35 Burst results for "Fungus"

This Is a Great Time to Start a Compost Pile

Your Gardening Questions

02:41 min | Last week

This Is a Great Time to Start a Compost Pile

"Well fred i know that With all the leaves down there people still raking some leaves as well It's a good time now to use that and the grass clippings in everything to get compost pile going well. Mark is a wonderful time. As a matter of fact i have been a theme. Well i've i've done that for probably forty years now as a spot that is ideal for it. it's Behind the fence and way from the the neighbors view i put in some farm wire. You will farm fence. It's about forty two inches high. And then i put. And i do it a bit lazy man's way but of the chipper grass clippings bland with leaves. I toot around dumped into this compost area. Now i usually put in. Let's say a bag or two of the clippings. Then i have some old compost material in the same pen. 'cause it's four by eight i will put some of the the worked down compost. That has all bacteria and fungi and so on in to get the others going and am amazed some well. Family kids Long time ago. I had put this pie altogether on a thursday. They were here for the weekend. And i took them out when they didn't understand what i was telling him and had them put their hand down into that pile of composting materials and where didn't burn them. They pulled their hands up. Pretty darn quick because it builds temperature when this is happening and it's You need at least a reasonable space for but when you use only green things will no meat no cheese anything of that nature and you put in the blend that is We'll call living tissue and dying tissue. It's almost ideal for composting. And then you kind of adulterated. A little bit with the older compost to keep it going and then. I don't bother to turn it as often as i should. I put it together in the fall. I dig it out and start using it in the spring because over. The course of the winter is pretty much composted and Therefore i call it the lazy man's way you can build three bends and keep moving material back and forth into bins. All of which is very good. I am well between age and a very bad back and a little laziness. I just do it. The lazy man's way.

Fred Mark
The Low Down On Houseplant Fertilizers

Plantrama

04:50 min | 2 weeks ago

The Low Down On Houseplant Fertilizers

"We're going to start off with a true or false and that is you need to have a special fertilizer for every type of indoor plant that you grow so ellen what say you do. We need african violet food. Do we need orchid food. Do we need foliage plant food. I want to just be flip about it and say no next question but there are some times when a special fertilizer is useful but i will also say that you do not need an african violet food and an orchid food. You can use the same one. I will not name the company. But i will say i was once on a press junket in florida out of factory where different house plant. Fertilizers were being made. And guess what. The same fertilizer went into the african violet. Food bag that went into the orchid food bag because both of those foods are basically intended for promoting bloom in your house plants and it didn't matter if it was an african violet or an oregon and that company that you visited is not alone many fertilizer companies make a formulation that's appropriate for many different plants. And then they put it in a bag. That has the picture of a particular type of plant and that same formulation goes into another bag with another picture. So it's you know it's kinda the american way and people need to know that sometimes it is not necessary to have that special food for a particular plant. What i do think is necessary. Is that people not only think about the amount of fertilizer that they are giving plants right that they think about whether the fertilizer that they are using is a synthetic or inorganic fertilizer and how the plant might respond in indoors. And the reason. I'm mentioning that is first of all many people want to use organic so they'll you sprinkle a granular organic on the surface of their house. Plant and about two weeks later. They see mold growing on the surface and they should know that. This isn't really a problem but it freaks people out sometimes but it's an organic matter that they've put on and they're keeping it moist. So that's what happens to organic matter when it stays moi's did it breaks down and the fungus that's breaking that down is what's making it usable to the plant and i think another thing to think about it in addition to what kind of fertilizer you're using is when you're using it. You're gonna read on the fertilizer packages that you should be using it every time you water your plant will please remember where that advice is coming from. Just coming from the people who want to sell you. Fertilizer and i would never fertilize my plants every time my water. I think that's way overdoing it. I agree with that and you are correct. Think about when and think about whether the plant is thirsty if you are using a synthetic fertilizer you really don't want to use a synthetic fertilizer on a thirsty plant. So if you routinely let your your house plants dry up a little bit inbetween watering by all means you want to water that plant. I let it get well hydrated and then apply the fertilizer and not too strong a concentration. Well that brings up two interesting points. First of all yes. I i would always mix my fertilizer at half the strength. That's recommended on the the bag or the jar. But let's talk a little bit about why. You should not fertilize thirsty plants because this might be something that people don't know But if you do fertilize a thirsty plant or plant with a dry root system. You run the risk of that fertilizer. Actually we call it. Burning the roots now. Of course they're not going to be set on fire but but it does a nice for the routes it can stress them it can destroy them it can kill them. Does the salt in the in the in the fertilizer instead of the root pulling up the water at it's pulling up salt too and if the root is dry then that can kill the the cells and you sometimes see it as root damage and you can also see it as brown edges on. The leaves are typical sign of fertilizer. Burn as well because when the roots die and can no longer do their job. They can't keep the foliage hydrated the way they're supposed to and that's why you see the the browning on the leave so bear that in mind. I think seals advice about make sure your plant is well hydrated before you apply fertilizer. That's a really good one

Ellen Oregon Florida Plant
The New Science of Why We Get Cancer with Dr. Jason Fung

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

04:56 min | 2 weeks ago

The New Science of Why We Get Cancer with Dr. Jason Fung

"Dr fong welcome to the broken brain. Podcast thanks for having me here. I'm really excited. Many of our listeners. Know that my my family like a lot of families out there has been touched by cancer. Mom few years ago about ten years ago was diagnosed with breast cancer had aunts that have been also diagnosed with breast cancer and my grandfather passed away of cancer bone cancer. That was there so. I think i'm representative of a lot of people who have been through this journey supporting family members and are just curious not only for their own health and their families south but curious about what is this thing and i want to first start off by saying you know your books and the way that you approach writing. I really appreciate because you're taking a premise and idea that people seem to hold a true. And you're bringing new contrarian thinking we used to think of fasting as being this restrictive thing potentially dangerous and you highlighted the research around that field. That helped us understood. That fasting is actually central to healing inside of our body with things like diabetes and other diseases. And you're doing it again with cancer by questioning the basic premise. And i want to pull a quote from your book to start off the conversation. Which is you say and you start off in the book you say the most pressing question cancer. Research is the most lucid question. What is cancer. So can we start off there because it's still a question that we're asking today. Which is what exactly is cancer. Yeah that's sort of the most important thing is understan- disease you really have to understand what it is like a causes et what the disease is lily for the of the common Diseases cancer stands virtually alone because we had no idea what this disease actually so you look at other diseases like cove it or you know infections. We've identified viruses. We've identified bacteria. We've figured out fungi. And so these are external invaders for heart disease and stuff. These are you know. Blockages in our blood vessels which starved the heart. Or the brain of blood to get heart attacks or strokes so we sort of understand what the disease how it develops in that kind of thing But for cancer sort of a very very strange disease. So it's it's unlike any other disease we've ever face is not a faster. Disease like heart disease is not an external invasion like bacteria or viruses You know it's not a you know stones and stuff. There's all these other diseases. But what is this strange disease and it's not that it's one of these sort of rare. It's unfortunately extremely comments. Lifetime risk of cancer is somewhere around one ten. And it's gonna you know affect everybody's life in that if you don't get it you will know people who will get it almost. Everybody does but we don't know what this is. This is the whole sort of discussion in the book is. What is this disease. Because it's a disease where the you have a normal sal which is part of your own body as it's derived from your own body and for some reason this normal cell he breaks off and becomes cancerous to the point where it can kill you and it kills of course many many fullest the second killer of people so our concept of what this disease actually is has been changing so you know it's changed throughout history really even in the last ten years. There's been this massive change in the way that we look at disease in this what. I call the paradigms of cancer that is you know not arguing about. Oh this you know this is how to treat cancer like we've done lots of studies on you know. Use this drug. The of these drugs in combination with surgery. Chemotherapy and radiation. You put him in this sort of you can treat cancer. I'm not disputing any of that. But in the end it doesn't help the answer. The question of what is if you want understand what it is then you have to start a starts from beginning. Go through it on say. What is this disease. That's where we really made a bata progress within the last sort of fifteen twenty years and most people haven't even really appreciate that. And that's what i wanted to bring forward. Is that sort of recent research and bring it to the people so they at least understand what this disease is. That data is affecting so many people

Cancer Dr Fong Cancer Bone Cancer Breast Cancer Diseases Cancer Heart Disease Diabetes Heart Attacks
Can You Use Vinegar Mixed With Water to Get Rid of Black Spot?

Your Gardening Questions

05:03 min | 3 weeks ago

Can You Use Vinegar Mixed With Water to Get Rid of Black Spot?

"And she says some of the plants that i'm bringing indoors from my deck have black spots on the leaves now. I read that apple cider. Vinegar mixed with water can be brushed on the leaves to kill the fungus. Have you ever heard of this. Yes definitely I have never done it. However i know people that do it. It's it's what i call a home remedy I would only cautioned the amount of vinegar in the water. So i would stay with one maybe two tablespoons in a gallon It will become Well if you if you get it too. Strong vinegar can be a weed killer. So let's go to that point but to To go one or two at the most dealers bones of vinegar in water and she could even dip them or brush it on or however you can do it but it should work to. At least it won't stop that black spot but it can stop the fungal bodies from growing and getting to be seed well into what it called. They're seen stage can stop the disease. But i don't think she can cured and make those leaves green again now. If you if fred hauer has black spot on some of the plants that he's going to bring inside what do you do. I don't bring them in now. Let me explain that I try to not foster things like blackspot however it is a fungal body is so very tiny. We never know it. We're breathing it. All the time is it. Lands as anyone Spore lands on a leaf of peony or a line lock or or whatever it may be I have one one peony. That is absolutely beautiful. Gray right now has nothing to do with the plants nature. So i won't even think about bringing that in I will cut it off at one inch above ground. I won't even put those leaves in the compost pile. They'll go into the trash And she can do the same now. sure what leaves she would be trying to preserve if she's trying to get a given plant seed head and leaves and all to come along if she wants to make a bouquet and and etcetera because i i use dried bouquets here She could indeed dip or use that solution to stop the disease from well from advancing on the leaves that she's bringing in and it certainly could stop it from carrying over into the next year is just reduction reducing the chances of one more sport case but as i say Next year that's going to be those little spores in the air. Everything that can contract a fungal disease which in this case is Well anyhow it is is just one of those things where next year the very plants that she's taking the cuttings from and so on. She should start in the spring knowing that they are susceptible to the audi mildew start spraying them to keep that from getting to be a problem during the course summit. Needless to say when. I mentioned that i totally beautiful great. Dna it's not good It's it's attractive where it stands and so on but i. I don't even want to think about that. Carrying over. because that means that plant unto itself is susceptible and. I want to get all the sports. I can't wait from it so it's one of those things where yes One of the one of the things that she can even do is along with the cider. Vinegar she can use one or at the very most tablespoons of horticultural oil. Now that's just it is We well it's a horticultural. Oil is listed such on the in the garden center on the shelves and so on. It's very highly refined so it's not like oils that are used as a Well pre grow season situation for other things but It will stop both the carryover of insects and insect eggs by using the horticultural oil. The vinegar will hopefully slow down or stop the black spots and so on and go from there now Backwards to black spot. I have very few roses anymore. One of them is. It never has had a touch blackspot. One of them is almost killed every year And i just kind of let it happen but Well prevention is the key to bomb insect problems and disease problems.

Fred Hauer
Finding the Best Cell for the Job

The Bio Report

06:40 min | 3 weeks ago

Finding the Best Cell for the Job

"Eric thanks for joining us. Thanks so much that we daddy very nice to be on. Today we're gonna talk about berkeley heights. Your digital cell biology platform and its potential to impact finally therapeutic development and manufacturing but agricultural and industrial applications of biotechnology. Let's start with some terminology. Berkeley lights calls itself a digital cell biology company. I'm sure liz familiar with each of those words but maybe not put together in that way. What is a digital cell biology company. Yeah i mean so for for the listeners who are lights reposition ourselves as leading digital biology company. What it means dante's we're we're really focused on accelerating the rapid development and commercialization of bio therapeutics and other selves products. And and. so we do that because we really we. We've envisioned future. Where you know cells are skew volt steinway to manufacture the product. We need to live a long healthy life and and we also understand that. There's big challenges in making salvage products in a big challenge. Today is is that you really have to understand an assess how the cells performa hey In other words you functionally characterize many single cells at scale to find the single-cell that makes the product you need and so what we do at berkeley heights is. Is you know we we record. You know that that kind of qualitative information from these functional asked the cells we translate that into digital information and so this is the digital information which is associated with the digital sell vilocci component right. This is the digital information that our customers used to select the cells. And so you know. We provide this huge data cube of information to our customers and and that is why we are a digital biology company. I think for the purposes of this discussion people need to think a bit differently about cells than they might otherwise. You're not looking at sells for the role. They play in a living organism but as factories that have the potential for producing a desired end product. What our cells in this context we believe these cells are are these little factories like you describe in an inside of these sales there there. There are millions of things happening at any given instant them you know you have you have of course transcription from a Into ornate translation into different proteins. All covered by you know these crazy maddock reactions that allow these chemical reactions to have an at temperatures that are that are unforeseen and read sit around for seen outside of these little factories. And so you know these cells birthrights can be just about anything. It's actually one of the one of the wonderful things about our platform is we can handle wide variety of of different cells on the platform and so although our major workflows are in selig development where we used cells like Chinese hamster ovaries sales chose cells or in antibi- discovery where we either take plasma v cells and these can be from unionized. These be from humans can be from any host of of animals. It's been immunized or has been to disease and recovered so this is the fbi cells and antibody discovery. We have t. Cells that we pull on the device from for self therapy development workflows in synthetic biology can be bacteria yeast Different fungi A huge host of different organisms can be can be operated on the brake lights platform. So you know it's it's it's pretty exciting tasks be able to operate across central. Why a wide variety of of biological organisms one of the challenges of developing cell based products. Is that it requires living and functionally validated cells. Berkeley said adding methods to characterize cell functionality are insufficient and come too late in the process. Can you explain yes so for example of when you think about Let's let's take an example like antibody discovery in antibody discovery. It's it's not uncommon for you know the former customers or or or biotech companies to have is animals. And and so you know you take a blood sample from these immunize animals and you find that. Animal is has positive. There are antibodies in that animal. Which are specific to a therapeutic for a particular disease. And so you know one of the ways that that the most common way of a finding or discovering the b. cells which produce antibody which by the way have the code so that we can manufacture therapeutic. You have to find that. Sell one of the ways that they do it is. Is this process cold hybridoma. And so i in the hybridoma process you. You sacrificed animal. You grab the spun decides you then fuse them with his cancer cells myeloma cells in and you create this kind of frank inside cell which is all hybrid home now the functional characterization that process doesn't happen for eight to twelve weeks and so your way down your way way down the process and by the way in that first fusion process that i mentioned you lose a a very large amount of the genetic diversity in that process. So you're way way down the time line you don't know whether you do have a functionally a functionally diverse set of of anti pd. Candidates are not if you contrast that to the lights workflows. You know we do. Is we take the cells. Positives be cells directly from that animal and we put them on the system and within eight hours. I you know whether you do or do not have invaded therapeutic candidates and so we're able to perform this level of characterization very rapidly and it's not just it's not just you know isn't engine specific you know we. We also have the ability to measure cross species reactivity competitive binding essays and these are all kind of india isotopes. These are all kind of bread butter things but will we recently released. One of the workflows we recently released was our are viral news. Ation workflow in which we showcase day in the app note functional blocking acid so we can actually put either reporter cells or or proteins bound to feeds into the nfl with a cell that secreting antibody and show that you know that there is a blocking That blocking performer. If this is done with live cells you can actually see the the function on the live cells that the antibody blocks the interaction. So that's it for us. That's pretty exciting.

