35 Burst results for "G. Miller"

No. 2 Alabama loses QB Bryce Young, beats No. 20 Arkansas

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 2 d ago

No. 2 Alabama loses QB Bryce Young, beats No. 20 Arkansas

"Second ranked Alabama lost quarterback Bryce young to a shoulder injury in the second quarter of a 49 26 win over number 20 Arkansas Head coach Nick Saban says the reigning Heisman Trophy winner sprained the AC joint in his throwing shoulder But back up Jalen Miller led the crimson tide to touchdowns in his first two drives to open a 28 zero lead Had a 77 yard scramble on third and 15 to set up a touchdown Jameer Gibbs had 206 yards and two touchdowns on 18 carries including a 76 yard touchdown to seal it in the fourth quarter I'm Dave ferry

Bryce Young Jalen Miller Nick Saban Alabama Arkansas Jameer Gibbs Dave Ferry
Stephen Miller: Biden's Cognitive Mistakes Can Lead to Nuclear War

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:09 min | 3 d ago

Stephen Miller: Biden's Cognitive Mistakes Can Lead to Nuclear War

"Cut ten. Here's more of what Stephen Miller said about the cognitive decline of Joe Biden and why it matters. I'm not sitting here just trying to take political pot shots at Democrats. That's not what we're saying. You have got to understand what the risk is here. Stephen Miller sure understands it. Of course, we can talk about Afghanistan, the greatest foreign policy humiliation in American history without even a close second, we can talk about the fact that this administration is now presiding over the first war in Europe since the Second World War, obviously you've had some conflicts, so I shouldn't say the first major war in Europe since the Second World War. There's obviously been some conflicts, but the first major war in Europe. And nothing like, for example, what happened in the Balkans or what happened in the Clinton administration, you're talking about something that could lead us to nuclear war. You're talking so that could lead us to World War II. So this could lead to nuclear war. Do you understand it?

Stephen Miller Joe Biden Europe Afghanistan Balkans Clinton Administration
Stephen Miller: Biden Is Not 'Cognitively Present' as President

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:11 min | 3 d ago

Stephen Miller: Biden Is Not 'Cognitively Present' as President

"Last night, former senior adviser to Trump, Stephen Miller, was on newsmax's Eric bolling show. Here's cut two. Listen to Steven Miller, what he accurately pointed out. And I want to play for you his argument and then I want to tell you ask you to call and tell me whether you agree or disagree with Stephen Miller's assessment. The President Biden is not cognitively present. He does not have the mental capacity to serve as the president of the United States of America. If he was in a nursing home, he would be in the assisted living section, not the area where people are in a retirement community who are living their own lives and who are making their own decisions. Maybe they just have a little bit of help when they need it. He would be in the round the clock care section for someone who forgets who they are, where they are, what they're doing, who's alive, who's dead, how to take care of themselves. He is completely cognitively diminished and deteriorated. So this is a terrifying situation. And of course, we see the results. We see the results all the time. The world is more violent, more dangerous, more unstable than ever before.

Stephen Miller Eric Bolling Steven Miller Newsmax Donald Trump Biden United States Of America
Mary Miller: Republicans Are United on Four Issues

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:30 min | Last week

Mary Miller: Republicans Are United on Four Issues

"The commitment to America was announced on Friday. My head is off to you guys. I think this is a brilliant plan. I like what we've already heard. Do you think this is going to be the winning formula, the secret sauce? Absolutely Republicans are united on core issues. We want to investigate big tech. We want to preserve our free speech, the left wants to silence us. So they have no opposition. And we want government accountability. With several of my other colleagues are calling for defunding the FBI, I know that the press and the left I was going to go after us and say that we're anti police. If we do that, but I do want to say that the press has become powerless. They've made a joke out of themselves and people when they started saying men can become pregnant and breastfeed. You got to get your best vaccination shot, the virus didn't come from China. People started turning CNN and often and setting down their newspaper and they have become an echo chamber. People are turning to radio programs like yours to podcasts that get their information. And so I want to say to my Republican colleagues that we shouldn't be fearful about the left and how they are going to portray us because people have been turning them off. And

America FBI CNN China
Alabama halts execution because of time, IV access concerns

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | Last week

Alabama halts execution because of time, IV access concerns

"Alabama has called off the execution of a convicted killer just three hours after a divided U.S. Supreme Court gave the okay prison officials had until midnight Thursday to give convicted killer Alan Miller a lethal injection but corrections commissioner John Hamm says the team administering the drugs had trouble accessing a vein and didn't say how long the team tried but he says Miller was returned to his cell the 57 year old was sentenced to death for a 1999 workplace rampage in which he killed two coworkers and a former supervisor I'm Donna water

John Hamm Alan Miller U.S. Supreme Court Alabama Miller Donna
HBO Max Is Cutting Smoking From Old Movies

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:05 min | 2 weeks ago

HBO Max Is Cutting Smoking From Old Movies

"To see this new thing, HBO is cutting back on costs. Okay, HBO Max. Try to save some money. So get this, they're taking cigarettes out of old movie posters. It's such a ridiculous move. They've been censoring cigarettes from certain really famous iconic movie posters that they display on their streaming site. Now I thought it was on a couple of years ago when I started to see. This movie contains graphic language just moving contains sex and smoking. I thought smoking. Why do we need them? Why don't we need that? Oh, warning people are smoking in this movie. All right. I don't know why that suddenly became the thing we have to warn people about. As if it's as bad as sex or so now not only are they warning you that smoking takes place in a movie, now they've gone and just taken the cigarettes or cigars out of actors hands on movie posters. Some people were on Twitter and they noticed, hey, you scrubbing cigarettes out of some very famous movie posters. Robert Altman's mccabe and misses Miller. The life and times of judge Roy bean, you got these Photoshop posters, you know, Warren Beatty and Paul Newman no longer hold cigarettes between their fingers, but instead they're just posing bizarrely with their hands in a certain position with the digits raised up in the air, staring off in a distance. That's better. You see they show the photo before and after? And it's outraging people. It's so stupid. It's ridiculous. 90% of the people who work at Warner Brothers are discovery. I bet they vape at their desk, a small snort Coke at lunch, and now we can't see a cigarette in someone's hand. I hate smoking, but it's part of the movie.

HBO Roy Bean Robert Altman Mccabe Warren Beatty Paul Newman Miller Twitter Warner Brothers
Glenn Kirschner Will Risk Trump's Threats to Defend Democracy

