39 Burst results for "GE"

Fresh "GE" from Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:35 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh "GE" from Morning Edition

"High pile of sand. Congressman Frank Pallone Junior says the work is needed to address erosion in areas that were hit hard by Sandy and still need assistance. Well, clouds roll in over the next couple of hours and we could see some light rain this morning scattered thunderstorms into this afternoon highs today in the mid seventies. Rain continues into tonight with overnight lows in the mid sixties. And for tomorrow rain tapers off in the morning with partly sunny skies in the afternoon and highs around 70 degrees. Right now we've got partly cloudy skies over New York City. It's 69 degrees. You're listening to W. N. Y. C at 5 34. Support for NPR comes from WM. I see members and from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, supporting those working towards the day when no one has to choose between paying rent, putting food on the table and protecting their house and the health of others are w. J f dot or GE and the Ford Foundation, working with visionaries on the front lines of social change worldwide.

Congressman Frank Pallone Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Ford Foundation New York City Sandy GE NPR W. N. Y. C
Fresh update on "ge" discussed on Jim Bohannon

Jim Bohannon

00:30 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ge" discussed on Jim Bohannon

"That will come before the Supreme Court. Uh, if she is confirmed, and one quick word, different, defensive Susan College Susan Collins had the guts on. I'm sure it was not easy to cast a vote in favour ofthe Cavanaugh. Ah, and gave a rather impassioned speeches to why she was going to do that. So you know, I give in college. A lot of kudos for for that. There is more to come. 186650, Jimbo 18665054626 as though we are talking. In the sports in the program with John Malcolm. He is vice president for the Institute for Constitutional Government director of the ME Center for Legal and Judicial Studies at the Heritage Foundation Online at heritage dot or GE and so coming up in May The Senate Judiciary Committee hearings will begin on Monday. The 12th with an introduction that on tooth of the 13th and went through the 14th, there will be questioning and then following that. We'll get down to.

Vice President Cavanaugh Susan College Susan Collins Senate Judiciary Committee Supreme Court Heritage Foundation Institute For Constitutional G Me Center For Legal GE DOT Director
Fresh "GE" from Pacifica Evening News

Pacifica Evening News

00:34 min | 10 hrs ago

Fresh "GE" from Pacifica Evening News

"Weekends. And you can hear any news. Online whenever you like. It's archived at Cape Organ. We are entering the second week of the fund drive here at KPFK. We need to raise $450,000 to get this station through the rest of the year. Financially psychically. I don't know. Even if we got the money, we'll make it to the end of the year, but well, at least have a material in hand to spiritually trying to get there. We'll have the material base. 1 804 395732 is for is the phone number that you call to help with our material base or our financial need Or you can do it online at K P a dot or ge 1 804 395732. Online at dot org's We are supposed to raise some $2500 towards the fund drive here tonight during the newscast. You're a regular listener to this newscast, and you are not a financial supporter of Kpfk a subscriber. Sometimes we call it a listener sponsors. Sometimes they call it At any rate if you haven't given us any money, But you listen to the news. I seriously ask you tonight to consider how much you can Support us with at 1, 804 395732 or online at K P F a dot or GE. We have a 25 $100 gold by the end of the newscast. We're halfway through the news gas and we are zero of the way towards our goal. 1 804 395732 If you believe that the news and information that is available.

Kpfk Cape Organ GE
Fresh "GE" from The UPTIME Podcast with Allen Hall

The UPTIME Podcast with Allen Hall

00:47 min | 10 hrs ago

Fresh "GE" from The UPTIME Podcast with Allen Hall

"Question. Yeah. So when there's you maybe have flat farmland and EM. Yeah, we'll look at the lightning data that start collecting data from that area and it's collected by the national lightning detection Network, which is run by slow as you mentioned. So we get that song from by Cilla and assess how much what the severity is for that site. But then as you say you put turbines in their gigantic structures birth Are going to impact the lightning environment. We do have experience looking at that. So looking at lightning Data before and after when Farm is built and we have some sense for how it how the reference of turbines impacts like, but we definitely want to impart on your listeners that lightning is a very random process. There's a lot of unknowns about it. There's a lot of thoughts about the interaction between lightning and wind turbines. So none of this is is hard facts hard science. There's a lot that we will be able to estimate and give indications of birth of it. We just have to wait and see what happens. Gotcha. Okay, is this where your fuel performance assessment comes in? Cuz it sounds like when there's a new project and you guys are Consulting for them. You will do like an initial assessment. Is that right? Yeah, so we can assess the field performance at any point. So we use the same approach whether the turbines are in the ground or not, whether they've been dead. According for a year or ten years but the longer operating history the more certainty that we have on the outcome of the results. So if we're doing an assessment before he turbines have gone in the ground weather forecasting and trying to give an indication of what we expect to see as far lightning damage goes once the turbines are in the ground and they've been operating for some time. Then we can look up the actual labor government how much lightning the turbines have experienced over the number of years that they've been operating and then from that estimate how much damage would expect given fully functional lightning protection system. And if the late production system wasn't doing a great job, then you'd see more damage than that calculation would show and that can give me a direction to go for figuring out why you're seeing that damage. So is there a generic rule of thumb based on the country or location? Is it regionalized in terms of the quantity of lightning strike or even the amplitude or action goals or all those sort of lightning parameters? How do you break that down? Because it seems like every part of the country is just a little bit different and I was different than Texas and Texas is different from California. And California is different than Italy. How do you do all that? Aggra gate that data? Yeah. Yeah. It's a good point and there's localized effects too. So you might know what the light being a government is in Texas. But then once you put your little farm in place in Lubbock, then you know, might see very different lightning exactly in that that specific location. So when you are assessment, we collect data from the exact location where the turbines are and no more no less. So, I think that's a really important part of it that said, we're not home. Scientists or engineers and so what we know is mostly from the research that the the lightning phds of their have done and what we've observed but took it does seem like there's some standard characteristics of lightning and some parts of the world that will vary but General you can expect to see in a certain distribution of characteristics of lightning across different sites the exception. Well, yeah, the exception to that is the the frequency of the lightning fairies Box by location and you can look at maps of frequency and see how that varies across the world. I had a thought there Alex as you were talking it is true as you've said that lightning flash density varies geographically one thing that we've seen recently which is very interesting is in a couple of very low flash density Geographic areas wage. In some very significant strikes to wind turbines and very interesting and this has been several points around the globe where we might normally have one slash per square kilometer per year something like that very low flash densities yet. We're seeing some significant lightning events. And so it is and I say individual Events, maybe the overall Flashdance it's changing but we are seeing instances where turbines gets struck and damaged so what's going on there to me that's interesting from a number of angles, but one is related to tall structures like turbines and the nature of lightning and you know, we understand that very tall structures are struck almost exclusively by upward lightning whereas shorter structures below say 60 meters or stroke almost exclusively by downward lightning and the lightning directionality matters because the characteristics of that lightning are different and the resulting damage modes to the dog. To the object that they hit are all so different and so the case of upward lightning and wind turbines. Well, there can be a lot of charge transferred in those upward lightning events and that can have some specific damage modes. There's a lot of heating involved in that type of event in addition to that upward lightning can be very challenging for lightning location systems to see them in cases where there's a continuing current phase only of Lighting Event. There's just basically DC content and there's not a lot of the The High Frequency content that the sensors ground-based sensors anyways are looking for in buying events that makes our job interesting. So you may have a damaging writing event that there's no record of it based from the ground-based sensors. That's a particularly strong topic and and I think one that we're going to start to see more of as tip Heights. So that's the Hub height of turbine plus the the length of blade goes go up which song Seems to be the trend and it doesn't seem to be stopping. Yeah, there's very little data met. I think you're right about that there's very little data about height versus lightning strikes when the Empire State building was built back in the what twenties yours GE had performed a lot of research on the top of the Empire State Building and we're measuring lightning strike date and they realized a lot of the lightning strikes upward and then but in terms of like a power generation equipment, we've never been to those Heights before and it rely on if the Empire State Building got struck nobody really cared but if our wind turbine goes down we start to really care about it. And I think you're right about that. There is some effect about as we get bigger and the diameters configure. We're we're changing the way we're changing the environment. It's weird way to think about it, but we're actually changing the way electricity that works in the cloud because we're creating these really dark conductive things and I'm not sure if it's all height related or combination of height plus some environmental changes that are happening on top of it or in summer. Is it seems like the number of turbines these affect the weather pattern a little bit any sense of as we go bigger what we're going to see going to see more of this sort of continuing current positive lightning strike wage upper triggered strikes as we get bigger, which is where we're going right now with some of these GE blades and highly head and some of these terms are just getting enormous. Yeah, that's right. The turbines are continuing to grow wage. It is my sense that we will begin to see a higher fraction of events that strike determines as upward in the upward Direction Just because of the height as far as song couple of the other comments the environment having some influence there that's possible. I don't know if the number of turbines is affecting that or not. I think that's a very challenging question to answer with the other interesting question is whether or not the rotating nature of the turbine has any impact on it. We do have some Curious behavior of lightning around wind turbines. That doesn't seem Shipping impact with just tall towers. So there's some indication that it's the rotating nature of the turbine that we don't think that is perfectly well understood yet and there's some wage graduation. I guess that shutting down a wind farm when a particular storm comes through might reduce the damage side on the turbine there been any studies done with same Woodforest if we're talking about really tall non-rotating objects. I wonder if there's been anything, you know done there where they say. Hey this is comparable in to Heights of too many of these wind turbines, but they don't seem to have the same lightning environment. I don't know.

Texas Empire State Building Cilla Farm Flashdance Lubbock California Aggra Gate Italy Alex GE
Female Sheriff’s Deputy Shot In Compton Ambush Released From Los Angeles Hospital

KNX Evening News

00:47 sec | Last week

Female Sheriff’s Deputy Shot In Compton Ambush Released From Los Angeles Hospital

"County sheriff's deputies who got ambushed, incompetent earlier this month are both out of the hospital recovery. Both were shot September 12th as they sat in their parked patrol car at the Metro Blue Line station. The male deputy was released when Say, and his female partner left the hospital today. The gunman is still on the loose, and no new information has been released and no suspect has been identified. The shooter was described by the sheriff's Department as quote a black man 28 to 30 years old wearing dark clothing who was last seen heading North found on Willowbrook Avenue in a black four door sedan. Contributions to the deputy's long term recovery can be made at a lads dot org's slash home slash cares and anonymous tips can be left for L. A Crimestoppers at 800 to 22 tips. 802 228477 or at l a crimestoppers dot or GE,

Metro Blue Line Station Sheriff's Department DOT Partner GE
Chicago-based GE Healthcare would invest $50 million in a new factory in West Milwaukee under proposed plan

Wisconsin's Morning News with Gene Mueller

00:16 sec | Last week

Chicago-based GE Healthcare would invest $50 million in a new factory in West Milwaukee under proposed plan

"Healthcare, one of the area's longest running high tech manufacturers, is on the move. The company will invest $50 million in its location in West Milwaukee. That means hundreds of jobs will move from the company's big campus and Walker shot, the Milwaukee Business Journal says. The movie is subject to bargaining with labor groups.

Milwaukee Business Journal Milwaukee Walker
More Than 50 Dead After Gold Mines Collapsed in Eastern Congo

Live From Here with Chris Thile

00:43 sec | 2 weeks ago

More Than 50 Dead After Gold Mines Collapsed in Eastern Congo

"Republic of Congo. At least 50 people are reported dead after an illegal gold mine collapsed as ish Mahfoud equal reports from Harari. It's the latest in a Siri's of mining accidents involving small scale subsistence miners. The tragedy happened Friday following heavy rains in the town off coming to GE in eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo. And I witnessed told French news agency FB that only one person survived. He said the dead tried to escape, but they were swept away by the waters. A pressure informal mining is widespread in mineral reach idiocy and mining accidents are common. For NPR

Congo Harari Siri GE NPR French News
More than 50 killed at collapsed gold mine in eastern Congo

HouseSmarts Radio with Lou Manfredini

00:15 sec | 2 weeks ago

More than 50 killed at collapsed gold mine in eastern Congo

"After a gold mine collapses in eastern Congo, officials said. Landslides collapsed three artisanal gold mine wells near the city of committal. GE Heavy rains for days led to the disaster. The city's mayor says a team of rescuers with motor pumps came to recover the Victimsbodies In Los Angeles. Two

Los Angeles Congo GE
Boston's Museum of Fine Arts announces reopening plans

WBZ Midday News

00:32 sec | 2 weeks ago

Boston's Museum of Fine Arts announces reopening plans

"Arts institution, reopening it stores now coming up later this month. It's a big year for the Museum of Fine Arts Cove in 19 aside is it's their 150th anniversary. So, the museum says, If you want to go and celebrate with them, you'll have to take safety precautions. Like wearing a mask and social distancing you, Willis. Well have to buy tickets in advance. Those go on sale today for members tomorrow for non members. There won't be a co check by the way no restaurant access, but they say you can, of course, grab some goodies at the gift shop. So if you want more details and to their website, M f dot or GE

Museum Of Fine Arts Cove GE Willis
Houston SPCA takes in 90 animals from a Lake Charles shelter after Hurricane Laura aftermath

Rush Limbaugh

00:33 sec | 3 weeks ago

Houston SPCA takes in 90 animals from a Lake Charles shelter after Hurricane Laura aftermath

"When Hurricane Laura hit Lake Charles. Their local animal shelter needed help. Julie Kinston of the Houston S P. C. A says they traveled to the shelter and came back loaded up. We've basically cleared out the shelter in like Charles and was able to bring back 27 dog, 32 cats and even to kitten. Cancel says Adopting one of these pat's is a fun and loving way to help the victims of Hurricane Laura Veterinary exams were complete. And some of the pets will be ready for adoption. Starting tomorrow. Go to Houston s P A. S P c a dot or GE for adoption

Hurricane Laura Veterinary Hurricane Laura Lake Charles Julie Kinston Houston Charles Houston S P. GE
A Look at Bird Strike Countermeasures

STRUCK: A Lightning Protection Podcast

05:26 min | Last month

A Look at Bird Strike Countermeasures

"Obviously, bird strikes against you feel like this is an issue but it is right and these things especially. If. It's like a goose I mean, that's a I don't know what twelve pound object getting hit by something going for and miles per hour. Well, what what is, what is the damage like here and how do they? What is the technology keeping US safe from safe from these bird menaces it really is testing. That's what it is and designing for the regulatory requirements. So the regulatory criminal for aircraft for twenty five aircraft which are trying to transport category or. Larger business jets is a four pound bird I think is going at VC So that's a pretty fast speed. I'm electrical guy not a structural person but. Those tests are super destructive, and if you ever, you can go online and go on Youtube and see bird strike tests I've seen the other crazy it as look like they become liquid hitting these. Oh Yeah. Everything becomes at that speed is so much energy. Being dispersed in such a short span of time that biscuit the turn Jello. And it Kinda. It kinda it absorbs into the structure in which is running into, and then there's really no way. Today we actually have some competition ways to predict the amount of damage that recur, but we still do testing. So it's sort of a computational I look, and then we followed up with some validation testing. But as we have done that the last several years, we kinda get more and more. So the computational side. But? It's very easy to see aircraft that was struck by birds and the level of damage because it usually is not just one bird usually they're flying into a grouping birds. So birds hit windshields knows Rome spurts, wings, Burns, hidden vertical stabilisers, or horizontal stabilisers. burs being adjusted into engines are a huge problem because you can. On a wing, you can penetrate that leading edge and get into the thing. They got a fuel got fuel coming out right on an engine. It's going to go through that engine and you can lose or maybe maybe worn more than one bird typically but you can lose that particular engine and just like you're talking about with sully where they had birds go in and both engines in Las both engines so. It's. It's a really serious thing in if around airports that have bird probes and it tends to be at least in our part of the World Canadian geese that migrate want to hang out at the end of the runway. You'll see things like these noise canons, propane cannons at fire off once a minute to encourage the burs lands somewhere else because at a Canadian geese is bigger than a four. Pampered. Right So if you hit something that's obviously hopefully, you're catching it closer to the crown where you're going to get slower speed. So the energy last but the amount of damage that can occur bird impact is substantial substantial to the point where now we do a lot of testing to make sure that the bird can't bring down an airplane but still in the sully situation burs going both engine just really not much you're gonna be able to do their. The FAA puts up notices about where birds are. Philadelphia had a problem for a while. So yeah, it's it's really really serious, but it happens pretty often a lot more. It happens more often than lightning strikes in my opinion early, the damage more visible the lightning strikes because it is a debt left somewhere. On, the aircraft when shield knows radio. All over all over well so these engines are pulling in so much air and creating so much thrust. Create like vortex where a is more likely to go into the engineer or not really so much everything's happening. So fast I, mean you can kind of suck it in if it's if it's not directly in that lie in that line it can definitely could pull it in just grab. Yeah. It can kind of graphics. They do have some Massar but it's the engines pulling so much air sucking so much Erin to it it's it's like a vacuum just going to say anything it's around it into it So the engine manufacturers, Ge's Pratt and Whitney's the. Royce look at that as part of the one of their certification task is to validate what has a bird. Goes to the engine because what you don't. WanNa do is. Start loosening the heavy rotating parts of the rotors. Rhoda per situation. So not knowing you lose a bird, but then he got this flying grenade of an engine blowing holes in the wing and the fuselage and tail, and all this other stuff causes other problems. So it's it's a really serious certification thing but when we don't think about that much. I don't think of all the years I don't think about an aircraft has actually struck a bird I've seen damage from it but close but I don't think I've been an airplanes actually struck a bird. Have you ever been an airplane? That's? Not. What it now now makes me very nervous. So. Limited have my eye out for these birds album. I worry about it with a Canadian geese are or this large flocks in occasionally see it editor ports as you drive into an airport like There's a large flock of whatever geese hanging out down here. That probably smarter hope not taking off in that direction today.