Berkeley Heights Berkeley LIZ Eric Selig FBI Cancer India NFL
The Mystery Of The Mummified Twinkie

Short Wave

07:52 min | Last month

The Mystery Of The Mummified Twinkie

"Colin purring in Pennsylvania wanted the world to know about his accidental fungal experiments involving twinkies. So what happened next? So he posted photos on twitter and they were seen by two scientists, Brian Love it and Matt Casson at West Virginia University, they study Fungi Casson says fungi are everywhere and they have this amazing ability to break down all kinds of substances. Fungi growing on jet fuel. Wow. So he means fungi can grow on pretty much anything and everything. Yeah and in the past their lab has tested how well they grow in peeps. You know that classic marshmallow tree tour hasn't says fungi found the peace challenging because you know they don't have a lot of water in them in a way they're kind of like an extreme environment, right? The food industry has crafted the ability to to make foods that have a long shelf life. You know I could test that out right now I got some old peeps in my house my kid. Kept from Easter like years ago. But anyway back to the twinkies. So these researchers were intrigued by Collins Posts on twitter and Colin was only too happy to mail his twinkies right to their lab. They suspected that whatever had mummified the twinkie was some kind of fungus but they wanted to confirm that and then find out exactly what kind of fungus. Okay. So twinkie mummy gets shipped to the lab obviously, they had to open it up. I'm guessing and as I look at the photo, the plastic wrapping around the shriveled twinkie looks like it's been vacuum-sealed like it sucked inward like. Right right. So the scientists thought maybe the fungus got in before the package was sealed, and then as it grew the fungus was using up more air or oxygen than it was putting out I mean, here's how love it described it. You end up with a document. And very well, vacuum may have halted. The fungus is ability to continue to grow We have the snapshot of what we were sent but who knows if this process occurred five years ago and he just only noticed it now yeah five years that's forty times the shelf life of a twinkie in eternity for twinkie anyway they had expected this horrific smelled hit them. When they opened the packaging, the smell would possibly kill one of us. But because of them of -cation there there really was no smell at all, which was really a pleasant surprise. So twinkie mommy is unwrapped smells like nothing what happened next? Well, they took a quick look with a magnifying scope and Juhasz some signs of fungal spore formation on the twinkie. So that suggested a fungus of some kind and the next step was to take a sample. So casting used a bone biopsy tool to sort of drill through the tough outer layer of this grey mummified twinkie, we certainly hit the marrow of the twinkie and quickly realized that there was still some. Cream filling on the inside. So, the inside was still cream-filled. Yeah that was a surprise they thought it would be sort of hard all the way through of it says, whatever did this to the twinkie it seems that the fungus was more interested in the cake on the outside. Then the filling on the inside see, this is a smart fungus because cake is clearly the superior part of the twinkie same with Orios same with cupcakes. You know what I'm talking about right now I don't know to me. It's like the combination of two things that's key. So I can't really separate them in my mind. That's fair I. Accept that. So the scientists have taken samples from the twinkie, do they go about determining what kind of fungus growing on it? They actually sampled multiple twinkies. Okay. So one was the mummified twinkie we've been talking about the other was the second twinkie from Collins box that was not mummified. The one that was just you know marred, it had that weird little blemish on the outside of it, and then they had this control scientific experiment they need scientific control, which was a what they called an as symptomatic twinkie from the same box. So they put those samples into lab dishes with nutrients commonly used to grow fungi, and from that little blemish twinkie the one. With just the little. Marc, they were able to grow a very common indoor fungus called Klee does sport him common indoor fungus, right? It's one of the most common airborne molds worldwide. Okay. So what about from the mummified twinkie? Okay. So that's where it gets even more interesting. Love. It says, they have not been able to grow any fungus from that particular sample. It may be that we don't have any living spores on store certainly dying depending on the fungus they could I very quickly and remember because the twinkie had been sort of vacuum sealed by whatever was going on there. You know it seems like it couldn't grow anymore inside it's wrapping. So there's truly perhaps no life in this twinkie. Well, the scientists you know weren't going to let that stop them they. Samples from both the marred and the mummified twinkies and he sent off to DNA sequencing company and twelve hours. Later, they got the results back the mark twinkie was a ninety nine point six percent matched to a fungus called close Boreham zeile film. The mummified twinkie was eighty one percent to a closely related clear does for him species. Plato's Boreham Tenuous Sim. CASSON's says DNA from the mummified twinkie was pretty degraded. So they actually probably are the same fungus. I'm so amazed they were able to identify these fungi from these twinkies. It is the mystery of the twinkie over I remain confident that science will continue already one researcher Kate Wallace at the University of Illinois contacted them and asked for a bit of the mummified that she wants to put in a scanning electron microscope. One that can get really really close. Up Images and hopefully you know see something cool and Kasim says he's not turning his lab entirely over to twinkie studies but you know they could still do some more research. We thought about inoculating some healthy twinkies with some cletus forum may be doing some transplants with the bone marrow biopsy tool where we replace a healthy plug with a fungus colonize plug. And see what happens from there. This twinkie line of research is just relentless. There's so many of questions still I mean what's the overall moral of the story here that you can try to hold onto the past but nothing gold can stay not even a twinkie well, that's one moral I mean another moral of the story is that Colin, purring ten should've listened to his mother and had more respect for expiration dates but you know people are really drawn to this myth that twinkies are immortal. I should mention we did reach out to hostess brands for comment on this story and I have not heard back from them at all You know the mummy twinkie is this different kind. Of disturbing vision of what the future could hold for twinkies and you know for all of us I mean Matt and says, this story seems to be gripping for people maybe because the grey mummified twinkie is such a dramatic contrast to this golden iconic twinkie that lives in our memories when those memories are tainted by like a visual reality like the twinkie experiment, we're kind of like caught off guard and we're like wait no, that's a symbol of my childhood. You can't take that from me to. So basically, like you said, emily, nothing lasts forever. You know here's Brian Love again, we're living in a time where we're all really grappling with our mortality eventually, all of us are future fungi. On. Seeing. That is sort of facing the the reality. Of. Holly and Our destination now, I did not expect a twinkie experiment to be a meditation on the human. Condition

Fungi Casson Colin Brian Love Twitter Pennsylvania Hostess Brands West Virginia University Plato Collins Orios Emily University Of Illinois Holly Marc Kasim Researcher
The Mystery Of The Mummified Twinkie

Short Wave

07:52 min | Last month

The Mystery Of The Mummified Twinkie

"Colin purring in Pennsylvania wanted the world to know about his accidental fungal experiments involving twinkies. So what happened next? So he posted photos on twitter and they were seen by two scientists, Brian Love it and Matt Casson at West Virginia University, they study Fungi Casson says fungi are everywhere and they have this amazing ability to break down all kinds of substances. Fungi growing on jet fuel. Wow. So he means fungi can grow on pretty much anything and everything. Yeah and in the past their lab has tested how well they grow in peeps. You know that classic marshmallow tree tour hasn't says fungi found the peace challenging because you know they don't have a lot of water in them in a way they're kind of like an extreme environment, right? The food industry has crafted the ability to to make foods that have a long shelf life. You know I could test that out right now I got some old peeps in my house my kid. Kept from Easter like years ago. But anyway back to the twinkies. So these researchers were intrigued by Collins Posts on twitter and Colin was only too happy to mail his twinkies right to their lab. They suspected that whatever had mummified the twinkie was some kind of fungus but they wanted to confirm that and then find out exactly what kind of fungus. Okay. So twinkie mummy gets shipped to the lab obviously, they had to open it up. I'm guessing and as I look at the photo, the plastic wrapping around the shriveled twinkie looks like it's been vacuum-sealed like it sucked inward like. Right right. So the scientists thought maybe the fungus got in before the package was sealed, and then as it grew the fungus was using up more air or oxygen than it was putting out I mean, here's how love it described it. You end up with a document. And very well, vacuum may have halted. The fungus is ability to continue to grow We have the snapshot of what we were sent but who knows if this process occurred five years ago and he just only noticed it now yeah five years that's forty times the shelf life of a twinkie in eternity for twinkie anyway they had expected this horrific smelled hit them. When they opened the packaging, the smell would possibly kill one of us. But because of them of -cation there there really was no smell at all, which was really a pleasant surprise. So twinkie mommy is unwrapped smells like nothing what happened next? Well, they took a quick look with a magnifying scope and Juhasz some signs of fungal spore formation on the twinkie. So that suggested a fungus of some kind and the next step was to take a sample. So casting used a bone biopsy tool to sort of drill through the tough outer layer of this grey mummified twinkie, we certainly hit the marrow of the twinkie and quickly realized that there was still some. Cream filling on the inside. So, the inside was still cream-filled. Yeah that was a surprise they thought it would be sort of hard all the way through of it says, whatever did this to the twinkie it seems that the fungus was more interested in the cake on the outside. Then the filling on the inside see, this is a smart fungus because cake is clearly the superior part of the twinkie same with Orios same with cupcakes. You know what I'm talking about right now I don't know to me. It's like the combination of two things that's key. So I can't really separate them in my mind. That's fair I. Accept that. So the scientists have taken samples from the twinkie, do they go about determining what kind of fungus growing on it? They actually sampled multiple twinkies. Okay. So one was the mummified twinkie we've been talking about the other was the second twinkie from Collins box that was not mummified. The one that was just you know marred, it had that weird little blemish on the outside of it, and then they had this control scientific experiment they need scientific control, which was a what they called an as symptomatic twinkie from the same box. So they put those samples into lab dishes with nutrients commonly used to grow fungi, and from that little blemish twinkie the one. With just the little. Marc, they were able to grow a very common indoor fungus called Klee does sport him common indoor fungus, right? It's one of the most common airborne molds worldwide. Okay. So what about from the mummified twinkie? Okay. So that's where it gets even more interesting. Love. It says, they have not been able to grow any fungus from that particular sample. It may be that we don't have any living spores on store certainly dying depending on the fungus they could I very quickly and remember because the twinkie had been sort of vacuum sealed by whatever was going on there. You know it seems like it couldn't grow anymore inside it's wrapping. So there's truly perhaps no life in this twinkie. Well, the scientists you know weren't going to let that stop them they. Samples from both the marred and the mummified twinkies and he sent off to DNA sequencing company and twelve hours. Later, they got the results back the mark twinkie was a ninety nine point six percent matched to a fungus called close Boreham zeile film. The mummified twinkie was eighty one percent to a closely related clear does for him species. Plato's Boreham Tenuous Sim. CASSON's says DNA from the mummified twinkie was pretty degraded. So they actually probably are the same fungus. I'm so amazed they were able to identify these fungi from these twinkies. It is the mystery of the twinkie over I remain confident that science will continue already one researcher Kate Wallace at the University of Illinois contacted them and asked for a bit of the mummified that she wants to put in a scanning electron microscope. One that can get really really close. Up Images and hopefully you know see something cool and Kasim says he's not turning his lab entirely over to twinkie studies but you know they could still do some more research. We thought about inoculating some healthy twinkies with some cletus forum may be doing some transplants with the bone marrow biopsy tool where we replace a healthy plug with a fungus colonize plug. And see what happens from there. This twinkie line of research is just relentless. There's so many of questions still I mean what's the overall moral of the story here that you can try to hold onto the past but nothing gold can stay not even a twinkie well, that's one moral I mean another moral of the story is that Colin, purring ten should've listened to his mother and had more respect for expiration dates but you know people are really drawn to this myth that twinkies are immortal. I should mention we did reach out to hostess brands for comment on this story and I have not heard back from them at all You know the mummy twinkie is this different kind. Of disturbing vision of what the future could hold for twinkies and you know for all of us I mean Matt and says, this story seems to be gripping for people maybe because the grey mummified twinkie is such a dramatic contrast to this golden iconic twinkie that lives in our memories when those memories are tainted by like a visual reality like the twinkie experiment, we're kind of like caught off guard and we're like wait no, that's a symbol of my childhood. You can't take that from me to. So basically, like you said, emily, nothing lasts forever. You know here's Brian Love again, we're living in a time where we're all really grappling with our mortality eventually, all of us are future fungi. On. Seeing. That is sort of facing the the reality. Of. Holly and Our destination now, I did not expect a twinkie experiment to be a meditation on the human. Condition

Fungi Casson Colin Brian Love Twitter Pennsylvania Hostess Brands West Virginia University Plato Collins Orios Emily University Of Illinois Holly Marc Kasim Researcher
The Mystery Of The Mummified Twinkie

