19 Burst results for "Future Today Institute"

"future today institute" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

08:18 min | Last month

"future today institute" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"They're in very active bidding to get NFL Sunday tickets, the commish, is it still Roger Goodell says, we'll know, yeah, Roger Goodell. He says, we'll know by this fall of the fate of NFL's Sunday ticket, but he does say I really believe we'll be moving to a streaming service. In other words, that is, it is hard to over describe how devastating this is to broadcast media. No kidding. We so we have worked with an advice some of the networks. And the amount of money that this brings in, these are long contracts. So the talk about not being willing to confront your cherished beliefs. A couple of years ago, we said, hey, what if a streamer wins out during the next contract renegotiation? And just none of them would hear of it. It was really. It was incomprehensible. It wasn't just incomprehensible. It was like silly. It's a conceivable. Right? The devastation that this is going to result in for networks is like there's no way to sugarcoat it. It's really an interesting way for Apple to become a player here. Reports are that it's $2 billion a year, DirecTV. They're going to overpay. They're going to overpay. DirecTV bought it some years ago for one and a half $1 billion. Sunday tickets important because aside from the games you can see on your local markets in your local broadcasts, if you want to see any other games, you need Sunday ticket. So serious football fans, this is a big, big deal. Right. And what's happening is what used to be scarcity in the market. Doesn't exist anymore. And so for sports, especially where you kind of want to see the game when it's on, you know, the amount of money that they're able to make, especially from streamers right now, which are looking for additional differentiators, is like insane. Insane. And the presumably the NFL at some point will do their own app, right? Major League Baseball. It will be super app. I think you guys know I'm a baseball fan. And it's as bad as an experience as continuing to sit through 9 innings in the year 2022. So terrible. I thought you were a baseball fan. I am a baseball player. Why the hell is 6 daughter? The game is too long. It's time to modernize. We probably don't need 9 we could have a whole separate conversation. You know what? I'm with you. I love baseball in a baseball fan since youth since childhood. And even I just, by the 8th inning, it's like, give me another beer. I can't. Right. Where's the hot dog? I'm in a coma. I took my daughter. I was very excited because I grew up with the cubs, and the cubs were in Baltimore, so I went to a that's the only place you can see the cubs is that the orientation. In Baltimore, where literally nobody goes to see the Orioles. Right. And she was just, you know, she was totally done. Second inning, she was just, she was just done. Wow. Anyways. But the app is terrible. Could the NFL make more in a direct to consumer play? Probably, but a lot of that overall revenue is still coming from advertising. So even cricket is attempting to modernize and cut the games down from two or three days to a mere few hours. Our attention span is getting awfully short. I don't know if anybody under 25 has the patience to sit at a 9 inning three hour baseball game, especially because football, even though honestly, somebody did the math, there's only 11 minutes of action and a three hour football game. At least there's action. It's just somehow more exciting. And of course, the networks are very good at producing it. Amy, have you watched any of the Apple Friday night baseball broadcasts as a baseball fan? No, I haven't. They're terrible. They're terrible. They're awful. They even slower, even more boring. Hard to believe. I mean, I grew up in a household where WGN was on constantly. And so and that was when the cubs had lost for decades. We're terrible like they are right now. They were the worst. But that's it. Along suffering cubbies fan. One of the highlights of my baseball life is going to Wrigley and watching what's his name, practically fall out of the booth during the 7 things. Man, to the ball. By the 7th inning, Harry Carey 6 sheets to the wind. He would lean out the booth and lead fans in singing it. And every time you looked like he was going to just fall out. I mean, he was just want to hear you. Great Harry Carey. But that's Chicago baseball. That's a great sport. Apples, apples, announcers are just horrible. They kill. And if I were the NFL, that would give me pause. Well, I think the NFL hires them. I don't think Apple hires them. I don't know what to do. Wouldn't that be funny to you? MLB, those are MLB employees, I believe. What makes them so bad, I'm curious. Oh, they're just, you know, I've watched two games and only part of the games. And I wound up turning the sound off so I didn't have to hear them because they were awful. I just use subtitles. I watched a couple of Astros games. And they talk about themselves more than the game. Everything is relatable and personable. And I don't want to hear that. I want to hear details about the players. I want to hear back stories. But you don't get that. You get kind of how they feel about the game. They're doing their thing. And I guess MLB is trying to peel to the millennials. So these are young, there's two women and two guys. They're very young. By the way, this is very Apple. ESPN on the mic flags would have a big, legible ESPN. Can you read what's on these mic flags? No. If you have to think that there's an enormous amount of data that went into selecting the people and I'm sure that the more data sense. Right, right. That's the problem. Listen, if it attracts more young people to the sport, great because it's effectively going to die. Otherwise, it's just not enough young people who are my kid won't watch it. Somebody in the IRC says the only way kids watch baseball these days is they watch the highlights in their Amazon echo. Yeah. That's pretty much it. That's pretty much how people watch most sports. Everything. Sports. Everything. Yeah. I just want the highlights. I don't have time. All right, one more break, and then we're going to wrap things up. You guys are very patient. My problem is when I've got a great panel, I just don't want to stop it. You guys are fantastic. Amy Webb, future today, institute. Connie Guillermo, editor in chief CNET. EIC at sea and ET, you go, you go. You got the new logo on there up there on the sign. Did you have to revamp all your logo edge in your house too? Well, that's the only logo ridge in my house. Yes, we did have to revamp the whole logo. So what's the reaction been? Because I have to say, I worked for Cena when it was Halsey minor and Shelby and just a couple of people. He was the guy who came up with that C bar NET. This is a big deal redesign that dot com. What's the reaction been? I mean, you have your people who love it and people who hate it.

MLB NFL Roger Goodell cubs DirecTV Apple football Harry Carey Baltimore Major League coma Orioles WGN cricket Wrigley ESPN Amy Astros
"future today institute" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

07:39 min | 3 months ago

"future today institute" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"It's time for twit this week at tech. The show we cover the weeks, tech news, and we have such a good panel today. I thought, you know what? I'm just going to sit back, relax and enjoy the ride. Amy Webb is here, our favorite futurist from the future today institute, author of the genesis machine, our quest to rewrite life in the age of synthetic biology. I haven't seen you since the book came out as it doing well. Book is doing really well. And I actually Eric Schmidt gave me hives last week. We were at a conference together on a panel talking about AI and we diverged and started talking about he said some very, very nice things about me. Wow. And I was so, it was in front of this big group. I was so embarrassed in a good way, but I was so embarrassed. I broke out into hives everywhere. And bright red. And I was like three minutes into the session. And I was like, embarrassing. But that's maybe you have set up the challenge for both Leo and I we have to get you to break out at high. This is our goal. Very often. It doesn't happen. We have two hours to do this, Leo. David spark is in the house. Oh, I love seeing David spark. Longtime friends since going back to tech TV. He's been on Twitter many times, not in a long time though, so I'm really glad to get it a while. You have started a new network on security called the ciso Siri. Do you pronounce a ciso or is that just me? Yes, but if you go, we did a show a live show in Australia. And there, down under, they pronounce its size, router. They call it rooter. So ISO. So I'm going to say see so, because that's most of us say an America. You've got 5 podcasts all about security, which is great. Defense in depth, super cyber Friday, capture the ciso. Cybersecurity headlines. Good job. Capture the resource our new show. I like it. It's kind of like it's kind of like Shark Tank and that their cisos judging security vendors. But instead of seeing full pitches, sea toes, which are chief information security officers, they come on. And they've already watched the demo videos of the products and they're just having conversations with these security vendors asking them like, tell me more about your product and ask him relevant questions about it. Nice to then, and that's kind of like what everyone wants to hear. Yeah, the kind of thing you would be asking. Yeah. I think that's part of the problem with doing this kind of stuff is it tends to get very vendor heavy and ends up being an ad. So this is really good. This is a way to get some solid content. It's the conversation, not the pitch. I am drinking today, some synthetic booze provided by Amy Webb. It's called glyph. It is, I want to say distilled in San Francisco, but I think it's probably creating a vat somewhere in San Francisco. All the spirit, none of the rules, so I think we talked about this on a previous show, right? The idea that they could maybe was in the genesis machine that they can make whisky without actually putting whisky barrels and all that. Right, basically if you've got the molecular formula, the construct, you can print out molecules and just still in a different way. Hang on a second, I've got a crazy different microphones going here. Printed in printed molecules. Kind of like a Star Trek sent them all or every effect every science fiction has a synthetic whisky and just finishing the bob averse and that's one of the first things they try to figure out how to make whisky again. Right. So this is the show. I think that's a good that's a good goal. But we have a challenge. We have a challenge. You and I can't do that to four Amy. I just can't. Please don't. I had a very, very moment, right? Yeah. So she's not going to hate that. No. I'd never had anybody compliment. He just said very nice things and it seemed very sincere and it was kind of out of nowhere and we were deep in the weeds on AI at that point and he also really do you want to do you want it to go in the opposite direction? What's the opposite of how the opposite of high? Well, no, I've got monkeypox. Let's not give her a monkey punch. Okay, let's not do that. Let's not do that. Okay, please. Okay. Thank you. Monkeypox is the new, I don't know, cause celebrity. I don't want to celebrate it. Cool virus, everybody wants to take to prom this year. No, no. So okay, so I know everybody's afraid and rightly so that we might start talking about Elon. We're just going to get out of the way. It's going to be quick. It's going to be pretty like ripping off a band aid. Just rip off the band aid, get it over with quickly, Elon, what's the status of Elon's Twitter deal? Is it up in the air? Is it up in the air based on the percentage of bots that are or the fake accounts that are on Twitter of which it doesn't appear there's any third party that's verifying these. It just seems there is absolutely no, no, there are third parties that are verifying it. There's been a couple of academics and there's an independent group that to be fair like built some type of tool. It's not bad or not. I forgot who it was. But there are groups that are pulling as much data as they can by doing samples and to be fair. It's hard to get a huge sample size, but I mean, I think we all know even I even know anecdotally. There's a tremendous amount of thought activity. And they're always has. I think it's way over 20%, though. That's the thing. I think Elon was told it was 5%, and that's where he set the poop emoji to the CEO of Twitter. None of it matters. He's trying to use this as a wedge to get out of the deal. And why did he try to get maybe he's, I don't know, maybe the number of the number of bots thwarting his investment is sort of a red herring, right? He just wants to really wants to get out of it that that's really what's going on. I think what happened is that he bought up a bunch of shares. He got invited to be on the board, realized that he had a fiduciary responsibility as a board of directors member and he couldn't go around trash talking the CEO or others or the edit button or pick whatever you want free speech. Then left because Elon doesn't want people telling him what to do. And I now think he just got that had repercussions that had repercussions on the other businesses where his finances are tied up. So why tank Tesla? Over a social media, which a lot of us use, but let's face it has a limited number of DAUs and it was never a ton of money. It's never made more than a $1 billion in a year. If you pay $44 billion for something that's less than a billion, it's going to take you a long time. Is there any history of any company being purchased at that level of multiple of yearly revenue? That's 44 X that seems. I don't think it's that. I don't know if anyone's purchased anything at that..