United States Youtube FAA Philadelphia Rome Editor Royce Rhoda Engineer Erin GE Pratt Whitney
"ge" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

01:30 min | Last month

"ge" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"That or GE Northern Illinois Food Bank is committed to your communities recovery. We're all in this together. You're next traffic report at 10 28. NewsRadio 7 81 of five point out of back to weather forecast for today, shaping up to be a rather pleasant Sunday in Chicago. Mostly sunny, pleasant, low humidity high of 85. We do have a beach hazard statement for strong rip currents in Lake and Porter County's Along the lake Michigan shoreline in northwest Indiana. That's until one o'clock this afternoon. Tonight. Patchy clouds lows ranging from 58 in some suburbs to 68 at the lakefront tomorrow. Partly sunny high of 80 for Tuesday. Nice with sunshine, some clouds behind your 80 Wednesday mostly sunny high of 83 Thursday. Sunshine, mixing with clouds warm maybe a shower or thunderstorm in the afternoon. And a high of 86 than Friday. Intervals of clouds and sunshine and a high of 85 right now we have 76 degrees at O'Hare under mostly sunny skies. 77 midway 74 at the lakefront and in Wheaton, Sunny Sky 74 going up to 85. It's 10 20 our top story this hour. What began as a peaceful march on the south side ended downtown. With the scuffle between Protesters and police Last night, two dozen protesters arrested several police officers injured. We'll have much more on this story coming up at 10 31. Elgin is trying to get $4 million in funding to replace several 100 lead water lines..

GE Northern Illinois Food Bank lake Michigan Porter County NewsRadio Elgin Wheaton Chicago Indiana
Boston Bruins Shake Off Tuukka Rask News, Beat Carolina Hurricanes To Take 2-1 Series Lead

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:38 sec | Last month

Boston Bruins Shake Off Tuukka Rask News, Beat Carolina Hurricanes To Take 2-1 Series Lead

"Afternoon, the Boston Bruins getting past the Carolina Hurricanes three, toe one Boston, taking a two games to one Siri's advantage, despite the fact that their franchise leader in games played between the pipes. Goaltender to GE Rask opted out hours before puck drop Bruins head coach Bruce Cassidy talked aboutthe situation. Postgame. I know he had Ah, uh, his third daughter this, you know, this spring, um and and it was on his mind leaving here and you want to get something settled at home. But after that, it's his business and I don't get into unless he wants to discuss it with me, which I think every player is a little bit different that way getting underway at

Boston Bruins Ge Rask Bruins Bruce Cassidy Boston Carolina Hurricanes Siri
Imagine it Forward and Goodr

Zero to IPO

04:23 min | Last month

Imagine it Forward and Goodr

"To another episode of Zero, to IPO were absolutely thrilled to have to amazing guests on the show today I wanna I introduce Beth comstock who for many years in fact, almost three decades was at GE and served as the vice chairperson. There is on the board of Nike is also the author of this amazing book called imagine it forward, which I am really enjoying and learning a lot from and have a bunch of questions to ask Beth about the. Beth welcome on the show. Thanks Josh. Great to see you great to be here. And our other guests is Jasmine crow who is the CEO and founder of Gooder, which is a company that I am fascinated by I. think it's one of the more insightful companies that I've come across. Recently I also have a lot of questions for you Jasmin about how the idea came to you, but but welcome on the show. Thanks so much gas and happy to be here. Of course, we've got Freddie caressed my co host. Zeroed IPO your morning Josh, how you doing good I bet and Jasmine, nice to see you. Thanks for joining us today I'm super excited about today. Yeah me too good to see you. Well, let's dive right in because we have a lot to talk about Jasmine I wanNA start with you and I want to understand I want our audience to understand where you're coming from. When you started gooder there's some kind of basic facts that I want our audience to understand domestically we are wasting seventy-two billion pounds of food every year while forty two million people are struggling with food insecurity absolutely that's a foundational mess. And it's even worse. Now, I'll of everything that's happening with current virus who are wasting more food and more people are going hungry. So it is a huge issue. Yeah. I mean just to be clear before this even. I read somewhere that we were wasting about a quarter trillion dollars a year on food in the United States if people number eight is that right? Yeah. Right Frederick in. So I guess to put an even more simpler context about two percent of GDP is on wasted food for that's a lot of money spent on food that never gets eaten in this country does Like many people I have some passing familiarity with this I. Read about it I don't even know where to start and it seems like maybe you go out and you you know you try to donate food as best you can and and I think that's maybe where you started. Yeah and it transformed into something quite extraordinary. So yeah if you know Josh I started feeding people that were experiencing hunger and homelessness in two thousand thirteen out of my apartment in Atlanta Georgia So that's where got started I found a parking. Lot I drove past it one day and I just saw hundreds of people that were homeless in in something kind of just pulled on my heartstrings at that moment and I said I wanNA help you know what do I didn't have a ton of money and I knew I could cook and so I just went home I post it on facebook I mean Sunday. I'm going to go downtown and I'm going to feed on the streets. If. You want to join me I had about twenty volunteers I made a spaghetti dinner. And loved it. You know brought out my little beats pill at the time, which wasn't that loud outside. Dating us, you're dating we know exactly when you're store your. Heckling when it happened so I really wasn't that loud music thing. But I have bad and you know the idea was it would be old school kind of Sunday music why Jackson five and Aretha Franklin James Brown like this classic kind of music and a good Sunday dinner, and that's how it all got started in. So of eighty own from one of my pop up restaurants went viral on facebook and people are saying this is so amazing which restaurants donate the food and the reality was nobody I was couponing on price matching I always say, I'm the reason Walmart doesn't price-match anymore I definitely feel like i. gave them a run for him. And then I was cooking thing taking it downtown, serving it coming home cleaning up, and so it would take me like forty hours every week I did this and I started researching food ways and was really like upset like I can't believe this much food goes to waste in here I. Am you know putting together five dollar donations and my own money and trying to make these feeding is happening to feed five hundred people

Josh Jasmine Crow Beth Comstock Facebook Nike GE United States Jasmin Walmart Freddie Atlanta Gooder Frederick Aretha Franklin James Brown Jackson CEO Georgia Founder
Marlene Forte On Marvel's Runaways

Sci-Fi Talk Byte

02:04 min | Last month

Marlene Forte On Marvel's Runaways

"A longtime guest on my show has been Marlene Forte. Ge had a role in runaways as a pistol packed in Mama. I loved the Gun I understand. And I was like I would let you know I enjoyed the training that I had to do to do that team and and I think that that's the important thing to understand that you have to respect something like that like almost like you do a car says, you can kill someone with a car and you can kill someone with a gun. So I, think that was. That was my little political fan. They're sorry but I did love. Loved the the the idea of it was the whole fashion year I had to click it and it was Darab double barrel and Oh. It was fun when I was on Dallas The crew is a lot of locals into Dallas's you know they love their guns and during I again now. And, one of the one of the crew member kept wanting to give me to arrange and you know now that I've had this straining on runaways I I just want it was it was a lot of fun and at this age you know the guns I don't know I'm GONNA BE WHEELING GRANDMA guns I don't know how many. Guns. So I really am grateful for the runaways. I squealed when I read that scene I thought it was delicious. I was like, oh? My God. This is to be so much fun. Yeah that was a cool scene I definitely liked that seeing not. Young boys in the. It was so much. Alike. They're all pros. And we're all well, and now because of that, it's on a Disney plus a new channel you can see all the episodes there. Yeah When they call when I when I was going to die, but I had a good death. Yes. But you died well, let's say it's important. Do well. Runaways on Disney plus there you can see more lean in her role

Marlene Forte Disney Dallas GE
Get Momentum With One Question

The Daily Boost

05:16 min | 2 months ago

Get Momentum With One Question

"It is Monday and that means we always start. I know we'll do quick today. Have you done your homework? Did you sit down? Did you pay attention to where you're going right now your rolls, your goals everything in your life in other words he's here's the really simple cliff notes version. Are there things you like and you want to keep things you don't like you WanNa Change. That's it. Scribble it down look at it and say if I like it, I'm GonNa. Make make plans to make sure I don't ever lose what I really like in my life. And if they don't like it I'm going to sit down and figure out how to change it. It's all there is to do your homework. It's the most important thing you can do. It's you paying attention to you. Once you that you can pay attention just about anybody else. You know that's too right. GotTa Take Care Take Care Yourself first. So let's get to that one question. The question I just love to talk about I use all the time. This question came about years and years ago I. Think it was around two thousand six when I started asking myself this question at a beaver us with your is still remember to this day I was in a home depot parking lot in. Lake Mary Florida where I was at the time. And my first wife Cheryl had had gotten terminal cancer and she was in the process dying I. Never saw that way I I could I sold a miracle that we may may could save and I also recognize that we'll maybe not. Is Frustrated I was at home depot buying something who knows what it was, but something to to make life more comfortable and I was kind of freaked out about never forgets about my car in that home people parking lot. I was next to the place where you take the carts back and pushing the cart in there. That can the heck am I gonNA do? I do it to wife time what do? I had to ask the question and you feel this way right now you may be because of the pandemic. You may be feeling that way. Maybe you felt sidelined past few months or maybe busier than ever you can't even breathe. I. Couldn't read that. It's terrible. I wasn't alone. I. Knew it at the time and you're not alone right now people feel this way. Well, balanced right focused lacking direction lacking momentum. Fearful? It's scary sometimes. When I feel momentum do that when I feel momentum slow I discover that day. This very simple question. That I always ask myself or others when they need a boost and it's so simple. Write it down. Okay. What can I do? I. Know It's like wait a second. What do you mean that Scott so can i? Yeah. It's a direct question into your mind your subconscious mind if you will. What can I do now? Here's a trip to the question. I found this a lot of people because you're the boss of you. Right you don't have to do what you say. I'm going to do the Scott I'm gonNA, start a died on Monday then Monday you don't change my mind on the blossoming same thing here. You can ask the question what can I do and the answers are going to flood into your mind, but you may not like them right. Are you willing to ask. We right now think for just a moment. Is there anything in the world right now that maybe you just don't know what to do you just don't. Are you willing to ask that question? Are you ready to accept the answer? No matter how small it may be. It may be just a small tiny tiny adjustment get you where you WanNa go and that's it. Some people overlook those adjustments. They think that's not gonNA do anything it does if you do a little bit every single day right so maybe the answer the comes in little things been nagging me for a while. I just haven't done it. If I did things change maybe that's what you get. Maybe you get the big scary one, right I know these are the tough ones. These are the ones where you just sit around for a long time and things like pandemics tend to take the big stuff and go. Hello. Putting off for years citing the big stuff something significant needs to change. And you haven't had to do it. It's amazing. How change instantly like that very second that we have to. So when you ask that question, I really mean this because I asked it to my clients all the time. And they're fearful of the answer. So, the rule is pretty simple. It's just you'd have to ask and accept whatever comes to your mind. Now over the time that I've been doing life and and working with tens of thousands of people these days I have learned, it comes in two varieties, I kind of tease chatel already. Okay. Number one it's a very minimal adjustment in some areas of your life will get huge results. Maybe not this moment but maybe it might be just a phone call or whatever anything. Somebody. Number to. The realization that something significant must change and it must change now. Are you ready to toss out the old and go for it. Oh Scott Right now's not the time maybe it has to be the time I. Don't know. But asking simple question. Sets you up to be in charge in control, and that's usually where people feel. What people feel when they're trying to move forward they feel like they have no control. The truth is you do if you're willing to take it back into begins right inside of you. So four little words. I promise you if you'RE IN A. Relationship or a bad job or you just need to move or something has to happen if you ask those questions that question to yourself as four little words, what can I do and you're willing to accept the answer that comes into your head? And boy, there's a good chance you're not. But if you're willing to. Take Action on it. You'll change everything you will make you ge- huge impact on your life and those around you.

Scott Lake Mary Florida Cheryl Cancer
Breaking Through at CVRx

MedTech Talk Podcast

05:33 min | 2 months ago

Breaking Through at CVRx

"Welcome to the MED tech talk podcast your host Pardo and I'm very excited to welcome the deem yard CEO CRX to this edition of the podcast Nadeem has had the lustrous career starting at GE and then his GM of MEDTRONIC's navigation business but his biggest and most important challenges come CPR which we're going to focus on today for full disclosure. I've had the pleasure to get to know Nadeem over the past eight plus years, and for the last four I've been on the beam sport and killed as an investor in Cebu. Rx. and. I'm really looking forward to the conversation today. Deem it is great to have you on cats. Thank you jeff it's great to be with you today. Terrific will good what we have a lot of things to cover today and really want to focus on CBS which is turning into I think an incredibly exciting story. But of course, their their roots to the CRX story and maybe you can take us through that a little bit the genesis of. Both. The CRT is therapy in heart failure but also barracks. Absolutely Jeff. So I talk about heart failure it is. A devastating disease. Very expensive from a cost perspective, but also from the human side of things, patients unfortunately suffering from heart failure, end up having those episodes of congestive offense way as they feel that drowning, it's like a continuous waterboarding expedient just how painful that is right and unfortunately one of those episodes could lead to their death and. In the United States hot figure is the second most expensive disease. If we consider cancer as one disease, if you stopped separating cancer between breast cancer by cancer sets that hot figure becomes unfortunately the most expensive disease in the US. What is hot forget? It's. When the heart over the years of. Insult or injury to starts becoming larger the walls of the heart becoming thinner. And the heart's ability to pump blood to the system is compromised. And that's. Compromise happening in multiple forms. One of them is called synchrony when the left side and the right side of the heart start becoming disconnected from each other. So think about it like a car. Engine where have the cylinders not kill into properly? Than the COD would not produce horsepower that you need. You need to tune the car that is what's Artie Cardiac. Surgery synchronization therapy. Was designed to do they. You know put two pacemakers right now it's only one pacemaker with two wires. That's why they call it by basic they based both ventricles and they tried to synchronize the left and right side. That works wild if the heart is distinct honest. However in heart failure. Only thirty to forty percent of the patients have synchrony. That s of the patient's heart become lodged the world's thinner. But the left and right sides are still beating in harmony but not strong enough. And for those patients, unfortunately crt devices did not produce the results that WHO, hoping for. Ten fifteen years ago when we're testing them. And that is where our approach berry. Flex. Therapy comes into play. The genesis of this therapy goes back multiple decades not gonna go to the whole history with Dr Professor Bronwyn than his wife and everything, but nevertheless indie. Let me take one paper from Dr. Abraham. From nineteen ninety nine and that is about CRT devices. In this paper that was published in the New England. Journal of Medicine Dr Abraham demonstrated the sustained. That's or the sustained benefit of CRT. Comes from the fact that when you should denies the left side on the right side of the heart, the pulse pressure of the volume of the blood leaving the heart. Activates the Beverly Flex. In the cutouts dodgy. Trusting. Right. So those patients with this synchrony, you recent combined the left and the right. Now you're sending a pulse pressure strong enough you activate the battery flex let a convoluted way to do it. How did you see that actually signed to do it well? Alex secrets wandered in the body we went with a Wyatt directly into those better receptors in the. Wall and activate though cells. Jackie with. Why go all around right now, our device would work in all forms of heart failure, but we have to go in developed the evidence one by one and demonstrates and in our first. Quote Unquote. beachhead strategy. We selected a large segment of patients who are not able to be treated by CIT devices. Why not the eligible for Siasi devices? Those patients are those who do not have distinctly. Right. So they left the right side of the heart beating in synchrony, but heart is not strong enough. The walls fin the muscles of the heart are tired at the. Pump, the blood.

