35 Burst results for "G Zell"

The ‘Oath Keepers’ Militia Group Are Domestic Terrorists, FBI Says

61 Minutes

01:41 min | 2 d ago

The ‘Oath Keepers’ Militia Group Are Domestic Terrorists, FBI Says

"Charged in one of the most complex investigations the Department of Justice has ever faced. January six attack on the capital. The FBI has called it an act of domestic terrorism than one group has grabbed Investigators ATTENTION for their role The oath keepers. The FBI describes them as an anti government militia movement, among them current and former military and law enforcement. Their name is a reference to the oath they took to defend the U. S Constitution. But as we first reported this past April, Unlike most other militia groups, the oath keepers haven't been hiding. They've been armed and in plain sight, broadcasting plans to mobilize. Who start holding this way. If you were looking for a roadmap to January six, they're storming the capital now. Oh, my God. All you had to do was listen. Okay, guys, we're on open channel here. Now. These are the voices of far right extremists communicating with each other in real time from homes across America and on the ground in Washington, Godspeed and fair winds to us as some of them made there. Way to the capital. Trump's been trying to drain the swamp with a straw. We just brought a shop vac stop to steal. They were talking on the phone and computer app called Selo. It's unencrypted like a walkie talkie and has an international user base of around 150 million. It's popular with truckers, disaster relief groups, activists and extremists. It just be safe. The alert and stay in groups. Anyone can listen to Zell Oh,

FBI Department Of Justice U. Donald Trump Washington America Zell
Barzal has 3 goals, 2 assists as Islanders beat Capitals 8-4

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 2 months ago

Barzal has 3 goals, 2 assists as Islanders beat Capitals 8-4

"Matt Barr Zell had a hat trick and two assists in the islanders eight four romp over the capital's Jordan Everly scored twice as the aisles approve to fourteen one and two at home and beat the caps for the first time in four tries this season it's ME on Varlamov made twenty two saves for New York improving to eighty three and one in his last twelve games while allowing only thirty goals over that span Brock Nelson Casey Cizikas and Josh Bailey also scored for New York well John Carlson tallied twice for Washington both the islanders and penguins pulled into a first place tie with the capitals in the east division I'm Dave Ferrie

Matt Barr Zell Jordan Everly Varlamov Islanders Brock Nelson Casey Cizikas New York Josh Bailey John Carlson Penguins Washington Dave Ferrie
Rust's hat trick leads Penguins past Islanders 6-3

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 3 months ago

Rust's hat trick leads Penguins past Islanders 6-3

"Bryan rust registered his fourth career hat trick as the penguins doubled up the islanders six three Sidney Crosby had a goal and an assist for the pens who climbed within two points of the capitals in the aisles for the east division lead Evan Rodrigues said Frederick Gaudreau also scored and Tristan Jarry turned back twenty nine shots for Pittsburgh the penguins also ended Ilya Sorokin eight game winning streak Soroka was pulled after yielding four goals on just nine shots Matt Barr Zell Anthony Beauvillier Jordan Everly scored for the islanders who have dropped five of seven to the pens I'm Dave Ferrie

Bryan Rust Penguins Evan Rodrigues Frederick Gaudreau Tristan Jarry Sidney Crosby Islanders East Division Ilya Sorokin Soroka Matt Barr Zell Anthony Beauvil Pittsburgh Jordan Everly Dave Ferrie
Deciding When/If To Have A Baby

Parenting: Difficult Conversations

02:37 min | 4 months ago

Deciding When/If To Have A Baby

"Let's start with writer and journalist nell brazelle. She's the author of the new book. The panic years. This isn't enough to me of my own panic is we asked her to read a passage from it because it sums up so much for those book. She says isn't a guide. Do finding the right partner or how to get pregnant or the best way to raise a child. It's about what happens. When you're heading towards the grownup cutlery and matching sheets have adult life and wondering if you should have a baby if you only want one because you brought up to one or if you've ever been able to have one if you tried is trying to establish a career before you disappear into maternity. Leave is about wanting stability. While your friendship groups splinters into the parents and the not parents. It's not just looking for a boyfriend or girlfriend potential parent for your theoretical child. It's about fertility. Gender inequality and social stigma is about. Why you find yourself doing the panicked math. The diff you meet someone and you date for a year and if it takes two years to get pregnant but if you were to aim for this job if you're period started at thirteen months eggs ran out at forty until suddenly. You're not doing math anymore. But asking something bold and blank and unending who am i and what do i want from life so all of that is take away one. Ask yourself what you really want. Inner book for zell explores the questions. She says that she and many other people especially women have asked themselves while making this crucial life decision. Brazil says you have to start by digging deep into your feelings to be absolutely honest about what you want in. The world is terrifying. Because you open yourself to the disappointment that you're not gonna get it and david men who describes herself as a motherhood clarity mentor and is a licensed marriage and family therapist says that process can leave people feeling muddled as they tried to think and feel their way through. I think the biggest obstacle for everyone no matter their circumstance is that when they're trying figure out what they want with their desire is about becoming a parent and what they're going to do about it at the same time. It creates gridlock in their mind. Now for says working through. That gridlock is uncomfortable but necessary. If you want to see if you admit to someone that you that there is something that is burningly important. You then have to confront the fact that not getting it will make you desperately sad bont without admitting what you want how on earth you ever gonna get it. And how is anyone else ever going to help you achieve.

Nell Brazelle Zell Brazil David
Islanders score 5 in 3rd, beat first-place Bruins 7-2

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 4 months ago

Islanders score 5 in 3rd, beat first-place Bruins 7-2

"If any bodily is tally sparked a five goal third period for the islanders in what became a seven two rather the Bruins Matt Barr Zell and Anders Lee each had a goal and an assist to help the owls improved to six oh one one at home Parcells said it was great to see the office of break out in terms of just the floodgates opening you know sometimes that's just not how it works you get you get a bounce here and there you keep working in fortune that's what it does pager gets a PJ bounce and scores on a breakaway it's just certain moments in the game that's opened up in we're fortunate very Jordan Everly Oliver Wahlstrom JG Pageau and Adam pelik also tallied for the islanders New York posted its highest scoring performance of the season and improved to three and against Boston this year Nick Ritchie and Craig Smith also scored for the Bruins I'm Dave Ferrie

Matt Barr Zell Anders Lee Islanders Bruins Parcells Owls Jordan Everly Oliver Wahlstrom Adam Pelik Nick Ritchie New York Craig Smith Boston Dave Ferrie
Farabee, Hayes lead Flyers to OT win over Islanders

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 5 months ago

Farabee, Hayes lead Flyers to OT win over Islanders

"The flyers have a four game winning streak after knocking off the islanders in overtime for the second straight night this time by a four three margin the flyers also blew a two goal lead for the second consecutive game before winning it on a power play goal by Kevin Hayes at four twenty two of the extra session Hayes's goal came after Joel Farabee recorded his first career hat trick all on assists from James van Riemsdyk tonight just kind of happened happening going for me you know I feel really good about my game right now and yeah hopefully we keep moving forward from here goals by Josh Bailey Matt Barr Zell tied it early in the third period Nicoletti also tallied for the islanders who are three into in their last five I'm Dave Ferrie

Flyers Kevin Hayes Joel Farabee Islanders James Van Riemsdyk Hayes Matt Barr Josh Bailey Nicoletti Zell Dave Ferrie
Tacoma, Washington officer drives into crowd

News, Traffic and Weather

00:39 sec | 5 months ago

Tacoma, Washington officer drives into crowd

"A Tacoma, Washington police officer is on leave after ramming his car through a crowd of pedestrians during an investigation of street racing social media videos showing go to call the police officer power through a crowd of people No one dying at the scene. At least one person was run over that man still in the hospital. The police Department says the officer feared for his safety, adding that while trying to extricate himself from an unsafe position So Ford then stopped and called for medical aid, ABC Zell When Lopez police say a second individual was treated at a hospital and released

Tacoma Washington Police Department Ford ABC Lopez
Islanders beat Rangers 4-0 in 1st of 8 games between rivals

AP News Radio

00:29 sec | 5 months ago

Islanders beat Rangers 4-0 in 1st of 8 games between rivals

"It was a rousing start to the season for the islanders as they knocked off the crosstown rival Rangers Florida nothing Brock Nelson scored a power play goal just to thirty three into the game seventy nine seconds later and as we made it to do nothing Matt Barr Zell also scored in the Isle city three zip lead after one period the house maintain momentum with the help of eight power plays semoga alarm off made twenty four saves to earn the shutout Nick Leddy added two assists might make you so New York

Brock Nelson Matt Barr Zell Islanders Isle City Rangers Florida Nick Leddy New York
Digital Health: A CVC Perspective with Sean Cheng, Investment Manager at Phillips Ventures

Outcomes Rocket

06:11 min | 9 months ago

Digital Health: A CVC Perspective with Sean Cheng, Investment Manager at Phillips Ventures

"Welcome back to the outcomes rocket saw marquess here and today I have the privilege of hosting a Dr Shawn Chang He's a PhD in engineering and then investment manager at Phillips Ventures of the portfolio of promising early stage companies includes baby scripts, Zell Might Tani to drive the Phillips Health Tech Vision he's interested in early stage investment opportunities in digital health, medical devices and imaging based diagnostic prior to ventures. He drove key strategic decisions for the Phillips leaderships on topics, including wearables, health, cloud digital transformation, and data interoperability. Previously, Sean held positions at the Boston Consulting Group, the US FDA and NASA SEAN also. Serves on the board of directors of the Professional Center for child, Development Board of advisors at. Johns Hopkins University. And the Advisory Board of the World Economic Forum's Global Shapers Community Sean holds his PhD in engineering from the University of Cambridge England where he developed expertise in medical device design simulations and optimization algorithms. I'm privileged to have him here on the podcast with us today to chat about innovation in how we fund it, and how we view it within today's Environment John such a pleasure to have you here with us face for having me salt and that was a mouthful, but a takes the intro. That's Hey listen I mean for the things that you've done in your career it's like a the tip of the iceberg. So certainly going to be a fun talk today before we dive into the nitty gritty of you know the investments and an innovation I love to find out more about what inspires your work in healthcare yes. Sure So I think. Ever since I can remember you know is one of these professions where it was always going to be around rice on my my father's. Told that to me when I was very young. People are always going to get sick and you know this is something that is near and dear to everyone's hearts and something they worry about. So I, you at a very young age looking at healthcare is something worthwhile doing not to say that everything else is in November and? Certainly in the healthcare side, there's always relevance and and There was something that's from impact side of very worthwhile in a you know a few years ago. I, say. My Dad also. got into a bit of the healthcare trouble and I was in consulting time the generals consultant and having done engaged. She focused on cardiology and the more invasive procedures within cardiology like artificial hearts and L. Ads. I've felt You know I was almost blind sided when he was you know going in for a quadruple bypass and you know I I should probably rely and and it will come back to industry a little more. So something more personal more recently. And I can appreciate that greatly, Sean, you know a mixture of your dad's advice and life experiences you just kind of gravitated to the the field and and I mean, you've just done extraordinary work love to park a bit for a second here on the venture business and and how exactly you guys are looking at your your early stage companies and investments. What exactly are you looking to do with those? Are they adding value to the to the ecosystem? Yeah. Sure. You know I think. There's many aspects of this love to talk at length about all of them, but I'll just spare you that give you the highlights here. So from a corporate venturing point of view, it's always been cyclical as an industry and You know in the last ten years, we've seen a revival of you know corporate venturi with new formats approaches, and this is a will be really try to carve out as ventures. So we started a around twenty-six teen in the intent was to create a team and find that can provide that early stage reconnaissance as well as know how in working with founders, and so the given an idea of what was happening to pass our emanate folks was dealing with. The early stage investments as well, and so they would take a similar approach as an acquisition of a let's say, a two billion dollar company to a post money valuation but ten million dollar early stage startup, and so that combined with a lot of the various functional corporate requirements like in privacy security insurance etc was really a lot for any you early stage coming to handle, and so we WANNA do is provide a center of excellence as well as a team that can go and negotiate these deals and streamline the process, and so we were able to reduce a deal flow time live from. Don't call me on this, but you know nine months to a year down to route three months. And so that was one of the. Young one is just You know mutual benefit. So I. Think we were allowed unnecessary terms into the term sheets that you know we never really exercise and so Knowing that, moving the future, making a judgment call on you know, how can we help the founders succeed and then help them scale? The company's best is sort of where we really emphasize that those ventures in I know everyone says this, but we try to be more founder friendly than the typical CBC, which has a stereotype over the years, and so that's I think you know where where our value add would be you know bringing the resources in channels and infrastructure of fields, corporate the mothership, but also being. Venture and founder friendly as well. And then we can sit there work together with the companies over time to help them succeed for both sides and think that's awesome. Shine. You know you'd think about a lot