Amy Webb David spark future today institute Monkeypox Elon Leo Eric Schmidt Twitter Shark Tank San Francisco Australia America Amy Tesla
"future today institute" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

02:46 min | 5 months ago

"future today institute" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"I'm Manu zamoro di. And ask anyone to predict the future these days, they will likely decline. You know, I'm not going to speculate on that. I want to see what happens right now. No one can forecast exactly how 2021 will unfold. Well, I think this is one of those things that's quite difficult to predict. We just can't predict that. We don't know. For many of us, the world feels erratic, volatile, trying to guess what will happen next, seems futile. Unless you're Amy Webb. I'm Amy Webb, I am the CEO of the future today institute and a Professor of strategic foresight at the NYU stern school of business. And Amy, is it fair to say you're a futurist? I am. I'm a quantitative futurist. Coolest job title, but can you explain what a quantitative futurist is? Do you see like, I don't know, spreadsheets in your crystal ball? So futurists do not make predictions. Instead, we collect signal data. We model those data looking for patterns and try to anticipate many plausible futures. Big corporations and governments use Amy's projections to prepare for all kinds of scenarios, including pandemics. The type of work that we do results in very big bets, you know, sometimes involving billions or multiple billions of dollars. That chief executives and their teams have to have to place. And we want to make sure that they're prepared. But Amy says her research into scientific innovation and technology trends will more just regular people need to know about them as well. Manish like you, I'm a regular person too. Here's the plight of the regular person. The problem is that we're living through this great transformation and every one of us who's living today, we're going to have to start making some really difficult choices that impact how we spend our time and what we want our kids to do and the people that we vote for, you know, these are going to be complex decisions and the good news is that on the horizon, there's a lot of opportunity for personal growth for economic growth, but that opportunity comes with some serious associated risks. So today on the show, Amy Webb talks us through four categories of innovation. And explains how these inventions and ideas could upend the future of travel, wellness,.

Amy Webb Manu zamoro di future today institute NYU stern school of business Amy Manish
"future today institute" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:04 min | 6 months ago

"future today institute" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"But I just don't see the figure to overly aggressive when we still have an employment numbers below where the we start if we still have two and a half million people that we're trying to get into the workforce Ten year yield right now two O 4% spot gold down 1% 1853 the outs West Texas intermediate crew down 3.7% to 91 90 a barrel I'm Charlie peloton That is a Bloomberg business flash All right Charlie thank you so much This is Bloomberg business We Cal master along with Tim and our interactive brokers studio Bloomberg interactive broker studio on this Tuesday So you might recall an article in Barron's last year Tim it was about synthetic biology possibly being the next big thing in proponents of it saying quote the total addressable market being of a $1 trillion that's at least according to the report What does it look like when do we get there and how do we get there Amy Webb is the CEO of the future today institute She's also a Professor of strategic foresight at the NYU stern school of business She's the co author of the new book with Andrew hessel the genesis machine our quest to rewrite life in the age of synthetic biology She joins us on the phone from New York Amy how are you I'm great Tim thanks for having me In case anyone missed that Barron's article from last year let's start by defining synthetic biology What is it You got it So synthetic biology is an emerging area of science that effectively involves redesigning organisms to have useful purposes by engineering them to have new abilities And it can range from messenger RNA up to new types of organisms and even resurrecting a woolly mammoth believe it or not It is pretty remarkable And if you think about things that could be transformative right in our world This is one of those things Where are we though in this process where it really starts to impact our world I did come across in reading in I know Tim and I and reading and preparing for this segment about investors investor dollars and investor tension increasingly looking at this space That's right I mean in the last decade investors have put around $26 billion by my account and to synthetic biology startups And depending on who you talk to the current products that are in being created right now they can generate anywhere from a trillion to around $4 million over the next decade I say this however noting that we are on a very long trajectory with those technology So I want to drive home the point that this is the beginning We are nowhere near even the middle of all of this So right now investment is really going into the infrastructure and the company is building out the processes and the tools It's way too early to start investing in products Right So we've got to think what in maybe a ten year 20 year time frame perhaps even longer but I do want to do like in it is it akin to some other transformative innovation or technology that we've seen over the last hundred years Absolutely So I think that the best way to think about this believe it or not is the early days of the telephone And when Alexander bell went on stage upstate New York at chickering hall and debuted this new crazy device he had made in a wooden box Nobody believed him It was so shocking to people to hear this voice come out of the other end But they flooded the stage and demanded to see behind the curtain Assuming that somebody was back there When they realized it was a new technology it was absolutely earth shattering But it's still took a little bit of time to get from that demonstration on the stage to transatlantic wires That being said within the first couple of decades there were telephones there were lines drawn there were the beginnings of satellites being thought about in all of these years later There's actually no way to put a true valuation on what that telephone spawn which includes satellite technology Internet technology TikTok the ability for us to do what we're doing right now Often schools being a couple of other economists said that the only real way to measure the impact of all of this is to do it in the reverse to start taking things away I think we are going to look back at this moment in time As the chickering hall stage of synthetic biology and in the mid future it's going to be hard to figure out what the actual valuation is Similarly And I think it's going to happen at a pretty obviously a much faster clip So you add that of the telephone Yeah I mean that's fascinating considering dial up wasn't even that long ago and the greater history of the telephone and look what we're doing today through the Internet Amy I'm wondering about investor exposure here And we only have about 30 seconds left But what is our audience need to know about where they can actually get in on the get in early when it comes to synthetic biology We have 30 seconds then we're going to come back with you for more time You got it There are some ETFs out there BlackRock our capital management some others Franklin templeton their ETFs are they exist they're performing better than expected although I'm not specifically giving investment advice In their IPO deals happening all the time The median size of synthetic biology IPOs is rising It's valued about twice as much year over year So I think it's a matter of just poking around and seeing what looks safe and comfortable And maybe we'll poke a little further in terms of the catchwords or the developments or the established companies that need to be on investors radar when it comes to the development of the synthetic biological space We're going to come back with Amy Webb CEO of the future today institute and continue talking about her book the genesis machine Well let's head to Washington D.C. now and check in with Nancy Lyon She's standing by with the latest when it comes to world and national news Haynes Thanks Tim President Biden says he and Russian president Vladimir Putin have both expressed a desire to continue diplomacy but he's not convinced that Putin has put aside his intention to invade Ukraine Bloomberg surf Chapman has the latest from.