Short Wave

07:52 min | Last month

The Mystery Of The Mummified Twinkie

"Colin purring in Pennsylvania wanted the world to know about his accidental fungal experiments involving twinkies. So what happened next? So he posted photos on twitter and they were seen by two scientists, Brian Love it and Matt Casson at West Virginia University, they study Fungi Casson says fungi are everywhere and they have this amazing ability to break down all kinds of substances. Fungi growing on jet fuel. Wow. So he means fungi can grow on pretty much anything and everything. Yeah and in the past their lab has tested how well they grow in peeps. You know that classic marshmallow tree tour hasn't says fungi found the peace challenging because you know they don't have a lot of water in them in a way they're kind of like an extreme environment, right? The food industry has crafted the ability to to make foods that have a long shelf life. You know I could test that out right now I got some old peeps in my house my kid. Kept from Easter like years ago. But anyway back to the twinkies. So these researchers were intrigued by Collins Posts on twitter and Colin was only too happy to mail his twinkies right to their lab. They suspected that whatever had mummified the twinkie was some kind of fungus but they wanted to confirm that and then find out exactly what kind of fungus. Okay. So twinkie mummy gets shipped to the lab obviously, they had to open it up. I'm guessing and as I look at the photo, the plastic wrapping around the shriveled twinkie looks like it's been vacuum-sealed like it sucked inward like. Right right. So the scientists thought maybe the fungus got in before the package was sealed, and then as it grew the fungus was using up more air or oxygen than it was putting out I mean, here's how love it described it. You end up with a document. And very well, vacuum may have halted. The fungus is ability to continue to grow We have the snapshot of what we were sent but who knows if this process occurred five years ago and he just only noticed it now yeah five years that's forty times the shelf life of a twinkie in eternity for twinkie anyway they had expected this horrific smelled hit them. When they opened the packaging, the smell would possibly kill one of us. But because of them of -cation there there really was no smell at all, which was really a pleasant surprise. So twinkie mommy is unwrapped smells like nothing what happened next? Well, they took a quick look with a magnifying scope and Juhasz some signs of fungal spore formation on the twinkie. So that suggested a fungus of some kind and the next step was to take a sample. So casting used a bone biopsy tool to sort of drill through the tough outer layer of this grey mummified twinkie, we certainly hit the marrow of the twinkie and quickly realized that there was still some. Cream filling on the inside. So, the inside was still cream-filled. Yeah that was a surprise they thought it would be sort of hard all the way through of it says, whatever did this to the twinkie it seems that the fungus was more interested in the cake on the outside. Then the filling on the inside see, this is a smart fungus because cake is clearly the superior part of the twinkie same with Orios same with cupcakes. You know what I'm talking about right now I don't know to me. It's like the combination of two things that's key. So I can't really separate them in my mind. That's fair I. Accept that. So the scientists have taken samples from the twinkie, do they go about determining what kind of fungus growing on it? They actually sampled multiple twinkies. Okay. So one was the mummified twinkie we've been talking about the other was the second twinkie from Collins box that was not mummified. The one that was just you know marred, it had that weird little blemish on the outside of it, and then they had this control scientific experiment they need scientific control, which was a what they called an as symptomatic twinkie from the same box. So they put those samples into lab dishes with nutrients commonly used to grow fungi, and from that little blemish twinkie the one. With just the little. Marc, they were able to grow a very common indoor fungus called Klee does sport him common indoor fungus, right? It's one of the most common airborne molds worldwide. Okay. So what about from the mummified twinkie? Okay. So that's where it gets even more interesting. Love. It says, they have not been able to grow any fungus from that particular sample. It may be that we don't have any living spores on store certainly dying depending on the fungus they could I very quickly and remember because the twinkie had been sort of vacuum sealed by whatever was going on there. You know it seems like it couldn't grow anymore inside it's wrapping. So there's truly perhaps no life in this twinkie. Well, the scientists you know weren't going to let that stop them they. Samples from both the marred and the mummified twinkies and he sent off to DNA sequencing company and twelve hours. Later, they got the results back the mark twinkie was a ninety nine point six percent matched to a fungus called close Boreham zeile film. The mummified twinkie was eighty one percent to a closely related clear does for him species. Plato's Boreham Tenuous Sim. CASSON's says DNA from the mummified twinkie was pretty degraded. So they actually probably are the same fungus. I'm so amazed they were able to identify these fungi from these twinkies. It is the mystery of the twinkie over I remain confident that science will continue already one researcher Kate Wallace at the University of Illinois contacted them and asked for a bit of the mummified that she wants to put in a scanning electron microscope. One that can get really really close. Up Images and hopefully you know see something cool and Kasim says he's not turning his lab entirely over to twinkie studies but you know they could still do some more research. We thought about inoculating some healthy twinkies with some cletus forum may be doing some transplants with the bone marrow biopsy tool where we replace a healthy plug with a fungus colonize plug. And see what happens from there. This twinkie line of research is just relentless. There's so many of questions still I mean what's the overall moral of the story here that you can try to hold onto the past but nothing gold can stay not even a twinkie well, that's one moral I mean another moral of the story is that Colin, purring ten should've listened to his mother and had more respect for expiration dates but you know people are really drawn to this myth that twinkies are immortal. I should mention we did reach out to hostess brands for comment on this story and I have not heard back from them at all You know the mummy twinkie is this different kind. Of disturbing vision of what the future could hold for twinkies and you know for all of us I mean Matt and says, this story seems to be gripping for people maybe because the grey mummified twinkie is such a dramatic contrast to this golden iconic twinkie that lives in our memories when those memories are tainted by like a visual reality like the twinkie experiment, we're kind of like caught off guard and we're like wait no, that's a symbol of my childhood. You can't take that from me to. So basically, like you said, emily, nothing lasts forever. You know here's Brian Love again, we're living in a time where we're all really grappling with our mortality eventually, all of us are future fungi. On. Seeing. That is sort of facing the the reality. Of. Holly and Our destination now, I did not expect a twinkie experiment to be a meditation on the human. Condition

Fungi Casson Colin Brian Love Twitter Pennsylvania Hostess Brands West Virginia University Plato Collins Orios Emily University Of Illinois Holly Marc Kasim Researcher
The Mystery Of The Mummified Twinkie

Short Wave

07:52 min | Last month

The Mystery Of The Mummified Twinkie

"Colin purring in Pennsylvania wanted the world to know about his accidental fungal experiments involving twinkies. So what happened next? So he posted photos on twitter and they were seen by two scientists, Brian Love it and Matt Casson at West Virginia University, they study Fungi Casson says fungi are everywhere and they have this amazing ability to break down all kinds of substances. Fungi growing on jet fuel. Wow. So he means fungi can grow on pretty much anything and everything. Yeah and in the past their lab has tested how well they grow in peeps. You know that classic marshmallow tree tour hasn't says fungi found the peace challenging because you know they don't have a lot of water in them in a way they're kind of like an extreme environment, right? The food industry has crafted the ability to to make foods that have a long shelf life. You know I could test that out right now I got some old peeps in my house my kid. Kept from Easter like years ago. But anyway back to the twinkies. So these researchers were intrigued by Collins Posts on twitter and Colin was only too happy to mail his twinkies right to their lab. They suspected that whatever had mummified the twinkie was some kind of fungus but they wanted to confirm that and then find out exactly what kind of fungus. Okay. So twinkie mummy gets shipped to the lab obviously, they had to open it up. I'm guessing and as I look at the photo, the plastic wrapping around the shriveled twinkie looks like it's been vacuum-sealed like it sucked inward like. Right right. So the scientists thought maybe the fungus got in before the package was sealed, and then as it grew the fungus was using up more air or oxygen than it was putting out I mean, here's how love it described it. You end up with a document. And very well, vacuum may have halted. The fungus is ability to continue to grow We have the snapshot of what we were sent but who knows if this process occurred five years ago and he just only noticed it now yeah five years that's forty times the shelf life of a twinkie in eternity for twinkie anyway they had expected this horrific smelled hit them. When they opened the packaging, the smell would possibly kill one of us. But because of them of -cation there there really was no smell at all, which was really a pleasant surprise. So twinkie mommy is unwrapped smells like nothing what happened next? Well, they took a quick look with a magnifying scope and Juhasz some signs of fungal spore formation on the twinkie. So that suggested a fungus of some kind and the next step was to take a sample. So casting used a bone biopsy tool to sort of drill through the tough outer layer of this grey mummified twinkie, we certainly hit the marrow of the twinkie and quickly realized that there was still some. Cream filling on the inside. So, the inside was still cream-filled. Yeah that was a surprise they thought it would be sort of hard all the way through of it says, whatever did this to the twinkie it seems that the fungus was more interested in the cake on the outside. Then the filling on the inside see, this is a smart fungus because cake is clearly the superior part of the twinkie same with Orios same with cupcakes. You know what I'm talking about right now I don't know to me. It's like the combination of two things that's key. So I can't really separate them in my mind. That's fair I. Accept that. So the scientists have taken samples from the twinkie, do they go about determining what kind of fungus growing on it? They actually sampled multiple twinkies. Okay. So one was the mummified twinkie we've been talking about the other was the second twinkie from Collins box that was not mummified. The one that was just you know marred, it had that weird little blemish on the outside of it, and then they had this control scientific experiment they need scientific control, which was a what they called an as symptomatic twinkie from the same box. So they put those samples into lab dishes with nutrients commonly used to grow fungi, and from that little blemish twinkie the one. With just the little. Marc, they were able to grow a very common indoor fungus called Klee does sport him common indoor fungus, right? It's one of the most common airborne molds worldwide. Okay. So what about from the mummified twinkie? Okay. So that's where it gets even more interesting. Love. It says, they have not been able to grow any fungus from that particular sample. It may be that we don't have any living spores on store certainly dying depending on the fungus they could I very quickly and remember because the twinkie had been sort of vacuum sealed by whatever was going on there. You know it seems like it couldn't grow anymore inside it's wrapping. So there's truly perhaps no life in this twinkie. Well, the scientists you know weren't going to let that stop them they. Samples from both the marred and the mummified twinkies and he sent off to DNA sequencing company and twelve hours. Later, they got the results back the mark twinkie was a ninety nine point six percent matched to a fungus called close Boreham zeile film. The mummified twinkie was eighty one percent to a closely related clear does for him species. Plato's Boreham Tenuous Sim. CASSON's says DNA from the mummified twinkie was pretty degraded. So they actually probably are the same fungus. I'm so amazed they were able to identify these fungi from these twinkies. It is the mystery of the twinkie over I remain confident that science will continue already one researcher Kate Wallace at the University of Illinois contacted them and asked for a bit of the mummified that she wants to put in a scanning electron microscope. One that can get really really close. Up Images and hopefully you know see something cool and Kasim says he's not turning his lab entirely over to twinkie studies but you know they could still do some more research. We thought about inoculating some healthy twinkies with some cletus forum may be doing some transplants with the bone marrow biopsy tool where we replace a healthy plug with a fungus colonize plug. And see what happens from there. This twinkie line of research is just relentless. There's so many of questions still I mean what's the overall moral of the story here that you can try to hold onto the past but nothing gold can stay not even a twinkie well, that's one moral I mean another moral of the story is that Colin, purring ten should've listened to his mother and had more respect for expiration dates but you know people are really drawn to this myth that twinkies are immortal. I should mention we did reach out to hostess brands for comment on this story and I have not heard back from them at all You know the mummy twinkie is this different kind. Of disturbing vision of what the future could hold for twinkies and you know for all of us I mean Matt and says, this story seems to be gripping for people maybe because the grey mummified twinkie is such a dramatic contrast to this golden iconic twinkie that lives in our memories when those memories are tainted by like a visual reality like the twinkie experiment, we're kind of like caught off guard and we're like wait no, that's a symbol of my childhood. You can't take that from me to. So basically, like you said, emily, nothing lasts forever. You know here's Brian Love again, we're living in a time where we're all really grappling with our mortality eventually, all of us are future fungi. On. Seeing. That is sort of facing the the reality. Of. Holly and Our destination now, I did not expect a twinkie experiment to be a meditation on the human. Condition

Fungi Casson Colin Brian Love Twitter Pennsylvania Hostess Brands West Virginia University Plato Collins Orios Emily University Of Illinois Holly Marc Kasim Researcher
Funky Cheese Rinds Release an Influential Stench

60-Second Science

02:02 min | Last month

Funky Cheese Rinds Release an Influential Stench

"Aged cheeses like Camembert taleggio produce a powerful stench, the funk of cabbage mushrooms, sulphur, even smelly feet and those aromas are chemicals that are being kicked off by the cheese or being emitted by the cheese, and that's through the microbes that are living in the Ryan's as they slowly decompose the cheese Benjamin. Wolf is a microbiologist at Tufts University. He says in addition to alerting our noses to the cheese the AROMAS produced by certain microbes living in on the cheese can feed in sculpt other members of. The microbial garden living there wolf and his colleagues identified some of those microbial interactions by growing various cheese dwelling fungi and bacteria in separate. But adjacent dishes in the lab, the microbes couldn't touch. They can only interact via the volatile compounds they released and when we did this screen, this volatile screen, we quickly notice that there was this one bacterium vibrio species that really loved living in the aromas produced by the various fungi that you find in a typical wheel of campaign bear Wolf says the Vibrio. Bacteria. be able to eat the AROMAS which after all consist of chemical compounds and the odor of the cheese may also switch on certain genetic pathways in bacteria pathways that regulate the bacteria's ability to thrive in harsh conditions like a backup plan when things aren't going well and you're starving, you can try on this other pathway and still make a living. But unless ideal substrates at around the end result is that the stench we perceive may also shape the microbiome of the cheese. The results appear in the Journal Environmental Microbiology has for the practical. This research. Well, it's a little early for that. We don't necessarily do our science to make cheese better. It's honestly a lot of assistance to figure out how cheese works. In other words. He says, the tools of modern micro biology allow scientists to finally listening to the conversations happening in these tiny cheese Ryan communities.

Bear Wolf Ryan Wolf Tufts University Journal Environmental Microbio
Over Shadowed

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:32 min | Last month

Over Shadowed

"Welcome to kids myths and Mysteries. I'm your host can't come today cloaked in secrecy or overshadowed by current events. It would seem the only thing on the news today is our political situation as we approach election for President of the United States. And then of course, we have our economic debacle and fifty four million people who are food insecure not to mention some very serious changes in the weather. These have overshadowed something if you've watched or listened to the news you may have noticed the occasional use of the phrase. We didn't want to panic the American people. The truth is those words usually come out of the mouth of a politician who didn't want to face the backlash of his constituents over a particular decision. He made what if there was something that was real and not a political Ploy or conspiracy theory something that could kill you that have been closed off. Secrecy or overshadowed by today's events and it's only now being acknowledged as a threat still played down though. That's something that's a disease. It's a fungus no less than the common name. The one you hear used in the news is candida. Auris as the time of this podcast it remains drug-resistant. It also remains virtually unknown. It is rarely caught early because it's early symptoms are fever and chills that don't improve after antibiotic treatment think for a moment how many times you've gotten a fever sweat it out. So I mentioned candida. Auris is a fungus yeast is a fungus that lives in the body generally a fungus cannot Thrive or grow in the body's ninety-eight-point-six degree temperature that candida. Auris can or body is a sealed system. Candia artists can live on the skin fairly harmless lie, but if a cut is infected, Did with it or it is introduced into the blood it will be fatal in recorded cases. Those that have been diagnosed with candida. Auris and the blood have died within ninety days of the diagnosis wage in one case. It was determined that the hospital room of the victim of candida. Auris was contaminated with the fungus. It was on the hospital bed rails to Sheetz the doorknobs. It was also determined that standard disinfectants used to clean hospital rooms had no effect on the fungus because it can live on the skin. This means a doctors and nurses have to find a way to eliminate the risk of contaminating patients just like the FBI with its Ten Most Wanted list the CDC has an urgent threat list and candida. Auris is at the top of that list or wage was until the coronavirus surfaced yet. This super fungus is not new in emerged in Venezuela that appeared in Spain india-pakistan then turned up in South Africa job. In the United States has been detected in New York, New Jersey in Illinois. So how many in the United States have been affected one of the problems with researching something that is cloaked in secrecy and overshadowed by the coronavirus is getting accurate figures. I have been given a number ranging from thirteen cases to over 700,000 truth more than half. The people the contract candy ours died within ninety days. So the death rate is either 6 or 7 or 350,000 researchers say that as the climate in certain areas has increased or changed or heated up candida. Auris has adapted to the point that it can live in the human body. They have found that it is also related to agriculture as more antifungals are applied to plants to keep them from rotting in these plants are consumed and the incident of candida auris infection. Will increase the fungus can be found on meets manure fertilized vegetables. Although there is no cure for an individual that is infected hospitals are adapting a type of robot that uses pulsating violet light that removes microorganisms including candida. Auris for the average American researchers say it is best to consume organic fruits and vegetables. That's avoiding the rampant use of fungicides that contribute to the search in this drug-resistant

Candida Auris United States President Trump Fever FBI South Africa New Jersey New York CDC Venezuela Spain Illinois
Why Are Leaf Blowers So Annoying?

BrainStuff

04:10 min | Last month

Why Are Leaf Blowers So Annoying?