Sean Phillips Ventures Phillips Founder Johns Hopkins University Dr Shawn Chang United States Boston Consulting Group Professional Center Investment Manager Development Board FDA Zell Nasa Advisory Board Consultant L. Ads University Of Cambridge Englan
Decentralized Storage: The Final Frontier, w/ Bluzelle CEO & founder, Pavel Bains

CRYPTO 101

04:09 min | 11 months ago

Decentralized Storage: The Final Frontier, w/ Bluzelle CEO & founder, Pavel Bains

"Is Blue Zell and how is it different from other blockchain's? is a decentralized database. It's a delegated pufus state network and what we found was how came about was when we started a couple of years ago, we're doing projects for banks and insurers and trying to do the whole thing of enterprise blockchain and. Try to bring that in and saying, Hey, this is where the space is where it's going, and while we're doing some of those projects. We realized that okay. We do. For example, today attorney management system for three banks in Singapore. Great used know. But then all the data and certain parts of it we had to actually store in a centralized database. Then we had done in other one for insurance. Travel Insurance for one of the bigger insurance companies in Asia and that one same thing wait part of this information and what's happening store and centralised database, and we realize that you're not getting a full decentralized stack. It's only partial, and then you know you start thinking about at that time everybody's trying to figure out the decentralize web all the components we. Realized that our problem been solved if he had a decentralized database behind it. And that's where we kind of. That's where it came from. We dug in more and said, okay, that's you want to complete the entire decentralize staff and that's how he basically came together and said, this is the player. This theory we're GONNA play interesting. So it was when I think of blockchain's generally I, kind of analogize them with a decentralized database. Say That about. Bitcoin. Decentralized Database which holds ledger information. And stuff like that. So. Is it maybe the the design that makes it the design of Blue Zell makes it more just as secure as Bitcoin like first office. Is it just as secure as Bitcoin and you know that kind of thing and is it just faster or is it optimized specially to do a certain purpose that you know maybe bitcoin or a theory cannot? Yeah. So it's a different use case. So when it comes to ledger transactions, you know blockchain's are great for that. Just quick information things like that. But if throwing wheel data, let's say if you're building a financial product, can you need to store user information or building a game like profile sessions inventory management? You can't really put that on the blockchain because one it would be very slow. For all that hard data behind it, and it'd be very expensive I mean look the prices of cerium now. So what you said was who build a decentralized network database descended database with nodes at strictly are for storing data we get that security that one hundred percent up time of availability is there and you get and you can store large amounts of data edit or even. Less than half the price of centralized databases. So it's a different case. So your transactions, definitely, those things at the stadiums create at bitcoin the other blockchain's you keep doing that but the hard data lakeview application and you know, let's say you're using an APP whether it's Base Camp Mail chimp facebook. All data has to sit somewhere behind it and that's you put on. US interesting. So it's almost like Blue Zell would be a direct competitor. to any of those data centers that we would see that are be owned by Amazon web servers. Right or you know we drive past the freeway and we know that there's a big data center over there. Those are centralized and owned by certain companies right? So you're saying. If a group of people all came together to. Contribute their computing power to storing in serving files to anybody who calls it then you'll compensate them or somebody will be compensating them in Blues, L. Tokens. Right. Right. So think of it as AIRBNB. We've just discovered that, hey, there's a lot of people out there with a lot of computer space on on their laptops devices, xboxes that are sometimes most of the time not used right because everything's really run on the cloud. So what we're saying is made just give extra room in your apartment. Extra space on your computer. To, US will manage it and we'll have somebody rented. So

Blue Zell Blockchain United States Singapore Airbnb Asia Attorney
Nursing on a Wheeled Thone with Andrea Dalzell

The WoMed

05:56 min | 1 year ago

Nursing on a Wheeled Thone with Andrea Dalzell

"No I can just talk a real life mermaid today. Her name is Andrea. Del I know I. Keep saying I'm excited for every episode, but I truly am. This has been such a cool journey, and I hope you guys get as excited for each episode. Is I get to share them with you? I love getting to connect with people Andrea is an incredible voice in the nursing community, and for people living with disabilities. It's hard to know what to say or how to ask the questions, but it's important to start the conversations I really hope you enjoyed this episode as much as I do. This week's nursery energy moment was sent to me from at Valentine Al-Jabi. She writes Hi de I have a great end e moment for you that I did last week I was a covert unit taking care of my patient. Since the hospital has a no visitors, allowed rule, and my patient has been scared and unsure of what's going on also related to her dementia. Her daughter is an ICU nurse at the same hospital and they told her she is not allowed to go see her mom swallows caring for her. I texted the daughter and asked if I could facetime her so that she could. Could see her mom and the look on both their faces was absolutely priceless. I love stories like this and we need to keep sharing be stories, so thank you Valentine for sending that into me. It's so important to not lose our sense of humanity, and to try to connect now more than ever be at working through this pandemic or connecting through to unlearn centuries of racial prejudice I have a new challenge for nursery energy. How are you going to show up for the black community? How are you going to educate yourself? How are you going to advocate for black people in healthcare community? Let's sit with that. Anti Hyphen so excited to talk to. You don't know if it was on like an e. news like did like a instagram blast to, but I found you through nurse Tammy Edge. You decide like all the most amazing things to say about you. And I found your page and I'm like this girl is freaking awesome. Old Thank you I love nurse Tammy on my Sassi's amazing. We need to get this girl well, though because. Thousands sitting there. I forget what the count is now. It's like sixty to sixty five days now. Yes? I. Don't understand I'm like I would be screaming from the rooftops. Yeah, like fix me. Figure something out. But. We're not here. Talk all about nursing. About Andrea Dell's. How am I saying your last name Correctly Delta? Yeah, ooh goodness! People. Ask me all the time to try and be very conscious of of how I say names because I feel like I just WanNa. Make sure everyone's name is correct. Yes, but like my last name is literally two syllables. Dowell in Zell I get. died and even seeing the in the middle there correct. So I absolutely love your instagram page I love your for yourself as a mermaid. A wheel thrown like where where did that come from I? Love that. So a lot of women in wheelchairs, general or wheelchair users Themselves as Mermaids, because we're still very active on land yet. We're free water like there's no restrictions in water. Rates! We're MERMAIDS, right? mermaids can't walk on read. No, but we're on chairs and we're still getting around on landrace. Oh, yeah, I was miss. Wheelchair New York two thousand fifteen all I should know this. That's awesome. Thanks so I just said my chair was thrown on the Mermaid. WHO. Of that. Love that okay, so I want to talk about this now. You're Miss Wheelchair, New York. That's so cool. How was that competition like so? It's a small competition and we're not like a pageant per se where all about advocacy community like we promote community within disability atmosphere as as a whole, so my competition was really just proving what I'm able to do for my community and how undoing? As a whole for New York City But New York state. Yet competition was kind of it was it was nerve racking I think anything you go into? That's new is nearby and I've never done pageant world. Didn't I was very new to advocating and being an advocate having this voice, yeah. You know. Winning title. Everyone's like I. I was shoe in, but at the same time I didn't feel like that. The girls are amazing. I were who I was up against. They all have a waste. They're all making an impact in the world in a way shape or form and I just stood out, and I'm just grateful to have my name among that cohort of two thousand fifteen missile New York contestants. That's amazing. Is that where you developed your instagram following from a good percentage of a yes? percentage. That's amazing. What is that been like for you just to kind of have that voice now like? Media. I feel like not only. Am I being seen for WHO I am? but I'm being seen in a disability light like I'm opening that that vision that a lot of people tend to shy away from. Saying. Here's my life with a person that has a disability add still extremely active are still doing things that. Every person can do just in a different way.

Andrea Dell New York Tammy Edge Andrea New York City Valentine Wanna Dowell Sassi
Venmo, PayPal and Cash app share our personal info with data firms

Talking Tech

03:41 min | 1 year ago

Venmo, PayPal and Cash app share our personal info with data firms

"Okay guys you've heard me rail against then Mo and how they abuse our privacy specifically sharing some of our personal information with third party marketing firms. I don't think it's right and I talked about this a few weeks ago and was inspired to thus take a look at how some of the other apps responded as well. It's during this time of coded nineteen crisis. That many of us are ditching. The use of paper money which can gather germs and we are choosing to pay electronically peer to peer Mobile. Payments is the easiest in cleanest way better than even pulling out a credit card instead. Just open the APP. Choose the person dollar figure and click sin but what most of us don't realize. Is that when we pay our friends this way? In many instances we are giving up valuable information about ourselves that gets shared with a host. The data companies a process. That happens in the background without us. Having any choice any say so then. Mo is by far the worst abuser. There're others as well again. I worked with the security firm. Disconnect which monitored every payment I made to find out where the data wet with van Mo my user location where I lived in the person is transacted with that person's name was sent to a data firm name braise. We don't know why brace gets my information or what it does with it because neither company would tell me then. Mo also sent the contact information to a company called Pollard Dot. Io Creates animated stickers to accompany your payment and a company called pinpoint secure data collector but again then Mo wasn't the only abuser the cash up which comes from the square company. They sent my data to firms that showed up in the transaction as APP measurement dot com in mobile APP TRACKING DOT COM pay pal set my data to 'em Particle Crash Olympics in digger dot. I O. So all three sent my information without my knowledge without asking. If I approved of this let me tell you about the other companies. Would you believe that facebook pay Google pay and Apple? Cash didn't share my information with anyone. I I was pretty surprised about this because facebook and Google are so grabby about our information yet. They did not see the need to share it with third party marketing firms and of course apple is the cleanest of all of them and they didn't share with anyone Zell. Which is the banking consortium that works with Chase and Bank of America Wells Fargo and other banks? They shared my information with the security firm. But this was not concerning like the other ones. My bottom line is that facebook and Google by far the best payment experiences with Google. Pay You can actually pay someone in g mail. Nothing is easier and facebook was really easy to but now facebook and Google know who I pay when I pay how often I pay how much I pay. I'm giving them more information than they had before apple. I love the fact that they don't take my data but it only works on apple devices in if so does if if I have a friend who has a Samsung Galaxy. I can't pay that person. Patrick Jackson who is security researcher I worked with his tip is to use pay pal but only to use it on the web not to use it on the APP because it's in the APP where they share the information on the web. They

Facebook Google Apple Van Mo MO Pollard Dot Samsung Patrick Jackson Bank Of America Wells Fargo Researcher Chase
"g zell" Discussed on Squawk Pod