Jeff Nadeem Cancer United States Dr. Abraham Ceo Crx Medtronic Journal Of Medicine Cebu GE Pardo CBS Dr Professor Bronwyn Artie Cardiac GM New England Jackie Alex Wyatt
US officials: Russia behind spread of virus disinformation

AP 24 Hour News

00:23 sec | 2 months ago

US officials: Russia behind spread of virus disinformation

"U. S. Officials say Russian intelligence officers are using a trio of English language websites to spread disinformation about the pandemic. Intelligence officials say A particular Russian information agency operates a series of websites, including info, brooks dot or GE and one world dot press. To promote anti Western objectives and spread

GE
GE Hit by Steep Decline in Jet-Engine Business

WBZ Midday News

00:22 sec | 2 months ago

GE Hit by Steep Decline in Jet-Engine Business

"News. Lori G. E's jet engine division is seeing some early signs of improvement inflect departures on the path to recovery. But it predicts that the gains are going to be slow Both this year and next. The pandemic battered the company's results last quarter losses larger than predicted because the company was hurt by the steep drop in jet engine in its jet engine business travel collapsed. He produces engines, both

Lori G. E
What Will Dallas's Arts Scene Look Like Post-Pandemic

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

03:15 min | 2 months ago

What Will Dallas's Arts Scene Look Like Post-Pandemic

"Performing arts have had to go virtual during Cove in 19 and the arts Community Alliance is doing everything it can to support these institutions in Dallas County. During the pandemic, we're joined by Terry Loftis, president and executive director of Taka. So how you guys shifted during the way you helped the arts during this time? Yeah. So I took this position last October, and no one told me there was a global pandemic on the right. They really should have let you know that would have been nice of them. That would've been helpful. But in all seriousness, what we were able to do was to react quickly. So the first thing we did when this first half was to create an emergency relief fund with the goal of raising additional funding. So our normal grant process was last March, For example, to where we granted $400,000 to our arts organizations. The pandemic came along and was in full force, and we determined that if we could raise The end of the goal was to raise an additional $150,000. Well, we raise 705,000 so that initiative is drawing to a conclusion right now, then looking forward because back in March the models were indicating and North Texas by Jane July. Will be seeing the other side of this. We will a peak and, you know, April May and then things will get back to some sense of normalcy. Well, that didn't happen. So now we're looking at a situation to where Taka. Technically is not obligated to do the next round of funding based on our normal cycle until next June. Well, there's no way we can wait that long arts organizations. They're going to need our support. Well before then, so That is what led to the creation of the resiliency initiative to where we're taking what would be an annual distribution next June and starting that process and October doing rolling distributions up to the final distribution in June to provide much needed support. Now, then we're waiting until next year. You've got your normal taka grants that you give out. And then there are some smaller grants called pop up grants. Tell us about those What we're doing with this initiative is trying to cover all bases so pop up graphs, which are designed to as this smaller organizations who may be presenting programming in content that may be, for example, just won my concert or one night performance, a dance recital that is not a scheduled seasoned format, but their attempt to And desire to continue their mission statement and put some sort of programmatic content available to their patrons. We would reward those institutions with smaller grants that we call our pop up grants, and that could be anywhere from $500 up to $2000. And that doesn't require an application process because we're seeing a lot of that seasons have been cancelled across organisations of all sizes in the arts. The whole point behind resiliency is just that your ability to present some sort of content that is based on your mission statement to do so. And it's safe environment for performers and for the public. Primarily virtual. And that is Terry Loft is president, executive director of tacos. So if you're a performing arts organization in Dallas County, and you need help reach out to the arts community Alliance, Goto Taka Dash arts DOT or GE. Find out more.

Arts Community Alliance Taka Dallas County Executive Director President Trump Terry Loftis Terry Loft Jane July North Texas
Sandworm: A New Era of Cyberwar and the Hunt for the Kremlin's Most Dangerous Hackers

The Vergecast

46:42 min | 2 months ago

Sandworm: A New Era of Cyberwar and the Hunt for the Kremlin's Most Dangerous Hackers

