25 Burst results for "GBH"

"gbh" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:30 min | 3 months ago

"gbh" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The debt forgiveness program. She didn't offer an opinion, which is common for these kinds of appeals. Her decision was in a lawsuit filed out of Wisconsin, claiming, among other things that the program violated the constitution's equal protection clause. Now two other lower courts had quickly rejected that lawsuit. There was also a legal setback in another case brought by 6 Republican states, which is considered a bigger threat that lawsuit, a federal judge in St. Louis dismissed the case though yesterday ruling that the state's didn't have standing, which is a legal speak, David, for the states weren't able to prove that they would be somehow injured by the program. And this is not the only set of legal challenges, though. Definitely not. There are others. And the one brought by the 6 states will likely be appealed, Nebraska's attorney general, who's one of the ones who sued, said they believe they do have standing and they're going to keep going. And one thing that works against the states, though, is that the education department at the last minute changed the program, saying private loans wouldn't qualify for forgiveness, and that was a key element of the state's lawsuit, because some people consolidated their federal loans to private loans. So they're now out of luck, but for those who hold federal student loan debt, they can still apply as long as they meet income thresholds, David. Nova, thank you. Now to a story about getting to class with education back to in person learning after all the remote instruction during high pandemic from GBH in Boston, Kirk carapa filed this report for us. 22

Wisconsin St. Louis David Nebraska Nova Kirk carapa GBH Boston
"gbh" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

02:24 min | 9 months ago

"gbh" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Okay. And please would be poor for voort. I know that word. And what's goodbye? To God. Go with God. Yes. All right, cloudy, and Fatima, I'd love to just finish off with your favorite as a tour guide. Your favorite intimate little experience to share with one of your guests in your country may be a meal, maybe a drink, maybe a viewpoint, maybe an artistic experience. What one experience would you want me to have the cap my Portuguese experience? I would say sardines, grilled sardines. That's Portugal for you. The smell of grilled sardines may be being grilled right there under laundry that is hanging from the windows in alfama, and that's perfect. I love it. You've nailed it there. Cloudy, how about you? Well, it's very difficult to just put in the words, you know, just one thing about Portugal, but I'm from the city of Lisbon, so I recommend you the viewpoint. The viewpoints with the sunset, it's really, really nice. Up on the castle, you see the river, you see the bridge. The reverse pasture, it's really beautiful. And if you are in romantic, with someone, it's really nice to share that with someone. Oh, I love it. I can think of three or four viewpoints that I would love to be there with my favorite travel partner. Cloudy close step. Thank you so much for sharing with us a little bit about your beautiful country, Portugal. Thank you, Rick. Travel with Rick Steves is produced at Rick Steves Europe in Edmonds, Washington. By Tim tapton, hall and Donna bardsley. Special thanks to our colleagues at GBH radio in Boston for a studio help this week. Gretchen Stroud read our listener travel haiku, send us your own original haiku about your travel impressions, details are at Rick Steves dot com slash radio. Hey, I'm Rick Steves. In my latest book for the love of Europe, I share the highlights of a lifetime of exploring Europe. My favorite experiences, sites, and encounters in a hundred essays. If you love Europe too, this is four decades of greatest hits in 400 pages made to order a stoke your travel dreams. You can order your copy of for the love of Europe at Rick Steves dot com..

Portugal Rick Steves Fatima Tim tapton Donna bardsley Lisbon GBH radio Gretchen Stroud Europe Edmonds Rick Washington hall Boston
"gbh" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"gbh" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is all things considered from NPR news on Michelle Martin a major winter storm has been pummeling much of the northeastern U.S. today with heavy snows and high winds Massachusetts has been getting the worst of it Reporter Baskin from member station GBH has been out in it and he is with us now from Boston Matt welcome Thanks for joining us Sure thing How bad is it out there Well the conditions have been rough A lot of snow about two feet in some areas and a lot of wind The local office of the national weather service says they've measured guts today of roughly 80 mph out on Cape Cod between 40 and 50 mph south of Boston Now typically with wind like that you might worry about down trees down power lines One saving grace though with this storm has been that while there is a lot of snow it's not the heavy cement like stuff you sometimes get It's actually been pretty light and that has limited the damage There are more than a 100,000 power outages across the state right now That's actually a fraction of what it could have been during a storm like this Now one major concern was flooding in coastal communities There is mild to moderate flooding at high tide this morning Nothing really catastrophic the mayor's in town officials I've spoken with say they're now holding their breath for the next tide that'll be right around 9 o'clock tonight So we're in Massachusetts has the storm been the worst Well the heaviest snowfall and the heaviest wind has been south of Boston That's where we've seen the two feet of snow I mentioned We got something closer to about a foot foot and a half around Boston And it's to the south that we're seeing a lot of those power outages that I mentioned The outages have been particularly bad on Cape Cod mima the Massachusetts emergency.

NPR news Michelle Martin Boston GBH Baskin Massachusetts national weather service Cape Cod U.S. Cape Cod mima
"gbh" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

03:06 min | 1 year ago

"gbh" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"Save energy so we took the idea and we better in technology available today can reflect ninety eight point one person sunlight. That's way higher than the previous white paint available that the only reflect eighty to ninety percent so it's reflecting a lot of sunlight back into space as you say how does it impact the inside of a house. We have done some analysis using are paying. We haven't done experiment yet. We are paying for example used in phoenix arizona or reno nevada Up to seventy five percent of air conditioning knees in the summer. So that's kind of bursik significant shoo-in your paint is the worldwide. I mean how does one measure the whiteness of pain yeah we use instrumentation called a spectrometer to measure that we have the equipment to shine a certain among the light onto the surface. And we can merger how you know how much among is reflected so then people reporter these numbers into the scientific papers or recall literature based on what we know now. The number ninety eight twenty one percent is the highest reported so far and It is covered by by the news media as well. As by guinness volkov lord records would the average person see the paint notice. It was different more intensely white. Yeah we compared our new paying wiza- commercial white paint if you put them side by side Will are wide. Paint is wider. You can imagine it's it'll be maybe evenly being wider than the new snow. But he's not i- blinded though is because of reflection is that you use is not like a mirror that is directed it looks really really white but it will really hurts your eye or the flying by burs or so. How hot does it get in indiana where you live in west lafayette and have you ever considered using the pain to cool your own home. We can get above ninety degree. Fahrenheit in the summer very rarity over one hundred certainly I love to are paying on our own roof. So right now is not ready yet for that is getting close so are we can working with a large company to worst. Commercializing are paying. We have to do some further optimization to make sure it's durable lost for many years. I hope to have these happen in a year or two and this can be available on the market now. I can have do pain in my own house with that. She'll iran is an engineer at purdue university in west lafayette indiana. He created the world's whitest paint. Which is going to help with climate change. We hope she'll thank you very much. Akio it's migrate. Perjure talking to you. The world comes to you from the nan and bill harris studio at gbh in boston. You can find us online anytime at the world dot. Org i'm marco werman you stay safe. Be strong we'll be back with you tomorrow ex..

bursik guinness volkov reno nevada phoenix west lafayette arizona indiana purdue university iran Akio bill harris gbh marco werman boston
"gbh" Discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

