I think people will always I hope have faith that in with will be one of those beacons shining lights out that I to help navigate a really exciting category and now zips me this available in about fifty five countries. What kind of future planets do you have? Is it about taking over new markets or digging deeper in the existing once or you know if we had planned to sit down here ten years later and say we wanted to be in fifty countries. We didn't globalization. I think just the way direction the world has gone has taken us. They're smaller and it's easy to get products now being forced reading letting we'd ever thought about being the size that we are all within reach that we are. It's awesome that we are and it's really exciting. I think for us. What we must never do is take off ally of the ball? We've never compromise. Never changed the way we make it even though we've got these really exciting growth plants. I think it's about being deeper more meaningful and establishing shing really distinctive points in people's lives to tell stories of general. We want to inspire people to sit manage in from all walks of life. Seven goals worth the end. Jared Brown of CPS there you are listening to the Menu monocle twenty four.

Jin London Jared Brown Smith Gina Boom Britain Sam London Dry Gin Fairfax Hall Jim Gin London Magen Matthias US America Mrs. Jj Jj Brown Fairfax Brent UK partner
"gin" Discussed on Lochhead on Marketing

Lochhead on Marketing

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"gin" Discussed on Lochhead on Marketing

"Thanks for pressing play. This is Christopher lockhead and this is lockhead on marketing. And on this episode. I WANNA break down a legendary trend Jack. That was just. I pulled off by celebrity actor Ryan Reynolds and his Gin Company now on episode twenty. Three with Palmar. We pop the hood the secret. Pr Black. Art called tren jacking in recently Ryan Reynolds. He's an actor. Who's quite famous in the United States of Deadpool Tempur fame and a bunch of other stuff? He also owns a GIN brand company called aviation and they recently pulled off what I would call the trend. Jack of the a year by inserting themselves into the controversy around a recent Peleton bike. Add as you may know Peleton put out this ad and to say it blew up with negative reaction would be a massive understatement. The peleton add shows a rich young couple where the husband gives his Clearly thin wife. An exercise bike and The world reacted very negatively and they suffered a massive decrease in their market cap up and on this episode. We're not necessarily going to get into. Why the Peleton add blew up but we are going to get into is how Ryan Reynolds Gin Brand Aviation and Hijacked or Tren Jack this ad to produce some legendary marketing. All right. My friends at net sweet are the category Queens and kings of cloud cloud business systems for high growth companies. And if you want to schedule a demo right now and receive a free guide called the seven key strategies to grow your profits. Prophets check out net sweet dot com slash different. That's net sweet dot com slash different to set up your free demo and your free growth guide today also also my friends at spunk. WanNa remind you that we are living in the data. Age and spunk brings data to everything every question every decision and every action action checkout spunk dot com slash D to e as in data to everything today also you can go to lockhead dot com and check out the show notes for this episode including the links to both the original Peleton ad and the follow up response from Av Aviation Gin and the news articles I quote in this story now. Hey Ho let's go. This is long head on marketing. The podcast that helps you develop a lens for what makes legendary marketing legendary posted by Christopher lockhead three times. CMO Godfather category designed and a high school dropout. The Marketing Journal calls and one of the best minds in marketing and the economist calls.

Ryan Reynolds Ryan Reynolds Gin Brand Aviati Christopher lockhead Av Aviation Gin Gin Company Tren Jack Marketing Journal Peleton Palmar United States
"gin" Discussed on GFM's Inside the Album Podcast