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

05:01 min | 2 weeks ago

Glenn Kirschner Will Risk Trump's Threats to Defend Democracy

"Started? What are we running for? Let's do this. Yes, when I say I can't run for office because I can't fundraise. I'm not looking to get a rise out of people who are like, will help you. You know, I created a 501c3 nonprofit national homicide families went through the IRS process that was not fun, but we got our approval. And then I went on exactly one fundraising call and it made me want to hurl and I realized I can't ask people for money even for really worthy causes. I was a public servant step for more than 30 years and I never had to ask one person for $1 in order for me to be a public servant. I can't start now by saying I want to run for office and be a public servant. So money, money, money, money, money, not in my DNA, unfortunately. Yeah. Well, that doesn't mean you still can't be appointed. What am I looking for? Oh, attorney general. Yeah. Okay, I'm just saying, that's not running. Okay, you were the, one of the many of us who you tweeted. So Donnie soprano and the boys got together at the bottom being golf club to sort through some problems. I mean, between this Sopranos scene on the golf course with no golfing going on. And this latest threat, he just said, what did he say? I think there's going to be a big trouble if I'm indicted. I mean, how much more explicit a threat of inciting violence could there be? Yeah, it'll be big trouble and boy will it be good trouble. And it's precisely the kind of trouble this country needs. We can not decline to charge somebody for their crime stuff for fear of how that person's associates or supporters will react. If that impacts our decision, who to indict, then the rule of law is truly dead. Let him threaten violence. Let Lindsey Graham threaten that there will be protests and there will be riots fine. Bring it on because some things are worth fighting for like the rule of law and the future of our democracy. Yep, absolutely. Finally, you tweeted our team justice members have been sending me pictures they took while attending Saturday night's event in D.C.. It was such a pleasure and a privilege to get to share the stage with Stephanie Miller and representative Raskin to share the legal issues of the day in our fight for justice. You just posted a clip of you and Jamie Raskin and we were, what I didn't get a chance to watch it yet, 'cause there was so much good stuff that happened. What was that particular exchange? Do you remember? Yeah, so that clip you and I and representative Raskin were talking about basically the deep injustice that's at play in America right now where the people that Donald Trump lied to and used that lie to urge them to attack the capitol. Those people are going to prison because they obey Donald Trump's commands and they fell for his lies. Donald Trump, the person who is most criminally responsible for the capital attack has a teen time later today. That's a deep injustice that needs to be remedied right now because we add on top of that stuff. The classified documents crimes at Mar-a-Lago, Trump had top secret materials national defense information, which is why this is an espionage act crime being investigated. And information about the nuclear capabilities and defenses of foreign countries and he has not been arrested by the Department of Justice for committing all of those most dangerous crimes that undermines the confidence in our federal government and in our rule of law. These things must be made right by the Department of Justice, not rocket science, just good government. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, I feel like what happens is we get overwhelmed. I think you and Jamie were talking about that Saturday night that, you know, in all of this new espionage stuff, you're like, Jamie's over there going, wait a minute. What about our crimes? What about the overthrow of the government in January 6th? I mean, and speaking of which, I mean, there are going to be starting again, obviously the J 6 committee wanted to ask you finally, what did you think of a lot of people speculating on what Zoe lofgren meant and also many Thompson, do you feel like they're saying they have recovered the missing Secret Service tax? Yeah, and I don't think they were ever missing in the first place. Let's just say they were, they were perhaps misplaced or mistaken about them all being permanently deleted or purged. So they clearly have lots and lots of text messages now. So the next logical question beyond what do they tell us about what the Secret Service and Mike Pence and Donald Trump and Mark Meadows were doing on January 5th and 6th and 7th. But why did the machinery of the Secret Service and DHS at least the former leadership of DHS try to lie about it and keep them from being viewed by Congress and inferentially the Department of Justice? That is the next investigative lead. They're going to have to follow. All right, you heard him. Starve stage screen. And LA sexy liberal. Go to sex in the world dot com. Thank you, honey. See you next week. Thanks, Seth. Obviously. I love you

Donnie Soprano Donald Trump Raskin Jamie Raskin Golf Lindsey Graham Stephanie Miller IRS Department Of Justice D.C. Jamie Secret Service America Zoe Lofgren Mark Meadows Thompson DHS Mike Pence
DOJ Has Been on a 40 Subpoena Blitz

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

02:05 min | 2 weeks ago

DOJ Has Been on a 40 Subpoena Blitz

"As you mentioned, 40 subpoenaed DoJ has issued 40 subpoenas over the past week. Wow, that's a lot. So Boris Epstein, Mike Roman, had the phone seized. The actions represent a substantial escalation of the investigation. To which Jodie and I say yay, Dan scavino was one of the people getting a subpoena Bernard Carrick. There's that name again. Oh boy. So can we ask him about using the respite suite for the 9 11 first responders to bang his girlfriend just for fun? I'm sorry. Girlfriends. There were two mistresses that he was banging in the apartment. Once we get once we get them under oath, just to ask them that just for fun. Right, just because it was the anniversary of 9 11. Right. It was two mistresses behind his wife's back at the apartment 9 11 workers. And the other one was a porn star, right? Right. Yes. Okay, so my point is so that it's hard to keep track of all the crimes, right? The subpoena is for the plan to submit the fake electors, right? Some subpoenas also seek information into the activities of the save America political action committee, oh my God, how many separate investigations do is this now? Do you think what I don't understand is given everything we know about Bannon's help us build the wall grift and the save America thing, how is this guy raising a dime? Are there that many stupid people in America? Apparently. Yeah. Well, this guy Clark saying, you know, you lord, you'd think there's less fools in this world. You know, I mean, so why would anybody send them any money now? I know. So at least 20 of the subpoenas sought information about communications with lawyers who took part in the fake electors scheme, including Giuliani and John eastman, I mean, for those of us that have veruca salted about the Department of Justice, it does seem like they are on the move. Does it not? Well, they're driving, they drop paper on Stephen Miller, which is great, right. And they drop paper on Newt Gingrich. And I would sell tickets to watch Newt Gingrich in front of the January 6th

Boris Epstein Mike Roman Dan Scavino Bernard Carrick DOJ America Political Action Commi Jodie Bannon America John Eastman Clark Giuliani Department Of Justice Stephen Miller Newt Gingrich
How John Miller Got Inside John Gotti's Interview Armor

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:43 min | 3 weeks ago

How John Miller Got Inside John Gotti's Interview Armor

"John said he noticed a chink in Gotti's armor. You know, John was always afraid of electronic surveillance equipment inside his club, so he would hold meetings with the top members of his family. Like I said, walking around the block. And John Miller thought that meant that a halfway around the block, he was as far as possible from ducking back in the club. So he set a plan in motion. And the plan was we bring four camera crews. That's a lot for a story on a news show. For camera crews, that leaves two crews to tussle with Gotti's bodyguards, and then still leaves two other crews to talk to John. And the plan worked brilliantly. So one night, 1986, John Miller's got full cruise state around the corner from Gotti's club, the first time he comes around the block, he's got four of his men with him. And that was too evenly matched for John Miller's taste. So they left. The next time he comes around, he's with just two guys. Frankie Lucas you tremendous captain very respected captain. They call Frankie lox and Sammy the bull. John Miller gives the signal to move in. It was like clockwork. First camera crew approaches and Sammy of bull and Frankie locks, they spring into action and they block the camera lens, just like they knew they'd do. Doubles back, but he walked straight into the other camera crew, Frankie lodge took off after that one. Then the other two crews moved in, so they had them dead to rights. The monsters knew it, right? So John Miller's thoughts that pose a series of polite questions about John Gotti and the mafia, which John declined to answer. Frankie loaves and Sam the bull is still running after all the cameras, but too many to cover. Some guy tells them an Italian stop. Knock it off. So there they are. Four camera crews, John Gotti the boss, the underboss, the console, Frankie locks, and John Miller walking down a quiet street in Little Italy, you're just chatting. And all John Gotti said was, you know, John, I always treated like a gentleman. Always like a gentleman, John, you're not acting like a gentleman. And John says, look, mister Gotti, most of the time, my crews and I end up rolling around the sidewalk with your crew. And that's not sold generally either. So they made a deal that night. That John Miller could approach John Gotti and ask him anything. He might not answer, but everybody would be polite. And I said, wow, that's fucking cool.

John Miller Gotti John Frankie Lucas John Gotti Frankie Lox Sammy Frankie Lodge Frankie Loaves Frankie Locks Mister Gotti Little Italy SAM
AJ's First Brushes With Reporter John Miller

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:31 min | 3 weeks ago

AJ's First Brushes With Reporter John Miller

"Thing, guys. If I sound really high on John Miller, it's for good reason. And I want to tell you a story about my, you know, brushing paths with him. Crossing paths with him, brushing shoulders with him, I always looked up to John Miller because of what a Ruth ruthless reporter he was. He was just fearless. And back in the day, as I was still writing sports, but I began to dabble in gossip. I was spending one day a week at with Linda Stacey, the editor of the gossip column at New York newsday called hot copy, actually that was called inside New York. It became high copy when I got there, but it was inside New York. And I used to go every Friday, I'd work at New York newsday in Manhattan, every Friday. And then I'd work, you know, when work was through what I'd stick around and in the city all night and hit the clubs at the restaurant, just get to know the lay of the land and the people who run the nightlife. I'll never forget those experiences. They were tremendous. I learned everything. I met people who got me indoors. I could never have gotten in before. I ended up meeting women that I dated that became great sources and dead different lines of work. I just threw myself out there. And it was really, it was really pertinent to my career going forward. So Miller was a guy I ran into quite a bit. He was already marked to be a star when he was a terrific reporter for WNBC. And later at television, ABC and CBS, and a few years earlier, I remember being mesmerized because I'd watch Miller continually ambush the mafia Don John Gotti. He would ambush him with a camera crew while Ghani was walking along the street with a few of his men, was usually a Little Italy down on mulberry street, where John Gotti had his ravenite social club, and in order to avoid being bumped, Gotti and his underboss, Sammy the bull gravano, and other people would walk around the block, put their hands covering their mouths just like you saw in the movie Goodfellas. I actually casino. And they would discuss business.