"Hey brain stuff lauren Vogel Bob here the sounds of autumn satisfying crunch the crisp apple or fallen leaves to your feet or the teeth grinding noise of a leaf blower. Powered by electric or gasoline motors that propel air out of a nozzle to send leaves and grass cuttings flying leaf blowers are probably the most Vilnai's devices in the lawn care universe to the noise that they have met in the mid nineteen seventies when leaf blowers became ubiquitous in the United States to California cities adopted early bands of the Equipment Carmel by the sea beverly labeled the leaf. Blowers a noise nuisance and banned their use a move that has been followed by hundreds of other cities across the United States to some degree. But what is it about leaf blowers that people hate is that the decibels the constancy delete blowers pose real dangers to the health of users or others who happen to be within earshot increasingly, the answer appears to be yes to all of the above. Leaf blowers may send leaves and lawn clippings for a ride, but the gusts which reach one, hundred, eighty, two, two, hundred, and eighty miles per hour. That's about two, hundred, ninety, two, four, hundred, fifty kilometers per hour also create a nose clogging swirl of fungus spores, herbicides, and microbes. The resulting dust is so aggravating to people with allergies, asthma bronchitis, and other respiratory maladies that the American Lung Association recommend staying away from leaf blowers altogether. And then there's the air pollution operating a commercial leaf blower for one hour and it's as much smog forming pollution as you would if you drove a recent mid-size car as say twenty sixteen Toyota Camry from Los Angeles Denver, which is about a one, thousand, one, hundred mile or a one, thousand, eight, hundred kilometer trip. That's because most leaf blowers used to cycle engines they're lightweight and inexpensive, but they require a mixture of gasoline and oil to run unlike more complex engines. They don't have separate chambers for fueling lubricants when operated the engine wastes approximately one third of the combined mixture releasing carbon monoxide, nitrous oxide, and hydrocarbons into the air. Three toxins are some of the main culprits in the air pollution from leaf blowers. Carbon monoxide helps for smug nitrous oxide is a prime ingredient in acid rain and has been linked to global warming. Hydrocarbons are cancer causing organic compounds that also contribute to smog formation plus leaf blowers are noisy. How noisy are they when you engage in conversation? That's a noise level of about. Sixty decibels according to the center for hearing and Communication. If you're strolling on a sidewalk in a car goes by that's about seventy decibels a leaf blower, even fifty feet or fifteen meters away can be up to seventy five decibels and right up close that jumps well into the nineties according to the World Health Organization any noise about seventy decibels risks causing physical hearing damage. And then there's the mental toll. Miss. A phony is a relatively newly classified condition in which people are angered by particular sounds like chewing or knuckle cracking although leaf blowers aren't mentioned in the diagnosis parameters it stands to reason this phony may be related to people's dislike the machines because they're extra sensitive to sound. Preliminary data shows that phones brains may have a hypersensitive connection between the auditory system and the LIMBIC system, which is the part of the brain that's responsible for creating emotions. It's so much a part of life for a phones that they can be shocked others don't feel or react the same way to certain noises. But being irritated by leaf blowers doesn't necessarily mean your phone. Erica. Walker a doctoral student at Harvard. University's Chan. School. Of Public Health discovered that is far less irritating to create a sound than it is to hear it in a survey of one thousand, fifty residents more than a dozen Boston neighborhoods, Walker found that the majority of respondents said they couldn't control or get away from noises like leaf blowers and they believed that no one really cared that it annoyed them. What's more other research has shown that leaf blowers, a low frequency noise that penetrates through outer walls into homes and businesses in a way that some other noises passing vehicles, for example do not. However. Leaf blowers have become an integral part of commercial lawn care while a leaf blower may sound like fingernails across chalkboard to you for the businesses that rely on them portion of their livelihood. It's probably music to the ears.

United States Nitrous Oxide Walker Lauren Vogel Bob California Allergies Equipment Carmel Apple World Health Organization American Lung Association Toyota Camry Boston Los Angeles Harvard Erica
Why Consciousness Upholds Creation

Daily Breath with Deepak Chopra

01:43 min | 2 months ago

Why Consciousness Upholds Creation

"Hi My friends I'm Deepak Chopra. This is daily breath. Today I want to answer the question that delays everything. Can existence take care of itself. And my answer is, yes. Let's talk about how consciousness. Polls creation. At this moment, we're surrounded by the infinite intelligence and creative bar of consciousness. This is nature's secret life his consciousness. The principles that consciousness follows but. Everything. The most basic light poems follow the principles of consciousness which are self organization. Even, the most basic lifeforms know exactly how to stay alive. Have you ever heard of an organism called the Yellow Blob. Known as Feis Abram. Policy. This organism exhibits qualities of consciousness. It is an example of our existence can take care of itself. If you want to know more about this organism. Beulah read my book but it's a simple fungus like organism that shows all the properties of snus that you and I have as human beings. So consciousness and existence must go together. There's no such thing as blackness consciousness is always a life life was generated in the field of consciousness it is already alive. Life is invisible until consciousness takes physical.

Deepak Chopra Feis Abram Beulah
A Love Letter to Short Men

Does This Happen to You

05:21 min | 3 months ago

A Love Letter to Short Men

"DOT COM and at her website Carlin Betcha. Dot Com and here is a love letter to short men. Your height is not an issue unless you make it one. It's one of the most common openers I see on dating apps a man's height. It's usually the first thing men list and sometimes height is the only thing listed. Yep just height nothing else as if those two numbers measured in feet and inches contain multitudes. I understand why it happens. We are a society obsessed with looks we treat beauty and both genders as a currency attractive people make more money are viewed as more agreeable and somehow more valuable. This is part of the halo effect, a psychology term where we assign one single trait beauty to other characteristics kindness. Personally I have never seen a woman who cares about height in fact, I find short men hot, not all of them but many. Let. Me Tell you a not hot short man's story. I recently wanted to date with a five foot five inch guy within fifteen minutes of our meeting. He ass is my height a problem. It was not until he mentioned it. I had not even looked at the height he listed on his profile. I then spent the next twenty minutes assuaging his fragile ego and explaining why many women like short men it was exhausting at one point I think he read the weariness in my slumped shoulders and tried to self correct. I'm only asking because you're right about love and sex. Sure if you went on a date with a dermatologist, would you ask her to examine the fungus between your toes? I didn't say that, but I wanted to my sarcasm is a feral beast. Then, there are the many many short guys who lie about their height. You know who you are. I once went on a date with a guy claiming to be five foot eight inches. He was five foot four inches. That's a four inch lie. If we're keeping track I wore three inch heels for that date that put me at five feet eight inches. Greeted him with a hug. This was pre pandemic days his head landed on my chest. Awkward. For most women height is not a deal breaker but lying is So. Here it is short men the painful truth your height is not the Lady Boehner killer. You think it is it your lack of confidence that makes women's ovaries shrivel up and never want to go on another date again, I have dated a lot of sexy short men and they all had one thing in common nothing to prove when Tom Cruise five foot seven inches was sexiest man alive multiple times. Did anyone add a footnote sexy for a short Guy Hell? No. When Bruno Mars five, foot five inches shakes what his momma gave him are women getting out there measuring. Sticks Adriano. then. There's Napoleon. Napoleon. Never had complex about his height nor was he even really that short you can feel his confidence oozing out of the impatient love letters. He wrote to Josephine one read a kiss on your heart and one much lower down much lower. Nowhere in that letter, will you find a postscript saying unless my height makes you not in the mood? Yet Napoleon somehow got his name attached to the height inferiority complex known as the Napoleon. Complex. The Napoleon Complex states that short men tend to be more aggressive lie more and try to compensate for their short stature by being exceptionally cruel. But researchers found the opposite to be true. One study from Nyu phone short men are thirty two percent less likely to divorce than tolman. The study also found women married to short men reported greater happiness and short men did more housework than tolman. Yes. There is a correlation between happiness and a freshly floor. Clearly short men are doing something, right? I pulled over twenty of my most dateable girlfriends for this article I asked the same question. Are you attracted to short men most had similar answer? It depends on the guy that's a nice way of saying that is not the package. It's the meat inside. So

Napoleon Napoleon Complex Carlin Tolman Bruno Mars Tom Cruise Lady Boehner NYU Adriano. Josephine
"fungus" Discussed on Radiolab

Radiolab

04:11 min | 3 months ago

"fungus" Discussed on Radiolab

Science briefs from around the world

60-Second Science

01:55 min | 3 months ago

Science briefs from around the world

"Hi, I'm scientific American Assistant News Editor Sarah Frazier, and here's a short piece from the August. Twenty twenty issue of the magazine in the section called it. He dispatches from the frontiers of science technology and medicine. The article is titled Quick Hits And it's a rundown of some non corona virus stories from around the globe. From Canada a new study models how gigantic morphing Blob of liquid iron in Earth's outer core underneath the Canadian Arctic is losing its grip on the north magnetic pole a second intensifying. Blah below Siberia is pulling the poll away. From Scotland, a geologic dating efforts suggests the fossil of millipedes creature found on the island of Cara formed four hundred, twenty, five, million years ago making it possibly the oldest known fossilized land animal older land animals have been spotted indirectly through preserve tracks. From Tanzania researchers discovered Africa's largest ever collection a fossilized human footprints left in volcanic mud about ten thousand years ago. Many of them came from a group of Seventeen people mostly women all walking in the same direction. From Norway archaeologists excavating a twenty meter. Viking ship buried below farmers field to stop a would eating fungus from destroying it. Ground penetrating radar had found the ship in two thousand eighteen and a new woods sample analysis revealed that could not be preserved underground. From Zambia in Mongolia. Spring satellite tagged Kuku completed an epic twelve thousand kilometer journey from one country to the other. It had originally been tagged in Mongolia in two thousand nineteen and traverse sixteen countries in his round trip migration. From Antarctica, scientists found that King Penguin excrement releases nitrous oxide also known as laughing gas. It forms a soil bacteria eat the droppings nitrogen rich compounds.

Twenty Twenty Mongolia Sarah Frazier Nitrous Oxide News Editor Tanzania Siberia Norway Canada Cara Scotland Africa Antarctica Zambia Kuku
Bread Science: A Yeasty Conversation

Science Talk

05:11 min | 3 months ago

Bread Science: A Yeasty Conversation

"Wait we had modernist cuisine how long ago? Two thousand eleven. Let's get a quick summary of that project, and then what this project is sure monitors cuisine the art and science of cooking was a five volume about twenty, five, hundred page encyclopedic treatment of savory cooking. Including the history from Roman times to the presence. But with focus on guard cooking, hence modernist in the name referring to the modernist movement throughout the arts of all kinds that has most recently to culinary. Arts. And monitors cuisine presented as well. The science behind what goes on in the kitchen. The kitchen is really the laboratory will have on our houses where we all do experiments everyday whether we think of them, that way is not or not whether we control them or don't. And it explained in a very visual way through innovative photography and illustrations. What's really going on inside the oven inside the pot when is cooking and explain some new techniques you can use it or inspired by science and some of the tools designed issues that have been adapted by chefs to use in the kitchen things like. controlled temperature, water baths, and vacuum seals, and a high speed homogenize irs, and so forth, freeze dryers. So all these kinds of tools had been used to make pharmaceuticals, end bass food, really convenience foods and nominated opted to make high-end really delicious really exciting, intellectually stimulating foods as well. Immodest cuisine people how to do that. And now this project which follows up on that and would you've been working on for? A long time. This project called modern spread the art and science is an equally large and encyclopedic book but focused on one kind of food on bread and I are on this project I was a contributing writer. It's part of a large team headed by Nathan Myhrvold and Francis Coma Boya. The main authors on the book. The. Focus of monitors Brad was to explain. Everything, there is to now pretty much about bread which turns out to be one of the most complex and technological foods that we commonly consume. There's so much that goes into it from the processing of the grains old way through the fermentation that happens which involves some pretty interesting microbiology. To. The packaging in? Different forms and textures and shapes that that result in. Literally, millions of different kinds of bread products that we eat many which we don't even think of as products necessarily. Ver- short sentences that really caught my eyes baking is applied microbiology. It's true. We don't think of it necessary in those terms when we're doing it but what you're doing is control you creating an ecosystem. In a bowl. And if you're making a sour dough, for instance, you're actually controlling by the conditions you set the competition among probably hundreds if not thousands of different species of microbes. There are all of these sort of ambient microbes that are always floating around in the air and on your kitchen surfaces and when you make Joe. By mixing together the ingredients for your bread. There in there when you make a starter for your sourdot you have. you might have adding a sour dough starter that has some bacteria in its Sim. LACTIC ACID secreting bacteria, L. E. BS, and you might have some yeast in there probably do. Those may be dominant but there are all kinds of other microbes in there that are competing for those same sugars and starches. Are the food. We're in San Francisco. So you reminded me I gotta go get out the while. We're here actually there's law it's long been suspected in science has proved true to a certain extent but only to a certain extent that the environment determines the character of a sour dough and that. People have associated San Francisco sourdot. For a number reasons, there's historical reasons that's our does our easy sort of transport, and so if you're a gold miner, one of forty niners you know coming to to to make your fortune in the West. Panning. For Gold, you might be carrying your sour dough starter with you right and But then there's also the the case that symtas unique micro-climate and it has unique fungi that grow here live around here and just like a Belgian beers stick on the character of what's grown around them and what's in the Air The. Guy That are in the air and the bacteria around the net. Then go into the tanks fermenting beer and give off those byproducts that give the beer, the characteristic flavour the same can happen to bread if you let it out in the open so that it's exposed to all of the living life floating around in the atmosphere,

San Francisco Gold Miner Nathan Myhrvold Francis Coma Boya Brad Writer JOE
a secret wrapped in mystery

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

03:44 min | 3 months ago

a secret wrapped in mystery

"If you watched or listened to the news, you may have noticed the. Use of the phrase we didn't WANNA panic. The American people the truth is those words usually come out of the mouth will call Titian who didn't want to face the backlash of his constituents over particular decision he made. But what if there was something that was real and not a particular political ploy or conspiracies theory something that could kill you that had been cloaked in secrecy and his only now being acknowledged as a threat still played down. That's something is a disease, a fungus, no less the common name. The one you'll hear used in the news is indeed rs as of the time of this podcast, it remains drug resistant, they don't have a cure. It is rarely caught early because it's early symptoms are fever and chills at don't improve after antibiotic treatment. Think for a moment. How many times have you gotten a fever just sweated it out. As I mentioned KENDEDA RS is a fungus yeast as a fungus that lives in the body. Generally, a fungus cannot thrive or grow embodies ninety eight point, six degree temperature that can deal or a can our body is a sealed system. Artists can live on the skin fairly harmlessly. But if a cut is infected with it or introduced into the blood, it will be fatal. In. Cases those that have been diagnosed with CONDADO RS in the blood have died within ninety days of the diagnosis. In one case it was determined that the hospital room of victim of Candy RS was contaminated with the fungus it was on the hospital bedrooms the phone, the sheets, the doorknobs it was also determined that standard disinfectants used to clean hospital rooms had no effect on the fungus. Because it can live on the skin. This means the doctors and nurses have to find a way to eliminate the risk of contaminating patients just like the FBI with its ten most wanted list. The CDC has an urgent threat list and Candida RS is at the top. Yet. This super fungus is not new. It emerged in Venezuela then appeared in Spain India. Pakistan that it turned up in South Africa. In the United States has been detected in New York New Jersey and Illinois. So how many in the United States have been affected? Will one of the problems with researching something that is cloaked in secrecy is getting an accurate figure. I have been given numbers ranging anywhere from thirteen cases to over seven hundred thousand cases truth more than half the people contracted need. Ours have died within ninety days. So the death rate is six or three, hundred and fifty thousand. Researchers say that as the climate in certain areas has increased, candied orange has adopted to the point that it can live in the human body. They found that it is also related to agriculture as more antifungal are applied to plans to keep them from rotting these plants are consumed incident of data infection will increase. The fungus can be found on meets manure fertilized vegetables. Although there is no cure for an individual that is infected hospitals are adapting to type of robot that uses a pulsating violently. That removes micro organisms including candied office. For the average American researchers, say it is best to consume organic fruits and vegetables thus avoiding the rampant use of fungicides contributing to the surge of this drug resistant fungus.