"Everybody from the British. Ask this week's interview. Episode has any Greenberg senior writer at wired. He just SORTA book called Sand Worm New Era of cyber war in the hunt for the Kremlin's Miss, dangerous hackers, it is all about hacking group inside of the Russian government called San Worm. They were responsible for the most damaging cyber warfare attacks over the past year there behind not PECI. The hackers took out in the mayor shipping line hospitals across the U. K San has totally escalated. What we think of Cyber War, and he's book gets all into how they were discovered how they were flushed out the. The intricacies of these various hacks. It's super interesting. The book is a thrill ride. If you're looking for something that isn't the virus. This is like a thriller, a highly recommended. It was really fun to talk to her about the stuff. one thing I. WanNa know we're all at home so during this in every might hear some kids in the background. I asked you just be a little forgiving that we're all. We're all dealing with it and he was a great interview. Check Out Sandy Greenberg of sand worm, a new era of cyber war and the hunt for the Kremlin's most dangerous hack. Any Greenberg your senior writer at wired you're also the author of Sand Worm, new era of cyber war in the hunt for the Kremlin's most dangerous. Welcome glad to be here so even writing about cybersecurity frontier I think you just said two thousand six and writing about Cybersecurity, but this book sand worm as I was reading it. It seems like it's called the new era of cyber war. It seems like there's been a huge turn in sort of state-sponsored. Particularly Russians sponsored cyber attacks. How did you come onto that notion? How did you begin reading this book I'm I'm very curious how you see. See that turn happening well. In late twenty sixteen, my former colleague Kim Zetter she had been the one who really covered state sponsored hacking in cyber war stuff, but she left wired, and this was also at the time. When you know Russian hackers were meddling in the US election, they'd hacked the democratic. National Committee and the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee and the Clinton Campaign, so my editors were really primes on face, mantra hacking all of a sudden, but what they? They really what they told me they wanted was a actually like a big takeover of the whole magazine. All about cyber war, but cyber war to me is different than those kinds of espionage election, meddling tactics so I went looking for no real cyber war story, which means to me like a actual disruptive cyber attacks, and as I looked around. It seemed like the place where that was really happening was in Ukraine not really in the US in fact maybe. Maybe what was happening in? Ukraine seemed to me like it was in some ways, the only real full blown cyber war that was actually occurring where Russian hackers were not just attacking the election which they had done, they tried this spoof the results of a presidential election, but they had also attacks media and destroyed their computers. They had attacked government agencies and tried to like destroy entire networks, and then they had turned off the power for the first time. In December of two thousand, fifteen, the the first actual blackout triggered by hackers, and just as I was look into this happened again the the effect, the seem hacker group caused a blackout this time in the capital of Kiev so I wince looking in Ukraine for this cyber war story that. Turned into a cover story for wired that kind of gave editors what they wanted, but then also kept unfolding This cyber war kept growing in scope and scale and. The original story written for wired was kind of about the fact that you could look to Ukraine to see the future of cyber war that will what was happening. There might soon spread to the rest of the world. And that is actually what happens to like just after we publish that cover story to same hackers released this climactic terrible cyber attack in Ukraine. Called Not Petiot that spread beyond Ukrainians became the worst cyberattack history cost ten billion dollars, so when that happened, that was when I saw that there was potential to do a book about this that it was not just a kind of case study about Ukraine or even kind of predictive story, but a an actual full story arc about this one group that had carried out the what I would say was not only the first. First Real Cyber War, but the worst cyberattack in history and the you know I wanted to capture the the Ark of that story in the effects, the real experience of cyber war. Yeah, so the group is called sand worm in this is just one of the the sort of opening arcs of the book is how they've come. They come to be named this because references and code walk people through just like it's so. relatable that like even these hackers are using using this language that leads them recalled Sandwich Tell people about it. So when I started to look into the origins of this group after that second blackout attack I I found that this this company called eyesight partners which have been acquired by fire I I, said partners was the first to find these hackers in twenty, fourteen, basically using fishing in kind of typical espionage tactics, plant malware in the networks of typical Russian hacking targets like groups across Eastern, Europe and NATO in a look like what they were doing was just kind of typical espionage. They were planning. This by wear calls lack energy buds will first of all they could see that they were rushing, because they had this server that they were using to administer some of these attacks and they. They left the server, so anybody could look at it in. There was a kind of Russian language to file for how to use black energy on the service, so these guys seem like they were rushing, but even more interesting in some ways. was that they to track each victim each instance of black energy? This malware has little campaign code in each campaign was a reference to the science fiction novel Dune and you know so like one of them was something about Iraq is, and then one of them is about the sutter cars, these like imperial soldiers in in that SCI FI universe so I said partners named this group sand worm, because well just because it's a cool. Name associated with doing, but it turned out to me. It became this very powerful because a sandwich miss this monster that lies beneath the surface, and occasionally arises from underground to do terribly destructive things. partners didn't know that at the time, they they soon afterward realized what sand. was doing was not just espionage, but they were actually doing reconnaissance for disruptive cyberattacks. They were also hacking power grids. They were planning black energy, not only in the European Eastern European targets in the US power grid networks as well. The Ultimately Syndrome was the first twenty fifteen to cross that line in use black energy as the first step in a multi step attack that led to a blackout. So this was not just espionage really was kind of like you know this monster that rises from under the ground to do terrible acts of mass destruction that came to pass so one of the things that comes up over in the book. Is this growing sense of dread from security researchers and analysts? Oh this is an imminent threat to the united. States just Ukraine, but like this is happening here and then there's a sense that the United States actually open the door to this kind of warfare with stuxnet. which was an attack on Iran? How how did those connect for you that it seemed like there's a new rule of engagement new set of rules of engagement for cyber warfare that actually the United States implicitly created with with stuxnet by attacking Iran. Yeah, I mean I tried to highlight. Clearly sand worm are the real bad guys in the story, they are the actual hacker group that did these terribly reckless destructive attacks that actually in some cases put people's lives at risk, the kind of in some parts of the story they actually shutdown medical record systems and I. Think may have cost people's lives with cyber attacks today they are the actual antagonist here, but I also want to highlight the ways that the US government is is partially responsible for the state of Cyber War, and there are a few ways that that's true. I The US! Open the Pandora's box of cyber war with stuxnet. This piece of now where that. That was used to destroy Iranian nuclear enrichment centrifuges that was the first piece of our that actually have caused that physical disruption destruction, and we now see Sandra doing the same thing in Ukraine. In in fact, in some ways around the world, also the the US hordes, these kind of zero day, secret hacking techniques, some of which were stolen and leaked and used by sand worm, but then I think the in fact, the biggest way that I tried to highlight that the US is responsible or complicit or negligent. Here is that we did not call allows what Santorum was doing in Ukraine and say to Russia. We know what you're doing. This is unacceptable. Nobody should be turning out the lights. Two civilians with cyber attacks. There wasn't a message like that I. mean the Obama White House sent a message to Russia over this kind of cyber hotline to say your election hacking is not okay. We see what you're doing and we want you to stop, but they said nothing about a tube blackout attacks in Ukraine, and that was kind of implicit signal to Russia. They could keep. Keep escalating, and even as all the cyber security, researchers and Ukrainians were warning that what was happening to Ukraine, would soon spread to the rest of the world, the US government ignore this both Obama, and then the trump administration until that prediction came to pass and a sand worm cyberattack did spread to the rest of the world, and it was too late, and we all suffered globally as a result, so let's talk about patch it. WAS CATASTROPHIC IN SCOPE, right? It took out the mayor shipping line, which is a massive business. It took out some hospitals in UK like it was huge in scope. I don't think people really put it all together. Talk about how it started and how big it grew. Yeah, so not too was kind of like big apotheosis sandwich, where all of these predictions of the terribly destructive things they were doing to the rest of the world came to pass but it did it started in Ukraine. They hijacked this. The the software updates of this accounting software called me doc that is basically used by everybody in Ukraine. The quicken turbo tax of Ukraine. If you do business in Ukraine, you have to have this installed, so sanborn hijack the updates of that news to push out this worm to thousands of victims mostly in Ukraine, but it was a worm, so it's spread the mmediately end quickly kind of carpet bombs. The entire Ukrainian Internet's every computer at spread to would encrypt permanently. You could not recover the computer, so it very quickly took down pretty much every. Every Ukrainian government agency twenty two banks multiple airports for hospitals in Ukraine that I. could count and in each of these cases. What is eight took them down. I mean it destroyed essentially all of their computers, which requires sometimes weeks or months to recover from, but then as you know, this is a worm that does not respect national borders. So even though it was, it seemed to be an attack intended to disrupt Ukraine. It immediately spread beyond Ukraine's borders. Borders to everybody who had this accounting software installed? That was doing business in Ukraine and some people who didn't so that includes Maersk. The world's largest shipping firm and Fedex and Mondelez, which owns cadbury, NABISCO and ranking manufacturing firm that makes tylenol in Merck. The Pharmaceutical Company in New Jersey on each of these companies lost hundreds of millions of dollars. The scale of this is kind of difficult to capture but I in the book I tried to. To I focused in part Maersk because it is just a good company to look at because you can. They had this gigantic global physical machine that is they have seventy six ports around the world that they own as well as these massive ships that have tens of thousands of shipping containers on them. And I told the story of how on this day seventeen of their terminals of were entirely paralyzed by this attack with ships arriving with just. Piles of containers on them. Nobody could unload. Nobody knew what was inside of nobody knew how to load or unload them with around the world of seventeen terminals, thousands of trucks, Semitrailers, carrying containers were lining up in Lyons miles long because the gates that were kind of checkpoints to check in the these trucks to drop something off or pick it up. They were paralyzed as well. This was a fiasco on a global scale is responsible for a fifth of the world's lable shipping capacity. They were truly just a rendered brain dead by this attack, but yeah displayed out at all of these different victims MERC had to borrow their own each vaccine from the Center for Disease Control because they're manufacturing. Manufacturing was disrupted by this, and it ultimately spread to a company called nuance, nate speech to text software. They have a service that does this for hospitals across the US to dozens of our possibly hundreds of American hospitals at this backlog of transcriptions to medical records that were lost because of this, and that resulted in patients, being do for surgeries or transfers, other hospitals in nobody knew their medical records were updated. I mean this was scale where hundreds of hospitals each of which has thousands of patients missing changes the medical records. We don't know what the effects of that work, but very well could've actually harmed people's health. Our lives I mean the scale of not petty is very difficult to. Get your mind around, but we do know that you know monetarily cost ten billion dollars, which is by far the biggest number we've ever seen, but it also had this this kind of harder to quantify toll on people's lives, so it it you know you read about it at length and wired. Obviously these companies go down of ripples in mainstream sort of general press, but I don't feel like people really not like Oh. This Russian group called San Worms sponsored by the Russian government. Unleash this attack in it caused this cascading effect of failure and disaster cost in that because we know what we can attribute it to the government, our government. I don't feel like that connection got made for people. What is the gap between other as a hack and Oh, this is actually a type of warfare engagement, because that that connection seems very tenuous. I think for a lot of people. Even as sort of the more general mainstream press covers this stuff. Yeah, you know. I don't think that that's is just like the nature of. Of Cyber War I think that was a failing that that lack of connection is a failing on our government's parts, and on you could say even on the part of some of these victims like these large companies I mean I at the time did not pitch it happened. I was fully on the trail of standard within days. I was talking to cyber security researchers who? Who had piece together? Some of the forensics to show the not petiot was Sandra that it was a Russian state-sponsored attack in yet none of those companies that I mentioned mercker Mondelez or Maersk or Fedex, or any of them wanted to say the Russia had done this to them and know governments were talking about either like the Ukrainian government was. They're always willing to point. Point the finger at Russia, but the US government was not, and you know that to me seemed to be just kind of I mean I felt like I was being gas. Let's at that point. I had watched Russia due to Ukraine for a long time at that point tonight. I sort of understood that NATO in the West. We had this kind of cruel logic that. Ukraine is not us. Russia can do what it likes to Ukraine because they're not NATO not e you. They are Russia's sphere of influence or something I think that that's very wrongheaded, but at least it made sense. You know to have that that viewpoints, but now this attack had spread from Ukraine to hit American soil American companies in many cases and yet still the US government was saying nothing I just thought this was bizarre and you know so i. For months I was like. Trying to get any of these companies to tell the story of of their experiences, not Peta I was trying to figure out why the US government wasn't talking about the fact that this was a Russian cyberattack and ultimately I. Think it was I. think it was kind of I know partly disorganization negligence. I think it may have something to do with the fact that the. The? Trump administration doesn't like talking about Russian hackers for obvious reasons, but eight months after it took eight months ultimately for the US government to finally say not that it was a was Russia it was the worst cyberattack in history, and then a month later. The White House impose consequences in put new sanctions on Russia and response, but it took nine months and more importantly it took. Multiple years this without was the first time this was twenty eighteen, and the Russian cyber war in Ukraine had started around the fall of Twenty fifteen, so that's just incredible span of negligence when the US government said nothing about these escalating unfolding. Acts, of Cyber Award that there should have been unacceptable from the very beginning I mean these are the kind of quintessential acts of state sponsored cyber attacks on civilians, trying out the lights. You know that's the kind of thing that I believe that the US government should have called out and drawn a red line across at the very beginning took ears, so I do think it was a big failing. Of of diplomacy, it just seemed like that part of the problem, and this is kind of an expression is it's so hard to describe like if the Russian government sent fighter jets to America and live their support. Okay, like everyone understood, you can see it. You can understand what happened there. In the you know, there's like a however many decades of movies about how to fight that war. This is a bunch of people in a room typing. Like it there's just an element of this where the dangerous Oh federal where the attack is invisible, and while the effects might be very very tangible, the causes are still sort of mysterious people so. My question is who is sandwich. What what do we know about them? Where do they work? What are they like? Do we have a sense of how this operation actually operates? In some ways the the biggest challenge of reporting this book, and I spent essentially the third act of the book, the last third of the reporting of the book, trying to answer the question of who is in worm, who are these people? Where are they located? What motivates them and I guess to partially spoil the ending here. They are a unit of the year you. They are a part of Russia's military intelligence agency, which is responsible for you know, this is not a coincidence. They are responsible for election meddling responsible for the attempted assassination of You. chemical weapons in the United Kingdom they're responsible for the downing of a seventeen as commercial passenger jet over Ukraine were three hundred innocent people died on the G. R.. You are this incredibly reckless callous out military intelligence agency, but they act like kind of almost just cut through mercenaries around the world. Doing Russia's bidding in ways that are very scary, so I threw essentially like a combination of excellent work of a bunch of security researchers who I was speaking to combined with some confirmation from US intelligence agencies, and then ultimately some other clues from the investigation of Robert Muller into meddling all these things combined created the trail that led to one group within the JERE. You that were you know I? Eventually had some names and faces even address of this this group, and all that was actually only finally fully confirms After the book came out Justin in recent months when the White House finally actually was the State Department's. End as well as the UK on Australian and other governments together finally said yes, sand worm is in fact that this unit of the year you so this theory that I developed in positive near the end of the book was finally basically confirmed by governments just in recent months. So one thing that strikes me at that is I, think of the Russian military things. Gru is being foreboding being obviously, they're very very good at this other a buttoned up in then they have like a incredible social media presence that kind of POPs up throughout the book that distracts from what doing. They set up Gucci for two point Oh when they were doing the DNC hacks that fed to wikileaks in the. That account insisted it was just guy. They set up the shadow brokers which was. I read. It is just like your some goof-balls like they wanted to seem a lot dumber and a lot smaller than they were. They were very effective at it to people I. Talk About those that strategy, and then I guess my question have is like a re better at seeing that strategy for what it is well. You make a really interesting point. The uses these false flags like throughout their recent history that we I should say we don't know that they were responsible for shadow brokers. In fact, nobody knows who shot a brokers. The shadow brokers truly are, and they are in some ways the biggest mystery in this whole story, this one group that hacked the NSA apparently and leaked a bunch of their zero day hacking techniques, or maybe they were even say insiders. We still don't know the answer to that question, but the other other incidents you mentioned. That are you are responsible for this Guja for two point zero fake hacktivists leaked a bunch of the Clinton documents. They're responsible for other false flags like they at one point to call themselves the Cyber Caliphate pretended to be Isis. They've a pretended to be like patriotic pro. Russian Ukrainians at some point they they're always like wearing different masks ends. They're very deceptive. in the a later chapter of the book, some of the biggest one of the biggest attacks they. They did was this attack on the twenty thousand Olympics where they not only wore a false mask, but they actually had layers of false flags where as cyber security researchers W. This melwert was used to destroy the entire back end of the two thousand eighteen winter Olympics. Just as the opening ceremony began, this was a catastrophic events. The aware had all of these fake clues made look like it was Chinese or North Korean or maybe Russian. Nobody could tell it was like. It was this kind of confusion bomb almost designed to to just make researchers throw up their hands. Give up on attributing mallards. Any particular actor was only through some amazing detective work by some of the analysts that I spoke to the able to cut through those false flags identify that sand was behind this essentially, but yeah, it's it is a one very real characteristic of the jury you that they are almost they seem to almost take pleasure or like be showing off their deception capabilities to and their evolving those capabilities they are getting more deceptive over time as fake gets more, destructive aggressive. Advertising content when I say Utopia what comes to mind? Birds Chirping lush natural beauty dialed up and vibrant technicolor. Is it within reach. Your world. World. explained. You are an essential part of the Pathak social body. Everybody in that place. Everybody happy now. While the peacock original series brave new world takes place in a scientific futuristic utopia. The concept is nothing new Sir Thomas more. I introduced the theory five hundred years ago, but we keep looking for that community identity stability of aldous. Huxley's Utopia and not finding it. Americans are the unhappiest they've been in decades and we're increasingly lonely. whereas in a utopia, everyone belongs to everyone else. In nineteen, forty-three, the psychologist Abraham Maslov developed a theory of Yoga. One that allows total self determination in basic terms. maslow's theory says that in a utopia we decide for ourselves what we need and how we're going to get it in Huxley's Utopia. Citizens always get what they want and don't want what they can't get. Sounds pretty good right then. Why can't we make it happen? For a Utopian Society, to work, we might need to disband some of the things we hold dearest marriage government privacy individualism, even family. See for yourself if a utopian world is as perfect as it seems watch, brave new world now streaming only on peacock. This is advertising content. Hey. This is bowes I'm a podcast or By, I, a Gamer Five G. is changing the gaming world in really unexpected exciting ways with the help of Samsung Five G. I'm getting a peek at how gaming is getting faster smoother and can even improve our lives well. Let's dish some secrets about the future gaming. Dr Jean Mechanical Direct Route Game Research and development at the Institute of the future. She's also a bestselling author game inventor. She's optimistic about gaming impact on us and our minds. The biggest thing that we've seen in research is that. We need to be able to game in the moment wherever we are. So, what happens when when you're playing when your favorite games is that it fires up than her logical pathways, it's kind of like having a of caffeine and a pet dog from your favorite coach, and you've just meditated for an hour. This emotional neurological power up is called the game transfer effect, and that effect is heightened when using five. Five G. The game transfer fact requires you to be totally immersed in the game, so you want to have the most amazing graphics and the most immersive audio and with five G. to do that anywhere anytime, be one of the first to harness the game transfer effect with Samsung Galaxy Five G. now available on Galaxy, S Twenty-five g and a seventy one five G. feels good to be I with Samsung. I love to play the game of like. Imagine the meeting and imagine that the one set of meeting which is like the actual hackers finding the vulnerabilities figuring out how to jump from Windows, eight computer to some sort of physical hardware controller that actually runs like that. That's a very hard problem in and of itself, and then the other meeting. They're like what we're GONNA do is claim to be a guy called Gucci for two point, Oh and like those are. Not Connected Right, but the way they throughout the book the way they execute East campaigns they're deeply connected, and that seems like not only just a new kind of warfare, and you kind of craft, but some just consistently seems to work in surprising ways like the tech press is GonNa. Be Like Gucci. I says this and we're. There's never that next step of also we think it's Russian government, and that seems like first of all I'm dying. I imagine the meeting right. I would love to be a fly on the wall of the meeting where they decide what their twitter name is going to be today. I'm very curious how they evolve those attacks in such a way that it just seems to be more and more effective time. Yeah, I mean. I also love to have been those meetings in. It's my one kind of regret in this book that I never actually got. Interviews, it's almost an impossible thing to do. They liked find defectors from the R., you or something. He will tell those stories at a knock it murdered I mean. It's kind of a possible, but but. In some cases? I think your earlier points. They almost seem kind of bumbling in these things they do them in a very improvisational way. for two point Oh seemed almost like it was a justice thing they invented on the spot, tried to cover up some of the the accidental ups like they had left russian-language formatting errors in the documents that they had leaked from the DNC, so they admitted this guy who appeared the next day and started. Talking about being a Romanian. Friends as motherboard Lorenza, Franceschi decry he started this conversation. Align with with Guja for two point, oh basically proved at the guy could not actually properly speak Romanian. BE Russian speaker. In fact, it was. It was almost comical at the same time. They're using very sophisticated hacking techniques doing destructive attacks on a massive scale, but they're also. They seem like they're kind of making it up as they go along. They do things that don't actually seem very kind of strategically smart. They kind of seem like they're trying to impress their boss for the day. Sometimes with just like some sometimes, it's just seems like the Jere. You wakes up in asks themselves. Like what can we blow up today? Rather than thinking like? How can we accomplish the greater strategic objectives of the Russian Federation? So they are fascinating in that way and very stringent colorful group. That's I think one of the biggest questions I have here is. We spend a lot of time trying to imagine what flat and Mirror Putin wants. You know when he grows up, but it. None of this seems targeted like what is the goal for Russia to disrupt the Winter Olympics right like. Is there a purpose to that? Is that just a strike fear? Is it just to? EXPAND THAT SUV influenced. Is it just to say we have the capability furious is there? has there ever really been the stated goal for this kind of cyber warfare? That one is particularly mystifying. I mean you can imagine why Russia would want to attack the Olympics. They were banned from the two thousand Eighteen Olympics doping, but then you would think that they might want to attack the Olympics and send a message maybe like eight deniable message a message that you know if you continue to ban us. We're GONNA. Continue to attack you like like any terrorists would do, but instead they attacked the winter. Olympics in this way, that really seemed like they were trying not to get caught, and instead like make it look like the was Russia North Korea? And then you have to like what is the point of that was? The could kind of. Sit there in Moscow and kind of like rub their hands together in gleefully. Watch this chaos unfolds. It almost really does seem like it was petty vindictive thing that they just for their own emotional needs wanted to make sure that nobody could enjoy the Olympics if they were not going to enjoy them I that was, but that one is i. think outlier in some ways for the most part you can kind of see. The Russia is advancing. The G. R. You that sand worm is advancing something that does generally make sense which is that. In Ukraine for instance, they're trying to make Ukraine look like a failed state. They're trying to make Ukrainians. Lose faith in their security. Services are trying to prevent investors globally from funneling money into Ukraine trying to create a kind of frozen conflict, as we say in Ukraine where there's this constant perpetual state of degradation. They're not trying to conquer the country, but they're trying to create a kind of permanent war in Ukraine and would cyber war. You can do that beyond the traditional front end. It is in some ways the same kind of tactic that they used in other places like the US which. which here we saw more than influence operation that they were hacking leaking organizations like democratic campaign organizations and anti doping organizations to kind of so confusion to embarrass on their targets. They're trying to influence like the international audiences opinion these people, but in Ukraine, it is in some ways, just a different kind of influence operation where they're trying to influence the world's view of Ukraine. Influence Ukrainians view of their themselves under government to make them feel like they are in a war zone even when their kid hundreds of miles from the actual fighting. That's happening on the eastern fronts in the eastern region of. Of Ukraine so in a book you you you go to Kiev. You spent time in Ukraine. Is there a sense in that country that while sometimes light goes out sometimes our TV stations. Their computers don't boot anymore. Because they got rewritten, the Hydros got Zeros like. Is there a sense that this is happening? Is there a sense the defy back is there does Microsoft deploy you know dozens of engineers to to help fight back. How does that play out on the ground there? Yeah, I mean to be fair. Ukrainians are very stoic about these things and regular. Ukrainian citizens were not bothered by you know. Know a short blackout. They didn't particularly care you know. This blackout was the first ever. Hacker induced blackout in history but Ukrainian cyber security. People were very unnerved by this end, people in these actual utilities were traumatized I mean these attacks were truly like relentless sins very kind of scary for the actual operators at the controls I mean in the first blackout attack. These poor operators Ukrainian control room in western Ukraine they were locked out of their computers, and they had to watch their own mouse cursor. Click through circuit breakers, turning off the power in front of them I. Mean They watched it happen? At these kind of Phantom hands to control of their mouse movements, so they took this very very seriously, but yet Ukrainians as a whole I mean they have seen a lot. They are going through an actual physical war. They've seen the seizure of Crimea and the invasion of the east of the country. You know the the date hits. A Ukrainian general was assassinated with a car bomb in the middle of Kiev, so they have a lot of problems, and I'm not sure that cyber war is one of the top of their minds, but not patio I. Did, actually reach Ukrainians normal. Ukrainian civilians to it. It shook them as well. I talked to two regular Ukrainians. who found that they couldn't swipe into the Kiev Metro. They couldn't use their credit card at the grocery store. All the ATM's were down The Postal Service was taken out for every computer that the postal service had was taken out for more than a month. I mean these things really did affect people's lives, but it kind of. A until that kind of climactic worm. Not Patio for I think for this to really reach home for Ukrainians. who have kind of seen so much. How do you fight back? I, mean I one of things that struck me as I was reading. The book is so many of the people you talked to people who are identifying the threat. They're actually private companies. Eyesight was the first even detect it. they are contractors to intelligence agencies the military in some cases, but they're not necessarily the government right like it's not necessarily Microsoft. Who has to issue the patches from the software not necessarily GE which makes simplicity, which is the big industrial controls talk about a lot. How does all that come together into a defense because that seems like harder problem of coordination? Yeah, I mean defense in Cyber. Security is in an eternal problem. It's incredibly complicated, and when you have a really sophisticated determined adversary, it know they will win eventually ends I. think that they're absolutely lessons for defense in this book about you know. Maybe you need to really really think about software updates for instance like the kind that were hijacked to a with this medoc accounting software. As a vector for terrible cyber-attacks. Imagine that like. Any of your insecure apps that have kind of updates can be become a a piece of Malware, really unique to signature networks need to think about patching on. There are just an endless kind of checklist of things to every organization needs to do to protect themselves so. In some ways that just like a Sisyphean task and I don't. I don't try to answer that question in the book because it's too big, and it's kind of boring as well, but what I do really hammer on is the thing that the government's really could've done here. which is to try to establish norms tried to control attackers through diplomacy through kind of disciplinary action through things like kind of Geneva Convention for Cyber War if. If you think about a kind of analogy to say like chemical weapons, we could just try to give everyone in the world a gas mask that they have to carry around with them at all times, or we could create a Geneva. Convention norm that chemical weapons should not be used in if they are than crime, and you get pulled in front of the Hague. Hague and we've done the ladder and I think that in some ways should be part of the the answer to cyber war as well we need to establish norms and make countries like Russia or like organizations like the G. Are you understand that there will be consequences for these kinds of attacks, even when the victim is not the US or NATO or the? The EU and I think we're only just starting to think about that. One of the questions I had as reading is it seems like a very clear red line for almost everyone you talk to is attacks on the power grid right? That is just unacceptable. You should not do it if you do it. You've crossed a line and there should be some consequence. Is, that clear to governments. Is that something that our government says? It's something that the says it has been established. It seems like it's it's the conventional wisdom wants to salvage, but I'm not unclear whether that is actually the line that exists. It definitely has not been established, and when I kind of did these I managed to get sort of interviews with the top cyber security officials in the Obama ends trump administration Jay Michael Daniel was the cyber. Cyber Coordinator for the administration was the kind of cyber coordinator boss in the The Homeland Security Adviser for trump and both of them when I asked him about like wiped. Why didn't you know to put it bluntly like? Why didn't you respond? When Russia caused blackouts in Ukraine? Both of them essentially said well. You know that's not actually the rule that we want to set. We want to be able to cause blackouts in our adversaries networks. In their power grids when we are in a war situation or when we believe it's in our national interest, so you know that's the thing about these cyber war capabilities. This is part of the problem that every country. Absolutely the US among them isn't really interested in controlling these weapons, because we in this kind of Lord of the rings fashion, we are drawn to them to like we want to maintain the ability to use those weapons ourselves and nobody wants to throw this ring in the fires, of Mount Doom. We all wanted maintain the ring and imagine that we can use it for good in out. So that's why neither administration called that Russia for doing this because they want that power to. Make the comparison to to nuclear weapons but Negotiated drawdown and treaties with Russia in the past we count warheads where aware that the United States stockpiles can destroy the world. Fifty Times over today maybe tomorrow one hundred hundred like what we have a sense of the the measure of force that we can. Put on the world when it comes to nuclear weapons, there's a sense that Oh, we should never use these right like we have them as a deterrent, but we've gained out that actually leads to his mutually assured destruction like there's an entire body of academics. There's entire body of researchers. Entire body is got scenario planning with that kind of weapon. Does that same thing exist for for cyber weapons. There are absolutely. Know community is of academics. Policymakers who are thinking about this stuff now, but I don't think it's kind of gotten through to actual government decision. that. There needs to be kind of cyber deterrence in how that would work. In in the comparison to nuclear weapons is like instructive, but not exactly helpful. In fact, it's kind of counter-productive because we cannot deter cyber-attacks with other cyber-attacks i. don't think that's GonNa work in part because we haven't even tried to establish it yet. There are no kind of rules or read lines, but then I think more importantly. Everybody thinks that they can get away with cyberattacks that they can. They're going to create a false flag. That's clever enough that that when they blow up a power grid, they can blame their neighbor instead, so they think they're. They're gonNA. Get Away with it, and that causes them to do it anyway. A not fear the kind of assured destruction so I think that the the right response, the way to to deter cyber attacks is not with the promise of a cyber attack in return. It's with all the other kind of tools we have, and they've been used sometimes, but but they were not in the case of Sand Werman. Those tools include like sanctions which came far too late in the story indictments of hackers. In some cases, we still haven't really seen syndrome. Hackers indicted for the things that they did in Ukraine or or even not petty. And then ultimately just kind of messaging like calling out naming and shaming bad actors, and that has happened to some degree with Sandra, but in some cases there have still been massive failures there there has still been no public attribution of the Sandwich attack on the twenty eighteen Olympics I mean. My Book has been out for months. I think show pretty clear evidence that syndrome is responsible for this attack. The very least it was Russia and yet the US and Korean War, These Olympics took place at UK, none of these governments have named Russia as having done that. That attack which almost just invites them to do it again whenever our next Olympics are going to be, I guess maybe not this year, but if you don't send that message than you're just essentially inviting Russia to try again so I think might my big question is what happens now? I mean right we you write about. The NSA has tailored access operations, which is their elite hacking group. We are obviously interested in maintaining some of these capabilities. We've come to a place where people are writing books about how it works. What is the next step? What is the next? does it just keep getting worse or does this kind of diplomacy you're talking about? Is that beginning to happen I? Think there is some little glimmers of hope about the diplomacy beginning to happen I mean this year in February I think it was the State Department's called out a sand worm attack on Georgia, where a worms hackers basically took down a ton of Georgian websites by attacking the hosting providers as well as a couple of TV's broadcasters in the US. State Department with a few other governments not. said this was sand. Worm named the unit of the GRU. That's is that was confirmation that I've been looking for for a long time, but they also made a point of saying that we're calling this out is unacceptable, even though Georgia. Georgia is not part of NATO or the U. so that's that's progress. That's essentially creating a new kind of rule. That's state-sponsored. Hackers can't do certain things, no matter who the victims and that's really important. Also, it was kind of interesting because federal officials like gave me a heads up about that announcement before happened, which they have very very rarely do and I think they were trying. To say was in we. We read your book and we. Got The message okay like Stop attacking us about this like we're trying. We're doing something different here I. Don't want flatter myself that I actually changed their policy, but it did seem interesting that they wanted to tell me personally about this so i. I think that like maybe our stance on this kind of diplomacy is evolving, and we're learning lessons, but at the same time we also see the attacks evolving to. To and their new innovations in these kinds of disruption happening, we've seen since some of these terrible Sandra attacks. You know other very scary things like this piece of our called Triton or crisis that was used to disabled safety systems in a oil refinery in Saudi Arabia on that was you know that could have caused an actual physical explosion of petrochemical facility? The the attacks are evolving to okay final last real question. Tell people where they can get your book. You can find all kinds of places by on indie Greenberg Dot net. Written another book as well previously, yes. That's right. I wrote a book about wikileaks. Cypher punks and things like that. That's right well. I'm a huge fan. It was an honor to talk to you. Thank you so much for coming on I know it's. It's a weird time to be talking about anything, but the coronavirus I was very happy to talk about something else, which is that it seems a little bit more in control Even if it is quite dangerous, a thank you for the time. I appreciate it. Yeah, I'm glad to provide people with a different kind of apocalypse as a distraction.