Squawk Pod

06:11 min | 1 year ago

"g zell" Discussed on Squawk Pod

"San Francisco Miami on a per square foot million dollars. No no the the social haga was up there. Chicago was that was just expose San Francisco. La Washington DC. Not Miami. A Miami. I was on there now. Top NOT NOT NOT DALLAS OR HOUSTON. Either Houston Christ performance was Price goes up seven percent last year. Howard Lorber is here. He's the president and CEO of the Vector Group. He's also the chairman of Douglas Element. Of course our guest today is Sam Zell Howard when you start looking around the globe it where you want to invest right now. What jumps out to you. Well what jumps out to me is you know. Vancouver's a good example was up up up until they put taxes on it. Now it's down so the readjustment is happening. So you have to be careful with that but it's interesting to me that when you look and you say the worst performing cities were Price wise or London and New York yet. They're rag number one and two and the Index Knight Frank Index as to where people want to be and that's based on liveability obviously government taxes culture. So people still want to be there so I guess what you would look forward to is appreciation in those markets at some time. New York specifically was hurt this past year because of the mansion taxes and the other taxes that they're still talking about the New York City purchases so taxes obviously have a big impact. What ABOUT CORONA VIRUS? Does that change the picture at all? It's a rapidly. We haven't we haven't seen it yet. In fact We talking earlier is shocking. That are open houses. That broke his half are packed. So maybe they just want to get out and they think that's safe to go So it's pretty. It's pretty busy at Sam. Made the point a little earlier that the reits are still really hanging in there that you haven't seen much of a reaction. Why do you think that is Sam? I think that Priscilla Sir are relatively speaking under leveraged. I mean real estate historically has been a sixty seventy five percent you know. Ltv kind of business. Thirty five percent equity vice. Thousands twenty-five percent a lot of other companies are all much much less leveraged and they have been in the past. I think visit from a trend point of view. I think that the and no argument about the number one choice of markets. But I think more and more affordability is more more of a challenge and I think you know smart growth in this is going to kind of focus on. Where do you go if you can if you can't afford New York or if you can't afford London Nashville Austin his that Madison? Wisconsin is almost overheated. Though you look at the price growth there and it's just there quickly becoming less affordable there quickly kindness affordable but they have one thing necessary to deal with affordability space land lots and lots of land so by almost by definition even though prices mash for gone up a lot still ability to catch up problem in California and I was homeless. Problem is that you have legislative impediment to creating housing supply and so you create a perpetual an environment of shortage which creates size prices in the country and aside from Ford Ability. You've got the wealthy going to Florida because of the changes and California going to Colorado Colorado Texas is your whole business changing to focus on those lower tax states where people wanNA move it happening. Well first of all you have to change because it's happening so if you look at our volume numbers were up. Twenty over twenty percent last year and volume in south Florida and we're down four percent in New York City. I was going to ask you about that if taxes are the number one thing. That really changed the desirability. How huge of an impact has that had here in New York? And you think there'll be a time where it's at the top. It's very big impact. Yeah but the fact is people still want to be in New York. We have you on all the time because you're huge backer of the president and a close friend of the president any comments houses. Have you talked to them? How's he feeling? Excited is one of those you like by. Who's who want to really face you think Biden or burning or I don't think he cares. You'd really I don't think he cares. our over It's been a pleasure. We really appreciate it. Come back to that. Squawk POD for today on our rundown tomorrow. It's jobs Friday. This key indicator tells us how many jobs the US economy created or lost in the previous month. Squawk box hosted by Joe Kernan Becky. Quick and Andrew Ross Sorkin tune in weekday mornings on CNBC at six am eastern border. Bought a sidecar on your motorcycle. I might want to get the hell Outta here. In New York City. Sanitizing could do that to get the smartest takes and analysis from our TV. Show right into your ears. Subscribe to Squawk Pot. You can find us for free on apple podcasts. Spotify stitcher Google podcasts. Wherever you listen we will be. There will be back here tomorrow. Clear thanks guys this. Cnbc podcast is brought to you by TD. Ameritrade investing isn't one-size-fits-all every investor has a unique style. That's why TD AMERITRADE offers two different mobile APPs there's TD ameritrade mobile which lets you manage your portfolio with streamlined. Simplicity or thinker. Swim mobile which gives you tools. You need for more. Advanced Trades and in-depth analysis visit td Ameritrade dot com slash APPs to find the one. That's right for you once again. That's TD AMERITRADE DOT com slash APPs..

New York New York City TD AMERITRADE Sam Zell Howard Miami CNBC Price San Francisco Howard Lorber London president and CEO DALLAS La Washington Knight Frank Index Vector Group Chicago president Andrew Ross Sorkin Wisconsin Douglas Element
"g zell" Discussed on Squawk Pod

Squawk Pod

09:31 min | 1 year ago

"g zell" Discussed on Squawk Pod

"What a crash. That was a year ago. On squawk box. Almost to the day obviously. He's not shy. He wrote a book. Am I being too subtle all about his communication and investing philosophies and to answer that question no Sam not too subtle at all? And IF SAM. Zell wasn't exciting enough. He's also an avid motorcycle rider. His Motorcycle Club Zales Angels. Here's Joe Kernan ticking. Off squawks conversation with Sam Zell starting with the markets volatile response to the corona virus outbreak. What do you make of all this Osaman? And you've been around a while in you understand human nature Are we gauging this correctly or too much or too little? I think it's too early to tell I. Think that So far is seems to be maybe more excitement than reality. I mean we're a country of three hundred thirty million people and we're kind of I ten deaths and we're talking about a hundred people having a virus. I think the real question is what the three weeks from now is. That's really when we'll know. I think whether we got really serious problem or just a a spike proud. Unfortunately then it'll be too late if we have a serious problem to try and contain it because of the two weakened evasion period. I think we can do everything we can to contain. It having said that I don't have a lot of confidence that we have the ability to contain. Yeah so I'm looking the other way insane. We can't contain it You know what's the reality? The reality is call me in three weeks right. Have you done anything differently? A because of the crew virus or be because of the market volatility. That's that's happened. I think that in terms of the market I think we ended up buying some stuff that we thought was ridiculously low and but not a lot. Certainly every traveled decision Thought I mean when we turn wear crisis. Our our yearly motorcycle trip in two months in Italy were cancelled. Win this literally game everybody. I don't think I don't think we've got to I. Don't think regarded Italy when you sat down here. None of us shook hands around the table always have trouble is we didn't shake hands and then we grabbed the inland the door an open the door writing okay. So what did we accomplish by match he ends? You are being opportunistic in places like the Energy Patch. The energy fields But when there's so much uncertainty in some of these other areas too soon to be able to try and assess the eventual. I think it's you know people always ask on real estate You know what marketing bind. I never by a market. You buy a deal in the same manner Look at what's going on and you have to. You're forced to make the decision. I'm your judgment on that particular situation. We killed a deal killed deferred a deal that we were almost ready to close that was dependent on export of food. And you know. The question is is Is this a good time and be in the export of food business? All right. Let me ask you did you defer that deal because you think the export of food business is going to be irreparably damaged or did you defer it because the terms that you were about to set was based on a different reality again. You'd better terms at this. Well I mean that's part of the question is what term should ask you know. Is this three month the disruption his six month disruption is this a multi-year Disruption Matt? Are we going? Is Everybody in the world's going to end up getting he's not necessarily off the table. It's just not going to happen at the price you had been talking about bef- well and part of the question. Is You know. Price discovery is based on fact right and I can't imagine a where we're less fact govern than the one. We're trying to do it today. How many deals and I've been trying to get my arms around this because I hear this from a lot of people who are potentially putting deals together. How many deals do you think of just gotten put on hold private deals? Maybe not large ones that we would necessarily know too much about. I'm not sure that there's much difference between the term hold and slow and I think nobody's ready to say no. Nobody's ready to say. I know enough to know I shouldn't be doing this but I also don't know enough to be doing. They also don't know enough as to whether I should be doing it to the degree to which I should be doing it. I mean I think that. There's so many variables. When is the motorcycle test? The anime end of May British Columbia's Nice riding a motorcycle. What do you need to go to Italy for? What about Montana? And the the problem with Montana's it's long distances. The Motorcycle Sam or do you want to go five miles off it. Do you WANNA spend all day long. Doing and turns. Oh you go university. You don't want long straight of a good motorcycle. Trip is how few miles you go straight interesting. I didn't throw everything can live. That's why Europe is so good rights. That's why Ashville is around the city of Boston's Accu. But then you then you have traffic and and potholes. I didn't hear traffic. Want pretty views turns and twists tease attorneys all day long season. What have you been buying that you thought was really cheap? Based on the market well a couple of companies that we have significant ownership interest in one of them in the energy space. So I think that the only seen some extraordinary changes in pricing in the energy in the energy space much less so and everything else I mean in the wreaths read once again. Proven really resilient and map in the ones that we control the we all went down with his thousand points But they're back to where they almost back to where it all started when. You're really really liquid aren't you yes I wouldn't you. That's why I think. The stock market can't go down only goes down when I asked the grave. Which was your old nickname. Why aren't you all over the the energy or have you looked at a way to to? We've been spending a lot of money in the energy space and think that the space is very cheap and there's no money name despite lawless conversation about liquidity. There's no money in the energy space. So that lets you be really opportunistic. Wow would help that. We weren't in the energy space before. See an awful lot of people would not disagree with me in the energy space is cheap. But they're also sitting there saying already up to hear energy. I don't need any more. Sam was on our TV broadcast for two full hours. Here on Squawk Pod we're bringing you the highlights including this next conversation with another real estate mogul Howard Lorber and we'll start with CNBC's wealth reporter Robert Frank more than twenty percent of the world's multimillionaires plan to buy real estate this here and the US is their favorite destination. That's according to a report from Douglas Element and Knight Frank and the US is the number one country for wealthy buyers from Asia Australia. Latin America and Canada last year the best performing market in the world for prime real estate was Frankfurt Germany which saw values up ten point three percent followed by Lisbon up. Nine point six percent and Taipei now. The worst performing cities were Vancouver in Canada. They imposed a new tax on foreigners. And of course was dominated by Chinese buyers. Abu Dhabi was also hit by oversupply of high in homes New York London and the Hamptons also among the ten worst performers last year. Now Monaco is the most expensive city in the world on a per square foot basis. A million dollars only gets you one hundred sixty two square feet of space and Monaco. A million buys you two hundred and twenty six square feet in Hong Kong and three hundred and forty four square feet in New York now the least expensive town one of Andrew my favorites Capetown South Africa one million dollars. Gets you eighteen hundred square feet so much cheaper? It seems South Africa favorite but the favorite city in the world among the super rich. That's based on the investment climate lifestyle and the population of other. Rich people is New York followed by London now at the top of the top ten cities favourite among the wealthy eight of them. Eight at the top twenty are in the US but now look at size for the US doesn't show up anywhere. La.

Sam Zell Italy US Montana Zales Angels Joe Kernan South Africa Canada New York Ashville Monaco Europe Hong Kong Abu Dhabi Taipei Capetown Vancouver
"g zell" Discussed on Squawk Pod

Squawk Pod

08:10 min | 1 year ago

"g zell" Discussed on Squawk Pod

"Today's uncertainty may cause you to question your investment strategy but with the right perspective and investment solutions. We think it's possible to stay on track toward long-term goals with Janice Henderson. Abandon your dance. Not your financial goals this pod divining green to roll pray. Good Morning. Welcome back the SQUAWK box right here on CNBC. I'm Andrew Zorkin along with Becky. Quick and Joe Kernan WanNa talk to you about the latest in the corona virus outbreak California declaring a state of emergency as the number of infections in that state skyrock. It's no more than fifty. That's the most in the country. The massive spike is linked to a cruise ship. The recent returned to San Francisco from Hawaiian eleven passengers. Ten crew members were on that boat showing symptoms meantime in New Jersey reporting. It's first presumptive case ours. Making it the seventeenth state to report infection in the nation's capital. House approved a bipartisan. Eight billion dollar spending bill to a US response to the outbreak. Senate expected to pass that Bill. As soon as today and the president has indicated he will sign it into law. It's more than twice the amount that president trump originally had requested. Becky back to you all right. Thank you very much joining us right now to talk about the fight against Corona virus the Center for Global Development Senior Policy Fellow Germany Conde. He is also a member of the World Health. Organization's committee that oversees health emergencies and he led the US government's response to Ebola in West Africa as a director at US aid Germany thank you for being with us today. Can you tell us a little bit about where things stand right now? We've got the results from. Who or it looks like? They're saying it's a four point. Three percent mortality rate. That has a lot of people on edge went. What do you think is actually happening? Worldwide? And what do you think is happening here in the United States right now? Well this virus still seems to be on the upswing both in the United States and worldwide I would sound a note of caution about the mortality figures. I think the figure he started with three point four yesterday. The challenge with that is. We don't really know that denominator on that yet so we have a better idea of how many people have died. Then how many. Total total cases. There are In general with these kind of outbreaks. You do see some decline over time as we get a better picture of cases I think the most concerning thing right now in the United States is we now have cases in multiple metro areas. We've got cases in greater seattle. The Bay Area L. A. New York City and a number of other states as well and we still don't have anywhere near full visibility on total cases in the US because of the testing shortfalls. So what we're seeing so far in terms of official case numbers in the. Us is probably just the tip of the iceberg at the same time we we haven't really seen travel restrictions in the United States like we saw in China when they first started at least reporting the problems that were there they. They shut down the entire province in all the areas around that. We're we're not going to see those similar sorts of shut down here because of civil liberties here correct. I don't think the US could or frankly would want to do. Exactly what China did. We are beginning to see in Seattle new. What is called social distancing measures? Which is basically trying to keep people from interacting in higher risk ways So that's things like canceling gatherings advising people to avoid transit. Microsoft has just advised most of its personnel in the Seattle area in the bay area to work from home for the next three weeks. I think we are in for more of that. We are now looking at what China did though in saying because they were so extreme in that shutdown it probably kept it from getting around the globe faster that we bought us a few weeks at least to try and prepare for some of those issues. If the United States is not going to do those measures. What does that mean is it mean? Inevitably it's going to spread here in the United States. Well I think. Us spread is is inevitable. The question is how far. How fast and can we keep that spread to a manageable rate so that it doesn't overload? Us hospitals? I think that's really. That's really the game in the. Us going forward the challenge. Right now is we don't really know. Yet how best to apply the lessons from China to the US context. China took a sledgehammer approach to this. We've seen a different model in Hong Kong and Singapore where they've taken more of a scalpel approach more fine grain more targeted and has proved effective. There those are of course both very small city states in effect so the US approach is probably going to be somewhere in the middle. I think the biggest concern right now is we're still not hearing any sort of queer plan from the federal government for what they expect that to look like and secretary as our yesterday was still claiming incredibly that he thinks there are only one hundred cases in this country. Well that was the point that Dr Scott Gottlieb the former FDA commissioner made with yesterday that this is kind of being left up to the local authorities. His point was that the New York state authorities were being much more proactive than the authorities out in Seattle. The Washington state authorities at that point. So if this is piecemeal what happens? Piecemeal was a real problem. We want to have a consistent approach. You don't WanNa have you don't WanNa have some points in your armor that stronger and others that are weaker. And that's that's what we appear to be heading towards right now. I worked on the response back in two thousand fourteen and we saw at the at the outset of that we in the federal government left a vacuum in terms of sufficient guidance for the states and we began to see on things like travel measures states began to freelance and do their own thing. The government then stepped in provided guidance. On what to do with travelers in the states then got on board with that and we had a consistent national approach. We have not seen that yet from the federal government on this emergency despite the fact that it is posing far greater threats to the homeland than I ever did. When you say that at this point our goal would be to try and keep the cases to a level that the US hospital and healthcare system can handle. What what does that level boy? It's it's not a very high level a couple of years ago during a particularly bad flu season. Us hospitals were some US hospitals. That were hard hit. We're treating people on GURNEYS and hallways and setting up surge tents outside their buildings just to keep up with the case load from flu. We are still in high flu season right now. So there is not a lot of spare bandwidth within the US hospital system and we're already hearing from Seattle that just with the you know the about forty to fifty cases that have been identified in Washington. State that already is putting enormous strain on the health system there. You can imagine what would happen if we began to see numbers more. Like what's happening in Italy. Or Ron Jeremy. Thank you for your time today. Journey Conan dike is the senior policy fellow from the Center for Global Development. He's also the former director of USA. Thank you for your time. Thank you next on. Squawk POD real estate billionaire and motorcycle enthusiasts Sam Zell our yearly motorcycle trip in Italy. Don't think we've got Italy and is the corona virus impacting real estate. Douglas Element Chairman Howard. Lorber says not yet. The shocking that are open houses broke his against a pack. Back after this this CNBC podcast is brought to you by TD AMERITRADE. Investing isn't one-size-fits-all every investor has a unique style. That's why TD AMERITRADE offers two different mobile APPs there's TD ameritrade mobile which lets you manage your portfolio with streamline simplicity or thinker swim mobile which gives you tools you need for more advanced trades and in-depth analysis visit td. Ameritrade DOT com slash APPs to find the one? That's right for you once again. That's TD AMERITRADE DOT com slash APPs. Welcome back to Squawk POD SAM's out is a real estate titan. He's the chairman of Equity Group investments. Which you might know if you've ever lived in an equity residential condo building in Chicago or New York Same Company. He's a self-proclaimed professional opportunists and grave dancer meaning he's always spotting and cashing in on other people's mistakes. And he's been doing this with that moniker. Since the Nineteen Seventies Sam is also famous for colorful language even on air even to elected officials..