Fungus Candy Rs Cure United States Titian Fever FBI Candida Pakistan CDC Illinois South Africa New York Venezuela New Jersey India Spain
Prions And Infectious Proteins

Talking Biotech Podcast

05:11 min | 4 months ago

Prions And Infectious Proteins

"So today's topic is one I've wanted to address for a long time. It's the topic of Priante, a fascinating area of infectious particles that aren't. Alive, it's not it's not viruses or bacteria or or fungus, and in the days of cove it if you really wanted something else to have to worry about him. Here we go. Here's Priante and fascinating topic that has some very interesting routes and potentially some application to a number of important neurological diseases. So we'll say we're speaking with Dr Cassandra Teri. She's a reader in protein pathology at the London Metropolitan University in London so welcome to the podcast Dr Terry. Thank. You Kevin thanks for having me on. Yeah. This is really really good. I really appreciate you. Taking the time to meet with us because this is a topic that I think has. Just, so captivating. And we really need to start with the basics and there's a disease called Kuru. What is Kuru? and. Why is it important for us to understand pre-owned related disease? Okay. Yes. So curry is a really really interesting disease and. is. A disease that was found the tribes of people in. New Guinea. Um. What you what they used to do as part of that culture is when members family members of their tribe. Would die What they would do is they would actually. Senator. Eat parts of the of the of the person that had dead deceased. And And you know many years later when scientists looking into this, what happened was a lot of people down with this strange Strange symptoms the couldn't really work out why so many people within these tribes were getting these symptoms. So. When scientists eventually looked into it to try work out what was going on and they bend discovered the doing this practice this rich listrik cannibalism I'm what happened was essentially. A parts of the body such as. The central nervous system in the brain were eaten. By members of the tribe and those people who you know these parts of the brain. A parts of their body that were essentially infected with prions they got passed on to people who eat within the tribe. So essentially, what's happening is People within this community came down with the same disease Kuru. So it was it's been directly linked to the fact that. Members of this tribe were essentially add contracting this disease by ingesting m other m humans who had this these prions essentially I mean it's a fascinating disease unluckily this. The which list cannibalism has now been banned, it's not been stopped and there's been no more cases of crew and but it from a scientific point of view. It's very interesting to to see the actually this was one of the first reported cases of a transmission of a disease from humans to other humans. So this is why it's really Important to understand Karoo and from a scientific point of view because it shows prions can be transmitted. From humans to other humans. Now, you say, you say prey on and I've always said Priante and I've taken classes where said preempt is this like a tomato tomato thing like a UK okay. I try on other people, call them Priante if complete. Other. Correct pronunciations. Prions you can call them preowneds his. Just wanted to make sure I. got it right because you don't want to talk to a world expert and get it wrong. So that's a by. Could you tell us more about what is a PRI- on? So. They are essentially transmissible at infectious proteins. So they all proteins which are found within your body. And what they do is they can convert into a abnormally folded form of of the protein. And they can actually be transmitted. To species on cools disease essentially an infectious protein possible. It's really interesting stuff. So so you say they're naturally found in the body what is their role in the central nervous system? This is this is really important questions so. Obviously, lots of people, lots of scientists have tried to look at what it actually meant to be doing when they're not on the disease state, and actually if you look at mouse models, if you knock this protein out this off pc prion protein, if you knock your towels in mouse models. Mice. Absolutely. Fine. So exactly what it's doing in the body is not entirely clear. So there's lots of different theories are what it could be doing, but to this day was still not entirely sure what the prion protein does when it's not causing disease.

Dr Cassandra Teri Priante Dr Terry London Metropolitan University London Senator Curry Karoo New Guinea Kevin UK
"fungus" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

01:30 min | 4 months ago

"fungus" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"Fungus is said to contain chemicals similar to those found on hallucinogenic mushrooms and controls the insect as it eats away. Is it at its body? Sounds pleasant. Now. It's not some kind of ridiculous new horror movie it is riel. Check out why some people should be concerned on the front page of w dot com. All right, thanks with its bizarre is what it is. Right. Welcome back. We've got some of the stories for you outside of the voting up like so, Yeah, That's straight ahead. 8 51 Your traffic at 8 15 16 W. Not all tests of the same when it comes to testing for the Corona virus. Michael Doherty of any lab tests now in Stirling says consumers need to do their homework. There's two categories right? There's the swab, which is Do I have active these? That's not an antibody test. Okay, so if you don't have symptoms by large anyway, having this swab is relevant to see if you were just recently contaminate, which is highly unlikely. That's different than anybody. So anybody's are like you get the flu shot. You build up a defence Philip antibodies that shows you've been exposed. Antibodies will fight things off and you never know exactly how affected anybody's. They're going to be because every human beings different Now there's a ton of different antibody testing. You're gonna have to do a little more homework. Basically, you should ask your lab what antibodies test for because there's more than one and you should ask them what they use. For more information, visit Kobe test Virginia dot com or call any lab tests now at 7034446633.

Kobe test Virginia Fungus Michael Doherty flu Stirling Philip
"fungus" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

03:28 min | 4 months ago

"fungus" Discussed on Conversations

"My guest on conversations today is molen shelter AAC. Mohan has done many unusual things in the pursuit of his great passion, his buried himself naked in mound of decomposing wood chips. Run after truffle dogs in the hills around Bologna harvested bog myrtle from a marsh to brew medieval I O, and lane on a hospital bed as part of a clinical trial into LSD and imagined himself a fungus. Mohan is a biologist, and he is fascinated by the world of fungi. Mushrooms are the most well known emissaries from that world, but they is a whole teaming complex alive universe of fungi, going on every moment wrought beneath Thou fate, and this is the world that Molin brings to the surface in his book. Entangled Life High Merlin Hi. It's great to Viga. Noah am I right in assuming that fungi plants..

Mohan Viga Molin LSD Noah
"fungus" Discussed on HANNAHLYZE THIS

HANNAHLYZE THIS

05:25 min | 5 months ago

"fungus" Discussed on HANNAHLYZE THIS

"Well there you go. That's the first thing that we need to cut out of this month. Not, even a little bit. Question. You know Elliott, okay I I have to say I just met you, but I think you're going to go on my list of quality men that I know so far there's four you're going to be number five. Don't watch my special then. Told watch the comedies measure, but I keep the list to try to keep just that one little part of my heart from remaining frozen over, but my question is I'm so curious because now you know like sixty years ago, people get married twenty all the time, but now it's Oh. It's so rare so by mask. Like what made you feel like? Yes, we are ready. This is the time and we WANNA. Do those yeah. Did you know other people that were getting married at Twenty That's like a sixty four thousand dollar question because I have spent so much time in therapy trying to to. To kind of figure out what exactly the the reason was for, but you know I was very young in a group in a very conservative backgrounds and was like I think a part of me on some level was like if I do this, this makes me an adult and then I like can also bypass all the pain of having to actually grow up into an adult as I can skip all of that and just go straight to being thirty five years old which is very silly and naive, and it's strange like it all happened like everybody was cool with it because. I have relatively normal, not relatively very normal parents for the most part and. It was yeah. It's so surreal and it also this and I hate to say this. It sounds like I. Disregard that time but I. don't rain remember a ton of it. I think it was just like they say you're prefrontal. CORTEX doesn't form till you're like twenty five. which was around the time that I got a the divorced so I I think that was a lot of it. It was just a kid and I didn't know what it was doing. You know trying my best, but It was like a security blanket. You wanted to enter into your adult life with at least one assurance handed out. That is such a great way to put it in. That's better. That's so again more succinct than what I said, so thank you yet. That's exactly what it was a security blanket. That makes total sense. Wow, I'm so fascinated from a therapy point of view seriously. I'm fascinated. Greatly, Elliott, we, we hear it. Is this we we love to handle. Sivan. excited. To be on the podcast because I didn't know, I was into like the psychology and therapy stuff until I like started reading all the books in like 'cause when I went through the divorce and I was like I need to figure myself out, and do all the soul searching stuff, and so I- consumed so much self-help stuff and I was like maybe some of those, but then as it happened, a lot of what stuck was like being fascinated with how people's brains work and like. What led me to do what I did not just in the marriage of also in the divorce, and like where you know what who I was basically, so yeah, all that stuff is really really fascinating. I'm fascinated that you felt this pressure almost like need to be adult. When like you know that that was just that was just going to happen anyway. There's no way you could. You could not turn into an adult. You already. Well, maybe I don't know I think. There are some people who never become adults. It's too. I still am trying to be one myself. Working Heart well, it's interesting because I think that like. People not to generalize, but I think that the urge to bind your life to another's the that that comfort is a way of entering into adulthood, not alone you know, and whether or not you have the support of your family whether or not you feel poorly prepared for the pressures that are ahead of you, or you could even imagine handling these pressures as an individual. A Lotta people kind of gloss over that when we talk about like younger people getting married where like Oh. I guess there's nothing else to do. You know like Oh. They're going to get married starving kids because they don't have a lot of options in life. Really, it's like also a big part of just that reinforcement of the idea that you're not whole alone. Oh, for sure. Yeah, that's a great point. I'm sure that lines up I think a lot of it too is just like there's a sense of wanting. She was great to. My Ex is wonderful human? We were like best friends all growing out, and so there was this feeling of like I didn't not know how to break up like I'd never broken up with anybody in so my first Brigham was a divorce so i. quickly. was a divorce. Ole. Cool Dude. That's like punk rock. I mean you should write a song. My first break wasn't wait Not Let the brothers I. They come up on my like spotify discover. A. Town called divorce separation blues, and it's like super amazing okay I know where. To Go, but. Do It's Great You've been part of not one but two groups you know source fed, and then the valley folk and I guess I was just a little curious. You know given that you are with grace helbig. Are you familiar with the Term Heart Big Oh my God? Yeah I, is this a thing? Where as? Source Fed, valley folk fantastic written about guys. Yeah, yeah, I.

Elliott spotify Sivan. A. Town Brigham
"fungus" Discussed on HANNAHLYZE THIS

HANNAHLYZE THIS

01:58 min | 5 months ago

"fungus" Discussed on HANNAHLYZE THIS

"Reminds tension how we want to know how you. Grace Yeah, a long enough time line. She is the best at you know. Here's the thing I know. He's been married had been married so when I met grades I was married at the time I left that part out at sounds less romantic pushing. Down a peg or two? How old were you when you got when you got married? I was twenty years old and Oh, I was twenty years old. I was a baby boy I got engaged with nineteen. You couldn't even buy a drink yet. No in, are we so we had a dry wedding. It was I'm sorry for the people that were in hindsight I'm sorry at the time I was like this is fine. No one needs drinking. What young! I'm like can't. Did you have like a candy? Stay should. We We all held hands, and we prayed for a while we read the Bible and and that was our version of a party No Yeah I was married for I. Think Oh God. Seven or eight years or something like that, and then left source fed did the divorce thing did the existential crisis thing and and now my Now? I don't have that going on which is way but. Okay and also to answer your question real fast about my intentions with grace. It's I figured it out. On a spot, it's basically just to do as much as possible with her in travel and have so much fun because this whole quarantine thing has like is bad, is it is? It's been just so crate to just spend time whether and and be around her all the time, so the fact that we haven't gotten sick of each other is. Very nice that the big I would say that's a big sign. On hedges are are everything in for her to be. Happy and productive. I'd I genuinely didn't expect an answer that. I was just joking I feel like. Oh!.

"fungus" Discussed on HANNAHLYZE THIS

HANNAHLYZE THIS

03:44 min | 5 months ago

"fungus" Discussed on HANNAHLYZE THIS

"Wow. That was so good. What a professional and sinked intro! A Hannah so good on her day. She still so much better than I could ever be. It's almost like you've been doing this for a little bit of time. On my worst day. There is no. Because I don't feel guilty for just not doing my work when I'm sad. No. It's a free pass every time. I have so many questions obviously hint heart. You have met Elliott in person I have yes this time I've ever seen him okay so I would like to know how you and grace met as. A single for like forty years. Now I'm like. Does that happen still? No I. Don't think it does. Are you, how are you first of all? Are you on the APPS before I? Have on the APPS, and then I kind of a bitterly for them off. Are you on them. Okay, so you're not on them right now. I would I would prefer to meet someone in real life. You know at a farmers market. A meet cute. She wants to like bump heads into someone as they both breach for a fallen item on the ground. This. UNASSUMING. You need to start carrying around a very precariously tall stack of books everywhere you go. Oh, my God, and that's how grace and I met. That was I was carrying around some books. She knocked into me and you know our eyes met Back when I was source fed, which would have been twenty twelve very very very long time ago. Now so I think came in like six. You speak. Source Fed was a google funded Youtube Channel started by Phillip to Franco where we did news comedy for a bit of time, and then they expanded to do all sorts of fun nerd content. Of Comedy is just how I refer to all of the news. I mean who have you will today in today's age, but also specifically today I don't know if you guys have been perusing the news. It's terrible. You Know I. Have a policy about my news intake, and in fact, my entire relationship with social media, which is probably why I'm not like the best at my job. I don't go online during the day unless I'm like looking something up or trying to contact a friend I don't like to browse twitter twitter in the morning. To wait. I don't go on Instagram I. Don't and at the end of the day at the end of the day. When everyone's done, I read read it, and that's where I. Get all my news because by the end of day. Usually the facts are there, and it's not just reaction. Actually kind of I would say it's almost better to read at the end of the day than the start of the day because you WanNa, just start your day off like well. It's all hopeless war damned. You say that, but I keep doing it for some reason I keep thinking this this day. It'll be different and then today. I was like what am I doing. It's just NAB. Starting Your Day with a lot of sadness, but anyway Grayson I met was. We were all buds in the same circle. It's that whole, Youtube. incestuous. Bring people. I huddled light I. Mean I guess you would say that's the thing to say? We'll go with that. Collaborators will go with has have collaborated. Classic. That's look, let's get. Let's get this. Please cat. That story. Okay, so, are we doing our? Now. What are your intentions with Grace Helbig?.