Ukraine United States Russian Government Nato Olympics Kiev United Kingdom Sandra Cyber Award State Department Kim Zetter Barack Obama Clinton Russia San Worm Sandy Greenberg NSA DNC
Countries Look to Lockdown Again After Easing of Restrictions Sees Coronavirus Cases Soar

Ben Shapiro

01:42 min | 2 months ago

Countries Look to Lockdown Again After Easing of Restrictions Sees Coronavirus Cases Soar

"And the search has been driven by infections in John Ging. In the Northeast Manning province report 1/5 straight day of new infections. Jilin Province reported to new cases. Those were the first since May, Australian authorities have imposed a six week locked down in parts of the South eastern state of Victoria. They said that could last longer. Meanwhile, in Japan, the government said it would urge businesses to ramp up antivirus measures like staggered shifts and embassy. Rates of telecommuting returns levels achieved during an earlier state of emergency. Vietnam is evacuating 80,000 people, 80,000 people. After three residents tested positive this weekend. Read that first living extreme response. Have three cases and you expelled 80,000 people. Again. The notion that this is restricted to America that America is getting hard hit. Basically, here's the deal. No one knows how to stop. The virus virus is growing nearly everywhere. The idea that simply locking down all of society for years on end In order to curb the spread of the virus, which young is not particularly deadly. That's bad policy is bad policy, and it has some real ramifications. I know everybody's pretending that we can simply float cash to vast swaths of people. For insane amount of time. But that is not the way any of this works. At a certain point. The economy is going to get out. You cannot allow this to go on forever. Now there's some good news by the way, and it's news worth noting. The good news is that apparently that a couple of drugs that are going to come online maybe that could really help. There's one drug promoted by scientists at Hebrew University. They are hoping could actually reduce the impact of Corona virus to that of the common cold. That would obviously be a huge winner. Basically using anti inflammatories. We'll see. If that happens In the meantime, this notion we're gonna lock down forever. It just ain't in the cards is not gonna happen.

Jilin Province John Ging America Victoria Hebrew University Vietnam Japan
Astros reliever Joe Smith opts out of 2020 season

KCBS Radio Midday News

00:26 sec | 2 months ago

Astros reliever Joe Smith opts out of 2020 season

"Astros reliever Joe Smith has become the 14th major League player to opt out of the summer season that begins a week from tomorrow night. Smith's mother has Huntington Disease, which progressively kills brain cells, and Khun B. Passed down genetically Smith and his wife, TNT sports reporter Allie LaForce, have both worked hard over the years to raise awareness of the disease through their nonprofit help cure HD dot or GE.

Joe Smith Allie Laforce Huntington Disease Astros Khun B. TNT GE Reporter
"ge" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

02:49 min | 6 months ago

"ge" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"A collaboration with GE healthcare focuses on building ventilators production with forty set to begin April twentieth at a Michigan plant General Motors was also pushed last week by president trump's defense production act to speed up its partnership with inventing life systems it will begin producing ten thousand ventilators per month in the coming weeks at a plant in Indiana tables of the number of coronavirus cases around the world tops more than a hundred thousand nearly twenty percent here in the U. S. where the number of people who died is now to thirty one hundred seventy many of those in New York City area or a make shift hospital built by Franklin Graham's organization opens today in Central Park we've got people there that have experience dealing with infectious diseases so they know how to do this are there quick before they're ready for it no U. S. navy hospital ship getting ready to take non corona patients today after docking in New York other temporary hospitals are being set up in convention centers in other places in other states like Louisiana and Michigan where cases keep spiking America's listening to fox news he'll be J. news time is eight oh two good morning I'm mark Caesar this update is brought you by sinus and snoring specialists a survey of Texas restaurant owner show many are fighting for their lives it's estimated one in three restaurants has closed temporarily because of corona virus but Anna Tauzin with the Texas restaurant association says those that are still open and seen a forty three percent drop in sales combining for a total of one point eight billion a loss revenue already alright give it just a snapshot of the extreme economic impact that the cover nineteen countries that having two thirds of Texas restaurants laid off most of their staff and Tauzin says one out of every ten restaurant owner says within the next thirty days they'll have to close their doors for good Patrick Osborne is radio cable B. J. Austin is preparing facilities for the elderly who test positive these two facilities we have specially trained staff to treat covert nineteen with the goal of cutting the death rate for elderly nursing home residents says the city's Dr lean fry there's really no reason to expect that we would not have the same mortality again thirty percent mortality and nursing facilities here that they had just weeks ago in Washington state prices these facilities could fill quickly your predictions are right and if they do fill up she says the city will identify more sites that can isolate positive nursing home patients Robert wood newsradio Gail B. J. Austin school board met last night but the finish the meeting without making any decisions on online learning overcrowding leads officials to close lake Pflugerville including all peers trails restrooms and pavilions the city of Pflugerville says too many people were gathering increasing the risk of spreading corona virus the mayor says if people don't heed the warnings all other parks may be closed as well it's eight oh four eight K. L. B. J. here's Austin's on time traffic.

GE
"ge" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

07:26 min | 7 months ago

"ge" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Mighty weapon. And Holon certainly add one in the Guy Bulga like the a weapon so mighty that it is the is the the death weapon of last resort. He only even turns to it if he's basically fighting an opponent that is on his own level. Now it is not known exactly how to translate the term. Guy Bulga right It's translated many different ways I think we know that guy basically means spear right, but the Bulga. There's questions about what that means. Yeah, that's correct. guy certainly mean spear or Dart but the the Bulga part is. Is Open discussion. There's a particular tax return to by a by a writer by the name of Edward. pet I'm not going to give you. The full name of that article gives will give away what we're going to get to. In the later later portions of this episode we will say the name of the article. You'll say later, but he points out that that the guy. Boga has been translated as just use a test sampling, the belly DART, the DART of belly, barbed spear spear of Bello's body. Spear Bagged Spear Spear of swelling? The. Spear of the sack Fort Spear. Gaps Speier Solar Speier at the spear of mortal pain, the EEL spear spear of the lightning God spear of the Thunderbolt and he also adds that the Boga part has also been interpreted to perhaps refer to an inflated bladder. That one so essentially this would be a fishing spear like one would have tethered to something that floats Oh that's interesting, and then likewise it's also been potentially connected to the fear, bowl. These according to Carol rose the the the folklorist that often refer to when we're talking about mythological creatures and monsters she, it says these were the mythic first inhabitants of Ireland defeated by the to author, John and driven into mountain, caves and forests, where they became loathsome Munster's so possible connection there as well, but okay. Whatever Boga means they're bellows bulge whatever we know that there's some kind of special magic spear. So how does it work? What does it do well? One of the things is that colon alone knows how to really wield the weapon. You know I mean he, he. He is taught to depends. It depends on which version you're reading. He's either taught by God or by you know a skilled master, and he alone has mastery of the guy. Boga but it is a as a sphere, a weapon that you only turn to the basically I just last resort, and also users really willing to to absolutely murder your opponent I'm sorry I'm just suddenly reminded of one of those newspaper articles from the nineteen twenties that we quoted in our death-ray episode of invention where the Guy was like the death ray is mind, and only I can have it. Yeah! This was his death ray innocence now in that fantastic reading at the top of the episode. That story of from the cattle raid of. That really gives you some of the key attributes of the weapon here so it is brought to. The stream his charity or puts it in a stream and it. Floats down to him, and then it is cast by the foot. So, he picks it up with his seven toed foot in cast that dusty aims it with his seven people die right, and and then also in that telling we see that it it pierces his opponent through the anus, which is not a detail that is present in every telling of the story. But it is. And part of it has to do with the fact that his like you know, these are two. Former friends, you know the I mean. They're still friends, but they're. They're battling each other and. And they each have sort of magical abilities. You Know so Colin alone has the mastery of this fabulous barbed weapon, and then his opponent has his horns skin that protects most of his body, but not the the anus, so you might say that, for D, it has an Achilles heel, and it is his anus. is his Achilles anus so maybe instead of saying Achilles heel from now on, we should substitute for deeds. Amos is going to be challenging to drop that into just casual conversation I'm. GonNa Dr. Try Robert for the rest of my life for deeds Amos. All right so that that that Edward pet. Article we mentioned earlier. I believe this is Edward. G. Pettit from Lasalle University. Who's apparently something of a an edgar? Allan Poe expert and a monster expert I'm reading. teaches classes on vampire, literature and so forth. But he drives home that there are several key attributes that are that are generally consistent in the various. Telling here so first of all only Helen can wield the Guy Bulga here. He alone was taught. It's it's martial art and the teacher varies from immortal to see God okay. Another thing he mentions that it's sort of a single use weapon, right? You get one shot. Now that being said. I. Don't think he ever misses with the thing. or at least I have not read the story. where he busted out and Mrs Accidentally Hits a nearby bird in instead right also, it's sometimes sent to him by water the such as in our opening story there, it's it. Traveled down a stream to him. But it doesn't appear in the context of water. He also thrown from below the water. Yeah! So. It's also is a fearsome weapon, so did or special armor in an attempt to protect himself from it and know clearly. When he sees it. The this weapon is is is coming out you know he takes notice. It's gotten dire. It's not just a normal. Spirit is something that is known to be very dangerous. Right a just mechanically in its characteristics, a weapon pet. It says that it is quote accurate, Sharp, strong and highly penetrative. Yes, to say the least it's also inescapable and deadly, and in later telling it's also said to be venomous in cursed with an incurable poison that fills the body. No one really interesting feature about it is the idea that it is many barbed. I it's cast is like a single speier that is straight and thin, but once it pierces the body. It is said to spread out. It's barb, so that has to be cut out in order to be removed. He can't just pull it out. and this would be kind of like the barbs on some existing spheres like fishing spears sometimes would have barbs like this in order to make sure that the thing stays on their once you stabbed, but it's not just that it's barbed. It's that there's this idea that it sort of spreads out in the body like once you pierce somebody, the point and the barbs. Spread to all of the veins or spread to all of the joints and limbs. Quite sure exactly what it means there, except I'm sort of considering. When do you remember episode about Mistletoe? The plant, the plant parasite disappear side on other plans where we talked about the idea of the house story and it's this. Sort of root structure for mistletoe that grows on the surface of a tree.