Boston Public Radio Podcast

03:05 min | 1 year ago

"gbh" Discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

"Most of his adult life behind bars and a nineteen seventy-three rape case. He always insisted he did not commit now. The victim of that rape says tyrone clark could be a victim to suffolk county. Da rachel rawlins's seeking to race tyron clark's rape conviction is asking for new trial because the survivor now doubts for identification of clark was actually correct and Rollins has said if a new trial is granted she will dismiss all the chart well all the charges relating to the rape gbh senior investigative reporter. Jen from kim has been covering the case. She had an exclusive interview with the victim earlier. This year jen. Great reporting a really good joined us. Thanks so much for having me or pleasure. Thank you so much for joining us. Jennifer so detail the story but before you do. I was stunned. That this is a black guy. A convicted by an all white jury and i was stunned by your interview with the victim. Who conceded that At the time she really didn't know any black people and she wasn't sure she could differentiate among black faces. So tell us what happened to tyron clark into and came. Yeah it's it's really a remarkable story and As as i've written several many stories on wrongful convictions. But this one really touched me because it's so unusual to have a victim comeback nearly fifty years later and say wait a minute. I think i might have made a mistake. It takes a lot of guts to be able to say that and basically tyrone clark was eighteen years old when he was arrested for the terrible brutal rape of this woman in boston. And you're right marjorie. He was convicted by an all. White jury Anne kane years later was re he and tyrone clarke has always said it wasn't him he's always said. Ever since the beginning he has he filed other motions to seeking a retrial. And it wasn't until a couple years ago that his new attorney tracks down the victim who said who was open to an inquirer because she had doubts of her own and the the attorney reached out to the survivor. here who by the way martyr username. Her go and we should say as you make the point two while we're not in the habit obviously disclose the names of survivors of These kinds of crimes in this case senate consented to it through you. What was it that convinced the lawyer in this case from the innocence project. i think. Correct me if i'm wrong. That an outreach. After decades and decades to the complaining witness to the victims of the survivor might be appropriate so jeff. Jeffrey harris works was hired by the innocence program. Out of the public defenders office to re take another..

tyron clark tyrone clark Da rachel rawlins gbh suffolk county Rollins Anne kane tyrone clarke Jen clark jen kim Jennifer marjorie boston senate Jeffrey harris jeff
"gbh" Discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

Boston Public Radio Podcast

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"gbh" Discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

"Are we are done at the moment. Yeah we're going. Oh indica abroad next. I was confused voluntarily. Sorry you're going to talk about the mayor's race a little bit more with andrew abroad coming up. How michelle ruin A necessity joy differ on police reform and public safety and a bunch of other law and order issues. Andrew cabrera's next one eighty nine seven. Gbh watson public radio. Welcome back to boston. Public radio merger egan and megyn brady join us. Aligned for this week's edition of law and order under cabral andrews the ceo of sand and former suffolk county. Sheriff former secretary of public safety for massachusetts heyndrickx overall. Hey jim brady. Hey mode regan engine. Greatest taught you so something. We just talked about with listeners. In a second question as well pretty dismal. Turn out in boston not just boston all around here. On preliminary election day you've been elected to office Why do you think so. Few people turned out and the other big issue. Coming out of this race is at boston. Had chance to elect a african american Or well a barrel cape verdean but a black person to the mayoralty and they didn't in what your take on that so. Nobody showed up to vote and boston missed. Its opportunity to elect a black mayor. Well usual usual response to that. Is that so many Successive elections That people are exhausted. But that's not you know that's not really an excuse. And you know i was listening to some of the discussion with your listeners. And jim's point about sort of this lack of civic engagement people feeling as though government is somehow disconnected from their everyday lives when it is in fact the driver. That propels them. It's just that they take for granted the impact of government because streets are paved and traffic lights work. And you know you know those are the those are the things that government does script. Schools are open If the tears is running that is what government So thinking that it doesn't impact your life or more importantly the people that you elect to make the policy around those things that impact. Your everyday life doesn't matter is a is Is wildly misplaced And there does need to be a much more focus and much more effort on making sure people understand this and feel engaged enough to vote because it is a disconnect a probably a more serious disconnect from people being part of a democracy than i've ever seen in my life so in the second issue the first of all is there a reform you make or implement a few were the czars arena elections a single reform. That you think would would change things or is it attitudinal cultural as margarita suggesting no. I don't think that there is a single reform. This is a this is a multi-layered problem with That requires any a comprehensive long-term sustainable solution. I mean we have you know if you start from having gotten away from civics education that has been decades in the making and Those chickens are clearly coming home to roost People not understanding not just which offices are elected. But you know what they do. Make a huge huge difference But it is also this sort of cultural continuing message that nothing you do matters that your vote doesn't matter because it can be diminished or decreased or ignored altogether. And so you know thing..

boston Andrew cabrera Gbh watson megyn brady cabral andrews jim brady egan suffolk county michelle andrew massachusetts jim margarita
"gbh" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"gbh" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"But then five thousand feet up and down just diving. The film is a production of frontline. Also produced here at gbh in boston. Jennings joins me now from new york tom. Your film condenses years of investigative journalism. I'm going to ask you to condense even further in the end. What brought the two boeing planes down. There is not one individual who brought down seven. Thirty seven max. It was all about group. Think it was about a certain kind of inertia at the federal aviation administration the regulator but it was also the corporation itself and how it had come to believe in its own sense of mission and engineering capacities. Its ability to do no wrong. What technically went wrong with the planes may what was the technical issue there was a software program embedded into the cockpit is called an cast. It was all about letting pilots handle the plane effectively that program though who was designed in a way that was only for the highest of rare in extreme circumstances but blowing decided a certain point to implement that at normal operating levels in that problem with that was if there is a malfunction with that caste system at low levels. The pilots didn't have time to respond to it if it went into malfunction. And that's exactly what happened in those two flights that went down. The documentary goes over the context in which the seven thirty seven max was brought to market. Even though there were host of red flags within boeing. Here's one of your new york times collaborators. All of this comes out of trying to give airlines the most fuel-efficient version of plainfield. They can spend as little money training their pilots on. To what extent was this a corporate culture problem and to what extent was just plain malfeasance on boeing's part or was it both it's both it's malfeasance in the sense that there was a demand placed upon the engineering design process from the highest ranks from the c. Level down to contain costs. Because of that pressure that natalie kitchen f in that clip was talking the airlines. Were demanding a very fuel. Efficient cost effective airplane. Any kind of thing that went into the design process that effectively increased. The cost to the airlines was really looked down upon that resulted in a full-on attempt to reduce the cost of training of pilots. It's interesting the crashes both happened. In developing countries indonesia and ethiopia. A man who you interviewed in ethiopia lost five people in his family in the crash and was told it wasn't boeing's fault at.

boeing gbh federal aviation administratio Jennings boston tom new york plainfield new york times max natalie ethiopia indonesia
First Trial in U.S. College Admission Scandal to Begin in Boston Court

NPR News Now

01:05 min | 1 year ago

First Trial in U.S. College Admission Scandal to Begin in Boston Court

"Morning in boston opening arguments in the college. Admission scandal trial from member station. Gbh in boston kirk care. Pezzo reports that dozens of parents including celebrities have been charged with corruption and pleaded guilty in the case but until now no one has been tried to dad's former casino executive gamal abdelaziz and private equity adviser. John wilson are still fighting the charges in court. The defense will argue that these two dads thought they were playing. Within the rules of a shadow system perpetuated by colleges in which rich people donate to schools to help their kids get in and that is a strong defense from two thousand feet federal prosecutor. Jeffrey cohen says this marks the first time this system of greasing the wheels for elite has been put to the test. We're really going to have a jury of regular people who probably try to get their kids into college. At some point deciding what went on here the prosecution will depend on wiretapped conversations

Pezzo Gamal Abdelaziz Boston John Wilson Jeffrey Cohen
"gbh" Discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

Boston Public Radio Podcast

05:31 min | 1 year ago

"gbh" Discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

"Professor emeritus of international relations and history at boston university and his new book which we should all go out and read is after the apocalypse. America's role in a world transformed. Thanks so much to andrew base for being with us coming up representative. Mike conway joins us to talk about his legislative. Push to reverse a states. Happy hour ban ki on eighty nine seven. Gbh boston the radio. Michael boston public radio mar dragon. Jim brady massachusetts band happy.

boston university Mike conway andrew America Michael boston boston Jim brady massachusetts
"gbh" Discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

Boston Public Radio Podcast

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"gbh" Discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

"Pro or con tendon national search for new jeopardy host and that didn't controversy as the longtime executive producer. Mike richards pick the longtime executive producer. Mike richards as well as former big bang theory star miami yelich for primetime specials. Gbh callie crossley with us to discuss the lavar burton snuff and how lgbtq communities could gain power through their own gerrymandering. That's atom boston public radio. You're listening to boston public radio..