Tim Amy Webb future today institute Bloomberg interactive Barron NYU stern school of business Andrew hessel chickering hall Charlie West Texas Alexander bell Bloomberg New York Amy
"future today institute" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

03:14 min | 7 months ago

"future today institute" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"It's enough to make someone turn to religion. Well, 50 years from now, they're going to look back at this time in our history and they're going to say, can you believe that people used to leave their progeny to chance? Yeah. They used to leave the next generation to a genetic I'd feel better about that if I trusted people's choices more. You know, honestly, I think maybe nature had a better way of doing it. But you know what? We're headed headlong into the future. And I can't imagine two people I'd rather go down that road with and these two right here. Amy, you've given us so much food for thought. Future today institute dot com. If you are a business person, a CEO, or if you work for the government, and you're trying to figure out what the hell is going on, this is the person to talk to. Future today institute. We do need a little more strategic planning in our life. I think we do. Let's do it right this time. Father Robert ballas here. Thank you for joining us. Thank you for going to CES, so we didn't have to. I appreciate it. Did you get your battery? It looks like the camera got better again. It's slightly back. I basically had to plug in a portable battery bank, which is actually not enough, but hopefully the last one let you go before you get exhausted again. What a great conversation. I thank you both so much for being here. Just fascinating stuff. I think so much that we need to do more of this. We had originally scheduled some others who were not able to make it this week. Maybe we'll do this again with the people who we also wanted as well as you guys because I think there's so much more to talk about. We didn't get to all of it by any means. Amy, thank you for setting the table though. And what an amazing, amazing conversation. Thank you, Amy Webb. Thank you for letting me go completely off the rails. I appreciate it. Awesome. And yes, I'll watch the expanse, okay? Thank you. I keep trying. And I lose track. I don't read the books instead. Also read the books. The books are tracking. The books are actually fantastic. Yeah, I think I'll do the books instead. There's just something about it. I just have a hard time engaging with it on TV. So maybe it's the books. Thank you, Robert. Come visit us as soon as it's safe. We'd love to see you again. I'll be back in 6 months or so. Yeah. Thanks so much to our fabulous audience for being weird and here and listening to all this. It's been a wild, wild show. We do twit every Sunday afternoon. It's always different. It's always interesting. It's one of the reasons I like it. We have a rotating group of panelists. And so it's always a different subject. But I think this was really great. If you want to watch it live around two 30 Pacific 5 30 eastern 22 30 UTC just go to live twit TV. If you're watching live, it'd be great to chat live, or chat room is a wide open Amy was in there, which was great. And I know father Robert frequently goes.

Future today institute Robert ballas Amy Amy Webb Robert
"future today institute" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

07:00 min | 7 months ago

"future today institute" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"Then Descartes who's looking at free will, again, and think is like forms the foundation of AI. All the way up to Jules Verne, who's sort of writing pre science fiction to H.G. Wells who I know everybody knows, but probably his most important work was not the time machine. It was this paper that he wrote called the anticipations of the reaction of mechanical scientific progress upon human life and thought. Because never forget that. You never forget. Well, basically what he was saying was because he was a journalist. He did something he called predictive writing. But he was trying to say that these sort of what if scenario, the word scenario did exist yet, but what if? These are important questions to ask. And we can't just assume that fate is in charge of everything. If we want to make our own destinies, we have to do something about it. So he did. And through this process, which he was trying to get into universities, he wanted people to study it the way they studied math. He imagined a national highway system automated machines that he thought at that point would replace what was the servant class. He thought of prefab houses, he thought at some point the collapse of capitalism would come and later on, unfortunately, as tends to happen, he got into eugenics. So his utopian future was, yeah, so that happens. But anyway, then you get to World War II, and you get Nicholas wrestler and Olaf helmer, who use something called the Delphi method, which is a structured way of having conversations to collect data. Again, thinking about what if. Herman Khan, who I trace my origin to, he took a turn and built on what they did, but this time used game theory, which is what I did academically. And develop probabilistic outcomes. And so it was Khan who first used the word scenario. He was having lunch with a friend of his who worked in Hollywood. It's World War II. He's trying to get military officials to think very critically about what would be the aftermath of dropping a bomb on Japan. And he couldn't get them to pay attention. And he kept telling people like just sending numbers, it doesn't mean anything. And he was actually trying to prevent this from happening. So he wrote what became on thermal nuclear war. Anyhow, that takes us up to the modern era. So you've got pure vac, who's this crazy French man, super into eastern religions becomes a pivotal person executive at royal Dutch Shell because he figures out how to predict oil shocks. And makes the business case for foresight. Peter Schwartz, in a bunch of people after them sort of become this Diaspora. And now today, we've got people like me. So I'm trained and it's not divination anymore or speculation. But it is still sitting with uncertainty. And I would say now that there's a little bit of a gap, there's theorists. These are academics who are pretty closed off and they don't really care about practical applications. And then there's enthusiasts. They are super interested in the future, but don't necessarily have training. And I think there's an in between space that's useful that's necessary for society because our future depends on this type of work I think. And in a way, it's good to precondition people to say, look, we're not delphic oracles. We're not going to predict what's going to happen because that's almost impossible. This was going making the rounds on Reddit last week from the New York Herald magazine of 1922 what the world will be like in a hundred years. And while there's a lot of interesting stuff in here, of course, a lot of mistakes as well, including they said we won't be cooking anymore. In fact, private dwellings are going to disappear because we're all going to live in cooperative housings with dining halls. But some of it was actually pretty accurate. That's not what you do. You're not trying to say what the world's going to look like in 21 22. No, no. Now, that being said, my job is to explore alternative futures. So it's not about prediction. It's about preparation. So a lot of times when I have a big team that I work with. A lot of times we're going to companies the executives at companies and saying, what if your entire supply chain is not based anymore in China? What if it's based somewhere else, what would be the potential outcomes? Or, hey, there's the synthetic biology thing on the very near term horizon. What if the outcome of this is that humans live ultra long lives, that's good on the one hand, it's actually really bad for sports for professional sports leagues. What? Why? Why? Because you wind up with games. I mean, I'm not super, super into sports, but I'm super into baseball. And you could make the argument that the star players who are also the most expensive never retire. That would be bad. It would be bad. It would make the game super boring, but it would also break the financial models. Yeah. Interesting. So anyhow, inside over for a professional sports to survive. You also need turnover just in general in government life. Yes. You can have supreme art currents like the current Supreme Court gets to be on the court for life if life now means a 120 years. Instead of 80 years, does that become a problem? I think it probably does. It's already too old. As is the Congress, yeah. So anyhow, we don't make predictions, but we do look at, again, using not speculation, but data. What are the possible outcomes? What are the next order impacts? And the point of this sometimes is to inspire and delight. But what I'm hoping is that it enables it reduces uncertainty so we can make smarter decisions and also so that it inserts us into that future. My concern is that with politics and COVID and everything else, people are now lists and also absolutists. And I think our future demands a sense of awe and wonder. Not complacency or disillusionment, but leaning into that uncertainty with the hope that we can learn. And we don't have all the answers. And we're willing to make better decisions. By the way, her company's Amy's company, the future today institute, does make available it's a tech trends report..

foundation of AI Nicholas wrestler Olaf helmer Herman Khan H.G. Wells Jules Verne New York Herald magazine Peter Schwartz Delphi royal Dutch Shell Khan Hollywood Japan Reddit China baseball Supreme Court Congress future today institute Amy
"future today institute" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:56 min | 8 months ago

"future today institute" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

"You mentioned that we are going to be hearing a lot more about the meta verse, even though that is not Facebook's own thing. It's many, many companies. But where do you think we're going to see movement or how do you think the metaverse is going to show up for most people in 2022? One of the strongest signals coming out of last year, I think was the fact that a few companies have changed their names. So Facebook changed its name to meta square, the payments platform changed its name to block as in blockchain and these companies are letting others know that they intend to be the primary ecosystem player. I think more practically what we're going to see this year is more augmented reality, more mixed reality. Basically more lightweight consumer implementations that will be part of the metaverse as it's growing. I might also say that some of the arguments were having today about big tech in their outsized influence in the Internet space, we may someday be having about the metaverse. We're already seeing consolidation and there are already interoperability problems. So these are all the things that you think are going to happen. What do you sort of wish would happen? What would you hope in 2022 that we would see more of that whether or not it's actually going to happen? Here's what I would say. One of the challenges we had in 2020 and also 2021 had to do with misinformation. And I think some of that misinformation is tied to algorithms and profit models, but some of this is on us. And what I would love to see going forward in 2022 is sort of an effort to make media literacy, a more prominent part of our education system. Digital media literacy should be a mandatory part of what kids are taught in schools. And I think the faster that we get on that, the better off we are all going to be. It's potentially one of the single best things we could do to plan for our futures. Amy Webb is the founder of the future today institute..

meta square Facebook Amy Webb future today institute
"future today institute" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:45 min | 8 months ago