US seattle TD AMERITRADE CNBC federal government flu China Becky San Francisco Washington Global Development Senior Poli Janice Henderson Italy New Jersey director Senate Andrew Zorkin New York City president
Stocks Plunge and Bond Yields Sink: Live Updates

Squawk Pod

03:17 min | 1 year ago

Stocks Plunge and Bond Yields Sink: Live Updates

"So we had the Fed rally Monday we had the Fed is before they before anything. Bright actually fed is panicking. Tuesday we had sort of a okay. The Fed is back stopping us and the Biden win helping healthcare stocks. And everything will be okay. But it's just one big chop fest until the virus count starts to plateau. We're going to be in this type of virus got hasn't even picked up at this point just starting to hear the very special report so now we're about where it goes from here. I the rest of the world matters. I mean why would they would? South Korea. You know has another big addition of cases that doesn't help but every time if we believe China every time it seems like it's like they've handled it to some extent are capped at that helps absolutely in the morning. We saw a decline when Italy announced it was closing its schools through. What do you think so? The biggest point day ever was Monday second biggest gain ever was Wednesday. Shows you that we're at thirty? That were close to thirty. I mean it's just a number saying those things are really volatile. People Are Flying Blind. And I think that's reflected in these crazy moves and human nature when you can't sort of quantify anything you're going to get these emotional swings. He's talked about earlier. How do the charts reflected these crazy moves? Reflect the uncertainty and the emotional ups and downs that we're experiencing now to China. And you look at the Johns Hopkins website and it says eighty thousand people in China but then you think they have one point four billion people and we're obsessing that the eighty thousand we're also real so there is some hysteria here but it has real world economic impact if people say the best way of dealing with this is to coalesce less and you shutdown just doesn't matter if it affects the bank essentially bank or the grocery store restore exactly now. The Fed tries to believe they believe that they can somehow Cushion US and. I don't think that that was the right thing to do Do you think is a fiscal stimulus? Package that needs to be put in place carrying the virus not getting money hopefully spring and seeing the patient count reduce. That is the kind of stimulus. Do you think we'll ever get to a point where we're going to be stimulating. The airline industry the hospitality industry the retail industry. I hope not because I hope that that was the business hysteria. Klickovic side of things. But you never know we did after nine eleven we did help out the airlines I'm hoping that we we don't get to that. I had my eye on Singapore and Hong Kong because of the weather Hong Kong. It's it's beginning to get warmer Singapore. It's eighty five degrees and humid. Every single. Keep being told that the asset doesn't necessarily help the called the CDC website says. Don't rely on it but viruses do tend to get carried more and colder weather. So that's my mentioned. The healthcare stocks with the Biden win. At least if things do get worse we're not going to be standing in Medicare for all lines for like for like treated like at the. Va or something.

FED Biden China Hong Kong South Korea VA Johns Hopkins Singapore CDC Medicare Italy
Christian Louboutin Reflects On His Career

The Business of Fashion Podcast

09:35 min | 1 year ago

Christian Louboutin Reflects On His Career

"I'd like to go back to the beginning of your career and I read somewhere that you dropped out of school at a very young age around twelve. Have to cool till sixteen when you when you live in France but I was. Yeah I started to be expelled. Twelve so of out of school basically right and you were already obsessed with shoes right Yup. Yup where did that? Where did that come from this? Like shoe obsession. It comes from different thing than it. I would say comes from two things. It comes home in a session that I had as a kid for showgirls music Horn and even even movies where I could see dancing and it comes from that and it comes from actually from the place where we are now. Which is this museum which used to be which used to be a African panic art museum when you were answering on? It's a beautiful magnificent building. One thousand nine hundred eighty one so when you are entering a signal which was enjoying it was representing a shoe so it was a sea of a shoe high here on the fifty. But it just wasn't a late seventies so I didn't know that these join may me become sort of conscious that everything stopped by joint because it was drawing of a shoe of women's shoe but it was not existing because I'd never seen such show. It was appointee last appointee. Stiletto so I fought. I understand that. It's a drawing representing a women's shoe but this should doesn't exist so and it was. You showed me sign or symbol. It's a sign saying. Don't wear these shoes all issues when you saw them. As a young person he wanted to create shoes like that is that what happened. Exactly exactly so between my obsession for dancers on that joying. That made me understand that everything. Basically start by drawing and so. I wanted to do something which was not existing for music owned else and I sort of you know for me. Musical go further so they were like exotic birds on. I always love but and so I didn't think that had costume because someone told me but you could design costume for musical food was no costume. You know birds always have further which was natural to have further to those girls but buds don't have shoes. I wanted to create a human thing for these birds of paradise in a way. What what do you think shoes represent in our culture and why what is a shoe? What a shoe represent a lot of things According to different culture it has different meanings to same thing for callers. The interesting thing is at that. Say about work when I first started to design shoes for me on my name that say so early. Nineties shoe was people were always making reference to an accessory and then from accessory it expanded into something by itself. Schumer has moved. The Nimitz accessory has left the domain of just being an accessory it has become its own identity and things that it comes from different things but definitely it come from the fact that it's it's a very big symbol of Liberation. It's a symbol of feminity but it brings to it brings. The person wears issues a different poster. A different way of being a different way to show yourself and and so. It's a very different attitude. It's very small. It's a very small element which gave radiates. Antibody chains the body language. It changed it Sunup. Gravity and shoes whereas a woman of women who opposes by the Shoe Charissa woman right. So you didn't formerly study should assign but you weren't with some very famous shoe designers most importantly house if G. Yes what was that like? Because he's got obviously a you know long and very historic famous history here in France as a shoe designer. What what was that like working with him so what happened. Executive was is that when I worked with him he had ended his career but he was a mentor to me and so I worked. I did a museology type of work so I was ever seeing his assistant. But I never designed for Jose. Never no no. I worked at a period of the retrospective. I had met him before and then he asked me to be his assistant for everything but not designing on. That didn't want to design for him. I was so excited and happy to look at the work of someone that I knew so well and to have it explained but it's mass by his master and so what happened is that when I was ten I started to do. A sketch had seen that museum. Do Undo Redo that sketch always the same profane and so I started to put it every table of my different schools where I got expelled. Because one of the reason was because I was like trashing Zell's tables with my designs and and then one day one person and then it was almost sixteen. Gave me a book and say for you and I who likes shoes I find newsies and someone gave me the book of what it was Gold Makarova on just had his name. When I opened the Book I realized that my obsession with join shoes was also a beautiful work but had never thought of it as a work before it was rare in being shoot as no. I didn't know any design is right and so when I opened at book I fought. This is it. That's jobs and supposedly doing and from that moment I started to change the angle I started to. I was always own enjoying pro fine and when I decided that it could be a designer assured his on I started to free quarters exit down when I saw the work aversion so obviously has been very important and influential because he's sort of opened meat completely to the ideas that it was a beautiful possible word So then how did you actually learn how to design shoes so now so I started so? My first thing was to to jove a to do shoes for showgirls. So I started an internship when I was seventeen at I stayed less than a year and then after I realized that you know this is not Boorda was not going to do was not going to do shoes for showgirls. Invalid just doesn't happen. I was sent to glue to have to bring coffee Which was very nice and I learned a lot actually from dances but to really design shoes. I was not going to be there so I ended up thinking. Fashion is probably the place to go and I opened the yellow pages. I remember there was nobody. The first house was Batmans. Was nobody answering. The phone. Second House was Joel on ice to speak to the director. They say Jericho. What a subject off. Cuccia and on the path maters this wonderful lady quote Ellen. D'amato was direct couture. She gave me an appointment. She looked at my design. She said it's very pretty. And we want to do a stash jokes. Wt BY SEAN. Joel I say yes so. I got sent into south of France for one year and this is why I learned to be. My first job was as a modest so my former education of Mideast comes home sold off and then after I was. Stephen merged like a night club so one year a challenge. Although in in the south in the middle of nowhere was a bit tough but at Shell Joel down the technical aspects of creating shoe. That's where you learned it because it's important you were just showing me that incredible installation to show. How shoes or graded You know and the sizing of it like I think designs a bit like architecture hearing engineering and architecture. That's why yeah. That's exactly what I'm trying to show. It's actually Victor Nick. Yeah it's really precise but it's organization. It's very important Yeah it is definitely. It's very technical. This is why actually it's also often expensive and for instance. It's complicated for someone who would start to do a proper so so much engendering you know so much metal inside formation in order to keep the balanced also to keep the arch. You know you can sort of easily against do address with like a stitching being a needle. You can sort of manage to do something with fabric. But she's not fabric slander component which are complicated. It's orange

France Shoe Charissa Joel African Panic Art Museum Schumer Victor Nick Stephen Batmans Zell Jose Executive Boorda D'amato Cuccia Ellen Director
"g zell" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

02:34 min | 1 year ago

"g zell" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Was previously. The CO founder of Mazzola Fire Fox and the creator of Java script brave now has more than ten million monthly active users. And I'm one all of them. Why why would I use brave? Because breed gives you unmatched speed security and privacy when I say unmatched in the difference is hard to believe. And here's swipe every time. You download webpage when you go to any webpage you are not just downloading the text and images were also downloading web junk. This includes trackers scripts that run in the background. Slowing your downloads. Wasting your time by an average of five seconds per page also draining your battery faster and costing extra data charges. There is a way to have the best just experience what can offer and that is by using. Brave brave is up to six times faster than other browsers and it's truly incredible. How much faster everything is? I have used brave for instance to get an airplane Wi fi when other browsers crash. I have used to watch youtube videos. When it's just suspended in loading rooting for ever on other browsers it's not subtle? There's a huge difference other browsers act like a vacuum dinner for your data. Since is security privacy side you're being profiled and tracked across the web so what let ask well data collected about. You can be used manipulate book. Your decisions and countrywide decisions sounds like elections. And if you owe more on that listening to my episode with Tristan Harris Braves a way to protect yourself and remove the surveillance. Economy brave also include includes options which I use quite often such as private window with tore for those seeking advanced privacy and safety. This browser feels intuitive. It's super easy to use as you can import your bookmarks with one click and all your favorite chrome extensions are also available with brave and it doesn't have to be either or you can use multiple browsers for different things now. Listeners of this show the Tim Ferriss show can easily upgrade their browser for free. And all you have to do is go to brave dot com forward slash lashed Tim. That's brave dot com slash. Tim I use all the time and I strongly suggest that you at least test it out. So brave dot com slash Josh. Tim and give it a shot. This episode is brought to you by fresh books longtime listeners. This podcast that I've been talking about fresh books for years. It's the all in one. Invoicing payments and accounting solution came about because doing a revision of the four hour workweek for two nine looking at new software software solutions. That can help. People help my readers and I came up over and over and over.