New York Newsday John Miller Ruth Ruthless Linda Stacey Gossip Column New York Wnbc Manhattan Don John Gotti Miller Ghani CBS ABC John Gotti Little Italy Bull Gravano Gotti Sammy
Why AJ Approves of CNN's New Boss Chris Licht

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:33 min | 3 weeks ago

Why AJ Approves of CNN's New Boss Chris Licht

"If you listen to my politics is a bit show, you know that I'm very happy with CNN's new boss Chris licked and what's he's doing with that network. He's basically getting out all the bullshit. He's getting rid of the people who had a very slanted view of news. He wants news that's more central. You know, yes, they're probably still going to lean left, but not like they were leaning in the past. He wants factual based stories. And he made a couple of big hires the other day. One of which was a guy named John Miller who is now CNN's chief law enforcement and intelligence analyst Miller used to serve as the New York police department's deputy commissioner of intelligence and counter terrorism. You might have seen a lot of him with whenever there was a terrorism story or a bin Laden story. But before that, John Miller worked as a correspondent for CBS News and ABC News, he actually landed a very rare interview with Osama bin Laden back in 1998. It was also the former co anchor of ABC's 2020 and he worked for a decade as an investigative reporter for WNBC in New York. And he's obviously going to help deliver to what Chris look says is CNN's commitment to tackling complex issues while presenting audiences with independent objective news and meaningful analysis across platforms.

CNN John Miller New York Police Department Osama Bin Laden Chris Miller Wnbc Cbs News Abc News Chris Look ABC New York
Marshall upsets No. 8 ND 26-21; Freeman to 0-3 for Irish

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 3 weeks ago

Marshall upsets No. 8 ND 26-21; Freeman to 0-3 for Irish

"Marshall pulled off one of the biggest surprises in recent college football history by winning an 8th ranked Notre-Dame 26 21 The unranked thundering herd was trailing 15 12 with just over 5 minutes remaining but grabbed the 1915 lead on a three yard touchdown pass to Devin Miller Marshall then clinched the win a minute later when Stephen Gilmour returned an interception 37 yards for a touchdown leaving markets Freeman's fighting Irish Owen two to start the season We didn't execute I mean it comes down to execution We did not execute the way we obviously needed to to win this game Notre-Dame had won 42 straight games against unranked opponents coming into this one I'm Tom mariam

Devin Miller Marshall Stephen Gilmour Marshall Notre Irish Owen Football Freeman Dame Tom Mariam
A Look Back at the Life of Mickey Rooney

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:30 min | 3 weeks ago

A Look Back at the Life of Mickey Rooney

"Let me tell you, Mickey Rooney obviously was at one point the biggest movie star in the world for the late 30s to the early 40s at the peak of his career between the ages of 15 and 25. He made 43 films. 43 films in ten years. I know Bruce Willis just did that, but that's because they propped them up and put on earpiece in his ear and he was able to it's sad what happened to Bruce Willis, but no actor does 43 films in ten years. But Mickey Rooney was one of MGM's most consistently successful actors, very versatile performer and, you know, Lawrence Olivier, once said he considered Rooney the best there ever was, which is insane because most people believe Lawrence Olivier was the best there was, and I'm gonna tell you, I never enjoyed anything Mickey Rooney was in. If I'm being honest, never got the attraction. The Andy hardy movies? No, they were corny to me. I know those were the times we lived in, but I'd rather see Jimmy cagney Humphrey Bogart in a gangster film. I enjoyed a few things he was in when he was an old man, like that movie Bill. Very poignant movie, Mickey played an old man named Bill who'd been institutionalized by his mother since he was a child, and he finally gets out and ventures out into the big city where a nice family takes him in and he finally feels what it's like to be loved in his 60s. Dennis Quaid was in it. A made for TV movie. And I'm sure he never got over the fact that he turned down the role of Archie bunker, that had to hurt looking back, but Nikki Rooney made millions in his career. As a matter of fact, the first Broadway show I ever saw was sugar babies with Mickey and Ann Miller and they did that show over 1200 times and then it went everywhere for the next 5 years and he never missed one single performance. The guy was making $65,000 a week. However, he was a degenerate gambler and he lost a ton of his life's earnings. And he applied for bankruptcy later in life, which is so sad when a movie star does that. By the time he passed, he had 18 $1000 to his name.

Mickey Rooney Lawrence Olivier Bruce Willis Andy Hardy Jimmy Cagney MGM Rooney Humphrey Bogart Mickey Bill Nikki Rooney Dennis Quaid Archie Bunker Ann Miller
Jared Kushner Joins Hugh for an In-Depth Interview About His Memoir of the 2016 Campaign and President Trumps White House - Burst 06

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:46 min | Last month

Jared Kushner Joins Hugh for an In-Depth Interview About His Memoir of the 2016 Campaign and President Trumps White House - Burst 06

"Let's talk, extend the football analogy. Sometimes you have turnover artists. Sometimes you have bad coaches that don't relate signal. I noticed the reference to Margaret Peter Lennon here, and that's two inside baseball for the radio. But I do want to talk about Navarro and Bannon. I've known Peter naru for 30 years. When he ran for mayor as a no growth mayor in San Diego, when he ran unsuccessfully for Congress with Hillary Clinton at his side when he ran for supervisor. Peter is charismatic and fun to be around. I went to a Crosby still national young concert with him once. But he is completely mercurial and off the reservation often. Why in the world did you recruit him? It's a funny story. So one of the things I did on the campaign was Trump called me and says, I want you to write a speech for me for apac. And I go through this in the book. And I wrote a big policy speech for him. It was a policy I understood. And I convinced him to use a teleprompter for the first time, which he was resisted to. We called the story in the book. It's really funny. But you said, look, I used to make fun of the politicians who used teleprompters. And I just do this. If you don't like it, you'll never have to see one again. And he goes and he used it and the speech was incredible at AIPAC. He says to me after I want you to build a speech writing team. So Stephen Miller was on the campaign as I called Steve and I said, look, can we start developing a policy and a speech writing team? And he says, Jared, this is like the first thing I've heard on this campaign that makes any sense. Like that should have been done 6 months ago. But let's do it. So we started putting it together. And I was looking for people who can give me more nuance on Trump's what he was saying about China. So I found Peter's book death by China, which seemed like a title that was in line with what Trump was saying. So I researched him. I was a little nervous because I think he was a Democrat. If you would call me and we got on the phone, I said, hi, I work with president with candidate Trump. And I said, what are your thoughts on him? Because I didn't want to open it up to myself. I love what he's talking about. He's the first politician saying it. And I said, do you want to be on our economic advisory council? And he says, well, who else is on it? And I said, well, I really can't disclose names. Trump's a little controversial now. I don't want to be out there. There's going to be a secret advisory pal. Spears is absolutely all right stuff for you. I'll give you advice. I'll send you stuff. He was the only person on it. I was on it at the time. And so Peter started advising the campaign sent us some very good advice. And then when it came into time and The White House, we ended up putting him in a trade position. And again, he was a very useful voice throughout the time. He definitely played hard. I think he was a little bit paranoid that when Trump wasn't deciding his way that there was some grand conspiracy or people were stewing it up. But I felt like we had a policy on trade that was very revolutionary from a Republican orthodoxy,

Margaret Peter Lennon Peter Naru Donald Trump Bannon Navarro Peter Apac Hillary Clinton Stephen Miller Crosby Baseball Aipac San Diego Football Congress China Jared Steve Spears
The Flip Side of the Recording Industry w/ Rob Hatch and Lance Miller