GFM's Inside the Album Podcast

05:16 min | 1 year ago

"gin" Discussed on GFM's Inside the Album Podcast

"Life. You know my my best friend from high school. My best girlfriend she had an event where was she went paralyzed and we didn't know if she was going to live or not. <hes> that about two months starting in february yeah and <hes> you know then in in name my my you know my you're not supposed to have favorites but i do have favorite nephew. Nephew who's who's twenty years old who was shot and the ball state <hes> university be which was one of my alma maters. Where i i i went to college <hes> he was shot in the shooting there and he now wants around with two bullets in him on his back <hes> because it's too close to nerves and you know we went through that in in may and you know my father who has dementia he had and then they that was and the books coming out in june eleventh and so if it was as if once again prince divining in my life present itself because i'm two thousand four when i first met him it was very much that when i showed outside was like you know looking for a party and and he knew how to thought he was still partying it stars like the music and the concert but it was like was how bible study you know what i'm saying yeah it's he's not the live others expect and yeah so the project just realizing the fragility of alliance so very unreal and i was already in the process of the final edits of the book and instead of allowing these events to source that i use them to propel it and and also is managing the the emotions that the events elicited you now it was also very finely time that <hes> the the legend of that matter van has written by an author name on steven pressley becomes but he's and he sent me a copy of this booked artists journey at that time which really gave me an extra boost in an extra kick right at that time and no yeah i mean it's just it's just so and he's really cool like it's just a magnificent journey when you when you sit back and 'cause i came so close to publishing this book. You know it was no. You have no idea i went. I went back and forth like before actually just doing lenient even after lead it then the next day after it's released. Isn't you know an amazon best dialing like five different amazon bestselling in categories and that was completely off my radar but more so than that the people who have reacted to the book and comes to me with pictures and messages emails telling me what the problems mean to them. That's the ultimate rewards. That's that's what it's it's all about and it's just been such a beautiful experience. I even the public that i am. It's nearly impossible to put into words. Wow you know <hes> that's that's. That's just amazing amazing <hes> when you when you spoke about <hes> you know some of the different <hes> life stages of life events experiences experiences that are found here <hes> in the book one well mini many jump out to me but this poem here <hes> and i think it goes for you know it's written obviously obviously from a woman's point of view <hes> or experience but clearly as this has been written. I mean they can apply to either <music>. <hes> in any way you wanna look at it but the poem exodus <hes> oh brother yeah <hes> allow me oh right yeah go ahead no do i wanna hear yeah yeah. The tower yeah <hes> right his venom out of your bones owns. Wash treachery from your stand. Forgive your misjudgement. You simply let the wrong one and end purify your heart expelling all sins. This is the place to begin the exodus yeah yeah that's not resilient. Thank you so much. That was dutiful. All these words <laughter> <laughter> it'd be like and i mean just you know just the imagery <hes> you know i am. I allowed my stuff. I need to say this. I need to say this. You gave me an opportunity to come clean because see the people people and this is something many strange because i wanted to talk about people..

steven pressley amazon high school van twenty years two months
"gin" Discussed on GFM's Inside the Album Podcast

GFM's Inside the Album Podcast

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"gin" Discussed on GFM's Inside the Album Podcast

"And it just when you don't know what else to do be a light that mantra like seriously like this alley. I thank you so much <laughter> for writing that you know the sound that where they come from you know. It's just at that that moment in time of year like they're going to go into deep detail about someone's. I want everyone to experience it for what it is to them. You you know what i mean. Because while it's poem the iro i want you know people to read it and have their own interpretation from their own life experiences. You know however when all feels like it's falling apart when it feels impossible to move on when in year overwhelmed when all of these things are happening and you don't know what to do don't do anything the alike uh-huh until the confusion clears until you know until clarity comes delight because we can do that we can always do that. We have the capacity to love. So is that the <hes> wow the capacity acidy love so that's all that's the that's the film it. That's the that's the few that's wow like. I <hes> i thank thank you for that reminder because you know and as we've talked about certain things and like you said being you know overwhelmed aware of being you know all these different spaces that we can get in. It's like sometimes you just forget that that that you know you have the ability to do that. Little just to just be you know and and you know well prince wh- whoa while france was the <hes> emphasis. I'll say <hes> sunrises at midnight and it wouldn't exist without him. It is not a book about france. It's my life experiences. It's about resilience yvonne ability lafontaine grieving you know reading various forms of loss empowerment sensuality <hes> above all about the power of love and you know yes. There's a section of five part section entitled interlude lewd <hes> weeping rainbow and that comes from it had been raining that day and a rainbow after he was found chemo tasty parks <hes> yeah and so but this book is this book is my creative catharsis and a portion of the poems have existed for years. I mean many of which he read. I mean he's redmond. Especially <hes> heart sick leave. It is <hes> song song venus and one third of the book is in there is like twenty eight poems. I believe <hes> and it sensual moms as poems about love and essential sensual poems and <hes> so i mean this book is this book is about a lot. There's seven different parts <hes> and and he's part five <hes> with the weaking rainbow and just real quick. Let me go after goes through because there's eighty four months total total and ju. She let me pull my own book out. A a the first part is fluidity and then you move into parts sou- which is midnight lose and there's a very short section called enters broken man and that was in regards to narcissist. I got lesson as poems about that and then you went into a senior rising part for and that's the part that i just love because there's always that rising part you know and that's and because we also we all have encounters in our life that leave us feeling you know we're an ashes but we're that's inex- rising right and then of course you mentioned the part five which is <hes> weaking rainbow. Oh and then that are what seven paul <hes> one is called for you. One is <hes> my flowers. Nother is simply entitled. <hes> <hes> weaking relondo is my love for you violets for you and flowers my garden and then part six songs <hes> and as i said the the twenty eight of the eighty three poems during the section so that's like one third of the book and then this seven part is sacred as a fair and that's one singular earth poem is stepping allie of so <hes> yeah this is yeah. No it was curious because it was really interesting because again the journey creating <hes> this book i encountered set several significant what we'll recall concussions of the heart <hes> i had several events that happen in my life..