"future today institute" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

"And your ongoing support that makes people smarter every day. Thanks again and happy new year. How a futurist sees the future of tech for the year ahead. From American public media, this is marketplace tech. I'm Kimberly Adams. New technology has shaped so much of the last year, advancements in BioTech and mRNA vaccines helped save lives. Better software helped many of us work and learn from home more efficiently. Meanwhile, the federal government made big investments in tech infrastructure while trying to push for more regulation of big tech companies. And those same companies made their own headlines good and bad while expanding into virtual worlds and even space. So what's ahead for tech in 2022? Amy Webb is a futurist and founder of the future today institute. She says last year will heavily influence what's ahead. Well, there are a number of signals that emerged in 2021 that will carry over and they range from the metaverse, which depending on your perspective. Fortunately or unfortunately, we will continue to hear about decentralization, which sort of covers the world of decentralized finance and blockchain and those pesky NFTs. I also think we're going to be hearing about synthetic biology and quite a bit about space. Let's take that synthetic biology one first. We are still in the pandemic. Where do you see things going there? As we are speaking, there's a variant that is moving through most countries around the world, including our own. If anything that will, I think, spur additional research into some key areas of diagnostics and over the counter testing and Therapeutics in our race to try to curb what's happening. But I think this is where synthetic biology, which is a relatively new field of science and is responsible for creating the messenger RNA vaccines comes into play. There's actually quite a bit that is happening within the realm of engineering or editing biological code. Can you give some examples? Sure, so pretty soon we're going to be able to program living biological structures as though they are tiny computers. A chicken patty that was produced in a bioreactor using the actual cells of a chicken that over time, a short amount of time turned into a chicken patty that is the same molecular structure and tastes exactly the same. But didn't require any of the natural resources that commercial chicken farms currently require to produce the meat that most people buy in their grocery stores and at restaurants. And are we going to be seeing this kind of stuff at scale in 2022 or just more of it come out? Well, synthetic biology is on a long horizon trajectory, but I would argue that it's the most important technology of the 21st century. There are more applications.

Kimberly Adams Amy Webb future today institute federal government
"future today institute" Discussed on This Week In Google

This Week In Google

07:19 min | 9 months ago

"future today institute" Discussed on This Week In Google

"People named babies named given the name. You wouldn't name your kid alone. After Billy Joel named their kid the numbers went up and up. He wrote, he wrote a song, didn't he? Yeah, yeah. 2020 Joel does. In 2020, only about 1300 babies were given the name. Okay. I mean, there's a name for this kind of story. It's kind of a lifestyle. Moral panic. Moral panic. I don't think that's the name. I don't think it's a name that I'm looking for. Do you want to talk about basic effort for a trend story? I know you're trend story. That's the word I was looking for. Do you want to talk about Benedict Devin slides? Every year we does this. That time of year. Yeah, it is a time of year. I think Ben's brilliant. And a great analyst. And I don't know how many pages it is. What was it? Oh hell, I should look. I'm sorry, I should have looked up the name of it is three steps to the future, which is essentially the premise is. Three trends in 2021. You know, it's funny because Amy Webb, who is a regular on a Twitch show would love her. She's a futurist. Awesome. Future today institute. Came to us a couple of weeks ago and said, I'd like to do a show about the future with on Twitter. So we contacted, I think Daniel Suarez, science fiction author. And I thought we're going to get a scientist as well. And get Amy and talk about future trends. That'll be early next year. I think will be the first January 7th, the first week of the first Twitter. Nice. I'll watch that. Won't that be interesting? But let's see what Ben has to say. Okay, future. Here's a whole slide. This is one. Can you summarize this, Jeff? She says future. There you go. I'm trying to look for the slides. There you go. Okay. The tech vision's for 2030. He's got two dots. One says web three, one says metaverse. And then he's got a lot of other words, random words put together. And then the great rebranding. Redefine the vision and set a broader goal for VR crypto. So cryptocurrencies are now going to be called web three. So which is basically say it's BS. Yeah. VR AR going to be called metaverse, the next plot. That was interesting. He says the next platform after smartphones. I think that's probably true. Web three, the Holy Roman Empire is nearly is neither holy nor Roman nor an empire, according to Voltaire. Cryptocurrency is neither secret nor only a currency. Blockchain or DLT are not databases. That's what Voltaire would have said, had he been born later. Blockchain is a distributed open computing system, or at least that's the plan, web three, the dream of the next version of the Internet. Users read the web publishers create and make money. Web two users create networks control and make money web three users create network users control networks and money and you know what I'm done with this. This is fun. This isn't that insightful. BuzzFeed went public, said interesting Jeff. It's because journalism was a spac, but a whole bunch of this back holders backed out before. It was a spectacle. It was a backpack, yes. And so they didn't get as much money as they wanted me. Well, NBC was not happy about the valuation, which was a clawback on his backpack. And so NBC owns BuzzFeed. Hugely. Podcast. Let's say Comcast, my Friends. They own BuzzFeed news, HuffPost, taste. Acquired complex media complex part of this is part of what the horizon owned HuffPost. They sold it to BuzzFeed. Oh. Rising got out of all that media. And they bought complex from hurston Verizon for 300 and then Jonah peretti thinks the only way to compete with the big guys is to become a big guy. He's the founder and CEO. He's brilliant. Jota was the brains behind HuffPost two, really, and all the technology. But this back didn't work so well. The 94% of investors withdrew. Yes. I don't understand enough to understand fully what that means, but that means there wasn't as much money in this. Yeah, you raised a bunch of money and then you take things public through a pipe basically. So you usually merge with the public company. But you have to raise all the funds with the idea of doing this. So they just didn't have enough money to do their deal, or did they buy a cheaper company? The merger raised roughly $16 million after investors withdrew about 94% of the 287 and a half million previously raised by the spac. The company also raised an additional 150 million in convertible note financing borrowing as part of the spec deal. What came out at ten bucks today closed the 7 16. Nobody's lost. And finally, because we're going to take we're going to take a break and then get your picks of the week. Finally, the Chinese have finally made contact with an alien civilization on the backside of the moon. There it is. They call it mystery hut. The outhouse on the moon. They're rover is only it's only 260 feet away. Over there. It's not moving fast. It looks like it's cubic, which means that either there are aliens on there or wombats, Stonehenge. Because it's a cube. And that poop could be that's John's joke. It could be a monolith. Except 1001. It would be the monolith from spinal tap, it'd be kind of like a little one. I actually it's hard to say how big it is, I think it might be actually like 5 meters tall, but I'm not sure. I thought the pressure reports that 20 meters, 20 meters. Anyway, it looks kind of like a cube. So in three months, two to three months, the U2 forgotten about it. Two will spend well, if you put it in lunar terms, there's only two to three lunar days. So it's not okay. I'll still forget about it. They have to because they have to avoid craters because if they fall in, it's like there's nobody to get them out. Estonian rat robots. So that's a good that's a good story. Wouldn't it be amazing if they got there and it is a cube? It's like, wow. That would be a base. Went on. It's a cute cube..

Benedict Devin Amy Webb Future today institute Daniel Suarez Voltaire Ben Billy Joel Twitter Jeff hurston Verizon Jonah peretti Joel NBC Amy Comcast
"future today institute" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