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:49 min | Last month

The Flip Side of the Recording Industry w/ Rob Hatch and Lance Miller

"Flip side that the recording industry, the labels and everybody else, you know, there's been the upsurge in but yet the very, it's almost like it's really interesting and I want to see if I've thought about this. I want to see if y'all agree. It's almost like a farmer who has a full load of corn, but didn't plant any corn in the field as much to get the corn. The song rotting was at least the planning in the field, the corn is going to the market. And if you don't have people planting that corn, pretty soon that truck is going to be pretty dry. And right now, it's pretty good because there's still people turning out. That's the concern that I had in the creative side. When I really first got involved with, you started to see that the less and less songwriters who could stay active, you know, it's really affecting the talent who are performing. It's really interesting you say that because you brought up George Strait and a lot of the community, I hear young artists talking about man Tim McGraw, Kenny Chesney, they can pick great songs, of course, Kenny is a great rider too, but, you know, it's going to take, I don't know, it's going to take a miracle to turn some of these things around to make it these artists or some of the younger artists that say they want great songs are going to have to really put their money where their mouth is and go out and try to find those songs because they're out there, whether we wrote them or whoever wrote them, but they're back catalogs to all these publishing companies and, you know, there's so many things that's changed the quality a little bit with TikTok and all that kind of stuff. You know, but radio still is king in our business for now in terms of that on time we're making any real dollars, you know, the rest of the time it's just sort of a living, which is fine, but you know these artists really need to put their money where their mouth is back up the song riding community or you're right. That porn is going to dry up and there's

George Strait Tim Mcgraw Kenny Chesney Kenny
Rob Hatch and Lance Miller on How the Songwriting Business Has Changed

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:03 min | Last month

Rob Hatch and Lance Miller on How the Songwriting Business Has Changed

"Way you're paid for the words that make the song are completely different many times than the way the artists who record the song and then go on tour are paid for it. And that was one of the things how we got to know each other through especially through digital streaming. I mean, just think about it. And I think this will be an appropriate and tell me if I'm wrong. If your songs were back in the 70s and 80s, compared to with inflation and everything else, it would be a massive amount more from what was done because the way music was produced back then. Now the streaming situation and everything else has gotten in there. How do you talk to us about how that has changed over the last few years? Whoever wants to. You want to talk to that rob. There used to be a huge amount of numbers of people that were consuming music on the radio and buying out. And so you would purchase an album when I was a kid for 20 bucks. And then you would have those ten or 12 songs. Well, now for 20 bucks, you can own the music store. So the nature of how the amount and the price of music and it being basically free is it changed the game of how people got paid. So sure, back in the 90s, there was a lot more money rolling through the music business than there is now. And it's in the transition of changing over to a digital market and figuring out, you know, with people like you, thank goodness, you know, out there that understands the situation and is trying to help and, you know, you know, it used to be rob and I both, you know, we kind of missed the wave a little bit in terms of we got the town a little bit later. I got down here in 95 and he got down here and I didn't get a deal about 98 or 9 or something like that and these boys Jared and rob Dallas Davis and that whole group Randy Jamie. They all kind of got down about three or four years after I did and the wave of mechanicals had long since gone out of record sales to folks out there going to order mechanical is, but it's the record sales and so, you know, anybody that had a pulse that had a record deal with selling a million records in the early 90s.

ROB Rob Dallas Davis Randy Jamie Jared
Lance Miller Reflects Back on His Songwriting Career

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:06 min | Last month

Lance Miller Reflects Back on His Songwriting Career

"You also have, you know, again, we're talking about among rob and we're just, you know, from the side of life, you know, we're happy to be in behind the camera. Most times, but you know, you've been out there in front of Nashville star TV show. I mean, I was, I mean, looking at myself here this morning, I look like I have a face for radio, but I will be calling. You better watch out. But I was, I was on Nashville star, Miranda Lambert, the fans of people out there listing my remember Miranda was on that show the first season and she got set third place, I think, and then I was on the second season and got fourth place. And it's interesting you bring that up because my first publishing deal after singing demos, what your demonstration recordings and I would sing for songwriters. And that's how I got to know a lot of the songwriting community by singing demos and from that I got a deal at EMI publishing. And then that deal ended after two or three years and then I was kind of flopping around in Nashville again trying to figure out what to do next and then Nashville star came down the pike. And I got on that show and there's a long story to that but the short version of it is everybody most people that I met are still in my life now from that show in a very important capacity. The Warren brothers were judges on that show. Right. That season. They told me in front of 800,000 people to watch that show that I sounded like Merle Haggard, but I look like chastity Bono. And we were instant friends 'cause I could tell a joke. Everybody's like, well, I kind of see it out there. Let me squeeze this. Oh yeah, these are. They look, hey. Chastity. There she is. You were just ahead of your time, brother. I had my time, I think, yeah. So anyway, I met Tracy gershon on that show. She was a judge as well. And she went to Warner Brothers records shortly after that show, and she told me she said, when I get over there, you're going to be the first act I signed. And she did.

Nashville Emi Publishing Miranda Lambert ROB Miranda Merle Haggard Warren Bono Tracy Gershon Warner Brothers
Rob Hatch and Lance Miller Join Doug to Discuss the Art of Songwriting

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:13 min | Last month

Rob Hatch and Lance Miller Join Doug to Discuss the Art of Songwriting

"Rob, hatch, Lance Miller, are with me today. We're all together. This is going to be fun. Getting to know them, but also just talking about everything from families, to songs, to country music, to just life in general. And then getting into the real important stuff and that will be hunting later on here in the bottom. But rob Lance, welcome to the duck college podcast. Yeah, you did my friend. Good morning, Doug. Hey, everybody. It's got one of the things is that I like when I first got involved with the whole song router issue and the whole music issue and we went over that on the podcast some before. What really did it for me and I think from the first time I met you guys and others was the stories that came from sort of real life. It was just gear review you have families, you grow and songwriting is such an interesting art. Both of you come from different places you ended up in Nashville. One on one of your other one and pick up and just tell the folks how you got there. You know, what it really got you to be in the songwriting. Yeah, well, for me, I started coming down here. I won't take you through the whole thing, but my dad's a singer too, so he pursued the music business in the 70s. So I was, I was actually coming to Nashville as early as 1974. I know I look like I'm really young, but. I didn't know it did make up on song writing there. You know, come on. But I got bit by the bug really early through my dad performing. In the back of my mind, I was coming this way, even from, I don't think I've ever told rob this, but I knew as a ten or 11 year old kid, I remember talking about I wasn't going to go to college, which I did go to college, but I was talking about coming to Nashville. And so I was talking like that from a pretty young age, just seeing my dad on stage, and it was, it was like watching a star up there to me. I mean, he was dad through the week, but on the weekends, he was a weekend warrior when I saw him Jeff, I'm on that stage. I knew that's what I wanted to do too. Really young. And then the songwriting thing, we're going to that a little more later, but which is good for people out there that want to be a songwriter, maybe it is something that you can actually learn the craft a songwriting

Lance Miller Rob Lance Nashville ROB Hatch Doug Jeff
"g. miller" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