Youtube Grace Helbig twitter Elliott google Grayson Phillip Franco
"fungus" Discussed on Surprisingly Brilliant

Surprisingly Brilliant

08:11 min | 5 months ago

"fungus" Discussed on Surprisingly Brilliant

"Diseases. The use of antibiotics essense. On bacterial infections, so what she's referring to there, she she mentioned briefly, cancer immunotherapy, and my partner recently had to undergo some pretty intensive chemotherapy, treatment and chemotherapy. There are a lot of different kinds, but often it suppresses your immune system, so your white blood cell count get super low on your body can't fight off infection so bacteria in the environment that would never make us sick. You and me healthy people with normal immune systems and be really dangerous anybody who's on any kind of immunosuppressive drug, and that can be someone with cancer with an autoimmune disorder sling like that, so antibiotics have made it an incredible difference for people. For Cancer Survivorship for organ transplant survivorship therefore take it almost as a preventative aloha Joe driven exactly. Yeah, you're on of course of Ibn -biotics pretty much. Constantly and talking about the obvious benefits. But when did it start well, you said earlier when it started to lose its edge, you mentioned the first ever case of antibacterial resistance, xactly against Sulphur Drugs and you've brought me so beautifully. To my point here, which is that if we can't imagine a world of that antibiotics, we have to know how to use them wisely, because we are currently sitting on the precipice of sliding back into a world where antibiotics are no longer effective we on the precipice, or do think that we are actually we have started sliding. We've started sliding personally I mean. We've seen some pretty alarming rates of rise in antibiotic resistant gonorrhea gonorrhea, and that lovely STI is one of the diseases that is almost completely antibiotic resistant. Now we have maybe. Maybe, a couple of last line of defense courses of treatment for Honoraria and then once those fail once once. Gonorrhea develops resistance to those. We no longer have a treatment for gonorrhea. We're seeing that with diseases like meningitis. Bacterial Berko says we're seeing this with a lot of diseases, worldwide and the CDC the Center for Disease Control in America has something really beautiful? I think to say about the discovery of antibiotics and its relationship to this era. We're living in now, and they say the unusual serendipity involved in the discovery of penicillin. Demonstrates, the difficulties in finding new antibiotics and should remind health professionals to expertly manage these extraordinary medicines. naively. How difficult actually is it to to focus down? Laser focused down on what we need to develop. Is it just a case that we don't have currently have it, but we could develop it, but that quote therefore shows you the number of factors and the amount of knowledge of process that is required to develop and test money to these if we lose most powerful. Powerful tool. We've got to redesign a whole new tool completely exactly so I think that the case of penicillin is a perfect illustration of how hard it is, and how long it takes an after penicillin is discovered and developed an isolated and industrialized. We develop a whole, develop and discover a whole suite of penicillin drugs. Methicillin is one of them. You've probably heard it. It's the end in Mercer, which is methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus Mercer is a is an antibiotic resistant. Of Staff Orioles we've developed a all kinds of antibiotics and that we've we've sort of stolen from nature from things like fungi that produce these naturally, but we're ending that era of discovery like we it's it's difficult to discover new ones and lots of fellow microbiologists that I've talked to mention this issue of pharmaceutical development as well as the antibiotics are cheap, so they're not very profitable. They don't make A. A lot of money, and so some scientists have pointed out that the scientific community is actually not that motivated to look for new ones, because no one will pay them to, and now that is, that isn't to say that there aren't other solutions being worked on the absolutely are because antibiotic resistance. Is this huge threat that we're facing? We're looking at viral viral motza defense like bacteria, phages, which viruses that. Infect and destroy bacteria were long. Vaccines there. There's lots of really exciting stuff on the horizon, but nothing like this age of antibiotic development. That's why we need the likes of the bill of Melinda Gates Foundation and others right that can fund the big cost of the development of Jason. For the Prophet. Because because those are the drugs we need your right. Don't be driven by the ones that are going to make you the most profit to be driven by the. Need to save lives and extend lives exactly we've actually known that antibiotics have chink in their armor for a really long time, because as early as nineteen forty-five. Fleming is giving an interview with the New York Times where he warns that misuse and overuse of antibiotics will lead to antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria, so we have seen this coming for a long time, and we are developing innovative solutions were getting there, but when we're staring down the barrel. Barrel of looking at dying from a small cut again. It's really important to remember that we need to work on our public health campaigns for proper use of antibiotics places in the world where you can buy antibiotics over the counter right, so they don't have to be prescribed by doctors. Sometimes people go in, and they get antibiotics for what is actually the flu, which is a virus, right? That's a big problem anytime. You get prescribed antibiotics you. Finish, coy great work, Greg and Maria says avoid infection in the first place is also. Important thing to do hey. Why would they also just never catch a cold never full of your bike? Full of you're. Being careful and being preventative you know is obviously always step number one of useful exactly so public public health innovation highly necessary I love the idea of viruses attack the bacteria cell Corcoran. Is this a new thing? Debatable. It's hard to say if anything's anything. You can always truck it back. Yet. There's evidence that people were looking into bacteria, phages way back when viruses were first discovered as a thing. But I think that's a topic for a whole `nother podcast. Soda I've really enjoyed it because I would have always have said Fleming was like the father is they say of antibiotics? Yeah, thanks for listening I could talk about antibiotic long. If you WANNA learn even more about all of this amazing stuff than check out Marias paper on the subject and Kevin's book, the penicillin and giving them homework. Hey listen curious people inquiring minds want to know so those resources will be in the podcast description along with all of the services. That I used to write this episode. Please do rate and review the show as we always say, it really genuinely does help dry as does telling you buddies as well episodes coming soon we hope so subscribe to catch them, and if you've got a story from science history that you would. Would like us to tell or discovery or invention that you want to know the story behind it. Email US early int-, Sika DOT COM that is brilliant at secret dot com. We would love to hear from you. Surprisingly. Brilliant is a podcast from seeker and iheartradio and today's episode was researched, written and produced by yours truly. That's me man Hans Berger I am at Merrin. Be On instagram Marin Patriots and Mary Hans Berger. I really didn't have to do anything. Just go to sit here and have a wonderful storyteller that me. Hey. Is Greg Foot I? Am just a Greg Foot on twitter and instagram rolling credits. Our expert producer was emily fouled out. Editor was Jeremy Schmidt, our studio engineer was Ariella Markowitz. Our supervising producer was David Zwick. Executive Producers of Brian and Gospel Kushner and Mangams Hatakeda another huge. Thanks to our amazing guests, experts out. Lebanon Scott and Kevin Brown. Thank you guys so much for listening. Very sued might tend to bring the story. twenty-seven.

penicillin Greg Foot Fleming Kevin Brown cancer Methicillin partner CDC Mercer New York Times flu US supervising producer Melinda Gates Foundation Hans Berger Berko
"fungus" Discussed on Plantrama

Plantrama

14:50 min | 8 months ago

"fungus" Discussed on Plantrama

"Eat. You can take a chopped salad with you for launch. And you don't have to have a knife. You can just have a fork it. You don't have a big old leslie dangling out of your mouth that embarrasses you at your if you're out to dinner at a restaurant because it's bite size you can mix up all the flavors in a single byte. It's a great thing. I love it too because sometimes the flavor seem to be better. When you cut vegetables in smaller Piazza's true there is some science behind that. Well I don't know I'm glad that you told me that. Their science behind it. Because I don't know about that but frankly I've experienced that that if I have a beat that's a great big piece of beat. It tastes differently than when I have tiny little chopped up pieces of beat with the same dressing or no dressing. This finely chopped item is much better. And so this is a wonderful thing and I would encourage people to experiment with it by taking say something that they are not sure that they're wild about whether it's like a. Brussel sprouts beets Brussel sprouts Kale. Right uh-huh then some bigger pieces but then chop up some of them very fine and put the same dressing on both and see if you agree. That the finely chopped that's dible tastes different. It's been awhile since I read about this but I believe it has something to do with when you chop it up small. You're breaking into the cell walls and you're making the natural sugars in that plant more accessible to your taste buds. I believe that's what it's related to the other thing. That's nice about a chop salad is basically you can use whatever is in the garden ripe at that time or in the fields and the woodlands. Let's not forget the foraged ingredients all right all right. God forbid so. That's a wonderful thing to be able to go out to your raise bed or your vegetable garden and say what what's going in the salad tonight and maybe it's a radish. Maybe it's a chopped up finely chopped Green Bean. Maybe it is. Finely chopped barely cooked summer squash or cucumber right or asparagus or bamboo shoots or a lightly steamed fiddle head from your fern. There's all sorts of both wild and cultivated ingredients that you can toss into a chopped salad and if you need a little extra protein in their go ahead and cut up your favorite cheese or some hard boiled egg or dinner in a bowl exactly and one way that. I like to serve this ellen. Is I take a large kind of flat bowl and I chop all the ingredients and I don't mix them all together all at once. I put them in piles in this large flat bowl so then you can really see the colors and textures and and you can. Visually appreciate the abundance. That has come from your garden. And then it's up to everyone when you serve it. Then they can take if they really dislike beats or they dislike. Those chopped up Brussel sprouts. They can avoid that pile right and just take things the carrots or the finely shredded a rubella or whatever it is they can take the the components that they love and combine them all on their own plate and then of course you serve it with dressing or a little bit of lemon juice of your choice. Well that is very thoughtful of you. You are much kinder host than I am because I like to toss my salads with the dressing. I just don't like dressing on the side. Maybe that's a personal quirk. But I feel like a tossed. Salad dressing coats everything more evenly and so so. I like that better. And you're right. It coats everything more evenly. Frankly because it's hard on your plate to toss it and get things coated evenly although I will say it's easier with the chopped salad then. It is with bigger pieces of lettuce so serve it on a bigger plate chop it fine and enjoy for our insider information segment today. We're GONNA talk about leaf spot fungus because this is a problem that occurs in cool wet weather early in the growing season and here we are at the end of March. It's cool it's wet. It's early in the growing season. This is right on point and you may notice that you've got some small spots on some of the foliage young tender foliage in your garden. And we WANNA help you figure out how to minimize that damage and also let you know when you need to do something about it and when you can let nature take its course now. This is not just a problem in early in the season. You'll notice some leave spots appearing later in the season. And we'll talk in a minute about that but What people need to know first of all? Is that live? Spot is seldom fatal for a plant. That is absolutely true. So don't panic. If you have a tree or a plant that has suffered greatly from leaf spot and defoliation for three or four years in a row or that is stressed because of insect predation. Or because it's been recently transplanted. That is an instance in which leave spot. Might actually really weaken the plant but in most cases this is something the plants have learned to deal with and certain things that you can do will lessen the chance of the problem recurring. So for example. If you've got a tree that's had leaf spot disease in the fall. Rake up those leaves and don't compost get rid of them so that those spores can't over winter any place in the vicinity of Your Garden. That's going to help a lot just that very simple task at this time of year. L. And a lot of people in my area are noticing leaf spot on evergreen plants such as Rhododendrons or holly and it's leaf spot. That actually occurred last year in the summertime and at this time of year. Those older leaves the plant. Might BE GETTING. Ready to GE Edison those leaves anyway because they are the older ones and so those leaves are starting to turn yellow and it makes the leaf spot appear much more vividly and people worry that the leaf spot is what's causing the leaves to yellow and fall off but that's not the case The leaf spot happened last year. It was not fatal to the plant but the plant is just getting ready to jettison those leaves at the start of the growing season anyway and when it does jettison those leaves rake them up and dispose of them. It's interesting that you mentioned Rhododendrons because there are actually more than ten different fungi. That cause leaf spot in Rhododendrons. It's a plant that is particularly susceptible to leaf spot diseases. Sorry to say because it's such a beautiful and popular garden plant. Well you're correct that there are many plants that are particularly susceptible especially if the foliage is getting frequently hit with water yes and an example that I often see are the moped and laze hydrangea. They those leaves are very susceptible to black leave spot if they're getting hit frequently with say an automatic irrigation system. And in fact you know frankly. Automatic Irrigation Systems. That are coming on every day or every other day. That's pretty much a prescription for causing leaf spot. On a lot of plants it is in nature. Those spores will over winter on the leaves on the ground and when the spring rains come it's splashes the spores up and the wind will blow the spores. So that's how those sports travel and when you are watering overhead or with a sprinkler. That does the same thing that the rain does. So if you have serious leaf spot problems one way to reduce the damage is to either use drip irrigation or to make sure that you're watering at the base of the plant and not from overhead so you're not splashing spores around moving it onto the leaves of the plants. One Way. People can become a little bit of a detective when it comes to leave. Spot is if you see that. Your plant has spots on the leaves. Look carefully over that entire plant. If if the leaf spot is being caused just by nature right. Maybe you've had a it's been a damn season or maybe the plant you know. Every year gets a little bit of leaf spot. In either of those cases you will see that live. Spot being distributed fairly evenly around the entire plant. But if you see a plant that has leaves spot on one side. That's not something that usually nature does and so so think to yourself is the irrigation system on. This side is decide where the sprinkler is located. And I see this again and again on hoste that I will go to someone's property and half of the hoster has leaf spot fungus on it and the other half does not and then I pointed out to them and say your irrigation system must be squirting from this side because nature does not usually have a fungal problem that only hits on one little part of the plant right usually fairly even so it's interesting most of the time leaf spot. Diseases Are Fungal. Most of the time there are some bacterial leaf spot diseases. And there's a really easy way to figure out which you've got and I learned this years ago in horticulture school and I thought it was so interesting. Take a leaf. That's got some leaf spot on it. Put it in Ziplock bag blow it up. Seal it and put it on top of your refrigerator for a couple of days where it's nice and warm and what you're doing is you've created what's called a moist chamber and look at it three or four days later and if you might need to take out a little magnifying glass look at the surface of the leaf and if it is a fungal disease you will be able to see fungal growth coming out of that. That leaf spot and it's just so cool and if you don't see any fungal growth you may have a bacterial leaf spot disease. In which case you need to do something different. You need to treat it differently than you would. If it's caused by a fungus. The fungal problems are far more common than a bacteria plants right so this is a case of you know hearing hoof beats you think horses not zebras right. When you see leaf spot you think fungus not bacteria usually not to say that the bacterial spots don't happen if you think that leaf spot is a real problem. Most of the time it is a cosmetic issue and altering your watering concertedly help You can use one of the organic fungicides particularly the ones that are bacterial based That you spray on a plant and the good guy. Bacteria that you are applying on their out compete the fungus and so that can help control the leaf spot but like any fund your side that you are using any organic treatment. Even you want to use it before the plant gets a problem. Yes it's preventative not curative. That's right so once you have leave spot you've got leave spot if you have a plant that's particularly prone to it and it's making the plant. Look ugly every single year. This might be a time to say well. You know maybe this plant should be either transplanted to someplace where it's much drier or maybe it should be transplanted to the compost. Bin and replaced with a whole different plant. That is not prone to fungal problem. I get your point I really do but I want to say there's a couple of other things you could try to situation. I've already talked about breaking up the leaves at the end of the season you could also maybe improve the air circulation within that plant. Prune it a little bit so you can open up the center. Get the good air circulation going in there and around the plant with a fan fanning. It gently well you know. Just stand on the plant and blow on it. Let's just do that all day long but seriously adjusting your irrigation raking up the leaves making sure there's good air circulation and if all of that fails all right over to the compost.