Boga sack Fort Spear Spear Guy Bulga Bulga Edward Amos writer speier Edward. DART Lasalle University Allan Poe Mrs Accidentally murder Bello Carol G. Pettit
"ge" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

05:45 min | 7 months ago

"ge" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"He fights off the forces of Queen Maeve at the age of seventeen. Believe virtually singlehandedly like he's dat, powerful warrior, but he's eventually tricked by warriors in the employ of made and slain at the age of twenty seven, so not a long life, but then again. You know you're an Irish warrior. During the first century there's not a long life expectancy there now they kind of have to employ some trickery in order to overcome his strength, which think is a common feature in like mythic hero cycles you see that with like Samsung in in Jewish legend, and you sort of see version of it with Achilles with them, finding out his one weakness, and indeed there's basically like a three-part plan that has to be employed here I mean the first one being key. They tricked him into eating dogmeat. Which Breaks Taboo in weakens his spirit. Yeah, I read somewhere that this came about Bhai pitting two taboos against each other like there's a taboo against refusing hospitality on one hand, but there's also a taboo against eating dogmeat. So what if somebody shows you hospitality by offering you dog meat? You're you're caught? Yeah, you're caught there. That's you know. It's still interruptus so he had to pick, and he picked to not refusing hospitality, but he ate the dog meat, and that that screwed him up. Now the next thing that helps if you're trying to take out a half, divine warrior is to have a divine weapon of your own a magical weapon of your own that will will help you slay them, and so that's what the trio do here. They hit him with a magical disembowelling spear that is enchanted to kill kings. They apparently had three of these, and they used to on his on his compasses, including the chariot tear. King of chariots, which seems kind of like a a loophole in the whole king thing like you don't have to actually be a king. You're just kind of a quote. Unquote, a King of something, but colon has like a really bad dude moment here like he gets it with the spear, but he's like I'm not going down that easy. Yeah, he's not GONNA die. Like that, he is going to die standing up fighting, so he like tuxes innards back into his body. And then. Stumbles over to pillar lashes himself to the pillar that he can fight and die standing up right. They're going to have to come in and take him on his feet, but okay, so he's tied. They're dying and they gotta be trade right because Helen is the killing machine, even dying, cut open with a with the kill, Speier tied to Iraq or a pillar he's going to be. Be Scary, so they don't WanNa. Get too close so I think one source says that they had to wait until a bird landed on him in order to know that he had actually died. Yeah, and then they move in then what you do, you cut off his head to be sure when they cut off his head. There's this brilliant light that like cuts off. One of Attackers Sword Handset leave, and then it's not until they they cut off Colin sword arm that the light dies away and that he's definitely dead, so it's like you don't have one thing to cut away the seat of reason from this mighty warrior also have to cut away like the the physical sore hand of the warrior. There's a wonderful like full telling of this final battle of one in particular that light came from Lady Augusta Gregory. Coo. Coo Helen of Murtha Ni from nine hundred to. That's all online I. Recommend checking that out. If you want the full blow by blow, death of Colon, so how do we not have full hall and movie? Yeah, it seems like we should. I mean how many Hercules movies do. We have right way too many easily. Peel off some of that money into the Caholon Enterprise. Now we were talking before the episode about who to cast as we could not come up with a good idea because all of the best Irish actors, we were thinking of to cast this Irish hero, or now all those yeah, but like Pierce Brosnan Yeah Pierces right there in his name. But, but sadly like we said he he died at twenty seven. You need you need a young like powerful and imposing Irish men who is also a really good actor. Yeah I, think some of my favorite Irish actor. Let's see there's There's Brendan Gleeson guess he he's older now. There's I love. Liam Cunningham the guy who plays her Davos on game of thrones but HAG. I don't know I. I don't know who the young guy is I. Don't know everybody can think of is too old. Like even be There's a thinking well. Maybe a professional wrestler I get. A big muscle bound dude to play colon. Okay, there's there's a guy named shameless. WHO's a big Pale Irish wrestler, but he. He's too old for the part. Maybe he could play the doubt version of Colon. You do kind of. Like the incredible Hulk TV show Brad Lou Ferrigno playing the the actual Hulk Oh this is giving me a great idea, actually like the main normal Holland before he helps out, he should be like Super Way. Fi like a very very wavy, boyish teen heartthrob kind of Irish actor, and then when he hawks out, he gets replaced by the bodybuilder. Okay, I like this so we'll. Maybe our Irish listeners especially We'll have some ideas about who who could be cast in such a film are Irish listeners also I'm sure going to get in touch with us to let us know how badly we're saying all these words I'm sorry. All right well, we're GONNA. Take a break, but when we come back, we're going to get into the real meat of this episode. We're going to talk about. The unnatural. Death Weapon of Holland, we're GONNA talk about. The Guy Bulga everybody, today's episode is sponsored by Native Deodorant. Native has good smells with ten cents, including their classics and rotating seasonals. You're guaranteed to find one..

Coo Helen Queen Maeve Samsung Bhai Coo Brendan Gleeson Brad Lou Ferrigno Pierce Brosnan Lady Augusta Gregory Native Deodorant Liam Cunningham WanNa Davos Caholon Enterprise Iraq Colin Speier Holland Murtha
"ge" Discussed on Command Line Heroes

Command Line Heroes

02:53 min | 8 months ago

"ge" Discussed on Command Line Heroes

"Let's go back to something. Thomas brought up in our conversation in something we also talked about. In last season's seachange Enj- episode when Dartmouth College Used The G. E. Two twenty five to develop a tool that allowed programmers to work from different terminals at the same same time in other words time sharing GE hadn't realized the potential for that Dartmouth built it's time sharing system and using the GE to twenty five as well as GE data net thirty and General Electric had previously considered neither of those machines. For time sharing joy lizzy Rankin is technology. Historian the key thing about time sharing was that the computer cuter needed some way of being able to sort of stop. Its own clock. That's what the time sharing refers to not people sharing time on the computer but the the computer actually sharing its own time to process multiple computing requests and it was the faculty and students at Dartmouth College who had the idea of using the data thirty which was a GE communications computer to do that clock and time management together with the to Hugh twenty-five because mainframes were so expensive in the sixties the most efficient way to use them was to run programs in batches someone would write a program. Get the cards punch to run the program then hand over the cards to an operator. Then they'd have to wait for it to be bashed with other programs. Sometimes they'd wait for hours even days. Time sharing basic and and Dartmouth and GE's relationship are crucial to ushering in what I call an era of personal computing before social computers and social networking well before facebook g. e. was easily able to take what was learned from Dartmouth building this time sharing system Tom and adapt it to their own business and quickly build a global time sharing service industry. I think at one point in Nine hundred seventy one hundred thousand time sharing users in Europe alone so this was a substantial business for them through the nineteen seventies into the one thousand nine hundred eighty s despite the success of the ged to twenty-five and the line of to hundreds that followed General Electric sold its Mainframe Division to Honeywell in nineteen seventy but they did decide to keep their time sharing business open and it stayed profitable well for years to come.

Dartmouth College General Electric Dartmouth seachange Enj Thomas lizzy Rankin facebook Europe Honeywell Hugh Tom Mainframe
"ge" Discussed on Command Line Heroes

Command Line Heroes

08:25 min | 8 months ago

"ge" Discussed on Command Line Heroes

"Okay okay so now they had to start putting it together first of all. They actually established a computer department. Now that seems like an obvious statement but to create eight a new department at a big company like this he was able to bring together the resources and the people ought to actually create a department within General Electric's that was a big deal in itself. Barney Oldfield became general manager of. Ge's new computer department. He set up the department to look like another department. The military systems division where they built special purpose computers the two divisions could then be in competition with each other and not in competition with IBM. This was how the new computer department was meant to fly right. Under corporates radar in a way jeeze decentralize management style was kind of perfect for he stealthy operation like this as long as departments happens. Were profitable there really wasn't much oversight. No one would know what was going on part of the backdrop here was that in order order to grow your little fiefdom in. Ge at the time meant that you had to go out and look for opportunities for growth. There wasn't any corporate planning at the time. He was a go getter and saw. This is a great opportunity. And I think I think he had the sheer will to bring the organization along because this is a huge huge step the bigger challenge orange late and where to locate the manufacturing facility. Up to this point Palo Alto Group assumed they would move into a Stanford Industrial Park but California had tough labor laws and high taxes so it was off the table. GED ON PHOENIX instead. Maybe not the best place is to attract experience computer. Engineers shore but Phoenix had a major upside now. The advantage to putting Phoenix was that. Put them far away from gene headquartered in New York City at the time so it was a case where I think it allowed them to happily operate under the radar of top management for a while to get up and running. Because you know there was a lot of this is a lot of money was at stake but so it allowed them to kind of do the skunkworks away from coordinator Oldfield managed to put together a solid team of engineers out there in Phoenix. Bob Johnson. George snively Gene Evans. George Jacob among others John Piven was in charge of the hardware. Henry Herald was the logic jake designer and j Leventhal was the system architect. Hold up and what seem to them like the middle of nowhere. The team got along. Surprisingly well. They were up to the task to build the IRMA under a shroud of secrecy. And it didn't hurt that they had a sense of humor about the whole thing. We found an old skip that the team performed formed something they called frontiers of progress. And I think it shows you where they were at. Here's an expert. Well here. We are in Phoenix. Well I see you finally made it. Welcome to the computer department. Not The computer department. What's a computer sort of a turbine with Christmas tree lights plays music kind of fest adding machine. We won't have to use one in accounting. Will we know but we will have to give van one to play within. Pretend we're using it. What's a computer? As far as Bank of America was concerned a computer with something that could handle fifty five thousand transactions a day it also needed to sort and distribute checks of all sizes and conditions nations it needed to update customer accounts and balance operations. It needed a way to identify the checks and bank of America wanted. I had not one but thirty six of these machines early in the process. The team decided that the G. E. version of IRMA would be transistor. Is I in the fifties transistors. Were more expensive than vacuum tubes but they required less space and simpler connectors to the logic boards so no. Each vacuum tube and flip-flop would be replaced by two transistors with some additional resistors and capacitors to hold it all together. The other big change to the original prototype was to make the Irma a stored program computer rather than a hardwired machine. This would allow for a similar machine design and easier modifications later on since most of Jesus developers were on the hardware side they needed to hire themselves a programmer. They chose a man who not too many years before had escaped Nazi Germany and had come to the US as a refugee three his name was Joseph wisn bomb. Why isn bomb had programmed a g fifteen computer at a company called Bendix he even even developed a pseudo machine programming language for it called Intercom one hundred with no experience in banking other than cashing his own checks? Why is in bomb? Would now lead the micro programming team to write software capable of supporting the transistor rise to hardware. The team also programmed all the peripheral devices including the checks orders and suddenly called the M. I c. r. Reader that stands for magnetic ink character recognition. You know that line of numbers on the bottom of your checks. That's an icy are three sets of numbers that identify a bank account a routing number and a check number and still there on all your checks because of the work wise and bomb and his team did out in Phoenix. Cool side note. Why is involved? Bob would later go on to be considered one of the founding fathers of Ai on December twenty the eight nine thousand nine hundred fifty eight almost three years after GE won the contract. The San Jose Branch of Bank of America installed the first completed earl. Oh machine the system could only handle one hundred transactions a day but it was a step in the right direction the next step get it to process the required fifty five thousand transactions day by March. The team had not only finished tweaking. The machine to get to fifty five thousand they. He added additional printers so that the overall system could handle two million transactions. A day BACOB America was thrilled. The PHOENIX UNIX computer department. Delivered thirty two machines now christened the G. E. One hundred with more orders in the pipeline. It was time to celebrate. Take back of America invited coordinator to the veiling of the computer. They even invited Ronald Reagan. WHO USED TO WORK FOR GENERAL ELECTRIC THEIR TB spokesperson? So this is going to be a big deal then coordinate came into the unveiling and then if I wait a minute this this is not what I proved. So that's where he got mad and he ended a firing Barney oldfield because of that Aw fired the Phoenix team had exceeded expectations had really done something extraordinary but now their leader was rewarded by being let go not only that but coordinator also reassigned the head of the Division Doc Baker his replacement Herald Strickland didn't care for commuters abusers coordinator still apparently worried about upsetting IBM gave strickland firm instructions to keep the computer group in check and the person who replaced Oldfield a company man by the name of Clare Lascher little do coordinator. Now the rebels streak ran strong in Lascher.

Phoenix Barney Oldfield coordinator Ge IRMA Bank of America IBM Bob Johnson General Electric George snively Gene Evans Ronald Reagan New York City general manager America Herald Strickland California Henry Herald Bendix
"ge" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

10:10 min | 1 year ago

"ge" Discussed on TechStuff

"That was the business that started it all really all the way back in eighteen in seventy eight and the Edison Electric Light Company but innovation can sometimes be a double edged sword the move toward led lights which can last for thousands thousands of hours meant that there just wasn't as big a demand for light bulbs anymore because if you don't have to worry about the light bulb burning out on a regular basis. There's not much call to a buy new ones you just by the led's you might sell your house before you ever have to change that lightbulb so light bulbs sales. Were starting to drop. There just wasn't enough enough call for them. I bet it may g long for the days when informed that secret lightbulb cartel in which companies agreed to limit the useful life of a light bulb through engineering era and things were rougher shareholders too since G had cut its dividend payouts a few years earlier. The payouts had slowly increased again. They grown up to twenty twenty four cents per share. So that was an improvement. It was still below the thirty one sense that it had been at its peak but was better but in late twenty seventeen. Ge had to cut the dividend again that time down to twelve cents and then not too long after that there were forced to do another cut they they just realized that there just wasn't enough money to cover the dividend payout so the dividend got cut down to just one cent per share. It just didn't have the money to cover the payments otherwise in addition. JI was having to deal with an unexpected cost. The company had not issued any long term care the insurance policies since two thousand six and in fact it had spun off almost its entire insurance business with a company called. Gen worth however in order to make that deal happen. G was forced to agree to cover any losses from long term care insurance. It was just seen as too great a financial risk otherwise otherwise so. Ge signed that agreement now. Those long term care agreements are policies that are meant to cover the elderly and it turned out that ensures ensures not just at Ge but across the industry had underestimated how long policyholders would actually live and the medical costs including things like nursing home fees would tend to get higher as customers got older so as people lived longer they were creating a larger and larger drain on resources sources for these insurance companies like if you looked at it from a financial perspective the person who was paying for the policy was getting way more benefits out of it they were paying into it and that was an issue so this was a huge cost for GE and it's no wonder that the company was continuing to try and find ways to get completely out of the insurance business to meet the obligation flannery had to redirect fifteen billion dollars of GE's wealth in two thousand eighteen just to cover the obligations of that insurance policy stuff and the company was also hit with a seven and a half billion dollar after-tax charge so things were really rough also in two thousand eighteen GE would leave the Dow Jones industrial average. If you listen to my previous episodes you remember number that was one of the original companies listed on that average when it was first created and it was the only company of that original list that still existed in two thousand eighteen it had been part of the Dow Industrial Average for one hundred eleven years but the performance of the company along with the perception. Shen that industrial companies in general weren't really key indicators for overall market performance meant that those days were over so in its place a different company would join the Dow that was walgreens boots alliance drugstore chain company meanwhile a problem with Geez most recent heavy duty gas turbines binds caused other issues for General Electric Utility in Texas had shut down to different power plants for repairs due to failures with these new turbines that news would end up hurting G. power sales which weren't doing super great at that moment already flannery efforts were seen as insufficient by the board of directors directors and on October first two thousand eighteen the company announced that flannery had been removed from the position of Chairman and CEO and the board appointed an outsider Laurence Kulp to serve as the new chairman and CEO Flannery had been CEO for about fourteen months and then he was out the would give flannery flannery the unenviable distinction of having served the least amount of time as CEO of all Gao's at least so far cope would be the third CEO to lead the company since two thousand seventeen the company cup took over was in turmoil and there were pending pending investigations into GE's accounting practices which had for years as I said earlier been described as opaque polite way of saying the company wasn't making it easy to see where money was coming from or where it was going to Ge had already settled SEC charges in the past but there were others that it sought to find out more about the finances of the company and then of course there was the recent report from Markopoulo. The Guy who was one of the early whistle blowers on Bernie Bernie madoff before everyone was aware of the Ponzi scheme that made off was running. The MARKOPOULO report alleges that GE is essentially robbing Peter to pay Paul also shifting cash around frantically to fend off insolvency. It's kind of like a shell game to try to move money around fast enough so oh that the company doesn't collapse. Ge I should add disputes this report and says that the allegations are baseless and it cannot be ignored that Markopoulo himself himself actually stands to make a lot of money should. GE's stocks decline in value so you could argue there is a motive for markup lists to try and drag GE's name in the mud so they're valid arguments on either side about whether or not this report is something you should pay attention to or if it's something thing that has ulterior motivations behind it that being said the fact that the Markopoulo report came out doesn't change the fact that there were already already numerous investigations government investigations into GE's businesses that could end up hindering the company further so there seems to be smoke. There is just a question of is the fire what Markopoulo says saying or is it something else on top of all the problems. The company faces aces is another external force. That could really spell doom. Many financial analysts say that signs point to another global recession already already industries like manufacturing and freight are in a bit of a slide so a recession would greatly exacerbate General Electric's problems so are we we seeing the end of days for a company that helped launch the technological age. I don't know I don't feel great about it but it is a very large company. It's not like any of these things is definitively the death knell for General Electric and there's lots of that could happen we could see. Ge Get broken broken up into smaller companies that individually are able to succeed much better than they can collectively all of that remains to be seen but it was fascinating waiting to learn more about this company's incredible rich history and I know that this last section was much lighter on the tech side as I said at the beginning thing but at the same time I thought it was important for us to understand how a company that had been so instrumental and setting the tone for the technological analogical age could be facing extinction in two thousand nineteen at so. Here's hoping that things turn around for G. She e that the company is able to reconcile all these accounting practices that is able to deliver value to employees employees to customers to retirees and to shareholders not just to shareholders and that wraps up this episode if you have suggestions for future topics of tech stuff whether it's a company a technology concept in tech anything like that. Let me know. Send me an email the address this is tech stuff at how stuff works dot com or drop me a line on facebook or twitter handle. Both of those texts stuff h s w you can also pop on over to our website site. That's tech stuff PODCAST DOT com. GonNa find a link to the archive of all of our previous episodes there so you can look up all the different stuff. We talked about including the previous episodes I did on. GE's history where Chris Paul at night sat down and talked about it but the show was very different back in those days. If you WANNA hear a different take on the same sort of stuff you can check that out that one came out I believe in two thousand twelve and don't forget we also have a link to our online store where every purchase you make goes to help the show and we greatly appreciate it and I will talk to you again really soon. The tech stuff is a production of iheartradio's. How stuff works for more podcasts from iheartradio visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows here sports business and everyday life breath there were rules fertile. If it has to do with rules you can learn all about it on the podcast. Good calls with me. Euros deemed blondie each each week. We'll break down the call. Everyone is talking about in take you into the world of sports officiating no way that hasn't been done with listen to good costs on apple podcasts on the iheartradio. APP or wherever you listen to podcasts..