06:27 min | 5 months ago

"g. miller" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"The spiritual child and most recently the awakened brain. In this chat today, we mostly focused on the awakened brain, and what I really like about Lisa is that she's a really nice combination of rigorous scientist and a really spiritual person herself. We had a really nice chat that was personal and it felt like talking to an old friend. I also like how we nerded out over the statistics and all the little nuances of this emerging science of transcendence and spirituality. She's a real pioneer in the field, and it's my real great delight to bring her to this audience. So without further ado, I would like to introduce you to doctor Lisa Miller. Well, doctor Lisa Miller, it's so delightful to have you on the psychology podcast. It's so great to be here, Scott. Thank you for including me, including the awakened brain. I have so enjoyed following your work. And I think we are transcendent first cousins. I think so too. I'll take that. I really like that. I've been really enjoying your work and reading in your latest book, reading your journey to such detail. It was very, it was read more like a novel than a science book, you know? I actually learned that from my students that, you know, oftentimes in the first ten years of my 20 years at Columbia teaching, I would teach about things and then I'd ask everyone in the class what they thought. And one day I was going through my course reviews and I said, great class loved it. But you know, you ask us what we think. But what does doctor Miller think? And it dawned on me that I think there's a culture within science don't look at the man behind the curtain or don't look at the woman behind the curtains in The Wizard of Oz that somehow, even the way that we write is in the distant third person. So it seemed to me that to really write a book about spiritual experience was to be behind the curtain and talk about the scientist as walking a journey in life. Yeah, for sure. And you make it dramatic as well. And your storytelling. Something surprised me though. You had this dramatic story about how you and I loved your enthusiasm. First of all, I love the enthusiasm where you like, I was like, couldn't wait to see the brain scan results. I couldn't wait. The high spiritual brain was healthier and more robust than the low spiritual brain and the high spiritual brain was thicker and stronger and exactly the same regions that we can and wither in depressed brains and you're excited. As you should have been and you had some cynic or someone who and he was like, oh, you were right, doctor. The whole thing was hooked back. But then you said one thing you said, you said this isn't what we expected to see. Why isn't that what you expected to see? That's why you went into the whole field, right? Is to because you believed in the power of spirituality. That's what I didn't understand that line at all. Well, it's probably, I think what was meant was that it's not what the team at large had expected to see. But you believed in it? Absolutely. 100%. Yes. I was not surprised. Although I wasn't surprised by the direction of the findings, I wasn't surprised that there were indeed robust neural correlates of spiritual awareness and that those should be neuroprotective against the next bout of depression. That I could see in the other levels of analysis for the epidemiological data through the clinical course data and it had been my experience. So I truthfully there had been also a sort of premonition that I had about that. But the team, I think, was quite surprised. So that's what was meant there by the way. That said, it was so much more vivid and magnificent than I had even sent. So even in science, I don't know if you've had these moments where you have an intuitive sense of where things may be going and you've yet to see the results and they could point in either direction that you do have a sense. This was sort of a hundredfold more magnificent. And it was one of those moments where I think of science as a form of witness. You know, just as in a church or a temple, someone can stand up in the first person, give witness. We look at the chorus of human experience, and it was a witness as to who we really are. And it was, it was a sacred moment in my life. Yeah, it certainly was, and I got chills just reading the story for you. Because it is very exciting, and it's very important to the field. But I was just thinking, but doctor mo, you've been saying this since the days you were hanging out with Marty taking walks with him. So I was like, surely you weren't surprised, but no, thank you for that clarification. That makes a lot of sense to me. Sometimes some things are so feel so obvious to me that of course they're going to find this XYZ and I'm shocked that other people in the field are like cynical about it. They're like, I don't know, are you sure that hypothesis is sound and you're like, just feel it, you know it's true. Well, yeah, I mean, you've been absolutely a fellow pathbreaker and that's very kind of you to say. It is very true. And my view is that all of the sort of skepticism and even at times unexamined unscientifically founded sort of poo pooing. That just means the work needs to get done. So we don't do philosophical psychology. We do empirical psychology and the proof is in the numbers. And that is the best friend of someone who is a weed whacker and a path breaker like yourself. That is embarrassing as our friend. Every mystic needs a little embarrassing. I love that. I really do love that. Okay, so we started with the dramatic moment. Let's rewind a little bit. And let's go back to your days at University of Pennsylvania. Cross paths through there too, didn't you? I did. I did. I ran the imagination institute with Martin seligman. So when you were working with Marty, were you his grad student in PhD? In clinical psychology and it was right at the time that Marty was starting to imagine the positive psychology movement. And it was so interesting as you write so well, Martin tugman was as an undergraduate when he was at Princeton a philosophy major. And he was really kind of a classic psychologist and that he drew out of aristotelian values and philosophy really the first template for the positive psychology movement. And others have gone their own direction since then, but he was really a path breaker. And to speak, we'd have long long walks where we talk and imagine and we agreed on many things, but there was one point where I love Marty as a mentor instead.

Lisa Miller Lisa Scott Columbia Miller Marty depression mo imagination institute Martin seligman Martin tugman University of Pennsylvania Princeton
"g. miller" Discussed on The RCWR Show with Lee Sanders

The RCWR Show with Lee Sanders

04:31 min | 1 year ago

"g. miller" Discussed on The RCWR Show with Lee Sanders

"Just say go fund me yeah go fund me every go but Shot out to as austin and and G. miller of you know that's very sad here very very sad to hear See here and what a what a. What a traumatic fill in. That must be to wake up in the morning. And you know you're smelling the smoke. You know that you know that distinct smell when you when you smell it and you're like whoa what the hell and You're trying to hurry up and just get the hell out of there all right. I'm getting ready to post the lincoln chaffee for you guys. Anybody that wants to contribute to go ahead and boom the link is now live and what i'll do in the episode description especially for on demand and on the download our actually include the lake and Look dave god almost twenty thousand dollars as it stands right now. That's a lesson awesome thing to see. shit it. Looks like our Our guy a- ryan barkin.

G. miller lincoln chaffee austin ryan barkin
"g. miller" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

Entrepreneur on FIRE

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"g. miller" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

"Robert say what's up to fire nation and share something that you believe about becoming successful that most people disagree with. Hey j. l. d. and what's up to fire nation. Look i believe that you can be successful at any age and at any time in your life and most people would disagree with that. They think that if you don't succeed when you're young that's it game over. Well i'm a musician. And i had a youthful dream to become a rock star but life got in the way like it does for so many of us. My dream faded away not just for a few years but for a few decades but i finally jumped into the deep end of the pool and it was the best thing that i ever did in fire nation. We're going to do a deep dive on that story because so many of you including myself by the way are going to resonate with is you're gonna pull value bombs inspiration motivation because today is all about following your dream fire nation by listening to the story of somebody who finally followed his dream and what that looks like so as you kind of mentioned earlier roberts you were a child in as he child your dream was to become a rockstar. Share that dream with us. While you're absolutely right. I was born into a family where my father played music and i was taught from an early age that i was going to be a musician and they started me on piano and i didn't love trumpet. Because that was my father's instrument. And then my world changed in the nineteen sixties when this little band from liverpool came around and played on the ed sullivan show and i'm talking of course about the beatles. Everybody wanted to be a musician at that point. And certainly i did too and i formed a little band with mike. You know my friends and started to play. And i switched to base because i had already learned how to play the treble cleft from the trumpet and somebody had to play the bass. And that's how. I became a bass player

robert miller Robert
"g. miller" Discussed on Texas Take

Texas Take

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"g. miller" Discussed on Texas Take

"And this is a special edition of the show You know all these podcasts or special. Send them all to the broadcast hall of fame but this one extra special. Because i'm in route to dc. I want to give you the very latest on what's happening with this. Voting rights fight in texas. Which has now become a front burner issue for congress and for folks all across the country. I think national news was all over this story for the last twenty. Four forty eight hours. You saw nothing but the texas democrats staging another dramatic walkout a quorum break at the texas capitol. They left town in fact they skipped town on three. Private chartered jets to go to washington. Why washington well two reasons one. They want congress to act on voting rights legislation. And if congress doesn't do that they're basically and it's democrats who have the majority in washington so the majority there is leaving their own party in texas and other states to basically defend the alamo if they don't do something the federal level about voting rights. And you'll hear this from multiple democrats during the course of this update. I just wanna give short update on what's going on here because it is a quickly developing situation and i'm taping the show a little bit later in the day because i wanted to monitor what was happening at the capitol As we went through the legislative day which was not unprecedented. But it's not the norm to see the texas house gavilan and have no quorum present. Which means they can't move forward with business. And that's constitutional. The texas constitution says that the democrats can do what they are doing. It's a legislative tool and the way the republicans wanna talk about. It is to say. Look if you don't show up for work you shouldn't be paid. You shouldn't be taken seriously. In fact they were mocking the democrats for heading to the airport. In a chartered bus and there were some pictures. That were circulated on social media yesterday. Where democrats on. The chartered bus were seen with a case of miller lite. Oh it's a scandal. That's not really a scandal. I do think that. Miller lite that you know a case of it polls pretty well. If we're talking politics in texas folks like miller lite now. Some purists might say about one of our craft brews from texas. I believe that miller. Lite is brewed in panther city up in north texas. But all that aside Miller lite and voting rights the democratic caucus. Almost all of them are now in washington and they got on the planes. They left austin about three o'clock on monday afternoon and they arrived late in the evening in washington where the democratic caucus chairman chris. Turner updated the media in a brief press conference. Not because.

texas texas democrats congress washington texas house Miller miller lite north texas miller democratic caucus austin Turner chris
"g. miller" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