Your Garden Brussel leslie rubella GE Edison Bin
"fungus" Discussed on The Easy Living Yards Podcast

The Easy Living Yards Podcast

11:37 min | 1 year ago

"fungus" Discussed on The Easy Living Yards Podcast

"Is that fungus waits for the right moment of of having the right material that it can eat up all right and so that's what it's doing with the bread and does it for a very short time before it runs out of moisture so fungus does does need some moisture to grow generally speaking and what it does is it breaks down organic matter she tree that falls in the forest yeah there's tons of insects and bugs in there and all sorts of millipedes centipedes right chewing on that stuff right you also have tons and tons of fungus that inoculate s- that would loyd and starts to break it down and so- fungus is really good at breaking down organic matter and making it bioavailable again as a nutrient source for new life so the fungus uses it itself and then as the fungus either dies or the fungus secretes <unk> either waste or or other chemicals to help support life <hes> other plants and other insects in and so on and so forth can utilize it's those nutrients as well so basically it recycles nutrients so has its recycling those nutrients makes them available to other forms of life including the plants in your landscape so as the funguses digesting stuff it secretes things it it secretes waste <hes> secretes secretes nutrients that it doesn't use or the hi-fi diane back when they they use it the resources or don't have enough water those dead hyphen than also become available available for use by other creatures as well but a lot of those chemicals that are secreted those nutrients are able to be taken up by plants and fungus can make certain nutrients of available to other life forms and they couldn't do it without the fungus. That's the cool part at least to right okay so the next piece which we kind of already touched on is they hold soil together so fungus creates like massive web of <hes> of this route network that basically just creeps around. It's cool watching like you can see like slow motion videos again <music>. I'm showing my clear nerdy to right now because like yes. I've watched videos of fungus growing. It's super cool guys. Basically you can watch the stuff it looks like it's crawling across russell space as it's growing and it's trapping nutrients in soaking up stuff getting moisture and so you can get tons and tons of these hi-fi growing wing across the space and basically you have all these different types of fungi interconnected growing in between each other and around each other and so you have this giant route network that holds the soil together so it actually traps the soil in place and prevents it from getting lost and that is super important for the integrity of of your landscape the integrity of force as well and so that's the cool thing with good healthy soil is is fungus has so many benefits okay cases the next piece because it hold the soil together. It's also preventing erosion and nutrient loss so it's holding all that that soil together as the water runs across it it holds it in place likewise prevents nutrient loss that they buy you know traveling up nutrients or making making them where they're kind of held in place with good healthy soil <hes> so they can be more available to other organisms like our plants okay <hes> so the next piece is they also retain moisture when it rains basically the the fungus grows so fast and it soaks up the water like a sponge and and then it slowly dies back as the water becomes less available and and things start to dry out and so that moisture it basically buffers it where that moisture's offers available for longer in the soil through the fungus to plants and the creatures around it to support good healthy life even in drought conditions. It's crazy. The last thing is the feed plants fungus feeds plants super cool so <hes> i'm gonna talk a little bit more about this but bazeley as leaders fungus that grow connected with plants. They have a symbiotic relationship but also indirectly. I talked about all those nutrients. It makes available so in that process fungus feeds plants and and it makes a lot of things <hes> available to plants that wouldn't otherwise be available. There's certain and fungi that can dissolve hard mineral rock and so it makes it hard mineral rock makes those trace minerals available to plants that the plants couldn't do themselves super crazy stuff right super cool stuff so let's talk more about this plant and fungus relationship that i've talked a little bit about so there's a super cool group of fungi called michael rizal fungi. There's going to be a spelling bee after this lesson but but just kind of try and remember it a little bit all right so michael rizal fungi basically form these relationships with plant roots and those relationships are called. Mike arising arises and so basically what micro risa is is. There's a plant root a tiny tiny hair route all right so this these plant roots are like microscopic level a big or small. I guess right so so when you have this microscopic root hair coming off plant there's a there are certain in groups of fungus that grow into the cells of those root hairs k. so they actually like connect with the plant and grow into the cells in the plants. Let the let this happen right. They actually wanted to happen so they. They allow the micro risa plant or the micro rizal fungi to grow into the plant cell okay so they're actually like connected. You can't separate them. Okay super crazy stuff and then the the arrest of this michael rizal fungi organism will then spread out across the the the soil. Okay so what you're doing. Here is your expanding. The route network of these plants by hundreds or thousands or tens of thousands of times of what at the plant could do itself and again it makes different nutrients available to the plant that it couldn't otherwise have so these relationships have been discovered in almost every type of plant that we know of it's crazy. This is a recent you know. The past couple of decades is that this relationship ship has been discovered in how important and how pervasive it actually is with all plants and so most plants have this relationship where they have certain species of fungi that live symbiotically with these plants and so what happens is super cool. Basically the plant secretes certain certain chemicals like usually a like a a carbohydrate like sugar right so it secretes sugars and different things that that because is it such a big structured organism. You know big plant right. It can take energy from the sign. Do it's deal with photosynthesis that we learned about in school so it takes all that energy it makes it pumps it down to the roots some of it you know it saves you know uses a lot to grow right but also take some of that pumps it down to the roots and spits. It's it out through these tiny. Little root hairs says basically it's a message saying hey fungus come over here and grow with me right and so if there's any mike fungi close by they'll formed formed association because they know that there's a plant that can feed them the sugar that they don't readily have so they get sugar they also get water when when during times of drought they get water back from the plant and then during times of of wetness not drought rain whatever we call soil moisture waster right when the soil is moist they do the opposite thing where the the fungus soaks up all the water and then lens it back to the plant over a longer time period so it's this give give and take between the two so the plant gives them sugars water <hes> other nutrients that you can't really have and then the fungus does that cool stuff where it's like dissolving minerals rules and it's reaching you know thousands of times more of of soil surfaces in the plant can do itself and so it basically expands the route and heck worker the these plants. Let's make some way hardier makes way more disease. Resistant makes them happier so that's the cool thing. Is we want that in our landscape right. We want the cool happy plant as opposed to the one that doesn't have the fungus <hes> the good fungus and and get the bad fungus instead right. That's the unhappy plant so again. Michael rizal fungi expand the route network worker plants. They change nutrients with the plants as well and the grow into the plant roots themselves to do. Do this super cool stuff all right so let's learn now that you've learned some nerdy stuff right. You're like me now. Especially when it comes to fungi okay and you want to have good healthy fungal soil in year landscape right good healthy stuff this fungus is not gonna cause you bunch of allergies and stuff this stuff that sits in the soil bill and grows and makes the slow happy makes plants happy <hes> and that sort of thing so you wanna make that fungus happy to do all that stuff okay. So how do you do that well. It's it's easy. You build good soil right. Okay well well then. How do you build good soil okay well. We've talked about this in the past <hes> in episode road eleven so go back to episode. Eleven lincoln show notes over at easy living yards dot com slash episode eighty two soil white it matters. I go into more detail. There super nerdy episode as well super good episode is what i mean. They're actually <hes> so go. Check it out. Learn why why soil is so important portent for you on top of that essentially in a nutshell what we're talking about with building good soil. I still want to listen to episode by the way <hes> is is that you're essentially making a good home for the microbes says the things like increasing organic matter <hes> you know blanketing your soil keeping it protected ed preventing erosion and making sure it's covered well with a lot of plant roots. <hes> things like that making sure has good fungal health all right. We'll talk more about that but those those those are the basics of building good soil. So how do we do that. There's super short answers here all right so having good fungi put-down compost compost compost is full of life all right. It's full of bacteria for fungus <hes> full of healthy soil organisms. If it's good well-produced well produced compost and how you can tell that if you pick up a handful of it and it smells like a forest smells like a somalia would like it then is good compost all right if you pick it up and smells funky putrid rotten puddle. Don't get that compost. Don't use it all right. That's not good stuff so that's how you tell it's super simple. You just smell it right. You don't have to like get your super in there and get it like up in your nose. That's that's gross. Just all you need to do is take all right so so get some compost composts spread it over your your garden beds you know if you're talking about your lawn here and you want good healthy lawn compasses a wonderful amendment for your lawn to all right right so we're not just limited to garden beds here okay so.

michael rizal loyd somalia Mike lincoln
"fungus" Discussed on The Easy Living Yards Podcast

The Easy Living Yards Podcast

12:00 min | 1 year ago

"fungus" Discussed on The Easy Living Yards Podcast

"Two of the easy living yards podcast today. We're going to be talking talking about how there's a fungus among us. That's right guys. We're talking about the benefits of fungus in your soil as we usually think about when you you think about fungus you think alike toenail fungus or you know nasty poisonous mushrooms or something like that right well today. We're going to be talking about fungi. Fungi are fungi. Whatever you wanna say. Let's face it. I'm a fun guy right okay. All the jokes are out of the way by now. Hopefully maybe i have a few surprises that my sleeve you never know right okay but the reality is the world of fungus is so diverse so crazy that we don't even <unk> as humans. We don't even understand and know about it. We're still discovering new stuff about this stuff. Fungus is like this weird kind of. It's this is weird organism that somewhere between a bacteria and plant and in a single celled. You know little amoeba kind of thing. It's somewhere in there without getting techy all right. I'll try not to get super nerdy on you guys today but the reality is this super diverse group of organisms. There are tons of very very beneficial fungus that are super important for the health of your plants the the happiness of your yard in the low maintenance value. Are you in your yard too so that's the cool stuff. We're going to be talking about today. We're not gonna be talking about all the nasty toenail gunk in that sort of thing and let's face it to there are pest pest fungi as well and so <hes> when you're talking about your plants. Some plants can be attacked by a mold or some sort of you know infection in a fungal infection. Usually you know they say it's a fungal disease right well so we'll get into that and talk about <hes> how cool that stuff is now before we do that. I wanna share something with you guys and that is over the past few weeks to pass a few months. I've been approached by multiple multiple companies <hes> that have been looking for sponsorships and looking for me to promote their products. We're talking about big companies like john. Deere troy bilt that that sort of thing and i have turned them down actually even though i've mentioned their names here because i don't want to specifically endorse a product that i'm being paid eight four and so this is a absolutely free podcast that i have been <hes> putting out there to help you guys transform your life through your yard right. We want to have a low meanest landscape. That's beautiful something we can be proud of that. Also benefits are life by giving us back joy and giving us back time and that's what we're all all about here at easy living yards. I don't want to murky that up to cloud that up with <hes> promotions and sponsorships or whatever <hes> paid endorsements that sort of thing and so. I wanna make it clear to you. I am trying to give you guys as an honest perspective as possible that i can give you without being clouded by some of those things and so the way i make money here at easy. Living yards is through my membership and so you guys supporting me in me helping you in turn to transform your yard so so few are appreciative of this show here if you want to keep it free and you also want to transform your yard and you ready to take that step to make a big changing landscape consider the easy living yards membership. You can always go over to easy living yards dot com slash membership and check out how to join the membership there okay so i just wanted to let you guys know that i have been one hundred percent clear on that but yeah i've been approached by these giant companies you know and it is i'll be honest. This is kinda tempting right. It's kind of cool to be perched by some big companies and and and they're saying hey. We want you to support our product. We're gonna come on your show. We can talk about about it. <hes> and we basically want me to be an advertiser for them and i've turned them down and so i wanted to share that with you guys. I'm kind of proud out of them. I self so i just wanted to share that with you guys as well and i'm proud that you guys are here listening to me supporting my show as well and helping us all make a positive change in this world okay okay so let's jump back into our fungus among is episode all right so today's going to be kind of <hes> really an informative episode. There's not specific <hes> things you can do except for one tip i do have at the end of the show that can really help you boost the health of your plants so stick around for that. <hes> i guess yes. I have a couple there so i take back what i said all right so <hes> i have a couple of tips for you that you can benefit the fungal life in your soil and how that can help with with actually benefiting your plants as well as reduced working your landscape so before that i just want to kind of this kind of be like a a more fun than your typical science lecturer you had in school that you've slept through <hes> but hopefully a bit more fun than that <hes> introduction to to the benefits of fungi in your soil bill okay so first off. There's multiple pronunciations just so you guys know. I use them kind of interchangeably now that i'm a little more self conscious about how i say i realize i say fungi fungi and some people say fungi fungi as well. Those are all acceptable pronunciations as far as i can tell from wikipedia so you know that's an official source now these days right <hes> but they all mean the same thing. Basically it's this group of all right now now. Here's the nerdy definition for you. Fungi are eukaryotic organisms so they're more complex than than bacteria. Is that what that means so they have basically the same internal cellular structure as humans and and more advanced animals like mammals fish reptiles is that sort of thing so they have a similar internal cellular machinery has what that means and there's two groups of fungi. There's yeast and molds yeast are single celled. Molds are multi celled so molds are your typical u._c. Mold growing on your bread right you see a mushroom pop up. That's the fruiting body of a mold. <hes> so molds are really the ones we're going to focus on today <hes> yeasts there's also plenty of beneficial piece as well as there's plenty of yeast that are not beneficial official right but just like fungi just like bacteria <hes>. It's the same thing so what we're focusing on usually the classic perspective. Is these things we you can't see. These little organisms we can't see is that they're bad. We don't want them well. That's changing and that's what we're talking about. Today is when it comes to fungi especially molds olds. There's a lot of modes that are incredibly important and actually necessary for good healthy plant growth and that's what we're focusing on today so when it comes to your garden what do fungi really do well. Let's step back essentially good soil equals is having good microbial life in your soil good bacteria good fungi <hes> good yeast good mold <hes> good nematodes little tiny warms that you can't really we see all sorts of things are right and good. Microbes equals good soil. Basically it's synonymous. When you have good soil you have a good life basis this for all sorts of levels of life and all those different levels of life support healthy plants in a healthy ecosystem in your yard and that's really important and because it prevents you from having all these chemical inputs which actually kill the soil life so it's kind of a reverse cycle <hes> you know killing your soil life eagles requiring chemicals eagles killing your soil life and so it's the reverse process and so building in good healthy soil allows you have good healthy beautiful low maintenance plants that the disease free pest free and trouble free and it's it's crazy. We'll talk about some of the cool things that fungus can do in just a moment so if you think about this when you think about healthy forest healthy forest soil has very high fungal content when you pick up that i i don't know if you guys have ever done this but i'm kind of a a nature lover and stuff right in addition to being a nerd right and so i've i encourage you if you've never done on this without damaging the forest too much so maybe close to the trail and the spot that doesn't look like it's got a lot of erosion where a nice big pile of leaves push away those is leaves a little bit and and take a scoop of that soil underneath. It'll probably be hard to pick up because it's all interconnected with a bunch of what seems like little tiny roots and those czar a ton of roots but also in there is tons and tons of networks of fungal heidi or fibers and so basically veasley. You're pulling that soil apart then take a smell of that beautiful wonderful earthy smell that people describe when they're you know like the somali a with their wines. It's a wonderful wonderful earthy aroma right so that's what we're talking about right your your smile and the real thing the somali it would be overwhelmed with joy at the wonderful smell of a good healthy sort force for in my opinion right so it smells awesome and smells healthy. When i in contrast you think about that nasty like putrid area where there's been a bunch of water sitting for a while and you get that like funky nasty st smell from it. That's soil. That's lacking in fungal life. Lacking in soil health and generally speaking is a bunch of anaerobic bacteria belching off these these nasty fumes. That's creating kinda funky space. That's what that is so. That's the opposite right so good healthy. Forest soil is good healthy fungal life in that soil okay so what we're trying to do is we're trying to be inspired by that forest. We're trying to replicate some of that in our yard which is actually very easy to do okay so let's talk about the benefits of fungi. How's this stuff actually beneficial for us. Well i what fung i do think about it from the very conventional perspective you have a loaf of bread in your pantry. That's been sitting there while what happens right. Well somehow magically. Don't know where but somehow got moldy right. It gets a little spot on how the heck did that. Get in there because i mean touch that part of the bread and somehow basically what happened is. There's all it takes is a tiny little spore one little spore. It's this little tiny microscopic piece. It's it's basically like a seed right. It's a little preserved cell and that all it needs is the right conditions and it waits and waits their spores that have been unearthed like with the dead sea scrolls. They research the spores on them to see how how long they've been there. I think that's correct but i i do remember at least that the dead sea scrolls had spores on that they discovered from thousands thousands and thousands and thousands of years ago and they were still viable spores. That's crazy guys so fungus can preserve itself and wait for the right moment so that right moment in your pantry is when that bread starting to get a little funky but it still has a little bit of moisture in there that sports i hope time to grow oh it pops up and you get that bread mold right and then that fuzzy stuff you see is when it's starting to dry out and it's saying it's time for me to create new spores before i run out of food run out of moisture so that's what happens is that little fuzzy stuff is actually tons and tons of little tiny spores replicating waiting to do the same thing again right and so what i'm kind of highlighting here is.