"g zell" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"g zell" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"That first generation kids had instilled into them without much thought on the part of their parents because they were the default. I guess no matter what you say I think comes down onto. Can you inspire your children. Cain you encourage your children to excel my message to my children. Room has always been gopher greatness. I never fantasized if anybody might children working for me if it turned out that one of my children had the the talents necessary that be great but what I really communicated to them over and over and over again is find. What makes you happy? Find the challenge and then excel at it. Be The best you can add who you are and with the towns that God has given you. That's that's the message that I've given to my children over and over and over again. Yes I've been very successful. And yes they're going to have less challenge financially early then I did but financial challenges not the ultimate answer. The ultimate answer is Cain you maximize wits skills were jeans understanding. Is You have and make a difference. That's what we're on this earth for. And that's what our responsibility is and I as a parent and responsible to inculcate my children with that and hopefully what I've done financially and otherwise it gives them the freedom to truly excel at whatever turns them hung last question. Sam Outside of Your Business World. What problem problem are you most interested in? I know that your wife who have had the privilege of meeting. Helen is very involved. Philanthropic -Ly as you think about your priorities over the next ext twenty thirty years. Let us pray where he used. See the ability to apply your problem solving. You are resources to problems that go beyond your day to day problems within business. which is you're constantly a problem solver? There well I think maybe the best way to describe. I bet you this that I've been very focused on freedom of speech. I'm very very concerned about. America is truly unique. Think America is like no other country in the world. I've been the beneficiary of that and the challenge that I haven't the thing that I worry about most is is can we keep America capable of providing unique opportunities for people to test their limits and Excel and freedom of speech is one of the most important things. I think that I've been very concerned about what's going on in college campuses. What's going on and business where you're politically correct is the standard that in effect I think challenges the freedom that has made this country great and so that's is probably the single biggest issue that concerns me more than anything else? Do you think the pendulum is just going through a cycle and that we're just seeing a very extreme end of with respect to that particular issue. I hope that's the case but I'm not sure that is the case and I'm not sure that the perpetuation of standards in universities or or in the workplace is changing our society in a way that ultimately is going to be deleterious in the future into the opportunity for our children. Our grandchildren will sam. I know that for you. Sit Down for this long as a big ask so I really grateful for for this chance. I feel like in some ways. We've barely scratched the surface of all of the stories. That are out there in all the Sam Adams. We didn't even get to twenty. We made a scratch the surface of five five or six of them. But I want to thank you so much for your time today. And I've enjoyed this discussion as much as any I've had with you know it's my pleasure in very fulfilling to think that people will listen to this conversation and we'll reach their own conclusions and find what parts of it resonate with them and in five created.

Cain America Sam Outside Sam Adams Helen
"g zell" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

12:56 min | 1 year ago

"g zell" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Ninety nine percent of our time focusing on building our business relationship and very little time and we ended up with completely unrelated social relationships. Were you one of the first people that Bob told when he was sick. Yes I was but to be honest with you. I didn't understand it. Do you remember what he said to you. Young man he come down with relatively aggressive form of cancer that he was going to get chemotherapy and I just assumed that it would suffer a little bit need. Be Fine and we'd go on an as this was in September of eighty eighty seven that he told me that we went on and he had surgery and had various issues and suffered offered a lot but then came back and I just never assumed that anything other than just going to be painful process but there was never a terminal into into it and then in February of nineteen ninety. He came down to the office on a Saturday. We hadn't been to the office for a month and he said I came down today because I wanted to talk to you and I said okay he says I want you to know that I'm GonNa die and I looked at him and you said you're going to die. That wasn't on the list of options I thought was possible. He said no he said you don't understand. I've been trying to tell you for a couple of years now that this is very serious and very rampant and that not too many people survivors and he says it was obvious to me that you didn't accept that as a possibility and you needed to know that we're at the end here now and I've got to prepare for it. I'm never forget that morning warning as long as I live because it was so shocking to me because he just never even thought dying was an option that that there could be terminal events. Here I mean you know I got a cold. He got sick and we didn't really connect it. But from that point forward that we started it to prepare and eventually died in June of nineteen ninety. Did his loss change anything in you with respect to your horizon. Your risk your desire to do the work or were you able to compartmentalize that and sort of move forward. I mean how did you think about losing in a partner who was your equal at that point. I think that is. I think that I think that all I could think about was our legacy and I and I think that I was more motivated rather than less motivated I met. I wanted to do more. Because as far as I was concerned turned everything that I did represented knee and represented him and later on when I endowed the real estate center at Warton. I doubt it. Under Samuel Zell Robert Murray and when we did the Entrepreneurial Center in Michigan I did it under Samuel Zone. Robert Murray because everything I thought I was doing I always thought I was doing for us and that I thought what I did. I did it reflected as much who I was as I wanted the world to remember who he was his wife has really carried on quite a legacy. I mean I actually heard of Bob even before I'd heard of you. Many many years ago through his wife's legacy of their philanthropy. Yes well first of all the two of them before Bob died. Spend a lot of time talking about Flan through pay a- and they both decided it's very Cheek today to talk about the giving pledge but this was nineteen ninety. Nobody heard of the giving pledge but these these two people said you know we have fortune that we've made and we have to give it away and we want to give it all away and we don't want to burden our children with any significant inherits or the burdens that come with it and so an effect before he died they kind of had an impact as to what they we're going to do and she happened to be a nurse so particularly focused on medical and eventually lary hospital and a lot of other things things that she did that. We're all about medical and created a wonderful legacy for him to worship gears for moment talk about an asset class that many any people take for granted today called reits which I'll have you explained to folks but what I think is most interesting is the role that you've played personally through your firm in and actually creating something that we now really take for granted so maybe spend a second explaining what a rate is and then let's kind of hear about basically the creation of what's now a more than trillion dollar asset class. It all began in one thousand nine hundred fifty eight when President Eisenhower signed something called the the cigar built and it was some kind of legislation had to do a skit cars. And I don't know what it was. But somebody had added a provision that created the quote Real Estate Investment Trust and the idea was that they wanted to create a vehicle that effectively created an opportunity for small investors investors to own pieces of large real estate projects and the re concept basically said the whereas whereas a corporation is subject to double taxation because reits real estate was illiquid. They eliminated one of those two steps steps. So that in effect the law allowed the creation of a vehicle that didn't pay corporate tax but only pay tax on the distribution and the requirement was in order to qualify for you had to distribute most of the income so that was created in nineteen fifty eight. And they were. I don't know how many there were but there were probably ten or fifteen. There were created over the next give or take twenty five five years. The industry never grew very much of time. Nineteen ninety-one came around the entire industry was only seven billion dollars. Ars and the reason was that the private real estate market was so much more attractive that the real world up up until that point only attracted people they came from insurance companies are not entrepreneurial scenarios in effectively it was just just kind of a byproduct of the real estate industry but all the action was on the private side. In other words. People weren't buying pieces of reads people. Were actually actually doing private investments in real estate directly. I mean that's when I know it's you know we built a major real estate company. We had you office. Apartments retail tale but ordinary. People like me could not have participated in that type in very difficult so the idea was that create these rates and then the classic description was the Little Old lady from Pasadena who wanted to own a piece of New York office billing but effectively because it was so unattractive compared compared to the private real estate side it attracted very very few significant players recruited very limited amount of capital capital and it was kind of a backwater of the real estate business and then an eighteen eighty nine. We ended up with a very serious oversupply of real estate and that led to Couple of insurance companies went broke. The savings and loan industry went broke and little by little all of the sources of capital that had funded. The private side disappeared. So people like me were senior saying in a whereas the capital GonNa come from from for the real estate industry in the future somewhere along the line. The thought process became well. It's going to be real estate. Investment trusts and in EFFEC- back we're going to have to access the public markets in order for the real estate industry to continue going forward and so we began studying a and naturally working with Maryland. John the first of the quote modern area error rates. I became very involved in the processing because I recognized recognize that this was the solution. And that ultimately this if done right would fulfill the ultimate dream which which was quote unquote liquid real estate 'cause ultimately real estate was illiquid and. That was a big problem. So if you could create liquid real realestate then the scope of what was available was dramatically more available than ever before and in Nineteen ninety-three in October. The National Association of Real Estate Investment Trusts which was really a another backwater organization whose sole objective was to protect protect the laws written in nineteen fifty eight with no understanding of the bigger scale questions and liquid real estate and what this was all about out in one thousand nine hundred ninety two at the National Association of Real Estate Investors Conference. I think they had twenty people between nineteen ninety two and nineteen ninety three as more and more people became more and more knowledgeable when we had our conference in October of Nineteen eighty-three in New Orleans. We we had fifteen hundred. People had never seen that many people involved in anything to do with real estate and the National Association Real Estate Investment. Trust asked me to give the keynote speech. I remember working on this bullet points for the speeches. I was flying into New Orleans and basically got up there and I said it to them. I say guys I said we have a horrible track record as a real estate industry dealing with the public because up until then the only reason that there was any kind of a public real estate trust a real estate anything was because there were no other options and now his yeah so it wanted to dump some properties you created a real estate investment trust. You took the worst of your properties and sold it to the public and the public with a fish. You know the old poker story of if you're sitting there and you don't know who the fish at the poker table has its you. Well that's how they did it and then it was not driven. What were the basics of real estate? Our cash flow. It was basically driven and commissions so it was very short sighted because all the action was on the private side and and I basically said I remember in that speech. I said I was driving around. Used Him in Nineteen eighty-four like swapped bumper sticker and the bumper sticker said. Please please God give us one more oil boom. I promise. We won't screw it up this time. That's where the real estate industry was in one thousand nine hundred ninety three and we had an extraordinary extrordinary opportunity to take this and make it into something really significant but we had to be in effect custodians of the Public Trust Trust as opposed to them that took advantage of the public's trust now speaking of you started this story by talking about the savings and loan crisis in the early nineties. You wrote wrote a letter in the late eighties and I don't think you necessarily predicted the SNL crisis but you certainly foreshadowed the circumstances that led to it. Yeah I wrote an article for. NYU's real estate center. This is what eighty eight eighty eight. I sat around trying to figure out the title for the article and and I ended up coming clues you in the right title from the article. was from Cassandra with love Cassandra. Was this lady in Troy who is cursed cursed by the Gods by making true predictions that nobody would believe and I then sat down and wrote out an article. Basically predicted predicted what was going to happen to the real estate industry and what the future was. True to form of. CASSANDRA nobody believe me. Everybody said Oh. See Him the pessimist again again. He's trying to discourage other people so he can have more of the market. I mean just all kinds of non recognition or non willingness to accept what to me. He was simple logic but it reflected. What has been kind of a hallmark of my career? And that is my ability to sit down and think through true where is tomorrow and how come I identify where tomorrow is going. And how can I position myself to take advantage of that..