The Michael Berry Show

04:30 min | 1 year ago

"g. miller" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

"We can do a fast set up like a repeat feature where every time you put that you know they'll be that makes twenty five dollars you're gonna give to you know to senator cruz and obviously on their back end to make sure you're not going over at bc limits and such. Then we make it real easy to contribute to these candidates so so it might like what they have to say great. I'm gonna go and contribute. Give them some money And then it's it's more of a routine investment As opposed to go the candidates have to go and beg point every time. Jason miller is our guest debtor. Gatt are go get it. It's a app that is going to i. Hope put twitter out of business competitions. A good thing and we needed this. It is long overdue. And i think this is a great opportunity. Jason's background his connections his desire to win. Because this is about winning at the end of the day this is about winning over twitter and facebook and our way of life in our thought process. I gotta tell you jason. I'm also very excited. You know youtube. When when they came out a lot of folks began monetize ing their content whether they were escape border or a political polemicist and they pulled away conservatives. they they they d- monetize conservatives. Some of whom were literally making their living or at least Subsidizing their living off of this the opportunity for folks who have a day job as an analyst or a car mechanic but have great things to say being able to supplement and eventually provide an entire income creating good content. I gotta tell you. This is very very exciting very exciting. It's so much fun. And i tell you just diving in and diamond dudas just seeing the engagement and the excitement and new people that are constantly coming on board the platform and It's It's a lot of fun to meet people. I haven't heard from in years jumping on my my cousin. My second cousin he's out in arizona reached out that. Hey all my friends were sharing This new platform and saying it's really cool and then i talked to my You know who my aunt is. And she's like oh. Did you know that your cousin chason started the social media company and he called me right away. It was like wow. I didn't even know this was this was you but you know this product is cool and all my friends are sharing in what we reached number eight on the apple app store on our launch date and yesterday number three overall on social media downloads..

senator cruz Jason miller twitter diamond dudas Jason jason youtube facebook chason arizona apple
"g. miller" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

The Michael Berry Show

05:11 min | 1 year ago

"g. miller" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

"It's easy to use eight. We want to make sure. It's easy for americans use for people all around the world to go and use and that's where while we have so So many different languages that we already incorporates erupted. Nine languages were now fully functional and But it's the the ease ability so to speak the user experiences everything and that's We take these these little notes and suggestions very seriously and so as we You know all my my friends and people have worked with in politics need over the years. Have been kinda. Load me up with suggestions and We're going to keep working to make sure that it's perfect. And we're gonna continue to add new features of products and we're real excited to bring this to people so you can say you know what we have the best in class technology. It's fun it's easy to use their. Oh this is the other thing michael. The engagement rates on this are insane and Secretary pompeo who's on the platform along with ben carson and You know domestic sues Dc drain no and all your favorite conservatives who are out there Secretary pompeo posted a happy independence. Day on fourth of july and immediately had almost five thousand lights that people went to this is a vibrant active overnight community. Where we're saying you know what finally we have a cool place to go well and that is serving the need that. That's what that that's the beauty of of capitalism is serving the need because there is a need. You have talked a lot about. You've talked in in statements. I've seen about redundancies and backups. And after parlor was knocked off line and really lost what mojo they had by amazon's web hosting service. Aws you've pointed out that look we're we're going to have redundancies. We're going to have backups. You know that twitter and facebook are going to do everything they can to keep you from succeeding because your success is their failure. It comes at their expense. So what are you have to do to fend them. Off the way southwest airlines had to from the big airlines. Yeah no that's a great point as well so some of these things are easier to tackle some of them are more challenging so when it comes to the The web hosting Yes we're initially on. Aws that's amazon But we have redundancies. In place in case that relationship was not able to go forward But then on certain things for example apple is allowed to play judge during executioner when it comes to who can be in their closed environment. App store That is but where you best address. All of these things by having a A good common sense..

Secretary pompeo ben carson michael amazon southwest airlines twitter facebook apple App store
"g. miller" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

The Michael Berry Show

03:39 min | 1 year ago

"g. miller" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

"Their constant updates coming through your phone because there's so many variables and little things that pop up That you know some little tweets here some little tweak their e tiny do that essentially resubmit and provided you version of the app And this'll be a this'll be similarly. they're always going to be things that we're learning. He had also things were improving as we go forward so as we talk about kind of the you know this next quarter as we allow What we call online appreciation tipping content creators allowing them to make money from the The videos the means of articles that they're posting together That's that's how we're going to draw from these. Content creators to the platform is by having that political contributions that which we think will be he To getting some of these political figures on board and keep keeping my That's something that twitter's never really figured out how to do how to make that a fundraising vehicle for political candidates or we're going to be different and we're adding more languages mean literally even just Since we launched we've now added portuguese in german Which is great. Because we're actually getting more engagement from germany than any other country in europe in brazil is actually are number two Most actor country on our launch dates glad portuguese updated. And so it's it's you're always going to have updates. let's talk a little bit about the user experience. Obviously it's free to use What are some of the things one of the things. I've seen that you've talked about is a lack of censorship. the idea that you can speak freely. How far does that go. i actually questioned. This is You know when you talk with free speech advocates. This is something that they're very passionate about it. Some bit of you know quite frankly i. I'm passionate about because that's why you have this platform so our goal is to make sure that nobody is ever de platforms or censored based on sharing their political beliefs. And i think that's something that we should all strive for There are some basic speech With it's that the courts and other places have said go too far so for example if you are threatening physical harm to somebody If you are cyber stalking somebody if you're using Racial or religious epithets Online those are things that that goes beyond a political free speech issue into your hurting somebody else and so what we ask. Is that people realize for us to be able to have this platform to go have a platform where you're talking to be censored or he platforms Or have your political voice. Muffled there are some basic things that go with the rest of society That we ask that. Those aren't things that you try to bring onto this platform. Jason miller is our guest. The new app is called gator. Gatt are if you had enough of twitter. Here's your alternative jason. You know better than i do. Because of your years with with president trump and and campaigns and building messaging twitter tends to be a little younger little harder to operate. Facebook tends to be a little older little more open and expressive in terms of user base. Is this sort of a bridge between the two because one of the things i've seen is is the focus on making this easy to use twitter. A little complicated for first time you especially older users was that something you thought about. We want to be very smooth very easy to use something that people could download and get right into and look whether you're whether you're accessing on your On android or on your iphone or going right to the web we wanna make sure it's available on all platforms..

twitter brazil germany europe Jason miller jason Facebook
"g. miller" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

The Michael Berry Show

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"g. miller" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

"Designed to give freedom to people from the major hosting companies the social media platforms big tech and the types of folks who kicked president trump off of twitter. It is a big undertaking. And i pray that it succeeds. Because i hope a lot of other people enter the space and i hope that we can show our independence from people who have shown an unwillingness to allow for free speech. Jason miller long a close advisor to president trump has launched the new app. It's called gator. G. e. t. t. r. Check it out. Gatt are getter. jason first of all. What did you hope to accomplish by doing this. Because this. this isn't for the faint of heart to try to compete with big tech. Now michael thank you so much for having me on what. It is a lot goes. This is months almost a year of work and effort going into this tens of millions of dollars to get to this point but what we saw after last year whether it be big tech in the social media oligarchs coming together to squash the hundred biden story for example and they decide who can cover stories in cami keeping by it All the social media said no. We're gonna have a blackout on this community share. The story even though turned out to be a hundred percent true then of course we saw president trump platform from all his social media efforts that he was on And just completely in efforts to silence him we realize we need a new social media platform. We need something that actually braces free speech and independent thought and weaning. To when you've seen over the past these last six months we need to reject this whole notion of d platforming and cancel culture. So what we wanted to come up with. Though i think too often conservatives have been told oh you can have another platform. It's going to be inferior if you look like a junior varsity version of Of what a real social media platform should look like and we decided we're going to have some has best in class technology and make it look really good. And that's where some of the ideas for a longer posts whether it be seven hundred seventy seven characters longer videos upwards of three minutes and twenty five thirty percent sharper images. So things aren't compressed nearly as much so it looks a lot better the fact that we allow people to import in their entire tweet history At a one time sign up which is very very cool And even the in video editing is a really features. you don't have to go and bounce around between different apps you can do it. All right there so get her is really cool platform it's anyone who embraces free speech The principles of rejecting cancer culture. Then you're somebody we want you to have joined. the platform built a couple of companies using database platforms that had to be coded from scratch. And it was an overwhelming daunting task. The glitches in the bugs twitter's had fifteen years at that. Should we expect a few of those at the beginning because realistically this is a difficult thing to do i mean obviously they're gonna have a couple of things You know little things and that's part of the reason if anyone say for example you have An iphone for example. And you always notice that they're constantly these it doesn't matter. It's door dash or nike or in commercial product..

president trump Jason miller twitter biden jason michael cancer nike
"g. miller" Discussed on Hands Up Don't Shoot

Hands Up Don't Shoot

06:00 min | 1 year ago

"g. miller" Discussed on Hands Up Don't Shoot

"After a few years one of them was actually reinstated by a riverside. County superior court theresa's family filed a civil lawsuit against the riverside police department along with five individual officers but a three million dollar settlement was reached and said in that family was the story of tisha miller. Now here's the story of william green william howard. Green was born on may sixteenth. Nineteen seventy six in washington dc. His parents names.