05:44 min | 9 months ago

"future today institute" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"It's time for Twitter this week and tech and show we cover the weeks, tech news and apparently I think there'll be some citrus news today. This is going to be a lot of fun. When we got these two guests on the show, we said, that's it. Stop. No need for a fourth, so great to have Amy Webb here. Amy has been missing in action as she took a little time off. CEO of the future today institute, you've wrapped up your book. I have I've got the hot off the presses, the galley right here. It's called the genesis machine and it's about the futures of synthetic biology. And I will make sure you get a copy. Oh, very excited. Okay, good. I'm going to order it if you don't see it. You can pre order it now. I think I will. I just get it because I'm very interested in that. Amy is besides being a futurist, one of the smartest people we know, especially on matters having to do with Asia, having lived there for some time. Also, with us from the information, the wonderful Paris Martina. See what I'm saying? I only need these two and I'm done. Paris. Actually, the third guest is the Buddha's hand. Oh yeah, let's see that. Show that. What the hell is some weird citrus fruit Amy's? Oh my God. So for those of you who are listening, picture, if you will, a bunch of limes that somebody sort of squeezes out to a point and then attaches them all at a base. It's called. Sorry, sorry, not a lot. One of the aliens from the I think the third season of Star Trek, I believe, but I might be wrong. It also, yeah, it kind of looks like a Dahlia if you hold it straight up. Pretty. But it's like the greatest smelling thing you've ever smelled. So you just have it sitting there just to smell good. I just, listen, I have a frustrating job. I need something to get through my day. And it's not going to be Adderall. So I just sit next to this thing and I smell it. Who needs that or all I've got Buddha's hand? And Paris, we also, as we begin the show, we wanted to wish your good friend Ryan, a happy birthday on Monday. Happy birthday. Happy birthday, Ryan, apparently. He's the only person in your circle of friends who actually listens to this show. So that's good. I don't know. I've heard that other people do, but for me wrong. I've heard people listen to Twitter. I've heard that. Anyway, I'm thrilled to have both of you here. I don't know exactly where to start this week. It's kind of a grab bag. Let's start with Twitter, because they launched their first, maybe no, not their first paid product, but their first widely available paid product, the Twitter blue, subscription service. And of course, being the Twitter flunky that I am, I immediately paid even though I have no idea what I'm getting. I did too. You did, too. I remember reading about it in Casey Newton's newsletter platformer and I paused, got up, don't know why. And then subscribe to Twitter blue. I don't know. I use Twitter so much that frankly, I should be paying a little bit. That's kind of what I felt like. But also I really enjoy the functionality of nuzzle, which is a app company that Twitter ended up buying that allows you to see what your friends and people in your network on Twitter, what links they are tweeting or commenting on. And they have put that feature in Twitter blue. We're on the browser you can see the top articles in your network. And frankly, that to me alone is worth 2.99 a month. That was funny. They did. But it's funny to say that because it's exactly the thing that got me to subscribe. I was so mad when Twitter bought nuzzle and within unceremoniously within a week just pulled the plug. Absolutely ridiculous. Yeah. So Jonathan Abrams who founded nuzzle, and I think, is one of the he was also one of the most brilliant guys out there in tech. He's just like slightly too early on a lot of different things. So yeah, he was friends to a pre MySpace pre Facebook. He had launched nuzzle and originally, it was an intelligence tool. And again, I think it was just slightly too early. And Twitter should have seen this functionality and they should have done something with it much earlier. And the way that I used it was that I created a whole bunch. I had like hundreds of Twitter lists that I had made that are all private. So I didn't want to follow those accounts. Instead, I used it as an intelligence gathering tool. And so I had one that was just very just having you with robots. And I had another one that was specifically about an area of drones. And I had nuzzles set up to ping me, 'cause you used to be able to set a threshold. So you could set it as like 5 three or two for how many people shared that same article or we're talking about the same thing. So basically, what I got was a curated view across individual topics all day long on the app. And it was like the most amazing thing. Then yeah, it got bought by a scroll got bought by which then got up by Twitter. They shut it down. It's back. But I don't find it at super useful now because if you follow a lot of people, you basically wind up with the echo chamber. You don't have all the settings that we had. This is the new Twitter page. There's a new little flame icon that says top articles. And this is their version of nuzzle. The one thing I do like if you click available in browser too. No, no, no, it's available on the app. You can. It's nice. iOS. It is on Android. I think no, no. I think it's on Android, but not iOS. Oh. Look.

Twitter Amy Amy Webb future today institute Paris Casey Newton Ryan Martina Jonathan Abrams Asia MySpace Facebook
"future today institute" Discussed on Spark from CBC Radio

Spark from CBC Radio

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"future today institute" Discussed on Spark from CBC Radio

"And flying cars and even exploring the cosmos in wonder star ships. But it's been more than fifty years since the first episode of the original star trek aired. And we seem to be no closer to transporters today than we were back then darn it. I was promised a flying car so we called up a couple of smart future thinkers and ask them what. The movement of people and goods might look like in the coming decades. I'm my name is lazy. And i am a senior associate of the future today institute. Hi my name is shawna braille. And i'm an associate professor at the institute for management and innovation at the university of toronto mississauga. There's a high likelihood that technologies like drone delivery autonomous vehicles and. Not sort of thing are going to become quite ubiquitous over the next ten to twenty years. I we're going to start seeing more of those through and so there are technologies right now that we think of as being very futuristic that are coming to the world very soon with some deadlines so one good example is japan's low series train and so this is a train that functions on magnetic levitation and it can break speeds over five hundred kilometers in our which is really really fast so you can get basically from toronto to waterloo in about fifteen minutes or less which is huge. So that seems like it's completely futuristic and out of our reach but japan is aiming for twenty twenty seven which.

future today institute shawna braille institute for management and i university of toronto mississa japan waterloo toronto
"future today institute" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

11:57 min | 1 year ago

"future today institute" Discussed on No Agenda

"Who had that map. Well flying around well. The company is no more. they folded they. They left wednesday. That's all that's left. That's all of your money. Vc thank you. For playing pew pew pew pew goan gone. I do have a correction from one of our retired police officers. Who says you wanted to weigh in on the story from thirteen. Thirty regarding civilian response to service calls which. We pooh-poohed liverpool. Did we do the training. People the incident. You know to go to help civilians instead of sending cops which is part of the defunding the police. I sat there in seattle or portland. Yeah well he says You know you read it. You and john combat. This was a horrible idea to have civilians respond to robberies. I that that new group of civilians won't respond to robberies is bullcrap says They said it was to take reports for things like abandoned vehicles and cold burglaries. This is something that's existed for decades in many police departments across the country typically the called. Cso's community service officers and they are report takers. That's all they do. Any crime of violence or with known suspect is router to a real police officer departments. They use this model do so to save money by essentially sending a lower paid level employees to handle calls. That don't require an officer to go. The story is a classic case of rebranding to sound woke and has nothing to do with the so-called mental health of social workers. That story was simply a diverse. You signal that the about the city's cost cutting measures measures. I think we've been taking in. I believe line and sinker once again once ran once again. No no wonder we have our producers bail us out which is what most podcast don't have you nailed it my friend you nailed it right. There got to clip to keep up with the news. I didn't know this was going on in men in trees. The protest has been going on for two years. You guys have been up in the trees and they're protesting for more than two years. Protesters have been trying to block the construction of a natural gas pipeline through. Virginia's blue ridge mountains well. That fight came to an end today. A court order authorized. The use of force and police went up in a crane to remove the last protester who detach themselves to a tree. Robbie harris of member station w. in blacksburg reports all through the winter and the one before that they stood their ground an array of protesters sitting in trees rotating in and out for months at a time trying to stop the mountain valley pipeline. They occupied a steep section of forest in the pipeline's path living on platforms high in the canopy negotiator. Here earlier with a with a bullhorn negotiate us out of the trees. That's a protester who goes by the name acre who wouldn't give their real name because of possible legal consequences of the protest. Take us out of these trees this week. Law enforcement did just that yesterday. One of the two remaining protestors using a crane and today. They came for acre. The last protester who've been live streaming the action from their perch in the tree and here comes are very very slow extraction all right. I might have to go. Everything's a tv. Show now everything but hey hey guys take is. This guy's active shooter. Active shoulder take is in the tree. Hang guys doing a podcast is. Everything's live streaming. The fact that he's up in a tree nydia. Hey molly would does marketplace for npr for npr. Molly would get. We both know molly would quit. Well molly good. Oh molly and she had this little ditty about Privacy regarding the type of hippo protected information. I might add that you will be giving up to function according to the laws and beliefs that people like molly have increasingly. You know we're all going to be asked for these data points that will very likely be housed at a national level. You know whether that's a covid vaccine passport some kind or a record of who you've interacted with and where you've been and i think that's pretty concerning i remember. I mean that's what you told us as you said. I think this will lead to the end of privacy and it has if you take nothing away from this conversation just on your privacy is dead. Now i i that sounds apocalyptic and horrible and it kind of is by watching movies. The resurrection this possible. Yeah i mean here's the thing we're we're never gonna re. There's no going back there. No going back. Privacy is dead so let's acknowledge that let's acknowledge it and figure out a better way to move forward. The problem is that we are not publicly acknowledging it we are just pressing on and hoping nothing goes wrong. Amy webb futurist founder of the future today institute. Thanks so much for talking with me. You privacy is dead. Thanks for talking with me. It's unbelievable so we just give up now. That's the message. That's the official message is crazy for what you don't want to be safe be safe. You wanna be safe safe for the safety versus private safe. I have one last clip all right and this is the clip. That's that's seems problematic. If you ask. Problematic is an outlawed term here okay. well well. That's problematic in itself. But this is the echo this is. We just passed his last week. We passed equal. Pay day oh. I missed that. Yeah you know what means right day. The extra month or to a woman has to work to make the same amount as a man. Oh at but. I think there's a problem with his listed as clip carefully and tell me that mike concerns are not justified with the logic of this. This is equal payday. Npr bureau windsor johnston reports. Today's date symbolizes. How far into the year women have to work to earn the same as men did the previous year at an event with members of the us women's soccer team president biden said the gap between men and women is real in almost every professional two cents on the dollar on average for a women. It's eighty seven cents for every dollar white manner. His sixty three cents for native american women. Sixty cents the. Us women's soccer team filed a lawsuit against the sport last year. Alleging discrimination on the basis of sex by denying them the same working conditions including pay as their male counterparts fans. Back them up shouting equal pay during the world cup final match which the us women one. Oh you might as well tell me because i agree with you problematic. Well here's the deal. Why if if it's a women all women don't get paid as women. Don't come certain women get paid more than certain other women if it's just about women if it's just women huckabee the aap. I i don't know where the term comes in american pacific. I noticed means. I'm just a little annoyed by. Hello but why do these women. They the asian american african asian american civic island. Sorry asian-american you're right. Why do they get paid more per year. Eighty seven cents on the dollar into white women. I know i'm just go ahead. And then they. Then you have your african americans hispanic and the deport native americas. They get nothing. And if it's a woman's issue why are all these wise it categorized by race and what is one race. The asians make more money than anybody else. i mean. this doesn't doesn't make sense. You have to be about women it's gotta be about women or can't be about race and women combined is not intersectional like the like the say is it or is it. Well the logical conclusion that this may be driving towards and dot heard this. I do like this a lot with the breakdown of pennies. I'm sure is science This can only mean that. The white man is discriminating based upon women and the color of their skin. And we all know the asian women love you longtime so. That's where it's going. White men are so horrible. Not only do they. Discriminate against women they discriminate discriminatively feeling. That's where this could go. It could go somewhere because you can start breaking it down like this and let it slide. Yeah no no no. No i like that. let's Let's keep our eye on that one. That's a term. That's something that could could pop back a couple times and that's what we do here. We protect your make your sanity and by extension your family and your pocketbook. Valuable at all. Please show your love by contributing some value back time. Talent treasure doesn't matter two four dot org slash as a good place to start coming to you from Opportunities on thirty three here in the capital of the drone star state known as austin texas. If you're looking for on a map issued by any government service look for seamer region number six. That is exactly what you will find us in the morning everybody. I'm adam curry silicon valley avid desire for some reason for some popcorn. And i can't say the yen for popcorn. 'cause that would be racist. I'm john c boy. We got nick the rat coming up next on no agenda stream dot com to fantastic mixes back toback coin nelson still still pissed at me. But you really want to hang around after that for secret agent paul until next time. Remember divorce dot org slash that sunday to be precise in the morning. Everybody else muslim and such. It's not the good microphone yet. But it's fourteen bucks better than nothing. Komo cove is taking this year. Tests outbreak taken one. Hundred years sucks. Here's the lives followed me. One could fall here over there and if he falls his way after his played well. Yes really shouldn't be joking. Say when he went even worse. You shouldn't say it don't matter it's a messy purpose bladder will remember anyway. Look the range challenge in europe and the united states take on together broad and complex. I.