Mike richards callie crossley lavar burton miami boston
"gbh" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

03:16 min | 1 year ago

"gbh" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"With the outpouring of violence on the streets where people were demanding change clearly the government put boots on and quashed but once people have felt their power. It's tough to put a cap on it. I was going to ask you so. Those protests have flared up two weeks ago in response to covert and response to lack of freedom of speech etc are those continuing or has the government. Actually put that fire out. You know the. I did put a fire out his very easy because of cuba being an island right. There's no border you can run to. And it is a very controlled society but we are seeing for the first time a government that is unable to project its complete and total control of things on the ground. Today was celebrated by these mya rations that were announced about the country. Which were some rice bagged rice a little bit of sugar and cooking that was in essence the gift that they got today for the revolution you served as a sort of informal intermediary between the us and cuban governments. Go i mean what are cuban officials thinking right now. Can you put us in their heads. But what is stark here for. The first time is that these are children of the revolution that are fighting the revolution. These are not the grandchildren of these. These are not the remnants of the propertied class or the the cuban coolmax as it were. This is the children of the revolution. And you notice that both in cuba those who are fighting are under thirty and you notice. Also abroad in the demonstrations were typically marked by people like my parents or my grandparents standing and fighting for a for the thought of cube or a democratic tube or a different view That is what the people who are taking the streets in in the united states in cuba. It's you it's the people that were brought up in the system today in washington. There were cubans protesting Asking joe biden to do more Bring pressure on the cuban government. So the us impose sanctions on a cuban security minister interior ministry special forces unit last week. I gather you've been on recent phone calls. Joe biden officials when they've laid out there thinking on cuba. What options are they considering what the us. I think should do some very aggressive help. Unkovic that gets directly to the cuban people because coleman kills capitalist and communist like the cubans always wanting for an epic battle and seeing themselves in the epic image. That fidel castro created for this small country decided to find a cure for kobe. This is something that over half of the g. Seven didn't even attempt to do this small country which is nowhere. The top fifty or one hundred economies of the world decided to take on spending hundreds of millions of dollars to try to develop this drug according to them. They've developed a drug. They simply don't have the syringes to inject people. It's tantamount to buying a ferrari and not being able to afford the gasoline to make former. Us democratic congressman from florida. Joe garcia speaking with us from miami. Joe thank you very much for your thoughts and your time. It's always a pleasure. Thank you for having me and that is our show for this monday. July twenty six. The world comes through from the nan and bill her studio at gbh in boston. I'm marco werman back with you tomorrow..

cuba cuban government joe biden united states Unkovic fidel castro washington coleman Joe garcia miami florida Joe gbh marco werman boston
"gbh" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:37 min | 1 year ago

"gbh" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is the world we are co production of GBH. Boston NPR X Between Turkey and Syria. There is a key border crossing, It's become the only reliable way for food and medicine to reach 3 to 4 million Syrians. Last year, Russia vetoed a resolution at the U. N. Security Council to keep three other crossings open. Russia is a close ally of Syrian President Bashar al Assad and helps his government limit aid to opposition held areas. Now Russia's signal that next month it will vote to close the one remaining border crossing. Humanitarian groups say millions of displaced Syrians would then lose access to critical aid. Earlier today. I spoke with Basma, a loose from the Norwegian Refugee council, and I asked her as President Assad asking Russia to seal off the Syrian border with Turkey. I think that could be something that could be happening in the background. I think from where we stand as humanitarian organizations, we constantly see humanitarian operations and the delivery of assistance being hijacked by different political actors and manipulated Meet different political agendas. And so I think this this might be another attempt within that space. But I think the most importantly, is to make sure that assistance does reach people inside Syria across the country. Irrespective of who's you know, in control of the territory that they live in. Right. So if this soul border crossing Bob Ojala is closed next month, what do you see as the options if Gavin Hauer is closed, then that means the massive Yuen structure that Operates under the cross border resolution will cease to exist. We saw that in the Northeast with the closure of the ought to be a crossing where the U N stopped programs and that means that also, um, with Expecting to see if the cross if the resolution is no law is not renewed this July that the U. N will, you know, halt its programs, But then it will also withdraw its funding, and that means Syrians will be a the first to suffer the consequences. And be the humanitarian response will be completely hindered and diminished. So you'll probably still have see some NGOs that will still continue to to try to program but with much less resources and much less, you know, very little ability to maintain the coordination and the capacity or the scope. That they have to reach the people in the northwest. So Basma. I guess there's also the option of transporting these shipments of aid through the Syrian capital Damascus. Is that a realistic option and is that happening already? So far, we haven't seen any cross line missions successfully reach northwest Syria out of Damascus. So I think the chance of that increasing to match the capacity and the scope that the U N has been able to do through cross border is is very unrealistic. There's absolutely no substitute for the cross border mechanism. Um, brings in over 1000 trucks. The Bible how, and it's really inconceivable that they'll be able to to meet those meet those needs and match the same scale of of the response through through class line. What do you see at stake if this single border crossing is shut down? Are we seeing a humanitarian catastrophe that would start to unfold? Absolutely. I mean, will likely see a deterioration in the situation. You know, with the covid pandemic. We're talking about over 90% of Syrians under the poverty line, and you know there's 13.4 million people in Syria that are in need of assistance. Three million of those at least are in the northwest. And so if we're no longer able to reach them, then that means that three million people that will not be able to access food won't be able able to access clean water proper, You know, shelter things of the sort that are, you know the basic basic needs that people rely on and have grown very dependent on to be able to survive the day to day struggles in northwest Syria. So tomorrow, Biden is said to meet with Vladimir Putin. Can Biden have any influence on Russia's decision? At this point? Do you know if it's even a topic in their meeting? We're hearing that the cross border resolution is going to be on the agenda. So I think that is promising. And it's an indication of how the U. S government is really prioritising this issue and raising it at all levels, including, you know the most senior level within the US government. But in terms of you know how much influence they can have. We're hoping that the U. S. And Russia will be able to put the politics aside and really, you know, facilitate humanitarian access and assistance to the people in need based on needs not based on politics. I mean, a bad case scenario would probably imply a lot more migration. What about pressure from other members of the U. N Security Council what countries are actively trying to lobby Russia not to cast a vote to shut the borders down? Think from from what we've been hearing, there seems to be a consensus within the U. N Security Council with than most of the members that on the need for the cross border resolution, so I think In that, In that sense, I think there is a proper understanding among council members that you know the crossword and mechanisms is crucial. It's the life saving mechanism and that we need to extend it. How much of that is going to resonate with, you know parties that are not in favor of this. Mechanism is to be determined, but it seems like for now there is a consensus for the most part across New York on on the on the need for this for this resolution to be renewed. Basma Solutions, the policy and advocacy adviser for the Norwegian Refugee Council, speaking with us about the possibility that Russia will shut down, they sold border crossing for humanitarian aid from Turkey to Syria, Basma Thank you very much for speaking with us today. Thank you so much for having me Michael High in the mountains of eastern Turkey. Rural health teams are trying to convince people to get vaccinated for Covid. Just 17% of people in Turkey have received a shot. Government health workers are trying to boost the numbers by hiking into isolated towns to reach people who can't come in for an appointment during mascara and tagged along with the team to get a better sense of what it will take to achieve success in a massive walk in freezer health department worker in the Turkish border town of Asche Calais loads up a bag with doses of covid vaccine than a doctor and a nurse. Take it and drive for miles past tiny sheep herding village. It's nestled into the mountains to reach their most isolated patients..