"g. miller" Discussed on The .NET Core Podcast

The .NET Core Podcast

06:08 min | 2 years ago

"g. miller" Discussed on The .NET Core Podcast

"Talk a bit about mother nam. now i through my <hes>. My professional career. I've only ever interacted with a sequel based database. So i know the martin <unk>. You describe it. But i know the mountain is a document based database although i know like the theory of without entails and how it works absolutely no experience of of that in real life so i apologize in advance in case i ask any kind of silly questions that you think. You should know this jimmy. 'cause i really don't now no no. That's okay help. In a relational database that all of us at some point in time most of those probably still using today most also probably using ten years because it's so entrenched on data's is organized in terms of tables of columns and rows it is a two-dimensional piece of data and the world is much more complicated than that. So of course you know. An order has ordered details. person has dependence. Has these things these things so then you start pick up relationships between tables but still working really hard to represent your world as tables columns rose so on and so forth. that's great it's awesome reporting fantastic for some of the early work. I did in my career <hes>. What supply chain work ordering parts like that but in the real world when you're talking about now the behavior my code <hes>. the world higher. I mean heavy user. But i have type. Caesar is parts but have different parts or <hes>. God forbid if you get into financial software <hes>. would you represent trades in finance world. Each kind of trade has totally different set of set of data. But yet you still want to try to fit that to relational databases and things get starting really nasty as problem domains in places where maybe you have a lot. Polymorphism maybe have. Very deep hierarchies <hes>. One of the projects kelvin. The works on right now. Our clients problem domain as a everything relates to a top level entity comma person but that person has up to two or three dozen other kinds of related entities and breaking that. Down into mapping that to relational database. You run into the old impedance mismatch of the way that data once the shaped in your code where it's all about behavior becomes very different than how relational database forces you to structure so here. I'm i'm trying to prove out that relational database is not not the end. All be all for some some problem domains so in document database will. We're trying to do is. We're trying to persist that that person basically just laid it and bypass a lot of this mapping so taking the example of martin and martin sits on top. Now we can talk about why martin on top of the post grad database. But what what martin's doing is taking your object instead of mapping individual columns tables whatnot. It's jason serializing your your document and stuffing a database. Somewhere to all your mapping problems. Go away as long as jason reliable. You're good to go fantastic. I like that idea because like you said there are just some things that cannot be maintained in. That sort of relational status right. There are only so many foreign case and join tables and also craziness like that until you stop bullying. At least in my instance. Bowling was left of your hair out. Trying to figure out i do. I get this data and that data and then you look at <hes>. Entity framework and you end up pulling he'd tire object graph <unk>. On his one piece of day there august a bit much to to to organize. I guess keeping your head as well if you've got fifteen different tables in the role into related you have to be able to keep all of that in your head on a piece of paper and explain it to someone else right yes. So you're saying that martin. Debbie i can just give it if my like you said if your objectives jason realizable i just he do i. J sunset realize it on just to mountain. Handles you tell. Marty you tell martin. I want to store the subject. And there's there's a few extra requirements martin has to figure out what the identity is of your object easily just as long as you have an. Id proper your field and you can override this explosive stuff. you absolutely have to be special indifferent. Different people do but as martin can figure out what the identity is and it can be <unk>. Jas on that's that's enough <hes>. Martin will take care of everything else for it. Moreover martin postcards has some special up <unk> capability where it's very efficient to observe. It's so we don't even make you care. We don't even make you tell martin unless you really want to whether it's an insert or an update. Just i want to persist. This and martin will get the. Id for you. It will sign it if it has just like. You're used to the core and it'll persist it to the right table if you working in development time with a developing mode on <hes>. Martin build the necessary underlying tables by itself for on the so. You can focus on getting stuff. Done thinking about your problem domain. Evolve your your your model objects as you need to. And don't even think about database migrations or structure or anything like that. Just go on what you're really trying to do.

Martin jeremy miller Maas Soccer
"g. miller" Discussed on Pond's Feed

Pond's Feed

04:26 min | 2 years ago

"g. miller" Discussed on Pond's Feed

"And the. I guess the evening over here but talking to you carmen miller who is a musician all the way from where you based on actually based until high. Oh right now. By way of detroit michigan originally from detroit. Okay well that. That's really cool to know. And i kind of discovered you recently finally Decided to do something with my took talk account. And but i have a tiktok account for awhile and i guess i just didn't have much inevitable Believe in tiktok to be honest. Until i saw all the diverse ways you could go but may 'cause i've just been so consumed by just the The music video of people who seems from differ movies like. That's not something. I'm crazy about but i'm you know kind of warmed up to tiktok now but yeah discovered you through it and also down the rabbit hole with tiktok. Tiktok is kind of for me. It's like a time drain. Because i see so much good content and i find myself scroll in like all the time i used to be like a big facebook head of corey's but like I think that the more political that things got in terms of facebook Original you to talk more quality. And now i know i'm gonna i guess i have to qualify this because okay so with facebook. The my the biggest drawback for me was how people take and manipulate information in terms of the Stories that they grabbed from sites that are like satire sites. They purport to them to be real and things like that. I like the fact that tick tock has creators and content creators. Who manufacturer what it is that they share and that it's almost like the sound version of twitter. Sue me because you know it's it's very sore net kind of thing so that i do enjoy I'm a novice still you know. I i'm hoping to really developed really content now but i'm still pretty new. I mean being a musical artist yourself. I mean i see you benefiting from some tiktok Even more considering that from what. I know artists regardless of bigger smaller they have their music out. There publicly comes on tiktok. I have a friend who had a song out A couple of months ago and it became it became a musical or annoyed. Obviously music that you can play in this video. What are we. And she didn't even know about. She even know her son is on there. I've been using it to share my my music Actually i have probably mantar cadillac. I do believe is in usable. Sounds on tiktok now And that's one of the things. I really enjoy about it too because it is a great way to get my music out there here lately since we've been kind of indoors during this whole covert thing. I've been creating quite a bit. So it's been like a big chris to get out there so yes no i. I definitely see that i mean it helps that if you have i mean because people love doing those are music videos or music soundbites. Yeah there is like a sern part of the lyrics of your songs. Which i've listened to of them i on youtube in your music is on several platforms. I believe yeah on your website often. To which i listened to one of your latest and let me talk is there to them but shoot i am trying to. I've.