Sixty cents seattle portland Robbie harris two years europe Virginia Hundred years Eighty seven cents last year Thirty sixty three cents last week wednesday two cents Amy webb Today molly this week yesterday
"future today institute" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

06:30 min | 1 year ago

"future today institute" Discussed on No Agenda

"That yeah. They came from the from the norse corporation that map. Yeah who had that map. Well flying around well. The company is no more. they folded they. They left wednesday. That's all that's left. That's all of your money. Vc thank you. For playing pew pew pew pew goan gone. I do have a correction from one of our retired police officers. Who says you wanted to weigh in on the story from thirteen. Thirty regarding civilian response to service calls which. We pooh-poohed liverpool. Did we do the training. People the incident. You know to go to help civilians instead of sending cops which is part of the defunding the police. I sat there in seattle or portland. Yeah well he says You know you read it you. John combine this was a horrible idea to have civilians respond to robberies. I that that new group of civilians won't respond to robberies is bullcrap says They said it was to take reports for things like abandoned vehicles and cold burglaries. This is something that's existed for decades in many police departments across the country typically the called. Cso's community service officers and they are report takers. That's all they do. Any crime of violence or with known suspect is router to a real police officer departments. They use this model do so to save money by essentially sending a lower paid level employees to handle calls. That don't require an officer to go. The story is a classic case of rebranding to sound woke and has nothing to do with the so-called mental health of social workers. That story was simply a diverse. You signal that the about the city's cost cutting measures measures. I think we've been taking in. I believe line and sinker once again once ran once again. No no wonder we have our producers bail us out which is what most podcast don't have you nailed it my friend you nailed it right. There got to clip to keep up with the news. I didn't know this was going on in men in trees. The protest has been going on for two years. You guys have been up in the trees and they're protesting for more than two years. Protesters have been trying to block the construction of a natural gas pipeline through. Virginia's blue ridge mountains well. That fight came to an end today. A court order authorized. The use of force and police went up in a crane to remove the last protester who detach themselves to a tree. Robbie harris of member station w. f. in blacksburg reports all through the winter and the one before that they stood their ground an array of protesters sitting in trees rotating in and out for months at a time trying to stop the mountain valley pipeline. They occupied a steep section of forest in the pipeline's path living on platforms high in the canopy negotiator. Here earlier with a with a bullhorn negotiate us out of the trees. That's a protester who goes by the name acre who wouldn't give their real name because of possible legal consequences of the protest. Take us out of these trees this week. Law enforcement did just that yesterday. One of the two remaining protestors using a crane and today. They came for acre. The last protester who've been live streaming the action from their perch in the tree and here comes are very very slow extraction all right. I might have to go. Everything's a tv show now everything. Hey hey guys take is this. Active shooter active shoulder take is in the tree. Hang guys doing a podcast is everything's live streaming the fact that he's up in a tree nydia. Hey molly would does marketplace for npr for npr. Molly would get. We both know molly would quit. Well molly good. Oh molly and she had this little ditty about Privacy regarding the type of hippo protected information. I might add that you will be giving up to function according to the laws and beliefs that people like molly have increasingly. You know we're all going to be asked for these data points that will very likely be housed at a national level. You know whether that's a covid vaccine passport some kind or a record of who you've interacted with and where you've been and i think that's pretty concerning i remember. I mean that's what you told us as you said. I think this will lead to the end of privacy and it has if you take nothing away from this conversation just on your privacy is dead. Now i i that sounds apocalyptic and horrible and it kind of is by watching movies. The resurrection this possible. Yeah i mean here's the thing we're we're never gonna re. There's no going back there. No going back. Privacy is dead so let's acknowledge that let's acknowledge it and figure out a better way to move forward. The problem is that we are not publicly acknowledging it we are just pressing on and hoping nothing goes wrong. Amy webb futurist founder of the future today institute. Thanks so much for talking with me. You privacy is dead. Thanks so much for talking with me. It's unbelievable so we just give up. Now that's the message. That's the official message is crazy for what you don't want to be safe to be safe. You wanna be safe safe for the safety versus private safe. I have one last clip all right and this is the clip. That's that's seems problematic. If you ask. Problematic is an outlawed term here okay. well well. That's problematic in itself. But this is the echo this is. We just passed his last week. We passed equal. Pay day oh. I missed that. Yeah you know what means right. The extra month or to a woman has to work to make the same amount as a man. Oh.

Robbie harris portland two years seattle wednesday John last week Virginia yesterday this week molly Thirty Amy webb liverpool One one more than two years thirteen Molly blacksburg
"future today institute" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

06:30 min | 1 year ago

"future today institute" Discussed on No Agenda

"That. Yeah they came from the from the norse corporation that map. Yeah who had that map. Well flying around well. The company is no more. they folded they. They left wednesday. That's all that's left. That's all of your money. Vc thank you. For playing pew pew pew pew goan gone. I do have a correction from one of our retired police officers. Who says you wanted to weigh in on the story from thirteen. Thirty regarding civilian response to service calls which. We pooh-poohed liverpool. Did we do the training. People the incident. You know to go to help civilians instead of sending cops which is part of the defunding the police. I sat there in seattle or portland. Yeah well he says You know you read it. You and john combat. This was a horrible idea to have civilians respond to robberies. I that that new group of civilians won't respond to robberies is bullcrap says They said it was to take reports for things like abandoned vehicles and cold burglaries. This is something that's existed for decades in many police departments across the country typically the called. Cso's community service officers and they are report takers. That's all they do. Any crime of violence or with known suspect is router to a real police officer departments. They use this model do so to save money by essentially sending a lower paid level employees to handle calls. That don't require an officer to go. The story is a classic case of rebranding to sound woke and has nothing to do with the so-called mental health of social workers. That story was simply a diverse. You signal that the about the city's cost cutting measures measures. I think we've been taking in. I believe line and sinker once again once ran once again. No no wonder we have our producers bail us out which is what most podcast don't have you nailed it my friend you nailed it right. There got to clip to keep up with the news. I didn't know this was going on in men in trees. The protest has been going on for two years. You guys have been up in the trees and they're protesting for more than two years. Protesters have been trying to block the construction of a natural gas pipeline through. Virginia's blue ridge mountains well. That fight came to an end today. A court order authorized. The use of force and police went up in a crane to remove the last protester who detach themselves to a tree. Robbie harris of member station w. in blacksburg reports all through the winter and the one before that they stood their ground an array of protesters sitting in trees rotating in and out for months at a time trying to stop the mountain valley pipeline. They occupied a steep section of forest in the pipeline's path living on platforms high in the canopy negotiator. Here earlier with a with a bullhorn negotiate us out of the trees. That's a protester who goes by the name acre who wouldn't give their real name because of possible legal consequences of the protest. Take us out of these trees this week. Law enforcement did just that yesterday. One of the two remaining protestors using a crane and today. They came for acre. The last protester who've been live streaming the action from their perch in the tree and here comes are very very slow extraction all right. I might have to go. Everything's a tv. Show now everything but hey hey guys take is. This guy's active shooter. Active shoulder take is in the tree. Hang guys doing a podcast is. Everything's live streaming. The fact that he's up in a tree nydia. Hey molly would does marketplace for npr for npr. Molly would get. We both know molly would quit. Well molly good. Oh molly and she had this little ditty about Privacy regarding the type of hippo protected information. I might add that you will be giving up to function according to the laws and beliefs that people like molly have increasingly. You know we're all going to be asked for these data points that will very likely be housed at a national level. You know whether that's a covid vaccine passport some kind or a record of who you've interacted with and where you've been and i think that's pretty concerning i remember. I mean that's what you told us as you said. I think this will lead to the end of privacy and it has if you take nothing away from this conversation just on your privacy is dead. Now i i that sounds apocalyptic and horrible and it kind of is by watching movies. The resurrection this possible. Yeah i mean here's the thing we're we're never gonna re. There's no going back there. No going back. Privacy is dead so let's acknowledge that let's acknowledge it and figure out a better way to move forward. The problem is that we are not publicly acknowledging it we are just pressing on and hoping nothing goes wrong. Amy webb futurist founder of the future today institute. Thanks so much for talking with me. You privacy is dead. Thanks for talking with me. It's unbelievable so we just give up now. That's the message. That's the official message is crazy for what you don't want to be safe be safe. You wanna be safe safe for the safety versus private safe. I have one last clip all right and this is the clip. That's that's seems problematic. If you ask. Problematic is an outlawed term here okay. well well. That's problematic in itself. But this is the echo this is. We just passed his last week. We passed equal. Pay day oh. I missed that. Yeah you know what means right day. The extra month or to a woman has to work to make the same amount as a man. Oh.