Edison Electric Light Company flannery flannery Ge Markopoulo Bernie Bernie madoff Chris Paul CEO iheartradio Chairman and CEO chairman and CEO walgreens MARKOPOULO Ponzi scheme SEC
"ge" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

05:44 min | 1 year ago

"ge" Discussed on TechStuff

"One one thing I want to mention before I forget it is that during emotes run as CEO of GE. There was a particularly wasteful practice going on that would later you get a lot of media attention when it was made public emerald traveled a lot he would meet with various. GE executives and facilities all around the world as well well as with other company and industry leaders and politicians particularly he would do this when he was on the lookout for possible acquisitions and he made a lot of those as as he was CEO of Ge hop over to the other side of the world he would take one of the GE owned business jets they had six of them but here's the curious thing every time he would travel there would be a second empty jet that would follow along behind and stay at the same airport airport and wait there and then when Emma would fly back so did the MD jet now the justification for that practice which again eventually actually became public in which a jet carrying only accrue no passengers would burn through fuel generate pollution. The justification was that emily was is a very important person on very important business and yes. I capitalized very important in my notes in this section as such. He couldn't be delayed by mechanical failures. His business was far too important so the empty jet was essentially a backup transport in cases primary should experience mechanical delay it was his just in case measure a very expensive wasteful measure the company he would actually stopped that practice in two thousand fourteen which was a few years before immelt would be replaced as CEO spoiler alert. We'll get there all right so back to the post post two thousand one. Ge in two thousand and two G. E. would acquire a business from a formerly huge company that company was Enron which went bankrupt in two thousand one after its own massive scandal which I'm not going to get into here. It's outside the purview of this episode but one of the many parts of Enron to go up on on the auction block after the bankruptcy was a wind power business. Emily was in his own words. Not Enthusiastic about win in Bauer he felt wind power wasn't profitable and it was too dependent upon subsidies and those subsidies could disappear at any time according to which way any government budget legit might be headed so there was no way to control that if the subsidies went away you'd be saddled with a really expensive and non-profitable business but what Ammo gave the authority to executives who really believed in that acquisition to go forward with it and they went and purchased the division it would end up becoming profitable and and perhaps should have served as a lesson for future Molt and I'll get back into what I mean about that in just a little bit in two thousand and three G. E. announced its intention to purchase a majority stake in universal pictures that was a company that was under the control of another company called Vivendi a French company and this deal. Ge would acquire eighty percent of Universal Vivendi was going through a financial crisis at the time so GE merged universal with NBC creating NBC Universal and the deal included several cable television channels like sci fi network USA network as as well as the universal film studio the Universal Theme Parks it did not include universal music that would remain completely under control but lots of the other universal properties were part of this deal. Vivendi would have twenty percent control of this and then you would have ge with eighty percent control and you got NBC universal g would not hold onto this property forever g was acquiring other companies as well at this time adding them to the various divisions visions of General Electric Ge healthcare was growing with companies like instrumentarium and Amersham P L C those were being added did as part of GE healthcare GE capital was also growing with similar acquisitions including some subprime mortgage loan companies and we'll get into that in a bit and G. he would also build out its industrial consumer and energy businesses. Egmont made several acquisitions of companies in the oil industry also in banking and that the old course of fossil fuels in general because he really believed that that was going to be the mainstay for energy production or electricity production. I guess I should say for the foreseeable. Future drought this time. Ge Capital would remain the most profitable division of General Electric and so the company would lean more heavily upon GE capital in order to do things like pay out that dividend to shareholders that setup. Ge for disaster just just a couple of years after GE purchased subprime mortgage businesses the world plunged into a global economic crisis which we often refer to as the two thousand is an eight financial crisis but really the crisis. I started becoming apparent in two thousand seven with these subprime mortgage market so what the heck is a subprime mortgage while the short answer is it's an incredibly risky predatory and irresponsible market practice that depends upon people who are some of the most vulnerable folks out there. Maybe that's just me putting my own bias on things but it's hard for me to see the whole concept is anything other than dumb and harmful harmful but here's how it breaks down all right so you know about credit scores right..

General Electric GE capital General Electric Ge CEO Vivendi Universal Vivendi emily NBC Universal Universal Theme Parks Enron G. E. NBC immelt USA
"ge" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

12:48 min | 1 year ago

"ge" Discussed on TechStuff

"Hey there and welcome to tech stuff. I'm your host Jonathan Strickland. I'm an executive producer with how stuff works in Iheartradio and love all things tech and we have come to the end of our journey covering the history of General Electric Up to today and just a heads up. This episode is going to focus a lot on the business side of General Electric rather than the tech side of General Electric. I could've ended the series with the last episode as far as the technological innovations go now that's not to say. Ge hasn't continued to innovate in the Post Jack Welsh era aw but rather that the innovations the company is most known for span the previous one hundred years of its existence the last twenty years the most recent twenty years have been more marked with controversy and business practices and mark issues and I think it's important to understand Dan what's happened since two thousand one because GE has been such an incredibly important part of the modern technological landscape. I mean that's one one of the main companies that helped spread the electrical infrastructure in the United States you know without. Ge It would have taken much longer for that to who have happened in the world would be very different today if ge had not existed but in the last episode. I told you guys about Jack Welsh the GE the CEO who pushed the company to incredible profitability mainly by selling off businesses where General Electric wasn't in first or second place in the industry he sold off more than seventy of GE's businesses just in this first two years of being CEO he also laid off more than one hundred thousand employees. Glow Yee's which earned him the nickname neutron jack because like a neutron bomb he eliminated people without damaging the assets and he also led efforts to acquire choir financial institutions like banks and insurance companies to launch this financial insurance business and that would end up giving Ge an enormous revenue boost it would become incredibly important for the company in the nineteen eighties and beyond for different reasons now one exception to welches amazing victories was an acquisition of securities firm called Kidder peabody and company any which was actually an even older company than General Electric if you looked at the origin for Kidder peabody and company that firm traced its history all the way back to eighteen sixty five more than a decade before even the earliest companies that formed General Electric Welsh should lead the acquisition effort in Nineteen eighty-six but then there were a series of scandals centered around insider trading that brought a lot of suspicion and scrutiny scrutiny on kidder peabody's business and therefore GE capital the financial division of General Electric and the year after the acquisition the global global stock markets crashed on October nineteenth nineteen eighty-seven what was called black Monday the combination of events convinced Welsh the he and made an error in judgment acquiring kidder peabody and it took several more years and more scandals centering on kidder peabody's a record keeping and allegations allegations of reporting false prophets but gee would eventually sell kidder peabody off at a huge loss now that embarrassment aside g. e. for the the most part did very well in the eighties and nineties the Stock Price for GE rose four thousand percent some sources state that when you take all the factors into consideration was more like five thousand two hundred percent under welches command. He put off his retirement in order to secure an acquisition of honeywell international now. If you listen to my last episode you know that didn't go well. The European Commission denied the merger for anti competitive reasons and the man and who hated to lose Jack Welsh had to go out on a down note but compared to Ge you could say Jack. Welsh got off easy now. This episode will cover what happened to General Electric since two thousand one including the events that would create massive problems for the huge company and there is ongoing disagreement as to weather most of the blame should fall on welches successor or if Welsh himself should shoulder some of that responsibility or some other party so what the heck actually happened. I let me talk a little bit about. Ge's stock because that's going to come back around later in this episode a few times so so for years. G. Paid out a dividend on its stock. Not all companies do this and a dividend is a payment that a company makes to distribute some of its revenue to its shareholders so a company makes money and then distribute some of that money amongst the people who hold shares in the company. It's usually not very much per share in fact it's typically less than a dollar. Jeez case it was around thirty one cents for a long time in the US. There are no rules about how frequently a company actually pays out dividends. Most companies will do it quarterly so you would get one quarter of your dividend four times a year so so if it was a dividend of forty cents that means every three months you would get a check for ten cents for every share you own so it's not very much but if you own a lot of shares it starts starts to add up and besides distributing revenue it's also meant to incentivize shareholders to reinvest and buy more shares of stock in that company so the idea is oh you gotta dividend payout. It's enough for you to buy another share in the company so you spend that dividend buying another share. That's the logic there well well. When Welsh I took over Jeez stock wasn't doing so great. It wasn't super high. A lot of investors thought of the stocks walks as essentially a dividend payout and not much else so you wouldn't buy. Ge Stocks with the idea of selling them at a higher price later on the road. You know you weren't thinking talking. I'm going to buy now because in five or ten years. The stock is going to be worth two or three times as much you bought. GE's stock because it paid out a dividend evident so it would take a long time but you would eventually make more money than you invested if that dividend were to hold steady now when Welsh took over over the stock price actually dipped a little bit after he had been running GE for a year or two but another year later the entire stock market took a turn AH started to climb in value this would be the beginning of eighteen years of a climbing market a bull market in other words. Even with events like black Monday day in nineteen eighty-seven taken into account so you had moments where the market was not bullish where it was crashing but it would recover and then go back on its bullish route trajectory if you will now collectively the S. and P. Five hundred index it would climb by two thousand four hundred percent and this this was the same time that we started seeing packages like 401k plans replace traditional retirement plans now that meant that stock market performance would become far more important to way more people like in the old days. It was just people who traded in stocks largely. It was a lot of businesses that did that. Trading your average person didn't play the stock market that much but now stuff like our retirement was tied directly into stock market performance so suddenly everybody was really really focusing on the stock market and I meant that it became far more important for stocks to do well see before the nineteen eighteen eighty s stock market performance. was you know it was an indicator of a company's overall health but most people didn't consider it the metric against which all companies these should stand you would worry more about the company's profitability. How much revenue is it bringing in. How much does it cost to do business. And how much profit is the company making. The share. Price wasn't as big a deal that changed around the same time that Welsh took over at GE and welches philosophy happened to match this general shift shift in how businesses operated in the United States now I don't say this to diminish welches contributions or Jeez performance because the company's own stock doc outperformed the general market significantly but I do also want to take the overall market performance into consideration because while I don't WanNa take any credit away away. I also don't want to give too much credit to Welsh and his impact beyond what it actually was anyway as the market improved moved and as GE's performance in particular made its stock price rocket upwards. Ge Stocks were seen as more than just a dividend payout the the company continued to pay dividends though which again is going to be important later those dividends were largely funded by the incredible performance of GE capital. That's the financial financial services division of General Electric in the last year of welches tenure as CEO GE's stock price did take several roll hits but then so to just about everybody else in March two thousand the stock market's performance shifted it was no longer bullish it was going into a bear air market so instead of growing it was receding the Dot Com bubble had crashed and that caused a bit of stock market crisis companies that were in the DOT com industry. Obviously they suffered the most many of them just were blinking out of existence after it became clear that those companies had no way to deliver upon the promises this is that they were making or to be able to justify the crazy speculation that drove their stock prices into the stratosphere before the companies that even figured out how how to generate a sent in revenue but even companies like General Electric which were traditional established giant conglomerate companies were affected by this change in the market between March two thousand and when Welsh would hand over the CEO role to his successor Jeff Immelt in early September number two thousand one the stock price for GE had fallen by twenty four percent now. I point that out because often the simplified story about what happened to Ge he was that Jack Welsh step down and immelt fumbled the ball that emily was a terrible CEO and he could not follow welches lead but in reality -ality I think the story is far more nuanced and we have to remember that the market itself was changing during this transition it wasn't a case of immelt being handed a profitable company on a silver platter and nothing was going wrong and he just messed it up from there he did make a ton of decisions that would not turn out to be great for GE so I don't WanNa diminish his responsibility either. I just think it's important for us to take all these factors into consideration. Okay so Welsh stepped down on September sixth two thousand one. Emily took over on September seven and four days later. The United States was rocked by a series of terrorist attacks that shook the country to its core. Those effects were widespread. The tragedy touched thousands of people directly tens of thousands. It's millions of people indirectly it transformed the New York City scape permanently and it caused disruption in the markets as well. Wall Street made the decision the to not open the New York Stock Exchange the morning of September eleventh two thousand one fearing that the terrorist attacks would prompt panic selling amongst shareholders shareholders making a truly horrible situation even more dire both the New York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq would remain closed until Oh September seventeenth two thousand one when trading resumed the market fell by nearly seven hundred points that was a decline of almost MO- actually actually more than seven percent and that was just the first day of trading losses actually continued throughout that week. I hate even talking about this but it is important in order for us to understand. GE's story at this stage in the company's history business philosophies had changed significantly in the United States in the one thousand nine hundred thousand nine hundred ninety S. We created a new environment where share value was the most important metric metric for a business..

General Electric Jack Welsh United States Kidder peabody CEO GE Welsh General Electric Welsh CEO Jonathan Strickland welches executive producer honeywell Iheartradio New York City Dan
"ge" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"ge" Discussed on TechStuff

"Electrons then the next electrons would fill up the next available state further out from the nucleus and so on and so on until you had all the electrons that that particular Adam would have whether it was a base version of the atom or an ion or whatever this was a pretty big simplification of what is actually going on then in my books. I remember seeing the old illustrations we had newer ones too but I remember those old. All illustrations has made it look like an electron with sort of like a planet orbiting around a Sun like nucleus so in other words according to those illustrations it would appear that an electron electron has a specific position around the nucleus that you could measure detect and predict but as scientists would later learn we could really only determine partial information mation about a subatomic particles velocity and location the more we knew about one of those two things the less we would know about the other so the more you know about particle velocity. The less you know about its position. The more you know about S- position the less you know about blossomed so really we don't know whether electronic quote unquote is is an up in a specific place we see we know where it can be the various positions where the electron could possibly be found. C can think of it as kind of a zone of probability or field of probability. There's a chance the electron will be at any of those points within that field it has to be within the field unless you've poured more energy into the atom and thus pushed the electron out but it has to be somewhere in that field. You just don't know where it is so it's Kinda this amorphous fog that the electron could inhabit now if you have a situation in which this field this imaginary Mary field because we don't actually have a fog here but if this field spans a barrier that normally you would have to use energy to get across it means that the there's actually a possibility that the electron could appear on the other side of that barrier so imagine you have a hallway and there's a door closed at the end of the hallway and you have this electron field and the electron field actually overlaps the door to the point where part of the field extends to the other side of the closed door then you would expect the electron to be in the hallway. You didn't open the door. You saw the electron go into the hallway. You figure that's where it's got to be but because that field overlaps the door there is the possibility that the electron could be on the other side and because there's a possibility ability means that sometimes there will be an electron on the other side of that door and it's as if the electron has tunneled through or climbed over the door but at no no time. Did it ever have to expend energy to do that. It just appeared on the other side. This is tunneling and it doesn't make a whole lot of sense to us because that's not how we observe things in our normal world. You don't go down a hallway and suddenly little Jimmy is just on the other side of the door because there was a chance little Jimmy was going to be there. That doesn't happen been in our real world but in quantum physics it's totes thing as one of the reasons why developing microchips was smaller and smaller components becomes a really. Lee huge challenge because electron tunneling is a problem if you're determined to channel electrons down specific pathways as is the case with a circuit then then you run into an issue if an electron can encounter a gate the gate is closed but because of electron tunneling there's the possibility of the electron appearing hearing on the other side of the gate. It means that you can create errors this way anyway. Let's get back to. GE's time line in Nineteen seventy eight GE's medical medical systems division developed an.