Vladimir Putin 3 U. N Security Council U. N. Security Council New York Norwegian Refugee Council Asche Calais Last year 17% tomorrow Russia Damascus Three million Biden Norwegian Refugee council next month today U. S government Bible Earlier today
"gbh" Discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

Boston Public Radio Podcast

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"gbh" Discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

"People were urged not together with others. The emerald necklace with it's lush green spaces from franklin park to charles gate fried. The place for city was to outside their homes and now live. Events are returning to parks across the city conservancy president karen monte which wants to discuss all the ways you can utilize the emerald necklace this summer. Jared bowen in for jim brownies. The boston city council voted to give themselves power to remove its president. Who just so happens to be acting. Mayor kim janey. The move comes before an election where multiple counselors are running to be mayor and serves as a reminder that she hasn't actually ascended to the full role yet. Gbh is adam riley and sarah winter smith join us for the latest city hall developments ahead on boston. Public radio boston public radio. Jim brady is off today. Gbh.

adam riley Jim brady sarah winter smith Jared bowen franklin park karen monte today kim janey Mayor jim brownies this summer president charles council gate fried Gbh boston
"gbh" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:47 min | 1 year ago

"gbh" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Manure with the world were co production of GBH. Boston NPR X After much opposition. It is the end of the road for the Keystone XL pipeline. It would have crossed native lands on its way to delivering oil from Alberta candidate major markets in the US It's a win for indigenous as well as environmental activists and a huge economic blow to Canada, one of the world's major oil exporters. Construction on the pipeline had already been underway in Alberta and now taxpayers there are on the hook for more than $1 billion. Anita L s have been following the pipeline controversy from Toronto and joins me now, how important was this project economically, And what has reaction been so far, You know, Marco, the oil industry makes up a huge part of the Canadian economy and for this pipeline advocates said that it would create nearly 120,000 jobs. So if you add that to the fact that oil prices had collapsed a few years back and that Alberta's economy has really been suffering, you can see that this is an important setback. In spite of that, though back in January, Joe Biden announced that he was revoking the license and at that time, Justin Trudeau said that he was really disappointed but that it was time to move on and that he wanted to focus on areas that Canada and the US agree on. And really, the issue has not at least in public come up between them and you know, even in Alberta, where this really hits home, the response has been Pretty muted. Um, you know Alberta's government invested $1.3 billion in the project just last spring, so they're now on the hook for that. Premier Jason Kenney said the province would file a lawsuit to try and get that money back. But he still hasn't done that. And it's not really clear that he will Last fall. Anita You reported on this for us and spoke with people in the small town of oil and in Alberta, which was already experiencing an economic boom from the construction of the pipeline. What is next for oil? And now that the project is cancelled? That doesn't actually mean that the boom is over right away. This is oil country, and they're used to the boom and bust cycle that goes along with that people in all plan are not really happy with the decision. But they also say, you know where resilient prairie people and something else will come along. It always does. They'd already built about 150 kilometers of pipeline. And just last week, there were nearly 300 workers back in town. Cleaning things up. The pipeline is going to be buried and maintained, just in case somebody needs it of maybe for a new pipeline project, and the workers are also restoring any of the land that was disturbed. So they're going to be in town doing that work at least until this fall. Indigenous groups and environmental is in the United States stage major protests as we will remember against the Keystone XL Pipeline project. What are you hearing from the same groups in Canada? Well, environmentalists and a lot of indigenous groups are thrilled with the decision. But there are also other indigenous groups who really are not that happy. There's one in particular the National Coalition of Chiefs, which describes it as a kick in the teeth for First Nations, people. And they say now that the project is dead, what that does is it entrenches poverty For them, It means fewer jobs for indigenous people and more long term unemployment. So Anita what's next for the oil industry in Canada, especially when it comes to other pipeline projects. The industry still has lots of other ways to ship its product, and there are also other pipelines under construction. So it looks like Excel is over. But other pipelines may still be in the offing. Reporter Nita Eyelash in Toronto. Thanks very much for this update. You're welcome, Marco. Last year, when coronavirus outbreaks first swept across the globe. There was confusion followed by a lot of scapegoating. People of Asian backgrounds were unfairly blamed in ostracized, so we're some medical professionals. That's what happened to a doctor in Canada, originally from the Democratic Republic of Congo. The world's Rupert Chinois has our story last May, as the province of New Brunswick went into one of the strictest lockdowns in Canada. Family physician named Jean Robert Ngala got a call to come pick up his four year old daughter in Montreal so beautiful much her mother, his ex wife had to attend a family funeral in Africa. Angola contacted local police and they told him it was okay to travel. So he drove the seven hours to Montreal spent the night at his brother's place, collected his daughter and returned home. Health officials advised him that, like other doctors traveling at the time, he could go back to seeing patients. He didn't have to spend time and quarantine since he didn't believe he'd been exposed. But soon one of Nicola's patients tested positive for the coronavirus on May 27 2020. He tested positive to, although we had no symptoms, he went into quarantine. Later that same day, The premier of New Brunswick, Blaine Higgs, spoke about the outbreak at a press conference and mentioned patient zero. This is a health care worker who saw multiple patients over a two week period following the return to the Brussels We are still contract tracing, But we know this zone is currently at a higher risk due to the actions of one irresponsible individual. The premier didn't say Jean Robert Nogales name. But that leaked online and with a little sleuthing. People found Nicola's address and photo within hours. His whole life changed. I was treated like a criminal, but I did nothing wrong. I was saying my job. His employers suspended him without pay people assailed him online and waited outside his home, delivering death threats and racist taunts, telling him to go back to Africa. He had to ask for police protection. At the same time, authorities opened a criminal investigation against him for failing to isolate Jewel Etienne, Nicola's attorney, says random people falsely accused him of breaking quarantine people would be congregating and places of commerce. And they would see a person of color and they would call the authorities and say, Oh, the good doctor is not questioning you need you need to run the police to his house and the police would show up and accused him of not self quarantining. In all 41 people were infected in that outbreak, and two people died, But doctors rallied to Nicola's defense. In September, 1500 physicians signed a letter blaming systemic racism for his treatment. This is clearly an example and its consequences how person of immigrant background person and who is African Canadian was absolutely marginalized, penalized and could have lost his life over this because the outrage was that palpable at the time. When a mayor in Quebec heard Nicola Story, he invited him to come live and work there. Nicola took him up on the offer. His trial was supposed to begin this month. And if found guilty, he faced as much as $8000 in fines. But last week, prosecutors dropped the charges, saying they've been provided with evidence that showed they had little chance to convict. No, I'm not your criminal. I can continue life like a human being. It's not completely over for Nicola. There's still something he wants. And that's an apology from Premier Blaine Hicks. They apologize means the beginning of the healing cannot change the past. But I have to prepare myself for the future. So far, Higgs has refused the invitation to apologize. I recall at the time it was it was when we had our first fatality in a long journey.

Jean Robert Ngala Justin Trudeau Anita Joe Biden May 27 2020 Montreal Africa Jean Robert Nogales Rupert Chinois September United States $1.3 billion Blaine Higgs January Quebec Excel first fatality New Brunswick US Last year
"gbh" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:31 min | 1 year ago