Robbie harris portland two years seattle wednesday Virginia last week yesterday molly this week Thirty One liverpool Molly more than two years one Amy webb thirteen today two remaining protestors
Century-old Michigan home produces more energy than it uses

Climate Connections

01:19 min | 1 year ago

Century-old Michigan home produces more energy than it uses

"Dr anthony leiserowitz and this is climate connections in two thousand. Six macro coffee bought a century old house. In ann arbor michigan. It had a south facing roof big windows and heart pine floors dream house but it lacked insulation the windows lead and a fifty year old furnace. Chugged away all winter long. We had to put buckwheat pillows heated up in the microwave. Stuff down at the bottom of the bed to stay warm at night and then we would get the utility bill and it was like three hundred and fifty bucks a month grow. Cough was determined to reduce energy waste and cut carbon pollution. He installed a geothermal heating and cooling system and rooftop solar panels and replaced appliances added insulation and installed storm windows all while preserving the homes original character and meeting historic preservation standards in twenty fifteen the international living future institute certified grow costs home as net zero energy meaning it produces as much energy as it uses. Its the oldest house in the country to that certification. And we're looking forward to giving up that crown because he says to limit climate change. It's necessary to cut carbon pollution from all homes including the ones that have been around for generations.

Dr Anthony Leiserowitz Ann Arbor Michigan International Living Future In Cough
Toolkit helps developers design affordable, climate-friendly residences

Climate Connections

01:10 min | 2 years ago

Toolkit helps developers design affordable, climate-friendly residences

"You may think it would be pricey to rent an apartment in a sleek new complex with rooftop solar and ultra efficient appliances but silver star apartments in La houses formerly homeless and disabled veterans. It's one of a small but growing number of audible. Housing developments. Built to meet Stringent Green Building Standards Amanda Sturgeon his former. Ceo of the International Living Future Institute the nonprofit certified buildings that meet strict targets for energy and water use climate benefits are that the typically zero energy homes so being able to generate all the energy for the homes from renewable resource says. She says investing in renewables typically pays off over time but the upfront cost can be a barrier for affordable housing developers so the Institute works with about twenty affordable housing developers in the US and it's created a toolkit with resources for designing and financing affordable zero energy buildings. She says a number are already under construction. Once you have built examples you can then sort of show people as possible and they can feel it and really see the you know. This is something that other people can. Invest in

Amanda Sturgeon International Living Future In La Houses CEO United States
"future today institute" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

10:09 min | 2 years ago

"future today institute" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

"Okay so fun fact. The nineteen eighty-two Science Fiction Classic Blade runner her was set around now wish November two thousand nineteen to be specific in Los Angeles but the LA envisioned by director. Ridley Scott is very different different from the L. A.. You would recognize today for one thing. It rains all the time. It is a dystopia and health scape with flying cars. Pervasive technology and artificial humans known as replicates who are almost indistinguishable from real humans. Also almost everyone smokes. Okay but aside from the obvious. How far off is the movie from present day. Twenty nineteen and what parts of our current day technological landscape. Did it actually get right. Amy Webb is founder. Founder and CEO of the future today institute and our favorite futurist have on the show and Talk Sifi. We started with the positives. I asked her what blade runner got right. I think some of the voice commands being able to talk to computers. I know that doesn't seem like the most interesting or exciting piece of that movie. But I think that was a pretty big leap. At the time time it would have been easy for people to imagine robots people always imagined robots. I think it would have been a much bigger leap to imagine an ambient interface. That's such a good detail because we have so much of that now that it almost doesn't register but you're right if you put yourself in one thousand nine hundred and you're like Oh okay. That's exactly which is why. Like flying on cars and the colonies that have moved off planet super interesting to think about but also not that hard to imagine at that time would have much much harder to imagine would have been the kind of technology that's currently invisible to us that we don't even think about we just use it. What do you think blade runner gets wrong. Where might I did have missed the mark I mean I think there are some obvious pieces like how artificial intelligence would manifest and I don't blame anybody for as long as we've had. We've been thinking about anthropomorphized ai so it shouldn't really come. As a shock that time there was an idea that humans would live alongside human-like is right the replicant. Or that those ai as would be bioengineered in ways that gave them superior cognition or superior physical strength and speed so. I understand where those ideas came from but obviously they were incredibly wrong is all around. US suggested show up that way. But Ai is in many ways replicating human human speech and behavior. And I don't think in eighty two. We had enough computers and enough devices for people to envision a future where you know androids walked among us. replicant walked among us in different ways. But we kind of have some of that now in the Fox right right. So you're saying even though they're not walking around that we do have basically passable programs. I mean I think given our current fake news. Problem would tell us us that. They're pretty believable right. I mean the replicates in the movie for the most part walked and talked and look like humans. I guess what I would say is this. This is kind of like a replicant. Just in a different container. I want to talk about the ethics at the core of the plot. 'cause this sort of germ of the whole plot is the idea that these replicas have have rebelled against being used as slaves and you know we now have in the physical world factory robots and care robots and potentially pets and then of course in the digital world you know all of these bots that do all kinds of bidding and. I wonder what you think about the kind of ethical implications of our development of AI and robots that do are you know are programmed bidding right so there have been some studies done showing that Robots that look very industrial. That don't have any human like characteristics. We don't empathize with so if they're doing repetitive tasks or even causing self-harm you know it's interesting for us to watch but we kind of don't care but once that robot looks and behaves more like another living being so in this case as I'm thinking about all of the Boston Dynamics robots that you've probably seen videos of mumps or replicant right that we relate to them in a different way and I think think again this sets us up on a dangerous path to the future because we ought to ask a ethical questions not just about the service robots in our lives but also in the ways in which humans are being asked to act like robots so one of the interesting outcomes that we haven't that that we never saw in blade runner or space odyssey or the terminator like the key the Canon of sci-fi deals with one of the future scenarios scenarios that nobody ever showed us was a future in which humans are functioning as robots and the machines are tasked asked with the cognitive work. And that's what we're starting to see happen already. There are plenty of companies. Amazon is one of them that rely a on a synergy between humans and robots and it turns out that it costs a lot of money to get robots to do a lot of the fine motor skills which quite frankly they're not terrific at right now but it turns out. They're much better at some cognitive thinking skills and it's more efficient in terms of energy but also cost for the machines to do all the cognitive work for the humans to do the robotic work. You know so we out empathy and robots we again. We tend to go to these. The places where we're asking if it's okay for us to enslave machines or treat them in these ways. I don't think we've asked the question. Is it okay to enslave humans in a different way. Right isn't it. Is it possible that we're again. Slave is a very loaded term. But is it possible that we've cognitively boxed in or enslaved human commission. Yeah it does seem like these questions of empathy for your fellow person or bought on the Internet and the idea of what you can trust in what you can't those seem to have been very prescient thoughts right absolutely and so do some some of the other constant themes like control that reflect our current anxieties. I think and certainly some of the executives of the time you know computers Making their way from corporations into people's homes communications devices like very early cell phones that were finding their way into more and more people's use you know and it was sort of the very very very early days of the Commercial Internet so the entire communications landscape was starting to change pretty drastically and I think people were starting to wrestle with questions that have to do with control Who controls the police force. Who controls healthcare for who controls medical supplies who gets access who doesn't get access who's who winds up with permissions who doesn't wind up with permissions? I I mean these are pretty gnarly problems that were being asked. In addition to things like possible that humans have empathy or that the Republicans Republicans have empathy in ways. That don't necessarily complement each other. In what could that mean you know I.. I think these are challenging issues that we've been wrestling with for a long time. I want to ask ask you all credit to our engineer. Robin who right before this interview sent me the side by side photos. I had seen on twitter that Elon. Musk said that the new cyber truck that he just announced was going to be inspired by blade runner. Seeing the photos I had I had not realized. Just how inspired I mean of all the things that could come true from blade. Runner are did you think the truck would would physically. It's a good reminder that a lot of our current leaders and technology have been heavily really heavily influenced by Seifi. Jeff bezos is a massive trekkie and his days growing up watching star. Trek have clearly influenced inst- path that he's currently on you know Elon. Musk has been clearly influenced by lots of those eighties and nineties. Sifi movies. You know and ah these are good things especially those are good things to remember especially to those current and aspiring filmmakers Sometimes you don't realize is that really terrific. Storytelling highly highly effective visuals. Along the lines of what should be used to put together can have real world impact later on. Amy Webb is founder and CEO of the future today institute related links here in the future. We do have an ongoing conversation about whether botts should pretend to be humans whether they have to disclose close that they're actually box and whether people can tell the difference between online persona and a real person. But we're still working on something like the boys camp protests from blade runner that helps distinguish human from a replicant although apparently according to a piece I found in curiosity dot com from last year researchers from MIT have developed. Something called the minimal touring. Test now the touring test is supposed to be the threshold for a computer to be able to trick someone into thinking. It's a human. The minimum version is is more about figuring out what human judges think a robot would say compared to what they think a human would say so the best word to use to convince human human judges that you are also a human is apparently poop. Then see that come and did you. I'm Ali would and that's marketplace tech This is A._p._N...