official Deere lecturer one hundred percent
"fungus" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

SciShow Tangents

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"fungus" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

"Podcast episode when you invented a religion all right now. It's time for the science catch where we ask those questions to our couch. Finally hone scientific minds Stephan what's question at Celta volt asks when parasitic fungi infect live animals and take over them. Are they actually thinking about what they're praise doing like actually putting them with a suit or nervous system or is that something else so there's there are fungi <hes> audio court accepts that infect affect insects <hes> and control their movement somehow and the one that we've studied the most is in carpenter ants and what this fungus does. Is it like infects. The aunts makes them crawl up to a certain height oftentimes oftentimes like twenty five meters think grab onto moss or leaf and then just die. They're never move again and never move again so that the fungus can then grow out of their head and then spread spores so it's like high enough out that the spores can can scatter Dr Grow and things like that other yeah so it seems natural the thing it would make a little fungus brain in there tell you what to do but there have been scientists who have gone <hes> like slice by slice through Zombie fide. I aunts infected with this fungus to see where exactly it went and it went everywhere but the brain which is very cool so they surround the muscles and form a network around the muscles of the ant that sounds like a neuro system yeah yeah so. I guess it's like sort of nervous system but it's like a replacement nervous doesn't involve the brain at all it just like controls the muscles so it actually controls. I always just assumed that it like gave the aunt some like signal like. <unk> gave it good feeling compounds until it got to a certain place and was like stopped and then it would give it bad feeling compounds if it moves like taking a drug then like Oh. I just want to be really high right now. Yeah on top of the roof going orange up twenty five to some extent it probably is a chemical signal rather than physical or maybe a combination of where it's just like sprinkling stuff onto the muscles so like muscles go muscles go muscles go and then muscle. Stop it interfaces with the nervous as that's why it just varies going so like the the best quote that I found her MMA scientists. We don't quite understand how parasites manipulate their hosts with such precision so scientists are even like shrug progressive. We spent a lot of time studying embroidery not no I could see there being something with like elevation like with pressure or something like the conditions there make the fungus produce a chemical that causes the ant to do this thing and then when it gets to a certain height the hard to sense height specifically if it was a a light signal that would be much easier if like you go until you see a certain amount of light and not indicating where you are in the canopy maybe and it could be related to that because another group that studies biological clocks hawks found that this fungus has a separate biological clock from the ant the in the way that time to study it is just like what is the chemical composition of this look like over the passage of time and like over relative day relative night <hes> and they found don't like cycles of compounds in it so some Nina due at the passage of time probably has to do with how this fungus controls the aunt <hes> which makes sense light exposure because it's like okay go up until all it's dark because you're under a leaf or in Moss and then maybe just makes it walk forward until it happens to go up a tree instead of aiming it who that that is like the big question mark and where I feel like it gets very dicey because no biologist is GonNa say the phone just wants the to do this because the fungus end goal is to reproduce read sports but it's the G._S...

Dr Grow Celta Stephan Nina twenty five meters
"fungus" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

SciShow Tangents

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"fungus" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

"Mold and yeast is a beast by Jimmy this criminally I- Belo- for Portobello every one of them's gold whether white red or yellow homey man it was so mad at my view most really our topic for the day is mushrooms more fungus more broad than mushroomed. That's my first question. Yes Sir is what's the difference between a mushroom and a fun guy with a subset yeah. All Mushrooms Are Fun Guy Manal Fungi or mushrooms yes and and the thing about fungi is pretty easy thing to define here like it's a it's one of the kingdoms this kingdom yeah so domains are the biggest new archea bacteria and then you carry outs carrier then under eukaryotes animals plants fungi is yes so they're like a whole a whole category of the tree of life. They're not plants. They're not animals are holder thing and I don't. I don't actually know what makes them different. Though while like a yeast is different from a protest or some other tiny you carry out I I also didn't know of course the top of my head but they are eukaryotic which means they have a nucleus inside. I think the two things that set them apart is that they reproduced with spores <hes> so like the little powdery stuffed mushrooms or things like that they all all fungi reproduce a sports. Is there a fancy word for that sport genesis. Yes genesis the process of spore formation. Maybe I knew that I probably I would also like a lot of biology. Words is pretty easy to go easy yeah once you get how they do it and then the other thing that sets them their cell walls so like plants theirselves have more structure than an animal cell but their cell wall specifically have have Keaton in nine so they're more rigid and they don't have chloroplast which plants have so they're they're Hetero trophies. They can't make their own food. This source that I found that it may include one point five million species and we've only named and described about eighty thousand of them Oh so if you want to start naming and describing some species this is where it's at yeah. It seems like the tax are very fraught like they're. They're old fungus researchers where they're like. We're going to name all these things and then modern modern fungus researchers like what the heck where people do they just looked at all this like black moldy stuff and lumped together without looking at anything genetic about it but they're actually very different species. You don't get paid. If you describe a new fungus now now you can name it after yourself. That's what people do what if I named after sponsors this cover drive a fungus and then you can pay me to name you after it because I don't really I'm not interested in doing. Science if I'm not getting getting that money just like the stars in Planet Yeah People by named a star after you except it's a slime mold. That's a great idea. Do you have any other questions about fung in. I've learned everything about them. Everything now so it's time for one of our panelists says prepared three signs facts for our education and enjoyment but only one of those facts Israel and the other three panelists have to figure out a deduction or while guest. which is the true fact if you do you get hank buck if you're tricked than Stephan? We'll get your Hank gammy that Kay these days we use fun guy for all kinds of different things like yeast as a fun guy so we use a fermentation spaghetti sauce as a medication food research all kinds of things <hes> but which of these three things did ancient humans use fungi for number one as a pesticide by spreading a parasitic fungi to their crops that grow inside insects audie eating away all the internal tissues until they die number to about seven thousand years ago in what is now Spain people were using fungus as tinder to start and transport fire or number three ancient Egyptians bound moldy bread to people's Nether regions to treat genital warts..

hank buck Portobello I- Belo Jimmy fung Keaton Spain Israel Stephan Kay seven thousand years
"fungus" Discussed on Flash Forward

Flash Forward

04:58 min | 2 years ago

"fungus" Discussed on Flash Forward

"Clearly make better connections, learn more easily learn languages, especially communicate more easily with other people who have this same symbiotic fungus. In rosewater, the infection is alien, familiar, invasion story. It's a salt of redemption story. It's story about the character himself are. It's a kind of allegory about how was caller Nies as well. So it's it's fun for all the family really. Now, these books have a lot of differences, and I won't spoil too much of the plot of either one for you, but they also have some really interesting similarities because they're both rooted in this idea of a parasitic infection behaves like a fungus. One of the key things that happens in the genius plague is that those infected by this fungus become connected to one. On another. And that happens in rosewater to people who are infected by this illion fungus like thing, can access something that Taty calls the Zeno sphere. And this idea of connectivity and connectedness comes from the very real biology of fungi fungi can can do that. They can spread over a long distance and then communicate kind of like a neural network. You have this vast network, it has no central point. So it's not like, you know, there's some central brain that is sending out these tendrils and bringing the information back to the central point. You know, every bit of it is the same, and yet it manages to have some very sophisticated functions where it's communicating. And in some ways you wouldn't say thinking necessarily depending on what you mean by that, but it's, you know, making decisions determining that really the, you know, this bit of moisture is better over there and these new. Nutrients are better over this way and you know, but it, you could destroy any part of it. And the whole is still there. The manufacturers try to storage and transfer of information, which is not so complicated for fun, the high Fe, but from team buddies alone, strands of fungus, they actually have enough in common with the near that you could use them for near Fano transmission. And that's, that's the part of it that I that I really us from from fund like, okay, look, the way designs you could conceivably transmits, Niran, seek transmits. They nervous impulse among their along their hyphen in both books, the parasite that has infected humans is mostly interested in surviving. It needs humans to do that, but it doesn't really care about humans or our wellbeing. Exactly. And one of the first things that happens in both stories, when these infections begin to spread is that governments get involved. There's no way facial isn't to get involved, but it's a noble thing. It needs commanded, control in needs, resources to have some kind of over reiki powers. So you need to know that is Asian to that otherwise, human racist, dude. So, yeah, that is not that back hot to happen in the actual plot, there's a. Man who is working for the NSA who is seeing kind of subtly the changes that are happening in world governments and around the world as this thing spreads and starts really shifting loyalties and changing things and having to grapple both in that global scale, and then his own personal scale with his brother who is my collagen and his father who has Alzheimer's, which could possibly be reversed or even cured with this, whether this is in fact something that is good for you Manet's or or not. And of course this makes sense, right. If you have a parasite that is changing the behavior of people all over the world, that is a small issue. We talked a little bit about what might happen during an outbreak of episodes ago, but this is a slightly different thing, right? It's not killing people. It's just changing them. And that's kind of scary too. To right. How do you know who is acting under their own power and who is being secretly controlled by this infection and in both books, different countries react differently to the infection. One of when you get when you get a visitor or strange that you don't knows that you're projecting ten to a stranger and the projection that you do is actually based on what you would if you were stringent place. So the United Kingdom, for example, has a history of going to other people's countries and taking over their resources over there done. Let's write this long history of that. So it is natural. For example, for nice came up to think if eighty coming, they're going to be all stop and look..

Taty Nies United Kingdom Alzheimer
"fungus" Discussed on In Our Time

In Our Time

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"fungus" Discussed on In Our Time

"Oh i have preserve specimens of these early primitive plants from poland fifty million years ago ju may maybe slightly younger may be for orange and twenty million years in the case of the ryan he church but they just contain the fossilized plans but you can actually see evidence inside the the root systems of structures are remarkably similar to the structures see in modern day planned c see hifi colonizing plan routes and developing the distinctive coils inside the route's all beautifully preserved acid that provide some of the best evidence to to date this greening of the earth earned were you tell us about the range of environment on gain hamid i'm a smaller question of where they don't inhabit they literally everywhere so in this room there are probably from gospel was planting around what are they up to at while let their very tiny so one of the the resist so successful is out the spoils can disperse or easily because they're so tiny and produced in haege abundance um so that's enable them to colonize virtually all batallion the judge aversive ballistic question with irs floating around here in this room broadcasting a they looking to do anything or just an accident will leg do anything other than flood around at they will find a suitable substrate to to colonize and to germinate many fungi associated with human so their skin for example may be ah a scary thought but we are coveted at an microbes including fungi um so there are essentially looking for a suitable environment to to germinate and and to colonize and that's the naval them took.

hamid irs poland twenty million years fifty million years
"fungus" Discussed on In Our Time

In Our Time

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"fungus" Discussed on In Our Time

"Halos the great swedish biologist he was the first person to two two group organisms anti group things into animals and plants but he threw the fungi into into the plug category so we're in good company when we think that perhaps they look a little bit like plums um and then this missiles have carried on from there what about hook inoussa microscope london a positive das arafat won't roma gauge sir kenneth combatrelated lives are we can talk about who could you later said we've got we've gotten ass and classifying and he gave comes in america david david johnson what the rule of funk he played in the history of life on us they have a hugely important role and one of them the main event so they were responsible full was and the greening of the earth so the movements of plants from the aquatic environment into the terrestrial environment which happened about four hundred fifty million years ago and that process was only possible because of the role of fungi so when plans a growing in the aquatic environment pay they have a that they have an nutrients out a fairly readily available to them in solution i am so taking nutrients is is rather easy on land that's not the case and the the the so primitive route saudis early plants had were really up to the job of acquiring nutrients and so one of the the critical processes was the dilution of the the michael rizal symbiosis so interaction between fungi that live on land with planned routes so they developed these very intimate associations that enable plants to colonize the terrestrial environment and take nutrients via these root born fungi to enable the plans to diversify and formal inner the the huge diversity of plants that we see today this happened but owned fifty million years ago it did yeah and we know now earlier while you're luckily we know that because there are some remarkable fossil evidence to share this and as some of that in the uk south of the famous rainy chart and near aberdeen at this dates back to the to the early devonian's about four hundred million years ago and it contained some incredible.

david david johnson arafat kenneth combatrelated michael rizal uk aberdeen four hundred fifty million yea four hundred million years fifty million years
"fungus" Discussed on In Our Time

In Our Time

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"fungus" Discussed on In Our Time

"Giving part of the fungus he grows and it feeds as a network fine tubes were large surface area where huge enzyme capacity i'm joe from the noted had to be given by three the nra button three to five million species of hungary and we have you identified only 150 unvem seventy thousand of them something like that so the there's a long way to guys what do they have in common all the vast majority of them have this piece my cdl structures some of them a uni sample sent such as yeasts date they have kyw tin in their cell walls as a common feature and us also found in animals in invertebrates in their exoskeleton so cheney fungi are more closely related to animals and now to plans how do you how do they differed they they're alleged arms of plateau do they differ from can you just develop that a bit yes you said more or less necessary generous at the start of the program and then the inside also the inside plaza is a bit of a decree crushing of lines a yes there is an is a is a bit of all all sorts of world i suppose fungi in some way i like animals in that they they have so far gene behavior they they they they they social round for food they don't get up on wander around like many animals do but they search for food when they find it ain't they respond and actually if you look at some of the patten's they make a rather look like the termite trails you you see when termites go investigating alpha food sources there are a bit like plants in the sense that they don't wander around it it it is very different that nickel similarities to two two different organism groups but that they've got huge difference is one of the most important things about them is that they can't make their own food so plants make their own food fungi comp make their own food they have to get it in the same ways owls do from other organisms so that is a crucial feature about fungi wounded fungus closure degroot take looked while i asked yoga okay yeah not short the answer to that is i suppose people started thinking about function classifying them in in the 1760s lin.

patten nra hungary cheney
"fungus" Discussed on In Our Time

In Our Time

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"fungus" Discussed on In Our Time

"This is the bbc thanks for downloading this episode had been our time there's a reading is to go with it on our website and you can get news about our programmes if you follow us on twitter bbc in our time i hope you enjoyed the programmes hello our planet is home to millions of species of fungi and the role it plays vital without funky life on earth as we note simply wouldn't exist they also play an important part in our everyday lives the making of bread and beer and wine wouldn't be possible if argument available in the field of medicine a bean part of their production of certain antibiotics since penicillin however there are other fungus which can cause nessan diseases in humans and destroy trees some tongi or even toxic to humans and can kill if consumed despite the significance much of the way in which me operate remains a mystery women to discuss peng are serega professor food security in the buyer sizes department at the university of exeter then body purpose of fungal ecology at cardiff university and debbie johnson nhs in microbial ecology at the university of manchester then body what is a fungus and what did they look like well funky not plants and animals they know bacteria their kingdom of their own you could be forgiven i suppose to thinking that their plants because the front bodies the things which we think of his toadstools all brackets on trees i suppose superficially they look a bit like the flowers or fruits of plants but then then then not the the flowers and fruits of plans wink we know that's not the only part of aplomb as the leaves and roots in the schoups and in the same way the fungus has much more to it than toadstools we see when we warmed through the woods the toast was just the tip of the iceberg underground we have the the main body of the fungus the my cgm my cdm is a a network of fine filaments that's the body of the fungus this is what sets funky apart from all other organisms it's the law.

penicillin cardiff university bbc professor university of exeter university of manchester