National Association of Real E National Association Real Esta National Association of Real E Bob Robert Murray President Eisenhower lary hospital partner Public Trust Trust Samuel Zell Robert Murray Pasadena Samuel Zone New Orleans
"g zell" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

13:32 min | 1 year ago

"g zell" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"He had any doubt of how big the risk was how critical was to exit and yet he was unable to convince everybody else but everybody else were settled and they had their professions? Were living in this. Relatively small city and most important had very little exposure to the outside world. I mean we live in a day of twenty four seven sound from the cable. TV stations and we live in a world where there's newspapers every day they'd come from all over the world and we can't really relate to the idea of a society where information was literally limited and the further. You got from the point. You were standing the less dependable. The information was so he was functioning with a lot of information that is siblings and his friends didn't have no different than when we talk about being a risk taker. What what I talk about often is how critically important? It is to be as knowledgeable as possible at all my life. I've basically focused focused on reading and digesting information because the well educated up-to-date. You are the better are you are to be able to assess judgment and assess risk when we had dinner while back. You told me a footnote to the story you just told which is years later. I don't remember how old you may have been five. Six seven eight. You came out of your bedroom one night and your parents and maybe some other friends. I think were huddled around a small movie projector and they were watching something. Tell us that story. I think I was maybe six years old and we lived in Chicago when we lived then. What's commonly referred to as a railroad apartment? which is he had a living room at the one end and the kitchen at the other end and then it was long role? Oh bedrooms in bath and my bedroom was at the far back next to the kitchen. And my parents had a group of immigrants imigrants that had their own little organization called the Harmony Circle Club and once a month would get together in one the other ones living room and talk about information particularly information about Poland and when they all were refugees from Poland and all Jewish Asia and all trying to get information. I remember why I got up that night but I got up that night and I snuck into the right near the the living room was and they were watching an eight millimeter movie and I remember looking at the movie. Has I'm sitting here talking. I can tell you that and I can represent the images that I saw in the images were of trucks and dump trucks and on the back to the dump trucks tracks in the bins were bodies and bones and heads and somehow or other they had all been dumped in the back of these trucks trucks. And then I learned for the first time that this was all about the Holocaust and these were smuggled out movies that were made a what was going on in these camps in Poland right before the end of the war and I sat there might and I I couldn't conceive of what I was watching and then when I talked to them about it afterwards I never told them that I snuck out to watch but we talked about things over the dinner table table etc and I began to understand that these concentration camps literally were created to wipe out a population and and is efficiently as possible. Kill Them and then put him in dump trucks find someplace where they could be dumped in lime tossed on the bodies and buried accordingly so it was an incredible thing for six year old to watch and most important of all but I felt about it was that but for the grace got. It could've been should've been my parents. And in fact most of their siblings ended up murdered in these concentration camps. When when you think about sort of your teenagers you have a really unique set of personality traits? Sam One of them. Is You pretty much do what you think is right whether it's popular popular or not. Was that trait evident when you were growing up. Was that trait evident for example during adolescence. When most of US succumbed to the need to sort of be approved by others and do what others think is the right thing to do? Well I certainly was no different than any any other teenager. But the fact that I wasn't any different didn't really change the fact that I was very different and lived lived in a house where the closest to which they came to being exterminated was very much aware for everybody all the time. I grew up in a house. Where are my parents took the position that whatever I was doing I was lucky I was doing it and I had to do more of it? I studied harder and I had a excel and other parents didn't have these kinds of influence on their children and so became obvious to me in relatively young age that I was different and that as much as I wanted to be accepted as much as I wanted to be like everybody else. I also recognized that I wasn't and that I couldn't and that at first it was very frustrating and very much of a challenge. I didn't really know what to do with it. And then eventually I just came to the realization that I had to be my own thing. I had to be who I was and that other people have different ideas in different objectives and that was fine but I couldn't accept what everybody else was thinking about. I also grew up in a world where the rest to the kids that I grew up with. They were kids but I grew up in an environment where they didn't really give me much of a chance to be a kit in effect whether whether it was watching Holocaust movies are are listening to my father telling me you went to basketball game last week a why do you have to go again. And why are being so focused on having fun. You've gotta be studying. You gotta be getting better you gotta be able to take on what's going on well. Needless to say I didn't listen to everything he had to say day but living in that kind of environment was very very different than what my peers were doing so after college. How did you decide right on law school? What other things did you think about? What did you have any sense of what you want to go? That was a very easy decision. My father's view is very simple. He you gotTa have a profession. No matter what you gotTa have something that you can quote a Haniel Shing Elida and law. School seemed like a very logical thing for me to do. Academic academic lab is very difficult to achieve and so I went to law school not because I wanted to practice law. I went to law school so I had a degree and and that if I didn't work out at whatever it is was doing I would be able to in effect still practice law and make a living and that's what he more more than anything stressed that I had to do. So your first stint in the law firm was pretty short one. Yeah well actually. The better part of the story is that I I had forty four interviews. Forty four talk about rejection and rejected by forty three and I sent the letter terrorism. I made all the appointments and followed up on it and what I didn't understand was that was actually made very clear to me. When toward the end of this this process I had an interview with a big fancy firm and I got through the first interview? I was very excited. 'cause I had been used to people rejecting me and then I had a second interview at the firm and went really well and they set up a meeting for me with the senior partner whose name was on the door and and I remember going in to see him. I walked into his office and it was a typical would pale. Lawyer's office books all over the place and he was on the phone and he just stick with his hand and said sit down and I sat down finished phone call then he got up. He closed the door to his office can he he said. Tell me about your deals. Can I look to him and I said tell you about my deals. I want a job. He said we we would never hire you. You wouldn't last more than three months. I said what are you talking about. I said I WANNA be Eloy. What about Perry Mason and he? He laughed and he said you don't understand and of course the truth was I didn't understand and so I basically asked him about it and he said. Did you understand you put on your resume all the things that you did while you were in law school and while you were an undergraduate he can you bill all too real estate business. You managed hundreds of apartments. You bought building Hugh refinanced buildings. He wrote a manual on property. Management management can literally just graduated from law school. How would anybody like you WanNa sit there and draft contracts all day and anxious looked at him and his wedding understand? He said the reason you've been rejected like this is because everybody looks and says this is a guy who can do something else. And why would we want to train him. If he's GonNa be gone very shortly and never forget that interview and not ultimately did get one job Bob actually with a firm that was kind of half entrepreneur. Have Law Firm. I got there the first day and had this tiny office so is is like six by six. They gave me a contract to do between linen supply company and a dormitory Northern Illinois University. versity and some client of the firm was built the dormitory and they were entering into a contract with a company that provided linens. They wanted me to write right contract well for anybody WHO's been to law school. They know that day you get out of law school. You know anything about being a lawyer. He may know a lot about theoretical conflicts of interest and broad concepts of the law but how to draft a contract not a chance particularly if you went to the good loss call where in effect they look down on any quote unquote lawyer Vocational Training. And so I went and I asked. The Guy was sitting in the next office and he gave me some form books and said here. This gives you a base in so I started working on a farm books and I was terrible terrible so I submitted the first draft after a couple of days and it came back and looked like the senior partner who had reviewed it had slit his wrists. 'cause he he used red pen on it and the whole thing was full of read this and read that and I'm looking at it and saying I just went to three years law school and this is what ends up and so I then redid it again and finally submitted it to him and before he responded to me. I went into his office for some Friday morning. And I said could speak to you for a second each sure and as only a twenty four year old would fought. I looked at him and I said it you know. I really don't think this is a good use of my time in. I never forget the look on his face and he looked up. He said what are you see I said I don't think this practice of law his could use of my time he said. Well what are you GONNA do. I say line just going to go back and pick up where I left off in business in our brand. I'm GONNA try and build a real estate business in the he looked at me and he said you can do what am I explained to him. That that's what I was GonNa do and I thanked him very much for the opportunity and he said well. I've got a suggestion for you. I said why didn't she just stay here. And the law firm will do. The legal work. Hung your real estate and will invest with you and help you get started and I thought about Patmos it. That's terrific opportunity in so I said fine and the next day came back to the office and I was no longer a lawyer and I was chasing deals. They at the time had a colosseum. This law firm where they would give everybody fifty percent of any business they brought in and methodology behind. That was was that we're trying to effect encourage young lawyers to be a little entrepreneurial. Maybe getting a state from somebody in the family who died died or contract but the whole idea of quote unquote hustling business and so they infect offered me the same objective and.

Poland senior partner Chicago basketball Haniel Shing Elida Asia Sam One US Harmony Circle Club dormitory Northern Illinois Un Perry Mason Hugh Bob Vocational Training
"g zell" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"g zell" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"That's brave dot com poured slash. Tim I I use brave all the time and I strongly suggest that you at least tested out so go to brave dot com forward slash. Tim and give it a shot. Hello Hello Hello Nila. This is Tim Ferriss figured out. Mix Up the INTRO. Welcome to another episode of the Tim. FERRISS show word is my job. Each episode episode typically to sit down with world class performers of all different types from all different industries from all different fields to tease out the habits routines favorite books influences. And so on that you can then in some fashion emulator test and apply in your own life this time around in this episode. We have a slightly different format which I'm super excited about. I will not be the one doing the deconstruct instead. We have my good friend. Peter Attiyah taking my place now. Peter Tia for those. Who Don't know is is the common ingredients in two of the most popular episodes on my podcast of last say hundred episodes specifically really those are episode number three fifty two Dr Peter Attiyah versus Tim Ferriss an episode number? Three Ninety eight Peter Tia. MD fasting metformin athletic performance. And more if you want to try one of those out after you hear Peter do his thing here I would suggest going to number three fifty two or are we talk about mental and emotional health and different tools that can apply. They're coming back to this episode. Though in this episode we have Peter Interviewing Reviewing Sam Zell Z L. A. Legendary dealmaker and investor and as of the time of this recording Sam's net worth stands at around five point two four a billion dollars as many listeners. Know and many probably don't know Dr. Peter Tia on twitter and Instagram at Peter. Attiyah A.. T. T. I. A.. M D is a former ultra endurance athlete. So he's done swimming races of twenty five miles cetera. A compulsive self experimental so we get along well and one of the most fascinating human human beings. I know he is also one of my go-to doctors for anything related to performance and longevity.

Tim Ferriss Dr. Peter Tia Peter Attiyah Dr Peter Attiyah Tim Sam Zell Z L. metformin twitter T. T.
"g zell" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"g zell" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Now. It organism living tissue skeleton show in this episode is brought to you by fresh books longtime listeners of this podcast know that I've been talking about fresh books works for years. It's the all in one invoicing payments and accounting solution. Kim vowed because I was doing a revision of the four hour. WORKWEEK for two thousand nine looking looking at new software solutions. That could help. People help my readers and I came up over and over and over again many entrepreneurs as well as contractors actors in freelancers. I work with all the time. Use fresh books more and more every day. Why is that while most people especially to preneurs business builders hate wasting time doing doing things in efficiently painful invoicing with different cobbled together? Solutions Including Word or excel can fall into that category. If you want to avoid that pain what can you do. Give fresh facebook's a try I books is counting software that makes invoicing another bookkeeping tasks. So easy you can save up to two hundred hours per year. That's a lot of hours. Here's how it makes running your business business easier. You can automate bank reconciliation. In just a few clicks. You can give your account access to the information they need to your taxes. This is a huge one. I've realized how important this is and how much it makes life easier when you get this done with many things. You can't accept credit card. Ach Payments Right on invoices to get paid two times faster. And of course you can create customize send branded and professional looking invoices in about thirty seconds with plans starting at just fifteen dollars per month fresh books as designed to grow with your the business and right now I books is offering my listeners. That's you guys a free thirty day trial with no credit card required simply go to fresh books dot com slash. Tim Enter Tim Ferriss. In the how did you hear about us. Section that's fairest to ours to us is of course. Check it out go to rush dot com slash. Tim and Start Your Free Thirty Day trial today. I books dot com slash..

"g zell" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"g zell" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"That's brave dot com poured slash. Tim I I use brave all the time and I strongly suggest that you at least tested out so go to brave dot com forward slash. Tim and give it a shot. Hello Hello Hello Nila. This is Tim Ferriss figured out. Mix Up the INTRO. Welcome to another episode of the Tim. FERRISS show word is my job. Each episode episode typically to sit down with world class performers of all different types from all different industries from all different fields to tease out the habits routines favorite books influences. And so on that you can then in some fashion emulator test and apply in your own life this time around in this episode. We have a slightly different format which I'm super excited about. I will not be the one doing the deconstruct instead. We have my good friend. Peter Attiyah taking my place now. Peter Tia for those. Who Don't know is is the common ingredients in two of the most popular episodes on my podcast of last say hundred episodes specifically really those are episode number three fifty two Dr Peter Attiyah versus Tim Ferriss an episode number? Three Ninety eight Peter Tia. MD fasting metformin athletic performance. And more if you want to try one of those out after you hear Peter do his thing here I would suggest going to number three fifty two or are we talk about mental and emotional health and different tools that can apply. They're coming back to this episode. Though in this episode we have Peter Interviewing Reviewing Sam Zell Z L. A. Legendary dealmaker and investor and as of the time of this recording Sam's net worth stands at around five point two four a billion dollars as many listeners. Know and many probably don't know Dr. Peter Tia on twitter and Instagram at Peter. Attiyah A.. T. T. I. A.. M D is a former alter endurance athlete. So he's done swimming races of Twenty five miles etc a compulsive self experimental so we get along well and one of the most fascinating human human beings. I know he is also one of my go-to doctors for anything related to performance and longevity.