"gbh" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Co production of GBH. Boston NPR X The Covid 19 pandemic has turned the world upside down in so many ways, And yet it's not over by a long shot. We want to reflect on another ongoing pandemic that began a few decades ago. Here's a voice from the time that will sound familiar. The transmissibility might occur prior to the time that an individual develops one of these infections and is thereby classified as having AIDS. That was Dr Anthony Fauci in 1984. Tomorrow. June 5th marks the 40th anniversary of the outbreak of the HIV AIDS crisis and the first report from the Centers for Disease Control about the epidemic. Since then, 32 million people have lost their lives of the disease. In the late 19 nineties, new anti retroviral treatments offered hope saving millions of lives around the world. Edwin Cameron is one of those people. He's a former justice with the Constitutional Court of South Africa. And he is considered a pioneer in the movement to fight HIV AIDS in South Africa. That's where he joins us from Edwin. Welcome to the program. It's great to be with you, Marco. Thank you. Can you tell us how it feels to mark this anniversary? First of all, what are you feeling? For decades Since the outbreak of HIV AIDS, I'm feeling a lot of intense and mixed feelings. I was a young men are still under 30 about to come out as queer in 1981 and I did the next year and I was terrified with so many other game in a quiet HIV myself. And I entered it terribly dark period because one of the distinguishing features of this disease has been the stigma. So the anniversary holds intense feelings for me 40 years back. And then, of course, a sense of great humility. Not not not, uh, Clem enjoy, but humble appreciation for the privileges that have meant that I'm still alive and able to talk with you today. Talk about what was going on in South Africa. I mean, South Africa, South Africa was pretty quickly impacted along with Uganda, notably, what were the conversations like in South Africa, so the overwhelmingly hit for sexual shape of the epidemic in Africa only became apparent a bit later in Uganda, as Iraqis say. The empty villages syndrome in the mid 19 eighties and then in South Africa with the onset of democracy after 1984 with the Mandela presidency. So they they were complex political issues. AIDS was a highly political disease. AIDS revolutionized approach to treatment to activism. To doctor patient relationships. It revolutionized our approach to marginalize groups like people like myself. We're men, sex workers, other marginalized groups, people using drugs. So we mustn't talk only in funereal, solemn grieving terms about the epidemic. We have to recognize that deep within that rightfully funereal feeling about the epidemic. They were also acts of extraordinary courage. When the anti retroviral drugs were introduced into the market. Edwin what changed also, what did not change what has not changed to start with your second question. Marco is the Lingering shame the lingering stigma. I think it's to do with the fact that it's it's a sexually transmitted disease that has not changed as much as I thought it would. And what did change was The drugs. They stopped the virus in its tracks. It is remarkable it is near miraculous. And it isn't miraculous. Of course, we must remember that this was a medical breakthrough largely paid for Marco by public money in North America. Um, many of the key drugs were developed by your National Institute of Health's by the C D. C by university. I think of Virginia. I might be getting it wrong here by Other universities and then the patent holders got hold of them and took them and said, We're not going to make them available in Africa. I was gonna ask you it was miraculous. But what did you feel? Edwin? When you realized most people would not be able to afford these life saving drugs, I felt an impelling sense of urgency to to join the struggle to make the drugs available to everyone, of course, at that point in Africa. There were 30 to 40 million people who faced death a terrible, lingering death and we could not let that happen. Zackie Achmat could not let that happen. And his confederates and the treatment action campaign. They confronted the drug companies and eventually, with the assistance of the Clinton and Gates, foundations in 2000 and two the former companies backed off. I'm speaking with South African lawyer Edwin Cameron, who spent many years of his life speaking out as an HIV AIDS activist, You know, I think about the timeline of Covid. We went from knowing virtually nothing about it to having in under a year, several effective vaccines. I think about HIV. A year after the CDC's report came out on June 5th 1981 about the pandemic, there still wasn't a name for the virus. People were using grid gay related immune deficiency. What is the biggest Most important lesson from the HIV AIDS pandemic that you can that you can pass on to advocates and activists on today's Covid 19 pandemic. So we transform public policy by enraged, contained savvy, strategic well directed principled activism. That's what got us the treatments with AIDS. It's what got us The breakthrough, which was a treatment breakthrough, rather than a chemical or scientific or laboratory breakthrough, so I think that's the most important thing, And it's a lesson not just for disease or for the doctor patient relationship all for the epidemiological relationship with the former companies. It's a lesson for our lives. It's a lesson for young people in the United States and and in Africa that by activist interventions can change our world. And briefly. What should the rage about Covid be? There is good cause for a judge. I'm an African. I'm a white African armies South African. I'm 68 years old, have not yet been vaccinated. But the raid should be directed at the fact that we do not see this as a worldwide calamity. Canada holding vaccines, Western Europe porting vaccines. It is shameful. That is wrong. And it is, of course. Like so many unprincipled and unjust things in public health. It's also very bad public health. Send Africa your vaccines and you will protect yourselves. Don't vaccinate your kids and teenagers before everyone in Africa and South Asia and the rest of the world has been vaccinated. That's what we should be feeling rage or not now. Edwin Cameron is a pioneer in the movement to fight HIV AIDS in South Africa. Edwin thank you very much for reflecting on the past 40 years with us What a joy. Thank you Marker. If you've ever had to flee your home country.

Edwin Cameron United States 30 Marco 1981 South Asia June 5th 1981 Africa North America National Institute of Health South Africa 1984 Edwin 2000 Mandela CDC Clem Anthony Fauci Zackie Achmat next year
Growing Number Of U.S. Male Survivors Talk About Being A Sex Trade Victim

Morning Edition

01:46 min | 1 year ago

Growing Number Of U.S. Male Survivors Talk About Being A Sex Trade Victim

"Flourishing sex trade. Ah, lot of them are vulnerable to traffickers and sex buyers because of homelessness and poverty. Jenifer McKim of GBH News Center for Investigative Reporting says male victims often go unseen and unhelpful. Warning. This story contains descriptions that are disturbing. Sale. Faro was 16 years old and homeless when he was lured into the country's illegal sex trade. It wasn't until years later that the now 30 year old Boston hairstylists realized he wasn't to blame. I didn't see myself as a victim. I saw myself as someone who participated in this business with him. Alfaro says his parents kicked him out of their house because he was gay. He met a man on the Internet who offered him a place to stay and then forced him to provide clients sexual massages, some that became violent. He eventually ran away. There were many times where Didn't have food to eat. I don't have anywhere to go. And so I began what people call survival sex. I needed to find a way to survive on my own, and I did what I was taught. Pharaohs is a common story that is rarely heard boys and young men captured in the sex trade and victimized and weighs the public generally assumed supplies mostly two girls and young women. Now a small but growing fraternity of male survivors across the United States are talking about their experiences. They're adding poignant details to what many researchers say is a vastly under reported problem. A 2016 national study found more than a third of young people involved in the U. S. Sex trade were boys and young men. More than previously thought. Black and brown males and gay and LGBT Q. Young people are at higher risk. We need to get rid of this error of silence. That's Christopher Bates,

Jenifer Mckim Gbh News Center For Investigat Faro Alfaro Boston United States Q. Young Christopher Bates
"gbh" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:34 min | 2 years ago