GE Jimmy Adam Lee
"ge" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"ge" Discussed on TechStuff

"Two is now so commonplace that you can go out and buy one and use it to frustrate your pets. You know you can just go get a little key chain with a solid state laser on it <hes> but I'm pretty sure back in nineteen sixty two. No one thought that that was going to be a future possibility. De Scientists were also working with superconductors and magnetism now. A conductor is a material that allows electrons to pass through it conducts electricity. A superconductor is a material that does this with no resistance to the flow of electricity so under normal conditions conductors have a bit of resistance to electricity atrocity in the amount of resistance is dependent upon several factors like how what the actual material is. What is the conductive material also its thickness org gauge so a thin copper wire for example has higher resistance than a thick copper cable. They're both made of the same thing but the physical structure structure is different and that changes the resistance of the material. GE's superconducting magnet was the first to break through the one hundred thousand costs limit limit. The Gos- is a unit of measurement for magnetic flux density. I'll give you the technical definition of Gos- as laid out by the Encyclopedia Media Britannica so here we go one gos- quote corresponds to the magnetic flux density that will induce an electro motive force of one AB volt in each linear centimeter of a wire moving laterally at one centimeter per second at right angles to a magnetic flux into quote okay so that's a bit of a mouthful anyway we rate magnets in Gos- that's how we measure their strength so jeeze superconducting magnet was incredibly ably powerful it would also lay the foundation for practical applications of that type of a magnet particularly in the creation of magnetic resonance imaging Technologies Angie would play a very important role in developing that technology or the MRI as we would say <hes> very important part of GS business one of the fun VACs. I discovered while researching these episodes is that the footprints that the Apollo Eleven astronauts left on the moon are there in thanks to GE specifically specifically the boots worn by the astronauts had silicone rubber in them that had been manufactured by GE so that's G. E. footprint up there in a way but that it was just one of the contributions Ge made to the Apollo Program. I don't want to discount or dismiss any of the other ones that the company made they actually provided a lot of technology analogy to the space program. General Electric was involved in designing or manufacturing several systems related to the space race including the ship to satellite communications system that allowed the Apollo crew to send TV images from the capsule two satellites orbiting the Earth which in turn being those images down to terrestrial stations in nineteen seventy-three three another GE researcher Dr Ivar Giver. Would get a Nobel prize he had back in nineteen sixty discovered the truly odd behavior savior of superconducting tunneling so what the heck is tunneling well it all has to do with the weird world of quantum mechanics and quantum physics so oh when I was in school we learned that electrons orbit the nucleus of atoms in a certain energy state and electrons would quote unquote want to occupy by the lowest energy state available once that energy state was full of electrons then the next electrons would fill up the next available state further out from the nucleus and so on and so on until you had all the electrons that that particular.

General Electric GE Dr Ivar Giver Nobel prize Apollo Eleven Apollo Apollo Program researcher one centimeter
"ge" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:38 min | 1 year ago

"ge" Discussed on TechStuff

"The work out of GE's research lab was pretty incredible in the nineteen fifties as you have the nuclear scientists building that I licensed power plant to provide electricity to a grid you add synthetic diamonds and you had Robert H win TORP DWARF WHO created the substance called Borozan in the lab or zone is a man made substance. You don't find it in nature but it's almost as hard as diamond demand and it can be used in temperatures much higher that even diamonds can be used in diamonds will break down once you get over a certain temperature boras on can hold together longer so so it would also become a very useful component in industrial cutting tools for example now around the same time a different group of engineers were building something perhaps a little bit less. Salafi in the grand scheme of things but that would be the humble electric can opener g introduced. The first consumer electric can opener in nineteen fifty eight and pet ownership has never been the same sense in Nineteen fifty-nine g introduced the halogen lamp these work in <hes> way very similar to incandescent lamps. There's a tungsten filament inside a very small bulb and encasing the filament is a quartz envelope envelope inside the envelope is a gas from the halogen group of gases so this is different from what the gas would find in your typical incandescent bulb. The benefit of a halogen gas is that it can combine with Tungsten Vapor so when the tungsten filament heats up and it starts to give off light it's also giving off. Tungsten Vapor you know tongue says essentially burning off of the filament that vapor combined with the halogen gas and then it gets deposited back back onto the tungsten filament at least some of it does so some of that vaporize tungsten gets returned that actually helps extend the useful life of the Halogen Lamp Lamp Halogen Lamps can produce a lot more light per unit of energy compared to an incandescent bulb. They also produce a lot more heat and someone who has sadly a few halogen lamp fixtures in his house. I can speak from experiences. Those things get real hot. Guys like you will burn your fingers. I know I have anyway in nineteen sixty a device built by GE became the first man made object to be recovered after going into orbit around the earth it was code named by the RV to a re entry vehicle those part of the discoverer thirteen satellite right the discover thirteen satellite kind of set the stage for space-based reconnaissance and spy missions now granted that was not the public facing part of the mission. Obviously letting everyone know hey. This is a spy satellite is not the best plan. If you WANNA use it for you know spice stuff so there was a cover story in the cover story was essentially that it was a science experiment but in reality it was a classified mission that was overseen by both the Air Force and the CIA he I a. g. would go on to open up a space center in Valley Forge Pennsylvania in one thousand nine hundred sixty one because they were getting more and more involved in and building components for the space race also in nineteen sixty there was a guy named Jack Welsh who joined Ge as a chemical engineer. He'll he'll be really important later so remember that name. Jack Welsh we'll get back to it nineteen sixty two scientists from GE would develop one of the first solid state lasers using semiconductors interestingly scientists at IBM and over at Mit were independently doing the exact same thing and all the parties pretty much crack the problem right around the same time this set off a bit of a patent rush with G. beating IBM to the punch by a little more than a week. I just find it fascinating that the solid state laser was one of those things that multiple parties invented at around the same time independently a of each other but to be fair the stage had already been set with early work in Mazars and lasers so he's not the first lasers they were the first solid state ones solid state lasers would then find their way into numerous technologies and applications early on scientists theorize that they could be incredibly useful in communications but they would become so commonplace that we'd rely on them to play our tunes for us because the laser and stuff like CD players. DVD PLAYERS BLU ray players. Those are all solid estate lasers so what was truly cutting edge technology in nineteen sixty..

GE Jack Welsh IBM Robert H Mazars Mit Valley Forge Pennsylvania CIA Air Force Nineteen fifty-nine g
"ge" Discussed on MedTech Talk Podcast

MedTech Talk Podcast

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"ge" Discussed on MedTech Talk Podcast

"Position to not only courage, her own daughters to pursue careers technology, but also middle school students through a program called g girls. We'll talk about that also talk shop specifically, how jeez, working to make one of the more comfortable screening procedures mammogram more bearable, because of that more effective. So now let's begin this great conversation with Agnes buyers. Any of the president and CEO of women's health at GE healthcare? We always start off these conversations finding a little bit of our guests, our listeners know who exactly they're talking to how did you find your way intimate tech? It is actually very interesting story, because I grew up in, in Hungary, and really in a family of engineers awesome. My parents have technical background and educator, it was actually quite normal for us to talk about science math engineering gets home. Matter of fact, also, my brother became an engineer as well. So as a result of this, it was quite normal for me to decide to study, engineering, and at age of seventeen I deceived a scholarship from the Hungarian government to study abroad, I went to study in the formal is Germany at in Magdeburg at the, the fun. Gary Cam university. Yes, it was very interesting time. And then in nineteen ninety three I moved to the US to pursue my master's degree in mechanical engineering. She went over to the US in nineteen Ninety-three was made possible by the fall of Berlin Wall, and all that, did you have Upton is available to internal ever just definitely more more opportunities. And I just wanted to, to really take advantage of those and, and also pursue a master's degree in mechanical engineering in the US. So I studied in a very good engineering school. But also at the same time and very old and very small tiny engineering school cadre whole Manitou of technology in, in Indiana survey. Interesting story because at that time, rose home was stealing a man's on the academic engineering college for undergraduate studies, so that have only very few female students in the in the master's program. So then. Time came for me to look for a job. I was just working on finishing my seizes in, in the in the spring of nineteen ninety five. I went to the job, Faeroes home and always does a good job about providing opportunities inviting companies and the very first stable, I walked off to was the table hosted by directors from GE aviation. So I'm sure they surprised to see a female in vineyard, at rose. Holman. But awesome. My odds are pretty good. I guess to get a job. So I joined GE in about twenty four years ago in incense to natty sort of technical leadership program. So that program was really focused on design and, and engineering and leadership, and I also saying that much of my background. I've Leo it to that, that program and to the rigor as we were learning about the fundamentals of jet engine design up bring began trusting as a tireless. She said she was invited into the world of science and math, clearly never left today, she lives in the US in Wisconsin. She's raising two daughters. Both of whom are interested in stem. But there's a interesting comparison or contrast between the encouragement she received as a young woman, and the current that many young women in the US received today. So I asked about that sort of difference. Interesting question, I've been actually thinking about this a lot because the G eager. And I'm co champion co-sponsor for this for GE it, it is really focused on. How can we ignite the interest of in girls and gives them the confidence that they can also study stem when they when they go to college? And we learn that you have to really reach them at, at early age. Right. So that they would still interested. They would not give up. And, and I think that are some opportunities here in the US growing up in Hungary. I actually never thought to be honest that I didn't have the fame options or same opportunities. And I don't know if it was because of my parents or because of the opportunities. I did notice in college that ever not that many girls in class. The couple and especially swim was I opening for me. But, but I think the signs education that early talent follow man was so big in Hungary. I mean often we would go to advanced courses, we would actually travel from high school to the.

US president and CEO GE Hungary GE healthcare GE aviation engineer Agnes Berlin Wall Indiana Gary Cam university Magdeburg Faeroes Hungarian government Holman Wisconsin Leo Upton Germany twenty four years
"ge" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

HBR IdeaCast

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"ge" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

"They just go from one pray to the next Paret and that does not make the world a better place the worst place. If you're a CEO living in the world, we live in with the rules and laws we have, how can you fight off an activist or out outwit one? It's like a gazelle with a pack of Venus, right? It is. It is very, very difficult. So that's why it is. It really takes a fantastic CEO with a fantastic. Effort overcome the kind of entirely negative impact of having an activist. Hedge fund, get some measure of control over you. It's sad sad. And again, it's not as though right, like, you know, hyenas are are very smart. You know if there's a bunch of, you know, kind of gazelles there and there's one that's limping. They don't go after the fastest gazelle. Right? They go off to the lipping one and just eat it. So let's dig into that a little bit more. You know. I like the gazelle analogy. Why was this Zell limping in the first place? Yeah. Well, I mean, I think a bunch of these things are kind of known facts that in retrospect, I would argue that g got far over diversified. And so so I, I do think that Jeff, I'm out inherited a broad messy portfolio. That was turbo charged with an unsustainable g. capital. And so he had a real challenge and I've, I haven't worked worked for GM not inside GE's. Some of it is just observations as anybody else would from the outside. But my my bet is in being an all of these businesses. There there wasn't enough of a focus on how are we winning customers, consumers customers. However, we making sure our valuation is superior to competitors rather hill. There was dealmaking we can fix whatever problems that we have by by emanate by both being ourselves up because g gotta be number one or two in your business. That's not a terrible rule. But if you have to pay an extraordinary, some to get to one of those and perhaps you know, being being too in a business where you've got a really, really, really, really good number one, you know, kind of ain't no fun and you've got, you've got understand what the competitive dynamics are that justifies emanate a to to bulk up. So so that's I think he inherited something that was a bit of a mess. And dramatically over valued. And he had a live with that even before and it was in the in the inherited in the middle of not great period. And then you know whatever it was six or seven years later, the global financial crisis hit which demolished GE capital and showed the weaknesses of GE capital and the big downsides of it. So I'm curious to hear more about that. The problem with 'em in a masquerading strategy as you put it in your h. article because we are seeing ton of murders all over the business newspapers these days, and I'm curious why that's happening and is GE only company that is making this mistake of thinking that a merger is kind of a strategy? Oh, hell. No. You're seeing a lot of it because it is the dominant form of strategy out there now, I think and part of it is just a talent thing, right? So most CEO's sadly, don't know much about strategy..

CEO GE Jeff GE capital Zell g GM seven years
"ge" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

KIIS 102.7

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"ge" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

"Ge tokyo again and then i had to say too much from what i heard she got a baby by bus go broke macy's yeah damn jeez you somebody maybe mama concrete is bigger than tv any given sunday proponents rafael tyco with your money mike sure go halloween leave eighteenth birthday you go broke as you go broke you wanna do doc why watson beans added edition baby laws i know was asked four white girl.

Ge tokyo macy rafael tyco
"ge" Discussed on MarketFoolery

MarketFoolery

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"ge" Discussed on MarketFoolery

"A lesser degree as well but his the fis so what you're talking about what the financing is the financing so even though there are these specific divisions is the financing so convoluted that it it spreads across all of them and i guess where i'm going with this is to some extent it is the finance is the way that they've been financing all these divisions likely to get them into some sort of legal trouble if that comes to light not necessarily they're doing something wrong at the moment as much as ge capital for instance has got about one hundred billion dollars in debt and that that's how the capital division it's financed well the reason that it can get that debt at a at a reasonable price from the market is that other operations of g e the industrial divisions specifically uh and the healthcare division have good enough cash flows and so that you've got when you look at the whole thing in its entirety you've got a higher lead higher rated bonds bonds are issued by ge capital are backed by all g and nothing and and the whole thing is better than than the some of the one part of ge capital well if he split all this up of these bonds are gonna get re rated uh and is that bought the bonds under the belief that they had the backing of these healthy cashflow businesses behind them uh are now going to be owning something with a lot more risk to it and therefore the price of the bond is going to go down and uh they're and what their money back in one form or another uh usually uh the one of the forms that they might try to get their money back is suing you know that that that of violates the covenants that they had or believe they had when they were buying the bonds so as there's just so much how do you would given there's 30 billion more than 30 billion underfunded pension obligations uh who who gets ac who who would like that part of the business gina say in the divorce who keeps that piece of furniture yeah uh and so who wants to buy who wants to buy any of these businesses is.

ge capital gina one hundred billion dollars
"ge" Discussed on MarketFoolery

MarketFoolery

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"ge" Discussed on MarketFoolery

"Buffet having the resources to strike a deal that no one else really could have gotten i mean he he investigating something like three billion dollars in preferred shares to help them shore up finances from shortcomings of g g capital uh he had a i think warrants for another three billion or something like that that he ended up exercising and making a little money off of the he did very well because he was able to offer something that they really needed at a specific time and and so you know hey mean that that just just goes to show you sort of of of really why warren buffett is who he is in sort of the benefits of of uh all of the success he's add in his career up to this point in on but dumb all in all i mean let's splits turned the page in and openly the g e that we know today is is a more streamlined more focused company i suspect that it is and i suspect that the next ten years and beyond will probably work out a little bit better for investors um yeah i mean you remove the too big to fail monitored now the ge capital's gone they sold that off uh did multiple different firms a different pieces of ge capital um and for me personally it's my favorite company i think to play the energy sector um did it so while diversified you're looking at the baker hughes acquis or merger that does nearing completion it was approved in a european union still waiting on the.

Buffet warren buffett ge capital ge three billion dollars ten years