redmond france lafontaine eighty four months
"gin" Discussed on GFM's Inside the Album Podcast

GFM's Inside the Album Podcast

03:02 min | 1 year ago

"gin" Discussed on GFM's Inside the Album Podcast

"Dot com. I'm very proud of that and what we did there. We were a pioneer <hes> internet radio in early days and euro part of that once i yeah yeah <hes> also hosted a radio. Show there where rhapsody where i was able to highlight you know platinum and grammy award winning artists indie the artist <hes> international bestselling authors it was a blast good times and then the last part that i would wanna share with people i guess <hes> to make it as they can basically been a lifelong activist <hes> i was assistant to the league p._r. <hes> the handled handles various other roles and save on martin case from the week after inception and member of the initial coalition in the martin family family and then <hes> i also represented the african american firefighter out of indiana who experienced the new thing terms everybody superior and twenty thirteen and we brought that to national attention so that occurred in my hometown which also happens to the the location is the last known public lynching an inspiration for billie holiday's strange through so <hes> you know that's very important thing to bring up because it's such an integral part of my life and it's also part of my writing life you know <hes> a book that will be coming out in the future but above above all i have to say i've always been a writer since i was a child and a poet at heart yeah i was and as you know as you know better than anyone anyone and music had you know plan my first wedding gig at the age of eleven so those are the pieces of the i start with. I guess oh how would that those are some pieces and <hes> you know to yes to see you know how they how they come together. <hes> oh you know not only in your personage in creative output <hes> i did have a question <hes> about there's a very special of dedication in sunrises at midnight <hes> it's it's dedicated to prince <hes>. Could you tell it was about about that and and what compels you to publish the book now well. The brook wouldn't exist without prints before four french. Read my writing including my poetry but thought of quote unquote doing something with it had never entered my mind and i've written the style throughout my knees us into adulthood and i just i didn't share my poetry. Openly i would share it was their friends here there <hes> the the kit the dedication in sunrises at midnight as read dedicated to prince rogers nelson for being a reflection of what i was not yet able to see him myself love for you and that's the truth..

prince rogers nelson martin grammy award billie holiday indiana writer
"gin" Discussed on 105.3 The Fan

105.3 The Fan

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"gin" Discussed on 105.3 The Fan

"Gin. Basis. Guns and roses. Also, golden revolver little known facts because nobody cares about that band. Either. No, this isn't about this, isn't that? No, this is an actual rock band because those vans still sell albums Phil still by appetite. Joe is the Kagan the short shorts wearing kid that. No, that's AC DC. Okay. Get your rock and roll. Confuse my irrelevant rock bands. It's the year two thousand nineteen. It's not nineteen Eighty-nine you, okay. You just had a guy that was only popular for what three seasons in. This guy was Bobby Lynn forever. Who is that the league is somehow? Sure more people know who that is now than enough stuff in at a rock concert. What's yes? So remember, we did the cover band thing down at a he was doing. He was part of the biggest guns and roses cover band in the world. Because he was part of the band. So I got to immune Troy introduced him on the stage. Awesome news, a lot of fun re there for that read out there that night, man. I don't remember that at always down to Smirnoff whatever it's called. Now. The knows awesome, dude. It was a blast. He's really nice guy..

Bobby Lynn Smirnoff Kagan Troy Joe
"gin" Discussed on In Our Time

In Our Time

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"gin" Discussed on In Our Time