Tiktok facebook detroit tiktok carmen miller chris corey twitter michigan
"g. miller" Discussed on Dead America

Dead America

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"g. miller" Discussed on Dead America

"When we think of the traditional learning, we always have this goal or mindset. I want to become a doctor. I want to become a lawyer. It starts being pushed early in our life. Will you should be a doctor you should be a fireman with but that doesn't always match our interest a lot of this time that we waste on this pre learning that actually is very substantial and development early years. I agree one hundred percent if we allow those kids to start early choosing what they want to consume may be billed off of what they already are consuming instead of that linear style pointed in One Direction and go with it and don't stop until you reach go that is heavy on not only our mindset but our economic standpoint in our community living everything is involved with early-stage learning. I think we're hitting on something here. If if we can enhance that and find the Educators that can get this done. We need more people at the legislation level pushing this type of job. Learning and I've recently heard quite a bit more of this type of Hands-On approach learning that is where we should be heading with our education. Have you hooked up with anybody of stature that is interested in sending you hire with people that really can get this implemented. I've talked to a handful of people at this point you asked earlier. How can we find courses stuff like that? There's a great resource. We're called class central.com where they basically database database all the different courses that get released. They make awesome blog posts to say like this is what came out this month. They even make guys like hey, you want to learn data science and you use the courses you want to take that's an awesome resource. I connected with the fact that platform a while back the wall style is he's really fascinating and the aspect behind education gets people so excited. I also had Aaron Smith who came onto my page. Show the polymath polycast he wrote a book called the blank check where one of you were asked to re event public education and it's a young adult novel about how he wants to build a perfect public school. And so I talked to him on my show and we were able to have a discussion about that. And so yeah, I haven't connected with too many people just yet what I've been focusing on with my networking is simply finding the more pollen like people at the moment considering that my show I have multiple Polly casts, but the main long-form one is the interviews that I do and I've been talking to you like Aaron Smith and people who are polymath on that show. The next season. I'm hoping to really talk more Educators and have a bit more of a education Focus. That would be very interesting to start talking to Educators in a format because that's where we actually need to start on the front line with the Educators. These people are the people that teach us. I know I'm in my fifties Kong Linda my sixties now and if we stop learning we will shrivel up because like you said earlier, you know, if we if we don't use we.

Aaron Smith Kong Linda Polly
"g. miller" Discussed on Dead America

Dead America

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"g. miller" Discussed on Dead America

"And welcome today. We are with dust and the poly innovator. We are going to take a great leap in traditional learning today. It's just awesome to have our next guess Dustin. Would you please introduce yourself and tell people how you got involved with what you're doing? Hi. Yeah, thanks for having me had so when I started doing my poly innovator personal brand content creation. I was thinking what could I do to start really building a name for myself? And at the same time I was pursuing a lot of courses. I had basically put together a list on a Google sheet over 450 courses from FedEx Coursera a future learn and I I just look around on all these different universities colleges could never find the greed that I wanted. And so I decided screw it. I'm going to make one myself. So I created this like DIY degree from Google Sheets or are table moved it around started cutting back a little bit realized. You know, I could actually do something with this. I could actually really a Pioneer an education revolution in a way by pursuing what what I now call the modular degree. Yeah, I find that very interesting. You know before we carry on with that. Let's clarify. What A polymath is.

Dustin Google FedEx Coursera
"g. miller" Discussed on The Over 40 Alpha Podcast

The Over 40 Alpha Podcast

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"g. miller" Discussed on The Over 40 Alpha Podcast

"Ten years little off the West to me neither Bob. My will look off material. Eleven but This makes sense what's happening to us. This is really good man. I love him any last words for anyway. No just die if you keep an open mind and enjoy it right. It's it's a really. I'm not a doctor a PhD or anything like that. You know all of these things that are from thousands and thousands of men that I've been in contact with you know and women to all my life in all parts of the world and this is just I think it's basic reading and it's it's it's incredible knowledge right. I mean all of these things that are in the book. They're real right this. I'm not blowing up some hyper or anything like that. Everybody who reads this book everybody? Even the women don't like it at some point admit that I guess that's true right. That's what I don't like but I guess that's I guess that's how man actually thank right right so I mean that's all you gotta say right. So it's it's worth the read it's It should be the shred forty Bible right one hundred percent. This is the over forty Alpha Bible right here man. Everyone should read this. You gotta read the guys for Instance GonNa be. We're GONNA figure something out how we can infuse into the program so that make it purdue our read ride you get on a plane in New York you fly to La. You're done right so it's kind of thing instead of like I say instead of watching. Nfl football tape two games. And you'll be done and I love it all right man. Thanks so much for being on the show I appreciate it. And again Reggie Miller R. E. G. G. Miller what's happening to dot com. Grab the book by it. Read it live it love it. Were out thanks guys for for being here figure piecing thanks. Hey it's funk Roberts here and thank you so much for listening to this episode of my over forty Alpha podcast now before you go. I've got a special gift that I wanNA give you.

Bob funk Roberts Reggie Miller R. E. G. G. Mill Nfl football La New York
"g. miller" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"g. miller" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"What G. Miller this is Wisconsin's morning news for Monday March second your top story Milwaukee comes together in mourning the victims of last week's mass shooting I'm Janette near Milwaukee police involved in a fatal shooting over the weekend I'm Brian G. the bucs take their talents to South Beach under the laws that we do have an accident on ninety four eastbound right about a highway after the left lane is blocked with emergency crews on the scene we also have another accident looks like he's just before that one off on the right shoulder so can we make things a little bit complicated highway sixteen to visit our changes up to about sixteen minutes from the zoo downtown another fourteen the westbound side downtown zero fourteen minute ride another thirteen from Missouri highway sixteen forty one south on highway Q. to the zoo interchange that'll be seventeen minutes thirty four north bound lane Avenue in downtown and take about fourteen so seven minute delay southbound forty three just little heavy fourteen minutes from your road to mark cast SO two minute delay and then on A. thirty four northbound between hail and the suitor change right to about an eight minute ride so it's a three minute delay traffic and weather together on the tense under the laws of the WTMJ palette of you I got contents here traffic partly cloudy today forty three for a high clear tonight below twenty eight it's thirty seven degrees in Milwaukee at eight OO one from the W. T. M. J. breaking news center dozens gathered at Milwaukee city hall remembering those killed in the Molson Coors mass shooting last week Milwaukee strong vigil focusing on a message of helping those impacted by the shootings forward Latino president they're all more in we come together when others are in their darkest hours.

G. Miller Wisconsin Milwaukee Brian G. bucs South Beach Milwaukee city hall president Missouri WTMJ W. T. M. J. Molson Coors
"g. miller" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

02:37 min | 2 years ago

"g. miller" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"The only official you know the ones I catch come along for that since I'm all about fitness and getting up off the couch how about giving up your remote freelance no G. Miller remind me about this because I'm gonna go here you might want to change the channel by walking up to change how much you reminded me you don't even know what the channel change button is anymore these are little tiny black but you have no idea no way of doing that so that would be hard I know most of you watch MSNBC for for five to eight hours straight anyway are really changing the channel March which actually changes going on but maybe just stand up every time you want to change the channel addressing the remote I do squats up down up down up down how about this for less than all the other members of your family control the remote it's not dad's remote Ryan's our motives the rest of the family you might be surprised what else is actually on his and last but not least this is one of the feel good at the end because it is one as a practicing Catholic just trying to shed some light how bout just turning down the noise during a little bit maybe don't watch a debate that is a lot of noise I'm not talking about the buzz of machinery or cars or all the other stuff personal noise main topics mark here hostile emails will send seventy laced what could be any sports seek out solitude happiness here's the big one practice listening this listening shortness is business of feel good moments this is like this is what you have what I'm trying to accomplish my last it's a feel good moment don't be the loudest person in the at least for life chances are the people around you will notice and maybe just maybe the big guy will notice the change and that's really what lance is all about so it took a home there we left with a loving father original this is better after that.

official G. Miller MSNBC Ryan lance
"g. miller" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"g. miller" Discussed on KOMO

"Miller was in downtown Seattle late yesterday grab some comments of police chief common best week and a half years since the corner of third invite transformed from the typical wild rush hour commute to chaos with those people that started to fly she's best is staying fairly tight lipped when it comes to details surrounding those arrests but we do know both of those men will be extradited back here to Seattle third in pine mass shooting back from Adam today it was a night Seattle won't soon forget a dispute on the sidewalk guns then drawn by three people at a barrage of gunfire that left one woman dead and seven others injured including a nine year old boy those two men that had been on the run marquise Tolbert and William Toliver both twenty four years old with sixty five combined arrests now captured eleven hundred miles away in Nevada a lot of hours were spent looking the suspects and finding them and taking them into custody in Las Vegas just blocks away from the lower and the lights of the strip there the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police department major violators detectives took them into custody the tireless work of our Seattle police homicide detectives and others working with a whole host of federal partners the department of corrections and then Las Vegas Metropolitan Police department the wheels are now in motion to extradite both Tolbert and Toliver and for the woman killed a fifty year old Tanya Jackson memorials have popped up both outside of that McDonald's at the apartment building that she was living at she was.

Miller Seattle Adam marquise Tolbert William Toliver Nevada Las Vegas Las Vegas Metropolitan Police McDonald Tanya Jackson