Tim Ferriss Dr. Peter Tia Peter Attiyah Dr Peter Attiyah Tim Sam Zell Z L. metformin twitter T. T.
"g zell" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

04:38 min | 1 year ago

"g zell" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"Optimal altitude I can run flat out and start shaking question now. It the organism living tissue skeleton show in this episode is brought to you by fresh books longtime listeners of this podcast know that I've been talking about fresh books works for years. It's the all in one invoicing payments and accounting solution. Kim vowed because I was doing a revision of the four hour. WORKWEEK for two thousand nine looking looking at new software solutions. That could help. People help my readers and I came up over and over and over again many entrepreneurs as well as contractors actors in freelancers. I work with all the time. Use fresh books more and more every day. Why is that while most people especially to preneurs business builders hate wasting time doing doing things in efficiently painful invoicing with different cobbled together? Solutions Including Word or excel can fall into that category. If you want to avoid that pain what can you do. Give fresh facebook's a try I books is counting software that makes invoicing another bookkeeping tasks. So easy you can save up to two hundred hours per year. That's a lot of hours. Here's how it makes running your business business easier. You can automate bank reconciliation. In just a few clicks. You can give your account access to the information they need to your taxes. This is a huge one. I've realized how important this is and how much it makes life easier when you get this done with many things. You can't accept credit card. Ach Payments Right on invoices to get paid two times faster. And of course you can create customize send branded and professional looking invoices in about thirty seconds with plans starting at just fifteen dollars per month fresh books as designed to grow with your the business and right now I books is offering my listeners. That's you guys a free thirty day trial with no credit card required simply go to fresh books dot com slash. Tim Enter Tim Ferriss. In the how did you hear about us. Section that's fairest to ours to us is of course. Check it out go to rush dot com slash. Tim and Start Your Free Thirty Day trial today. I books dot com slash..

Leaders: Gisle Rabesahala

Encyclopedia Womannica

03:45 min | 1 year ago

Leaders: Gisle Rabesahala

"Today's leader was a celebrated politician and was devoted to fighting for freedom and her country. She lived through era's colonialism and independence. Let's talk about Giselle Raba. Saha Jeff just sell Roberts Hollow was born on May Seventh Nineteen Twenty Nine Antananarivo Madagascar at that point Madagascar was a French colony. Gazelles family was very politically involved. Her father was an officer in the French army so she spent most of her childhood moving between his different postings and France Tunisia and molly when he died in nineteen forty to Giselle and her family return to Madagascar ask are those. Zell initially dreamed of becoming a nun. She decided against it by the age of seventeen. She was deeply involved in politics herself in the mid nineteen forties. Some political leaders about a gas car led efforts to become independent failed to do so through legal channels some some became radicalized and decided to take more violent measures in nineteen forty seven. Malagasy nationalists armed mostly with spears attacked attack. French military bases across the island. It became known as the nineteen forty seven. Malagasy uprising in response the French French killed many of the nationals estimates from the French said be killed around eleven hundred Malagasy nationals while Malagasy estimates were way higher around one hundred thousand casualties. Giselle was actively involved in a campaign for the rights of political prisoners from the uprising. She fought to free thousands of prisoners. She gathered a committee to support. Prisoners families wrote news articles to attract international attention and worked with members of parliament. Element petitioned the French president. In nineteen fifty six Giselle became the first woman elected as a municipal councillor. She was also the the first woman to lead a Malagasy political party having founded a party called the Union of the Malagasy. People in Nineteen fifty-eight Giselle United. Five nationalist nationalist organizations to help the Congress party for the independence of Madagascar. After a series of revolts Madagascar gained full independence in nineteen sixty when France agreed to let it become autonomous. Giselle then shifted roles from General Secretary of the Congress Party three to Minister of Culture and revolutionary art in that role. She committed herself to protecting people's heritage. She founded a national library. Prairie in nineteen seventy nine oversaw. The publication fifty works in the Malagasy language restored more than twenty five national monuments organized artistic mystic competitions and create the Mala gase copyright office in one thousand nine hundred five. Her policies helped promote national creativity. Giselle served as minister stir of culture until Nineteen ninety-one ten years later. She was also appointed Deputy Speaker of the Senate in addition to her roles in government. Giselle Zell was also on the editorial board of Nationalist newspaper. That opposed French. Colonial rule for much of her life. Giselle never got married or had any children when she was asked about her decision not to do so. She said that she preferred to serve her country instead to Zell wraps a Halla passed away on June twenty-seventh seventh two thousand eleven one day after the fiftieth anniversary of Madagascar's independence. After her death local reporters described her as as mother courage. Mother of the nation.

Giselle Giselle Zell Madagascar Giselle Raba Giselle United Union Of The Malagasy Congress Party France French Army Roberts Hollow Spears Jeff Officer Prairie Deputy Speaker Minister Of Culture Tunisia Molly General Secretary
Joey Logano finds a ‘challenging’ Next Gen car in Phoenix test

NASCAR Live

01:40 min | 1 year ago

Joey Logano finds a ‘challenging’ Next Gen car in Phoenix test

"Nine races in the season. Only Toyota's from Joe Gibbs racing and Ford's from team penske had scored race victories and Ford in one the previous seven Seven Cup series races at Nascar's next stop Talladega superspeedway at the end of stage. One time dealing chevy was out front and Chase Elliott drove his Camaro to the win in stage. Two but with six laps remaining joy lagaras Ford Mustang lead the field travel air. Justin hailing attack by Bruins Lugano led on the restart with Ford ago but by the time they reached turn forty uh-huh Chase Elliott battle for the lead is on Donald could block a ball. He tried to block. Kurt Busch that work but he couldn't block Zell. If that didn't work pit here comes Elliot to the lead. In Talladega. Chase was out front on the white flag lap. Lan turn number two now. They're spinning in the back of the Fowler. The David Ragan Korean patrol. Here's the race to the top of the Eric l the Lobos Chase Elliott knocking down the inside as they work their way off Warne. Money Lion Caution flag goes in the air. We'll wait and see. It is GONNA do here. Yellow black checkered flag in the air. Looks like Chase Elliott is GonNa win the Geiko five hundred NASCAR NASCAR ruled the chase. Elliott was the leader when the caution came out and he won the race down to the end and opportunity and to move forward and and took it over automaking work

Chase Elliott Ford Nascar Talladega Chase David Ragan Korean Patrol Joe Gibbs Donald Trump Kurt Busch Toyota Penske Chevy Mustang Elliot Fowler Justin Warne Zell Seven Seven Cup
After Bombing, Afghans Demand That Foreigners Leave Their Neighborhood

PBS NewsHour

04:22 min | 1 year ago

After Bombing, Afghans Demand That Foreigners Leave Their Neighborhood

"Sixteen people died in a car bomb explosion last night the target was the green village a compound housing mainly international workers today Afghans protesters outside the compound demonstrating against the foreign presence in their country the Taliban claimed responsibility for the attack even as they participate in peace talks with the United States use our special correspondent Jane Ferguson is on assignment in Afghanistan she's been talking to civilians and officials in Kabul today and she joins us now hello Jane how significant is it do you think that this attack took place just as we are told the Taliban and the U. S. are making progress on this potential peace deal. hi Judy it's no coincidence that we seen a massive uptick in violence in recent weeks and indeed recent days here they are peace talks of course between the United States and the Taliban but the Taliban have wanted to maintain pressure and to remind both the United States and the Afghan government here in Kabul of their strength we've seen shows of strength throughout the weekend while those talks were right down to the eleventh hour to provincial capitals with condos and fully come ready both the sol assaults by the Taliban and then of course yesterday's enormous bombing it has been a controversy around the surrounding these talks that they go on well there isn't actually a cease fire at this time but we have seen a breakthrough with the U. S. special envoy to those talks Zell mill Khalilzad arriving here to tell the Afghan people that there has been in principle an agreement so Jane how much is actually known about what's in the city of the details. it's extremely murky at this stage the Afghan people don't know for sure what's going to happen and it will massively affect their future but how does I did go on television went on national Afghan television on tolo TV yesterday and he gave away some details of the proposed agreement of course he reminded everybody that it isn't official until president trump signs it himself but he said that initially there would be a five thousand troop withdrawal Dino that's from fourteen thousand American troops and that effectively fine US bases would be vacated and that's really the start of what what we're starting to see as a draw down but there are still many many questions about what's not being mentioned about what could be in this deal such as whether or not there will be any kind of ceasefire he said that there would be a reduction in violence but specifically did not use the word ceasefire so there's a huge amount of uncertainty here in Kabul until people really find out what is in the proposed agreement on whether or not it will become the final text engine finally what about public attitudes you say there's uncertainty what is the public saying to you people saying to you about about the fact that this could actually happen. it depends very much so Judy on who you're talking to now you pointed out earlier there that there were there were riots after that bombing yesterday and they were very much so angry demonstrations against a western presence in that part of Kabul and that's because people have seen so much bloodshed of course we must remember that thousands of American lives have been lost in this war but many more thousands of Afghan lives have been lost and so there is a sense of anger whenever the Taliban are targeting westerners and Afghans died we seen a huge take an Afghan civilian deaths just in the last few weeks and months with some quite shocking violence so people here really really want peace they want an end to this war but there is a severe fear there's a very real fear that that that any American withdrawal and this is particularly strong whenever you're talking to officials in the government here could be too hasty they want to make sure that the Americans don't leave in a way that could cause the Afghan government to collapse or could be in danger the Afghan security forces of the Americans and their partners here has been so much time and energy and money building up so there's a sense that of course they want a deal they want to end to this war but they want to make sure it's one that's done responsibly hard to believe the US has been there now almost eighteen years Jane Ferguson reporting

Eighteen Years Mill
Payment apps are all fun and easy... until you get burned by a typo

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:45 min | 2 years ago

Payment apps are all fun and easy... until you get burned by a typo

"Hey Pal reports quarterly earnings tomorrow. We'll get an update on then mo the crazy popular peer to peer payments APP that pay pal owns but as services like Ben Mo- square cash Ash Roselle have gotten more popular there have been some growing pains fraud and scams for sure but also lots of accidental payments like because you typed in the wrong email address and when that happens as people have sadly discovered the money is gone. Lisa Ellis is an analyst at the research for MOFFITT Nathanson. She said up to one percent of all payment. Transactions could be fraud or accidents and if you screw up there aren't any official protections because it's just an accident you know they're not obligated to do anything well. Let's dig into some of the differences between the specific services because you have you know pay pal which has been around a long time you have square cash which is similar to Ben Mo-. Do they have less built in protections then let's say Zell which is developed by the banks in some ways yes in some ways no so the benefit that you have in the services like paypal van Mo- Zalis that you you know you have to have officially signed up for the. Surface so they have a very standardized set of information about you so they can avoid the issues like you know. Having the same email address at the same phone number assigned to multiple accounts they can avoid those types of issues because they make sure that doesn't happen when they sign you up. It does sound like you're saying though that if I accidentally send money to the wrong person in Zell that I have the same problem as if I do it in Venom Oh yes oh yes definitely if it's accidental. Yes what I guess is interesting about that as a consumer is that I thought that if these things were attached attached to my bank which is F._d._i._C. insured that there would be those protections like how hard would it be for these companies to say. I don't know we're GONNA help you out a little here they do they do try to help you out the differences. If you've protections related to like you said Your Debit Card or your credit card those are much more related to fraud and the banks are responsible for protecting you against fraud but there are not responsible for protecting you and making mistakes or are being an idiot. It's actually a much more difficult thing to protect against then fraud right and I'm not <hes> you know. Certainly we know that you cannot legislate against stupidity but you could imagine these companies saying that this this could. Could become a threat to the business right if people don't trust no no absolutely it's certainly in their best interest to figure out ways to mitigate it. It's a delicate balance because a big part of the value proposition of the pita payment services says is that it's super quick and easy so they just have to navigate through that and figure out ways to make it less onerous. Do you think that there is a possibility you know we're sort of talking about growing pains as these payments systems become more popular. They're probably doubly only going to increase in popularity and usage. Is it possible that some regulations need to be crafted in order to keep up like that. There should be a standard way that you verify the identity of someone you're sending money to for example. I don't know that that requires a regulation leashes per se but those types of things are usually handled. Yes as it's like industry standards <hes> in the same way that the fraud protection that you have on your credit card or debit card those aren't regulations per se. That's actually set not by the systems by visa MasterCard by the networks they have a whole governing set of operating rules that govern how risk is shared. How Fraud is mitigated what you know security requirements each player in the ecosystem has to? <hes> maintain etc.. It's just that that rule set which was built up for those systems over sixty years is not really in place for these other systems at this point and so you know it's a self policing type of thing they'll end up establishing their own standards. Lisa Ellis has an analyst every search for Moffitt Nathanson the big payment APPs including Ben Wenzel do warn users in their user agreements not to send money to people they don't know or to use the APPS to pay for services but with Ben Mo- growing throwing seventy three percent year-over-year in the first quarter of this year. It's a good bet that's not all people splitting the dinner bill and now for some related links last consumer reports did a deep dive into peer to peer payments APPs. They found that it can be almost impossible for consumers to really understand what protections there are in the case of a scam or a user error and it said almost all the payment APPs could do a better job of setting their security levels higher by default to make it harder for someone to access your APP if they still your phone or even to put up more roadblocks when you send people payments the bigger problem though is that when CR did focus groups and asked consumers. Sumer if they thought their money was protected from you know stupid mistakes pretty much every single person said they thought the services would make it right and they were surprised to hear that they probably won't still I should point out that consumer reports did find. Is that generally speaking P._d.. Payment APPS are pretty safe. You just shouldn't use them to buy things online from people you don't know and even if you're buying in person like when I bought a ping pong table recently from a guy on craigslist I know I know I'm in the gray area here with the user agreement then Mo introduced Q._R. Codes to people's profiles back in two thousand seventeen so instead of typing someone's email you can scan their code and you know you're paying the right person although again I am embarrassed to say I did not know this until I bought this ping pong table like a month ago so there you go little tip for Meteo.