"Thunderously into your microcode. Well, I will speculate about this with the mouth and down or you take taking on your little. Arguments about the fact that this was a affecting the poor very much in the bridge according to you from the very beginning of the program ritual drinking just as much if not more doing it in the houses, no Republican, getting sense and negative. Their immune from this legislation wasn't that didn't that set up riots among the per se. And in certain poems that you're quoting on what happened? Yes. Yes. I mean, you've got really problematic riots part of that mold culture that they're also frayed they're just so frayed of London, Judith, the saying that it's become this mass place. It's like half a million to three quarters of a million over the period. We're looking at this. I fifty years the business world of big cities. It's sucking people up. They know that there's more people dying than it being born. They don't know why they they're blaming gin and they blame Jin all this disorder. And it is certainly true that after the seventeen thirty six act, which literally raises the price of a license of fifty pounds totally beyond the capacity of anyone at all, really other than the big distillers on interested in paying that kind of money and they use informers to tone people. And so what you have been over the next few years is informed as being beaten up. People being let off juries refusing to convict and essentially by sixteen by seventeen thirty eight. The a dead letter is they. Can't get anybody to act on it. The justices won't do it. They're afraid of what might happen. People let offer Allen is a very famous case, so so really becomes a problem when government cannot rule losers, not only on throw like the first pillbox isn't it? When people just would not pay then not gonna do this. Again, there were street riots in one of the Christ which came out again and again was no Jin. No king, no Jin no king good Englishman women reserve the right three drunk. If they wanted That's right. to. This is what we talked about. The relationship with English identities. Part of British liberty is a sign when not French. We can allot we can get completely intoxicated when we want to absolutely. And the reformers try to spin that and say, no, this is not liberty. You're not. You're not. You're not really free if you're are to gin and the true rish liberty is abstinence, which of course his much dollar. And didn't catch on, didn't cancel all play. I think that the problem is that we're just assuming if you took a gin a drink of gin, then you've got drunk. I, I think we forget the poor were not that all the poor do not have a miserable life every day. You know, there is a pleasure in this pleasure in the sociability over a pleasure in the materiality of it. So the we forget that in the pro the reason we forget it is because we look at a picture like gin lane and often people see as a photograph what was going on as it goes apps. It is not that we see the court cases because it's true. You can look at Jin cases. If you just put the word wine, you lose find also cases of people. If you put beaming, let's go to Jim, learn the most the most famous huggers loan, and he's engraving. That is that not gives Jin very bad name. Slums baby, neglected Munger baby rolling from eleven those some steps and it's why you don't wanna go. Now, how accurate do you think that was? Well, geez, was telling us about all the fears and the horrible stories and terrible stories of people in what Hogarth does engine and incidently in really. Importantly, this is a two part dialogue beer street engineering bist special look at first, and then gin lane the streets were, is another engraving everybody, everybody's wanting. Yeah. Important. Now we go to Jewish lane so engine lane, it's literally a gathering together of all those terrible stories that suicide is madness. There's women who are busy, collect so busy with their luxuries that they aren't voiding their children, the dying man is wearing a soldier's coat. This is what's going to happen to our troops and songs last what's being said. But I think that one of the things worth looking at in our Hogue off print is the fact that the woman who may be due to four who's this woman who murdered her child..

Jin gin London Jim Hogue Allen Judith Munger Hogarth three quarters fifty pounds fifty years
"gin" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"gin" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Traffic crew criminal kicking this is making billy gin however.

billy gin
"gin" Discussed on Sips, Suds, & Smokes

Sips, Suds, & Smokes

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"gin" Discussed on Sips, Suds, & Smokes

"All right up next is going to be a really well known jen we're gonna talk about plymouth gin and carrying skinny introduces force yes so plymouth jen is that true original since seventeen any three its unique recipe of the tentacles has been made to the highest standards in this same distillery in the very heart of the historical city of plymouth on england's south west coast i thought plymouth with iraq over here in this country a lot of americans have stolen all rocks in you've put them on the other side of the pond and then he name after theft this right next to us you've got some new it's the jetty these factors have resulted in our particularly english jen becoming a famous than well traveled as those who first tasted at this is made at the blackfriars distillery and is the oldest working distillery in england i'll give an app set he will not with the military let's just say that right yeah so i chose to talk about this one because i was most surprised that this is at the second category that jen irate at the highest and was very disappointed to find out what it was that my first note on it was ginny djendjen i definitely think it heads all of the notes agenda shed and does it in a really fantastic unbalanced way sarah from the nose to the finish and i think it's a really complete balanced chen add juniper definitely the driver and takes good direction from the citrus in warm spices and there's a little residual sugar it's just really onion and creamy i enjoyed it i didn't mean to you.

jen england plymouth theft blackfriars distillery sarah iraq
"gin" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"gin" Discussed on FoodStuff

"I have had one of these um and it was lovely and at king was one of those big icg slick search all yeah those always been really happy yeah at that then again as we found out as we find out every time we gonna shoot together i very easily entertained yes oath as our work there's bob dole's bulls and the people working are like oh hey weren't there's the we're through the esta yes it's it's a positive yes i think so at any rate the gin and tonic um act which i very much enjoy even just the regular way nam of course has long been a go to in britain where you could even bite and premixed kansas which i find slightly horrifying to be super honest yeah i saw one of those and i thought it was like it kind of looks similar to a fresca it's anyone's familiar with that so uh i went the kind of examining more closely oh this is a jet islamic okay of winston churchill once said that quote the gin and tonic has saved more englishman's lives and minds than all the doctors in the empire who uh and the new york times called 2013 the year of the gin and tonic but the gin and tonic has not always been this trendy summer drink ja uh more on that in a moment but i want gin and tonic any lauren i'll tell you it is a high ball cocktail which is basically just at alcoholbased spirit mixed with a larger percentage of a mixer and alcohol vase in this case is your guest jin jan and what could receive surveyed it's tonic of the order of operations here typically is the gin and tonic lime juice if he wanted that's optional and ice i've seen it done other ways but votes mostly what i came across as researching this idea and then a lime wager twist to garnish rights.

king bob dole britain kansas winston churchill new york times lauren