"gbh" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And they're right to do so. But life doesn't let you do things in the proper order. Aleksei Navalny was medevac'd to Germany last year after he was poisoned with a nerve agent. He was immediately arrested when he returned to Russia on an old case that the European Court of Justice had described as unlawful and arbitrary. Germany's foreign minister called his sentencing a bitter blow to the rule of law in Russia. The U. S is likely to work together with Germany and other partners in Europe on more targeted sanctions. I could she saw that happening, that's probably not going to do very much to free navalny from jail. Georgetown University's Angela Stent says the U. S has a careful balancing act in Russia. With very limited in what we could do to affect what happens inside Russia. You know, we've had 30 years of democracy promotion and what we have is an increasingly authoritarian Russia. Vladimir Putin has been in power since Bill Clinton was president of the United States. But stent says his crackdown on Navalny may be a sign of weakness. These are not the acts of a really self confident leader. Former Assistant Secretary of State for Europe Dan Freed agrees, saying Putin's early years were marked with stability and growth, but he's been running out of steam and ideas and his government is more and more Just a kleptocratic scheme to keep them all rich. And now Bonnie has exposed that with his fabulous documentary about from his palace. More than 100. Million people have watched Navalny's YouTube video freed once the US to pick up on that and take early steps together with its friends in Europe to impose some costs on corrupt Russian officials. Michele Kelemen. NPR NEWS Washington Some American elected officials have lately discovered angry people outside their homes. New Hampshire's Republican governor, Chris Sununu, had armed protesters. Outside his house. And then there's the targeting of Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker in the seaside community of Swamp Skit. GBH radios. Adam Riley has more. It's easy to feel envious when you see Charlie Baker's home. It's a handsome Victoria in a gorgeous neighborhood right by a stunning stretch of coastline, but on dozens of occasions over the past year, the scene here has been anything but idyllic. We were exercising our First Amendment rights Last year, Boston anti addiction activist Domingos Derosa got hit with a restraining order after dumping used needles on the sidewalk. A man from Danvers Nearby suburb was charged after walking right inside. And then there are the regular visits from Diane Applause supporter of Donald Trump, who refers to the governor as Char lie, Baker. I'm in front of the home of governor, Charlie Baker. Was in bed with the Chinese Communist Party. And the Muslim Brotherhood for months plus and her allies have been setting up in the vicinity of Baker's home, wearing a host of fire, right grievances and unfounded conspiracy theories like these and clashing with counter protesters classes. Protests are a political migraine for Baker and his neighbors, but they're also taking a toll on Swampscott. Town administrator Sean Fitzgerald sites, traffic woes, police overtime and the sheer toxicity of the gatherings which can be seen and heard from a nearby elementary school. The vitriol is just so offensive. You're seeing a Confederate flag. Right on our Civil war monument really should cause everyone to really pause and think you know what's going on here in New Hampshire, the town where Governor Christie New New lives band picketing a private residences. But Fitzgerald says that given the first Amendment, Swampscott doesn't have many options that troubles Tammy Faye may need one of just a few Swampscott residents of color and the leader of an ongoing town discussion about racism. She has also been publicly targeted by Diana Plus who's falsely accused the need of being a Chinese operative She has mentioned being by name. Has called me out in terms of wondering why I moved from Roxbury too swollen, Scott. I thought to myself, you know, maybe this will pass. But it didn't And now, minutes says the simple act of leaving her home has become harrowing. It's scary going out, particularly with my son, I'm a very recognizable person. I have blue locks, and I'm a black female. As a result, my need is working with the Swampscott PD to ensure her safety, Fitzgerald says As he looks ahead to 2021. He's guardedly optimistic. Sometimes it takes conflict to actually Open up a perspective, that's better. I wish we could have avoided a lot of it. But there may be a silver lining at a time when darker alternatives are all too easy to imagine. For NPR News. I'm Adam Riley in Swampscott, Massachusetts. This is NPR news right here on KQED Public radio. It's 7 19. Thank you for listening in Nevado. Joe McConnell has some traffic.

Charlie Baker Swampscott Sean Fitzgerald Russia Europe NPR News Germany Adam Riley Angela Stent New Hampshire Massachusetts Vladimir Putin United States European Court of Justice Chinese Communist Party Scott nerve agent Joe McConnell
TV Dinners

Gastropod

08:38 min | 2 years ago

TV Dinners

"How has food. Tv changed over time. And how has it changed us. All not just us gastropod. That's right. you're listening to gastropod the podcast. That looks at food through the lens of science and history. I'm cynthia graber. And i'm nicola twilley and this episode. We're taking a spin around the dial which sounds medieval but believe us when we say. Tv's used to not have remotes. You had to literally spin odile. Even i barely remember those wild and wonderful days. This episode is supported in part by cabot. Creamery cabot is a co-op of new england and new york dairy farmers who make award winning cheeses with pure rich milk straight from family farms their specialty cheeses include unique flavors like roasted garlic cheddar and their team of cheese graders indirect with every batch to ensure award-winning quality. Go to cabinet. She's dot com to find out where to buy cabot near you there. You'll also find pairings how to videos and delicious comfort food recipes like the best mac and cheese and more the first thing to know about the very earliest food. Tv wasn't actually on tv. It was on the radio almost as soon as a radio came into being in the nineteen twenties in the us food radio came into being. It was a really easy way for programs to be created because they were easy and cheap. They were obvious outlets for advertising for sponsorship for food products and appliances. So that's where we saw food before. Tv was even a twinkle in the eye. Kathleen collins is a librarian and professor at john jay college of criminal justice and she's the author of the book watching what we eat. The evolution of television cooking shows the stars of these very first food shows. Were hardly stars in today's cents. These radio shows were unglamorous. It was all teaching housewives. How to economize and optimize and generally do all their chores. Better one of the not remotely. Glamorous stars was a woman named and sammy who we can only imagine was supposed to be the wife of uncle sam which is kind of disturbing. She wasn't actually a person. It was a program delivered by an arm of the. Usda and the she was not just one person but several different actors around the country. Adopting regional accents similarly a figure. That's much more well known was betty crocker. She actually started on the radio and like aunt. Sammy was played by many different actresses and she was one of the first we. Could i guess call her one of the first cooking teachers in broadcasting And we have some fun you one for. You are cooking lessons. This week is on some new christmas cookies. And besides that with sending seven ethically recipes to order numbers of schools who had indicated that they want the wednesday menu ambassador. I hope you'll be sure to watch for them on. Sammy's show was called housekeepers. Chat and betty crocker's was the slightly more enticing cooking school of the air. That sounds as though it was all about meringues and souffles and all things fluffy which it decidedly was not and then the very first television station came into being in the nineteen twenties though at the time the technology was still super experimental and people did not have. Tv's in their homes yet. Even as late as nineteen fifty only nine percent of american homes had a tv set. Foot made the jump to tv before. Tv even made the jump to people's living rooms so more megan was thirst. Tv shafran her snapple titled Tv show was called suggestions for dishes to be prepared and cooked in fifteen minutes and that demonstrated single ring. Cookery back in hundred thirty six. This is julie smith. She's a food writer. And podcast and the author of a new book called taste and the tv chef and she's british so i will translate for her single ring. Cookery means the kind of thing you can make on just one burner in your bed. Sit which is british for a studio apartment. Thanks for the cross pen translation of my uses as well as my bizarre accident. True also interesting. Megan was doing this. Fifteen minute meal about eighty years. Before jamie oliver's tv show and book of the same title. We have a picture of her filming her show dressed in. What looks like a raincoat on our website. Glamour personified where was i but by the nineteen forties food. Tv show started showing up for real in the us to the shows were cheap to produce and they were sponsored by kitchen and food companies and they were pretty boring. It was a very practical probably rather dry and yet a lot of the airtime was filled with these programs in different markets around the country. These shows obviously targeted at women most. Tv's at the time. Were actually in public places rather than homes especially bars where there weren't a lot of housewives. There was a show actually the first national televised. Tv show was james beard and it started in the mid nineteen forties and despite everything i just said about how most of the tv shows and the radio shows were led by home. Economists james beard was not a home economist. He was a gourmet and he was really all about the food and so it was a little strange to have this show on. Tv in a bar being watched by men james beard was kind of a one off for a long time but still here we go right off the bat you can see a gender divide in food tv women were the ones who were proper and teaching viewers had cook the man a ormond. Just appreciate food for food. Food was a chore for women and a pleasure for men until the only lucas came along. So diani lucas. Like james beard was a bit of an anachronism. She was a cordon bleu trained chef. Who was born in. Britain came from a very artistically oriented family. Do you only had a restaurant and cooking school in new york and she treated the kitchen as her art studio. it was her serious creative outlet. Her recipes were complex and mostly french. And they took a lot of time to make she was also kind of a taskmaster her british accent and her scraped back hair and she did not cut corners. But kathleen says the. Tony did occasionally have a little sparkle in her eye. Like when she told viewers to use as much rama's they liked or needed in their cribs. Suzanne that show was on the evening and prime time and it ran from nineteen forty seven until nineteen fifty-six but she was kind of ahead of her time. I would not be surprised if many of your listeners have never heard of the oni lucas. She just came along at the wrong time for the public. Viewing audience at diani did have a big influence on one particularly important person. Julia child the french chef. I'm doolittle she was a california girl. She was not a spy for the cia before being cooking show guru as many people think she was a research assistant at the oh s the precursor to the cia but she was really one of these happy accidents. She married paul child who had a foreign service assignment. in france. They moved to france and she fell in love with food. And she got herself trained. You know at the core blows school which was really challenging as a woman and she just became. You know a master in nineteen sixty one. Julia published a book with two other. Women called mastering the art of french. Cooking it is eight home and that seven hundred fifty. Two page book provided the kick. That landed julia in front of millions of viewers happen was. Julia was doing the rounds promoting her book and she'd been invited onto a book show hosted by a local professor on w. g. b. h. Which is the boston public. Tv station and she decided she didn't want to just talk with the professor. She wanted to cook. She wanted to teach him how to make a proper french omelette. The professor wasn't a particularly skilled cook in this live tv cooking class but people wrote into the show after it aired. They called julia a hoot and the producer thought. Julia was incredibly well-spoken so gbh gave her her own show. It would eventually become the french chef. The show was a huge hit. It was on national. Tv for three decades and it not only made julia household name but it also kind of launched the modern era of food