Fraud Ben Mo Lisa Ellis Zell Moffitt Nathanson Analyst Craigslist Sumer Meteo Ash Roselle Ben Wenzel Official Seventy Three Percent One Percent Sixty Years
"g zell" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"g zell" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"For your Bank, something called Zell Zell is a Bank, attempt was co-op to deal with the competitive threat, they faced primarily from then MO at the time, and now many others that have these methods where you can send cash to a friend, the example that I give most often that's tired. But I'll give it because it makes sense bunch of people go to dinner together one of them wants to earn points on their card. And so, when they split up the check the friends just van mode, the person who paid for their portion, the meal in everybody settles up basically instantly, then MO has become intensely popular, particularly with people in their twenties and thirties, the banks saw a massive competitive threat from this. And they started their own app called Zell and Zell is wrapped inside a bank's own ecosystem. The problem is, and it's what I have talked about the vulnerabilities for a long time. Now, there's a new NBC news report about people who are losing thousands of dollars. In addition, we are dealing with a number of people who've contacted us who criminals have been able to tap in through their Bank app. Steal money using Zell function out of their accounts, and they have not been able to get money back from their banks NBC news after contacting Bank suddenly banks were giving people their money back. But this is a terrible problem where the Zell at function does not have normal consumer protections and a criminal hacking in is able to run off with unlimited sums of money. Money. And if you have overdraft on your account as well, you get stuck, not only with your money being Cohen, but now a loan that you owe to your Bank. So the reality is, the banks need to put up better protection on sell both from the fraud standpoint, and clear, contractual rules that will protect your money with one hundred percent fraud protection, the banks, again did not think this through all they were trying to do is L is fight off non Bank competitive threat. They weren't thinking about you. They were just thinking about themselves with very harmful consequences to you. What I recommend until the banks, get their act together is that you delete, the use of Zell do not use do not have activated on your account, if it is activated. You need to deactivate it whatever procedure your Bank requires to do, so, and this is absolutely crazy. That consumers are being harmed to such a great degree. One other thing from the NBC report. Be very careful criminals are sending doing phone calls to you. With the caller ID showing up from your Bank saying that there's been a problem with fraud on your account. They need to verify your account, and they've sent you a one time use text with the code. We're used to those, what is the one time, use code that you got the criminals in use that to take over your account in empty.

Zell Zell Bank fraud NBC Cohen one hundred percent
"g zell" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"g zell" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Zell. Wealth redistribution won't work Americans. Don't want handouts. I think that's true. I think Americans don't want handouts. I brought this up earlier. I know we gotta get emails, but there's so many of these stories NFL players an NBA players. I don't know if you knew the seventy eight percent of NFL football players are broke bankrupt within two years percent NBA players within two years of retiring. The NBA. Yeah. Yeah. Oh, I believe it. How many times have we seen that? Sure. Lottery winners. Same thing when the story goes on and on the way that people deal with money is really kind of sick. And crazy. You know, what this points out though, this all NBA NFL lottery winners. It doesn't matter. What it points out is the importance of having a strategy that takes care of your distribution needs. This is what happens at retirement, it's it can be easy in many respects to get the money. Whether you win it, you're an NBA player. Or you just work real hard your life. Right. But the important part for that is how do you spend it because I could make two million dollars a year. But if I'm spending two point one million, it doesn't do any good. Remember back in the day. I think you had a relative or something at one of the big computer companies locally. I he has and their stock price went through the ceiling. I've told this story before I met was back when I was doing planning I'll do this stuff anymore. But I went out to their place in LA Hoya and a nice little house and beautiful family three kids wife, and they had I think it was a MCC or one of the small tech, Tom. Yes, you're right. Yeah. So I'm remembering this and this guy went from. To like four million bucks overnight. So he's got four million dollars. And he calls me and says I'd like to talk to you about a plant was mostly his wife that wanted to talk about the plan. And so what I did is I put up my calculators, and listen, which you guys should do is sell enough of this stock because he didn't want to sell a nickel of it. It was sacked option. It was unbelievable sell enough for this stock. So that you have some semblance of financial security. Pay off the mortgage, and then maybe invest so that you can take, you know, four percent out get fifty thousand bucks a year of income like for the rest of your life. So you have a free and clear, home and fifty grand. You're not going to be millionaires. But you're financially secure, you'll be able to pay your kid's education costs, etc. Etc. Well, he goes ballistic. I mean, he and his wife get in this massive fight. Because as on my side, I do well with the women. She's on my side. And he is like his beat red. He is so mad. So I said, I think I'll let you guys talk about this. I called him back. They wouldn't even answer the phone. This wasn't my relative there. No, no, no. It wasn't your relatives. I mean, I have a relative that? Okay, excuse. I thought you were. I thought did he meet with your? No, no, no. No. No. No. No. Okay. Good. Because this is the same good. I think it was AMC. See it may have been. All right. Okay. Good. I thought that had or he used he used to work in the one that I'm talking about. He actually did what you suggested my relative did that who had just in one year the options just. Thousand times worth what he paid. Right. So we had all this money. What he did was he took about half after commanded. They do about half. And he's a big listener to the program to and sold it off. And did exactly what you suggested the other half went into the tank of Powell, but what he was able to do was based on what you were talking about here actually left that company now business from self takes a lot of vacations as a very nice hall. It's all paid for big everything and it worked because he wasn't greedy. He wasn't greedy. Okay. Since patients pays do. You have time for an Email. Sure. Go ahead. I don't know if we have time for these two that I have here male,.

NBA NFL Tom MCC football AMC two years seventy eight percent four million dollars two million dollars four percent one year
"g zell" Discussed on 1075 KZL

1075 KZL

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"g zell" Discussed on 1075 KZL

"A beer and have a good night. Yeah when the delivery, drivers is also a part time. Stand up comedian. So you say come out to my, show and I. Think trying to be like Denzel is a good move because I've seen movies where he's in these it's acting He's very laid back like hey man no not like making it, more tense So Zell heard that a that'd make my day, to but the guy got saved that was playing on jumping off a bridge and then these two guys to. Them They kept driving now I think it was sometime maybe last week or two weeks, ago we saw into the future a little bit future Katie yeah it was an older woman and a campground Campground singing karaoke Yup she's seeing Missy. Elliott and so that was if Katie maybe in, twenty years maybe thirty. Years from now we've looked, further into the future right to maybe sixty. Years from now and a couple of weeks ago it was a lady who was in. A park a campground. Singing karaoke she was in her fifties and she had a microphone in the middle it's like almost in the woods and. Then, amplifier and speaker is what she was singing Exclusive here Get your, meals stunt get, a pedicure get your hair In the future Because you're right She's.

Katie Denzel Zell Missy Elliott twenty years two weeks
"g zell" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"g zell" Discussed on WSB-AM

"To be the weather w meterologist kirk mellish mix a cloudy day a few sprinkles possible with a high the upper fifties to city of atlantic computers are still under siege no word from the city yet or whether they'll pay a fifty thousand dollar ransom don lock them but a cybersecurity expert says they know who's responsible and number three former president george w bush bill clinton and jimmy carter expected to pay their respects today to former georgia governor zell miller wsb michelle wright reports miller's hometown also held a special goodbye service gathering in young harris monday to remember former governor zell miller not just as a politician but as a father a friend and a man who gave hope to nearly two million georgians as the creator of the hope scholarship the former governor us senator and father of the hope scholarship died friday wbz news time is five sixteen opponents criticize a bill to curtail early voting georgia's at awaits action in the house bill county elections offices would hold early voting on the third saturday or sunday but not bo we've had record numbers in the last two years have early voting turnout why would we want to suppress that why we want to kill that widely we want to further the burden on local boards of elections sarah henderson with common cause georgia also complains the bill closes the polls in the city of atlanta and hour earlier at seven the bill is awaiting vote in the full house from the state capital sandra parrish wsb gwinnett county minister and his family end up rolling with police over a missing girl officers say the pastor's family interfered as they tried to check on a missing teen in the parking lot of.

harris zell miller senator georgia atlanta president george w bush bill clinton jimmy carter michelle wright us sarah henderson gwinnett county fifty thousand dollar two years
"g zell" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

02:39 min | 4 years ago

"g zell" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Source quote too many red flags stop on that for a minute ponder that for a minute because that's got to be the most damning thing that's ever been said of a john menzel and it's not even close the team did hired or brawls looked at man zell and thought too many red flags they brought in a guy who cannot get a job in america a guy who ran a program where his players were accused of more than fifty rapes in four years and now is all right with thai cats but they saw man's ellen thought on two may red flags incredible but according to p ft it's not completely dead yet the team is still interested in him and the store chance to mansell could end up in hamilton red flags and all amendments are how to react oh than to say that she is hamilton going hamilton and no this is not wanted nissim chance for the rest eucanadian clones to dump on the proud shiny and 'upandcoming city of hamilton this is not about the city that gave us martin short and tim horton this is about the football team did aid and making one bazaar decision after another let's higher or brial us let's give johnny manziel workout he maybe they should check out orgy three await they actually do already have is rights of course they do how much more hamilton tigercats could you get that a potential quarterback depth chart of or g3 three and man zell and our brial is calling the place what joe wall risk ruffles didn't want any of that oj simpson's got to be released in a little over a month at this rate you know the thai cats or go on know what he's got left in the tank i've gotten years years without mentioning the tigercats but not gone deep on them twice in a single week can i make it a hattrick tomorrow amoking to force it in fact i'm going to avoid it but knowing the thai cats they're going to do something and forced their way right back on to this show and there will be looking at three dan will be looking at three we're this cat speaking to cats scat scattering this smack off skies one of the best score boston mark in boston and when you got that kind of game you don't wait right to the front of the line mark what's up hi.

john menzel hamilton tim horton oj simpson boston zell america ellen mansell hamilton martin football four years
"g zell" Discussed on Power 106 FM

Power 106 FM

02:24 min | 4 years ago

"g zell" Discussed on Power 106 FM

"On the budget rubber band the art of the tribe's drove his gums registered firm tracy letts agassi j the road because of the day jason statham but but but both are bronze in atlanta j credit georgia governor zell the brits added have you treated with dignity right firm ways killing a j double senator john mccain would love to have been offended look the judge has predicted the megawatts granted the visit the visit dude mr producer late last month britain to look me the jim judge georgia but football is set to go to celebrate travis two two what's guys rumor jape from yesterday jay from yesterday this is this is jerry on the phone to show yesterday listen to this now jape from irvine he married but he has a crush on his sisterinlaw his wife wow you think she's down judge eighty i dunno every why is it gravitate towards nato in that area looking at you yeah math when you guys are in the same room and you guys are kinda like looking at each other's kind of how write it off the issue makes a move are you going to make a move back are you that down you do it you review all making me guys rail risk it all so lacked jays on the phony track go j hello the ochre of j how you.

tracy letts jason statham john mccain producer georgia football jay jerry irvine nato jays atlanta senator britain jim travis