Amy Webb Ai Elon Los Angeles Musk Ridley Scott Boston Dynamics Jeff bezos MIT botts twitter Fox Ali Amazon
"future today institute" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

04:09 min | 3 years ago

"future today institute" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"Mean, some I arrest somebody for suspicion on something. I'm totally just gonna take their thumbed. I've and plug it into my computer late. Yeah. Of course, very first thing I'm gonna do. The the star immediately began install files a quote, very out of the ordinary event. He had never seen happened before during this kind of analysis analysis. What is in the analysis? Let's see what happens the agent had to immediately. Stop the analysis to halt any further corruption of his computer, the analysis is still ongoing but inconclusive I don't think they would analysis is your brother. All right that totally. Let's see what's on it. Let's see what happens. You know? You can't turn off auto run. I'm just saying. Actually that ESE. What does that mean? Excellent. All right Nuff enough. I am so happy to have you to on here. We we decide normally we have four person panel. He said, no, no, Christina Warren, Amy Webb. That's all we need. That's a show. And I absolutely proved true Christina is the greatest we've known her since the good old days of mash senior developer advocate cloud. Developer advocate Microsoft now. Catcher at the ignite tour coming soon to a town near you. And on channel nine you do stuff there too, right? I sure do YouTube dot com slash Microsoft developer. So you are on YouTube. You are YouTube YouTube star. Star for you know, geeks nerds the best best audience at. At. Answer. She's an observe, of course, she is always glad to have you. Thank you for keeping the lights on late at night in Redmond. Are you rushing off to watch game of thrones? We have how many hours. Yes, happy. Now. You've put it out on if you have HBO go you can watch it early, right? That's what I. So so in one hour, and you could watch it right now. Amy. Yeah. I'm in fact, if I don't leave pretty soon, I'm going to get. Party. Two is you're you're you don't let your eight year old watch game of thrones. It's not on the it's blocked by the great firewall of Amy prevent. I don't blame you. All right. Amy Webb the author of the big nine. You gotta read this great book. And always welcome on our on air. You could find out more at the future today institute or just go to Amy Webb dot IO. And I'm glad to know you're on key base. I did not know that. I will I will figure out your handle and follow you. I yeah, I searched for Amy Webb. I didn't find it. I'm you could And I'm glad to know you're on key base. I did not know that. I will I will figure out your handle and follow you. I yeah, I searched for Amy Webb. I didn't find it. I'm you could follow me. I'm Leo LaPorte key base everybody who's a geek, should nobody base dot IO. It's free, and it's an amazing service. Use their encrypted get for all my private stuff. It's fantastic. And great to chat keeps PJ. He's keys and all that stuff. Thank you, Amy. Thank you, Christina. What a great show that come back to this is actually better than Kawai. Now we saw last night. I'll say that how about. Everybody. We did twit it every Sunday afternoon roundabout to fifteen right after the radio show. That's fifteen Pacific five fifteen eastern time. That's about oh, I don't know twenty one twenty UT something like that come by watch TV slash live. There's a live audio and video stream. So you can watch or listen if you're doing that chat room is a great place to hang out there watching and listening to its IRC dot twit dot TV everybody, even Amy's daughter will feel safe there. It should be part. It should be inside the great firewall of Amy. If you wanna watch us in studio, you're more than welcome to do. So we had a great a live audience from all over the world, Australia. The. Let's see

Amy Webb Christina Warren YouTube developer advocate Redmond HBO Leo LaPorte Australia Microsoft developer eight year one hour
"future today institute" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

04:52 min | 3 years ago

"future today institute" Discussed on EconTalk

"We listened to every episode we've ever done going back to two thousand six or Email addresses mail it contact out or we'd love to hear for. Today is February twelfth twenty nineteen and my guest is futurist and author Amy Webb. She is the founder of the future today institute. Her latest book is the big nine how the tech titans, and they're thinking machines could warp humanity. Amy welcomed econ to thanks for having me your books warning about the challenges we face that are going to face dealing with the reservoir official intelligence, what is special about the book, at least in my experience reading about a and worries about artificial intelligence is that it doesn't talk about a in the abstract. But actually recognize the reality that AI is mostly being developed within very specific institutional settings in the United States to China. So let's start with what you call the big nine. Who are they? Sure. So what's important to note is that when it comes to a there's a tremendous amount of misplaced optimism and fear. And so as you rightly point out, we tend to think in the abstract in reality, there are nine big tech giants who overwhelmingly our funding the research building the open source frameworks developing the tools and the methodologies building the data sets doing the tests and deploying AI at scale six of those companies are in the United States. I call them the G mafia for short, they are Google, Microsoft, Amazon, Facebook IBM and apple and the other three are collectively known as the bat, and they are based in China that's by do Alibaba and tencent together, those big nine tech companies are building the future of AI. And as a result are helping to make serious plans and determination. Nhs for. I would argue the future of humanity. And just out of curiosity. I don't think he say very much at all in the book about Europe is renting happening in Europe in terms of research. Sure. So the, you know, there's plenty of happening in France, certainly in Canada Montreal is one of the global hubs for what's known as deep learning. So this is not to say that there's not pockets of development and research elsewhere in the world, and it also isn't to say that there aren't additional large companies that are helping to grow. The ecosystem certainly Salesforce and Uber are both contributing. However, when we look at the large systems, and the ecosystems and everything that plugs into them overwhelmingly, these are the nine companies that we ought to be paying attention to. So I want to start with China at episode was Mike Munger on the sharing economy. What he calls his in his book tomorrow? Three point. Oh, and in the course that conversation. We joked about people getting rated on their social skills in that those would be made public how nice the people were to each other. And we had a nice laugh about that on. I mentioned that I didn't think that was an ideal situation that people would be incentivized that way to be good people, despite my general love of incentives that made me unease -i and response that episode some people mentioned episode of black mirror the video series. And also some things that are happening in China. And I thought, hey, whatever. But what's happening China is it's just it's it's hard to believe, but tell us about it share. And let me give you a quick example of of one manifestation of of of this trend, and then sort of set that in in the broader cultural context, so there's a province in China where a new. Sort of global system is being rolled out, and it is continually mining and refining the data of the citizens who live in that area. So as an example, if you cross the street when there's a red light, and you are not safely able to cross the street at that point. If you choose to anyways to jaywalk cameras that are embedded with smart recognition technology will automatically not just recognize that there's a person in the intersection when they're not supposed to be but will actually recognize that person by name. So they'll use facial recognition technology along with technologies that are capable of recognizing posture and gait it'll recognize that person is their image will be displayed on a nearby digital..

China Amy Webb AI Mike Munger Google United States Europe Nhs France Alibaba official Canada Montreal tencent apple Facebook Amazon IBM Microsoft