Cynthia Graber Nicola Twilley Odile Creamery Cabot James Beard Kathleen Collins Betty Crocker Sammy Shafran John Jay College Of Criminal J Cabot Julie Smith New England New York Cabinet Usda Diani Lucas Jamie Oliver
Inside The National Women's Hockey League's Coronavirus Bubble

All Things Considered

02:46 min | 2 years ago

Inside The National Women's Hockey League's Coronavirus Bubble

"League is off to a rocky start. It just began its two weeks season in a bubble in upstate New York, and today, one team dropped out because of Corona virus infections. For another team. The tournament is a chance to win a championship that was taken away by the pandemic last year. Remember station GBH. Esteban Gusteau's has more from Boston. As the days ticked down towards the Isabel Cup final last March, the Boston Pride seemed poised to add yet another trophy to their collection with the 23 1 record, a championship felt inevitable. The only thing that could stop the hockey team, it turns out was the coronavirus. The in WHL postpone the final a day before the championship game as the sports world began so wise up to the viral threats. Eventually it got canceled altogether. Pride forward and captain Gillian Dempsey remembers the emotional elevator. As everything settled. It was starting to become more frustrating being like, Oh, man, we never We never got that chance. Now, almost a year since the team's last game, the pride or back on the ice over a two week bubble season in Lake Placid, New York. It looks like a penalty coming. Another power play coming for Boston Bubbles have become common as pro leagues navigate Cove in 19, no travel, no fans frequents covert tests and many other restrictions. Pride President Hailey Moore in the rest of the end of Uhl. The challenge of setting up the protective shell has been worthy of its own trophy. You want to be Sure that the safety of our players our staff, our fans are communities are the top priority. And as things evolved, this was really just the natural but to be able to salvage this season. At Lake Placid, the teams out to win hockey games, but players also have to carry on with their lives. Rookie forward Sammy Davis is continuing work on her doctorate degree. While she's in the bubble. Julian Dempsey teaches fifth grade. The time in New York is no vacation for them. Them seats hot remotely last fall and started hybrid classes this month in Lake Placid. She's teaching on zoom from her hotel room during the day and then taking to the ice at nights. It's a grind for two weeks. It's pretty much gonna be a game every day or every other day, and that that's a tremendous amount of hockey. With the game's underway, the pride have a chance to feel something like normal again, if just for two weeks into maybe claim a crown that never found a head to rest on last March for NPR news. I'm Esteban, who steals in Boston.

Esteban Gusteau Boston Pride Gillian Dempsey New York Boston Hailey Moore WHL Hockey Lake Placid Julian Dempsey Sammy Davis Npr News Esteban
Massachusetts coronavirus vaccine sign-ups plagued by problems as Phase 2 rollout begins

Morning Edition

03:39 min | 2 years ago

Massachusetts coronavirus vaccine sign-ups plagued by problems as Phase 2 rollout begins

"Medical researchers who work remotely have been rolling up their sleeves to get the covert vaccine. Meanwhile, seniors are waiting on the sidelines not yet eligible. Massachusetts has one of the nation's largest hospital workforces, and officials there have decided to put all of them at the front of the line. Gabriela Emanuel of member station GBH in Boston reports. Carol Helper set is 82. She's been in her apartment just outside Boston. Since the beginning of the pandemic. Nobody comes in. Nobody goes out. I become more and more despairing and lonely cut off some human contact helpers that has a long list of complex medical issues. The most urgent one. She's going blind, She says. She's desperate for ice surgery. But in order to safely be in the hospital, she needs a vaccine. The vaccine would change my life. It would give me the future for weeks. She's been desperately trying to figure out how to get a shot. I am still Totally Totally in the dark. She's watched with jealousy as seniors in many other states have started receiving vaccines. She studied data from the CDC finding Massachusetts in the bottom half of states in per capita vaccinations. But perhaps most baffling is seeing healthy young people get inoculated before the elderly and the sick. We're seeing just a huge number of people get vaccinated. Who I think you know, should frankly be way down the line. Michael Mina is at Harvard School of Public Health, the other people who have nothing to do at all with Cove ID or with Patient care. We're really with the hospitals. They just happen to be employed by a hospital, and thus they can get the vaccine. Ah, few things are happening here. First, the federal level nationally, vaccines are being distributed to states based on their total population. The federal government has told states to prioritize certain groups like healthcare workers with lots of hospitals. Massachusetts has lots of health care professionals at the front of the line and effectively means that the elderly and vulnerable people who might need the vaccine first will generally be pushed back the second factor state and hospital level decisions. Here. The health care worker category has been defined to include all hospital employees. Those in research labs and telemedicine in HR, including people working remotely. Paul Bettinger oversees the vaccine rollout at the Mass General Brigham. He says his hospital network needed to bring in some of those working from home during the first surge. They called up researchers and administrators and others in the intensive care unit listening for the alarms of ventilators because the federal surge ventilators that we had wouldn't plug into our alarm systems now a third issue, individuals have been flaky. Dana Farber Cancer Institute sent out a mass email saying quote we have had far too many researchers not show up for covert 19 vaccinations over the past week. The result of the email says, is vaccines that may have been wasted. These challenges have been compounded by communication missteps and technical glitches, and Massachusetts has admitted hundreds of thousands of doses are sitting unused in hospital and pharmacy freezers. Governor Charlie Baker has announced. Those over 75 will be eligible on the first of February, and he's hoping they'll have enough vaccines to meet all the pent up demand. For NPR News and Gabriella

Gabriela Emanuel Carol Helper Massachusetts Boston Michael Mina Harvard School Of Public Healt Paul Bettinger CDC Mass General Brigham Federal Government Dana Farber Cancer Institute Governor Charlie Baker Npr News Gabriella
"gbh" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:13 min | 2 years ago

"gbh" Discussed on KQED Radio

"With the world. We come to you from GBH, Boston and P R X Secretary State Mike Pompeo made an extraordinary announcement in the final hours of the Trump administration. Today, he declared that the Chinese Communist Party has committed genocide of the wigger ethnic group. Genocide is a powerful word that carries political weight. And it's a designation that wigger groups have been lobbying governments around the globe to use silly who Dyer's with the East Turkistan National Awakening Movement. He joins us from Washington and East Turkistan, by the way, is the name of the weaker state before it was occupied by China. I silly. What does it mean exactly? For the us to name Chinese persecution of leaders a genocide? How significant move is us. This is very significant. This would actually mean that the U. S government is not going to sit around. On allow China to continue its atrocities. This would mean that Theo US government would use it so laws and its commitment under international treaties such as the U. N genocide recognition. Tol take serious actions to bring an end to this genocide. This would also mean that other governments across the world would have to take action as well. The U. S will definitely use its allied partners to put more pressure on China. Be clear. Many activist groups have alleged and documented Wicker's in Xinjiang, working in factory camps on living in re education centers. But by pushing for this designation of genocide has the U. S. State Department essentially said. That the Chinese government is killing leaguers. Essentially, yes. Genocide doesn't just mean you know, directly killing we waters but also means you know, bringing about conditions in which you know their life is that danger? The fourth sterilization of women is one of the biggest issues the mass abortions. But also people are physically dying in these concentration camps, and there have been numerous reported instances of this within the past few years. I think the U. S government has now further evidence on this sense why they decided to designated as as a genocide. As you said, a genocide designation by the U. S means the world is not just going to sit around and we'll use laws like the U. N genocide recognition. But how would that actually work of China refuses to cooperate or recognize that genocide is happening in Xinjiang? China has always been pushing back against this and China will most likely refute this, however, the U. S government it would have legal obligations on its own, um to push back against us as a country that recognizing the genocide they would no longer be able to engage in, you know, trade deals or China they wouldn't be able to allow Chinese officials That are complicit in the genocide to come into the United States or engage in any type of formal diplomatic relations with them. Human rights have not been a top priority for the Trump administration. But this moves suggest otherwise. At least in Xinjiang in China. Do you think other countries will also acknowledge what's happening? There is genocide. Yes. Um, Initially, we were able to convince the Canadian Parliament back in October, too, Um, recognized the atrocities genocide, and we subsequently had gotten the U. S. Senate to introduce a similar resolution. The UK Actually, they're holding a vote on the genocide amendment, which nearly got defeated Sadly, but we're hoping that with the US recognizing this as a genocide, other countries in the Western world will follow suit. Are you worried, though that may be the last minute designation of genocide by the State Department just won't carry the weight, a full throated campaign that might have Carry this toughness for the past three years could have Not necessarily because what's happening is indeed a genocide, and you had the incoming administration that the Biden administration several months fact they had stated that they would recognize the genocide. And in fact, even today, according to The New York Times they have Stated that you know, they welcome this designation, so we're not at all worried about that. So Lee, How do you think Biden will pick up this baton with the Chinese when he's in office? Will he be even tougher on China that Trump was when it comes to the leaders? We're hopeful that he will, you know. Continue on the Trump Administration's You know some of the policies if not all of them to be tough on China. He had always, you know, spoken on human rights issues, so we're hopeful that he will uphold. His campaign promises. How long have you been working to get this genocide designation? What is today? This announcement made to you personally. Personally, This means that all of the hard work that I had many around me. Have been pursuing since 2018. You know, we haven't succeeded, and we're hopeful that this will be the first step towards actually obtaining justice and freedom for our people and into China's prolonged occupation of these Turkistan. Which is why this genocide has happened. That's silly. Who dire with the East Turkistan National Awakening Movement, speaking with me about today's declaration by the U. S. State Department that Chinese persecution of wingers constitutes genocide. Angela Merkel has been the face of German politics are more than 15 years. When Donald Trump was elected in 2016 people joked that the title of leader of the free World had become miracles. But now Germany is seeing a not too distant political future without Merkel at the helm. The world's your correspondent, Orla Barry tells us about the man that Merkel's party is picked to succeed. Her filling Angela Merkel shoes was always going to be a challenge over the weekend are mean lashes. A staunch supporter of the German chancellor took one step closer to that goal, Son.

China East Turkistan National Awaken United States U. S. State Department Angela Merkel East Turkistan Chinese Communist Party Xinjiang Donald Trump Chinese government U. S Mike Pompeo U. N Boston Trump Washington Dyer
"gbh" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"gbh" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Thank you so much for keeping the flame alive. Thank you dennis. Biddle is a former negro league player and president of yesterday's negro league players foundation. He's also author of the book. Secrets of the negro baseball league as told by dennis. Biddle he spoke with gbh. is callie. Crossley we reached out to major league. Baseball for comment about mr bills letters. Asking for pensions for all living negro league ballplayers. They sent us a.

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Republicans are distancing themselves from Trump’s refusal to commit to a peaceful transfer of power

WNYC Programming

00:53 sec | 2 years ago

Republicans are distancing themselves from Trump’s refusal to commit to a peaceful transfer of power

"Are dismissing President Trump's statement that he may not accept the results of the November election if he loses. Mike Dan from member station GBH reports. The Republican governor of Massachusetts did not mince words when addressing the president's remarks. Governor Charlie Baker has long distanced himself from the president. But he bristled when responding to a question about the president's statement. That quote we're goingto have to see if there will be a peaceful transfer of power should he lose the November election. Baker did not hold back. It is appalling and outrageous that anyone would suggest for a minute that if they lose an election, they're not going to leave. Baker called the peaceful transfer of power based on the vote of the people of fundamental aspect of America's strength. Trump spokesperson now says the president would accept quote a free and fair election. For NPR

President Trump Governor Charlie Baker Donald Trump GBH Mike Dan Massachusetts NPR America
Investors worry US-China trade war spilling into currency markets

Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

01:42 min | 4 years ago

Investors worry US-China trade war spilling into currency markets

"Insurers, rally today meanwhile the dollar adding to Las Friday, when US President Donald Trump said that he's ready to go with additional, tariffs in China the EU and others have been manipulating currencies Equity benchmarks declining and Japan and Australia in South Korea they were little changed. In Hong Kong up in China today the offshore Yuan steady after last. Week's drop the world's finance chiefs warning on Sunday the trade tensions threaten global growth is the. Engines of leading economies fall out of sync also rattling investors Trump took issue with the warm. Six weeks slide to the lowest level in more than a year raising concerns among investors that the u. s. China trade war was now spilling over into the currency markets that's a Bloomberg business flash here's Leon garren with more on what's going on around the world thank you Mark in the u. k., three men and they twenty s have been. Arrested after a suspected acid attack on a three year old boy in Worcester please say they have been. Detained, in London on suspicion of conspiracy to commit GBH, the toddler had a corrosive substance thrown at him in his push at, our home bargains store on Saturday a heat Wave in Japan. Has, killed at, least thirty, people, in center on ten thousand to hospital, blistering temperatures are set to continue throughout this week with take. Full cost ac- thirty six degrees on Monday and thirty seven on Tuesday and Wednesday. It comes just weeks after flooding in the west claim to more than two hundred lines. And a drug to treat malaria the first such to get approval in sixty years has been given the green light by authorities the medicine is designed to.

President Donald Trump China Japan Hong Kong United States EU Leon Garren South Korea Worcester London Bloomberg Mark Australia Thirty Six Degrees Sixty Years Three Year Six Weeks
Fierce fighting intensifies in Yemen's Hodeida

The World

02:23 min | 5 years ago

Fierce fighting intensifies in Yemen's Hodeida

"Where co production of the bbc world service pri and w gbh here in boston in the yemeni port city of hood data on the red sea it reached one hundred degrees today it was the first day of eat when most muslims are celebrating the end of a month of fasting but there was no partying in the streets on the contrary one resident told us people were trying to look for food and water and they were being cautious who the rebel fighters are patrolling the city that controlled most of yemen since two thousand fifteen and ever since then fighters from other parts of yemen have been trying to drive them out today fighting centered on the airport in data residents saw this week's military saw coming and many of them have fled over the past few weeks now they are what humanitarian groups call id peas internally displaced people different about what you saw happening inside yemen right now what's different now is unlike situations such as iraq when people were fleeing war and kosslick many those people would end up living with families or had some sort of support network to turn to in yemen you're not seeing that because so much of the population basically has nothing so what you're seeing now is tens and thousands of people who've been fleeing areas particularly on her her data since since december actually and they're literally going to feel to unfinished houses to wherever they can find some sort of refuge many of them live in these decrepit tents made out of blankets or tarpaulin remain cardboard others live and unfinished houses where they're living next to oaken sewage i met one family who basically didn't have a roof and the day after i interviewed them it rained and when i went back to see them again they'd lost all of their food that they had begged from neighbors the clothes were completely wet blankets were wet but they couldn't leave dead nowhere else to go so they decided to stay on in this ruthless house so this is a huge difference people are fleeing their homes yuda conflict and they have nowhere else to go no one to turn to you know support network so they have to really fend for their own so the story of.

Boston Yemen Iraq BBC One Hundred Degrees