36 Burst results for "Fuller"

Fresh update on "fuller" discussed on Ringer FC

Ringer FC

00:41 sec | 19 hrs ago

Fresh update on "fuller" discussed on Ringer FC

"Football fuller is like makoto. Ryan doesn't fucking light football bunch of really good some hair you know like football and they wanna play football and it's like something that is outside of their control is reducing their ability to do so many. The mental health aspects of that is because people people people don't understand the ramifications of when you know somebody for instance you're driving your car and you've not played you've played four games in two off years and you've gone for a load of money and people talk about is you're you're making money from their club and look at it's stealing money and you're trying to get fit into the point where you get kind of negative reaction and you.

Ryan Four Games Two Off Years Makoto
Why the Trucking Industry Is Such a Mess

Odd Lots

02:04 min | 3 d ago

Why the Trucking Industry Is Such a Mess

"Going to be speaking with craig fuller. He is the founder and ceo of freight waves which Which is kind of like the bloomberg terminal for our transport could be said they cover Transport from a new perspective they also data all that stuff and he is going to tell us all about domestic truck industry. And how stuff gets around after. It's unloaded from the port. So craig thank you very much for joining us. Joe tracy great to be here craig so excited to talk to Obviously there's lots to cover and of course we're going to get into all of the supply chain messes that we're seeing right now but is always you know. It's sort of helps. I think it's especially true in trucking to talk about what the pre crisis environment look like. Because if i recall from seeing the reporting doors a lot of like very intense boom and bust cycles just in the last few years leading up to twenty twenty period where is very good period where it was week. How would you describe this. Sort of health of the industry pre-crisis so this is an industry that runs on very thin margins as if you take the industry average in terms of profitability typically goodyear. The industry will generate three percent gross profits so it is not an industry that is typically very profitable. There's a lot of very very few berries of entry and it's very cyclical industry and so it's reasons of when the market's good aguero costs go up significantly because the input costs go up and win. The market's really bad. Obviously revenue dries up with the economy is sputtering and so because all those reasons. It's a very second goal. I industry so as you mentioned over the past five years. We've had to freight recessions in the past five years and two big boom cycles and that was pre kohout

Craig Fuller Joe Tracy Craig Goodyear Kohout
"fuller" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

07:16 min | Last month

"fuller" Discussed on TechStuff

"A team sponsor. Gyco fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. Hey i'm gabrielle collins period drama nerd and you're behind the scenes guy to richardson on bridgeton. The official podcast. We're learning how this fantasy world dipped in history. Came to life definite. Her costume design really is about the elegance of simplicity. It's just color and shape. We went old school. And we got to see karta's sin who painted the backings forest by hand. These dukes are like in their late twenties early thirties. Almost all of them were unmarried. Really good-looking looking at none of them have syphilis. Can you imagine when he looks into your eyes and then he dips you. We just had this sort of repaying. Sound yep i think. This just been awarded malfunction. Listen to brigitta on the official podcast on the iheartradio app apple podcasts or anywhere you get your favorite shows. Oh okay aerial Let's talk for a second in other. we're back. Let's talk for a second about monsters at work because that serves as of the two inspirational points for a mash today. So the first inspirational point is full house or fuller house and jonathan case because we are inspired by sitcoms but there was also news that disney plus is making a monsters at work tv show that is a sequel to monsters inc. And i guess by that account monsters university monsters you. That's that's that's that's a pretty. It's fantastic by the way i mean. It's it's unnecessary. it's totally it's a prequel that doesn't need to exist but it is. It is legitimately entertaining and adorable well so as monsters inc and so i therefore monsters at work will also be adorable. But you know when i was looking at. I'm like okay sitcoms. Full house just is is ripe for a mashup. Yeah and. I don't know why it's just like there was no question in my mind that we needed to mash it up with monsters inc. Unfortunately i think both of our mashups got a little bit more adult than initially anticipated. Going into it. Yeah and adult. Dark and or disturbing and or bleak. I mean mine's not super darker. Disturbing has a moment. But sodas full house. Yeah like both full house and fuller house had start on a sad note and then get happy. So that's where mine is since yours is apparently soul crushingly depressing. I'm gonna let you go first this time. Okay all right well so yes. I did set mine in the world of fuller house. So for those who are not you know. Haven't ever watched it for tall. Thank your lucky stars But it is a sequel to full house in which the character of dj tanner one of the daughters of the the in the original full house season. She's a grown woman she's a the series opens. She has recently lost her husband. She has three kids her younger sister. Stephanie comes to live with her as does her childhood. Friend kimmy gabler. And they all are working together to try and you know. Look after the kids and just make it in a world. That's tough and et cetera et cetera et cetera. So my is that in the world of fuller house And the world of monsters inc. So here we go. Dj tanner has a problem. She's a widow and mother with three children who now also has her younger sister. Stephanie living in her house. And there's kimmy gabler who for reasons. I'm only vaguely aware of has also moved into the tanner family home with her own daughter. Anyway the real problem defense has isn't with all of this. It's that there is a monster under her bed not that. Dj knows style but the monster is lurking quietly just hiding there. Because as it turns out the tanner home is the secret to monster. energy crisis. cut to title fuller. Monsters flashback monse droplets. The city has grown exponentially since the events of monsters inc. Becoming a mega metropolis that covers most of the monster world buildings more than one hundred stories tall tower in the incredibly dense hacked urban area though occasionally huge monsters do give the buildings a run for their money and the monsters on the laugh floor at the monsters. Inc factory are close to burning out even with the incredible juice supplied by laughter which is orders of magnitude greater than screams. They are running dangerously close to not meeting. The energy needs of the growing city. The monster world is on the precipice of a true crisis. That is until mike was hausky already. A legend tries a door. That hasn't ever been opened the door. Leads to the tanner home in san francisco. It was always there ready to be used but for whatever reason simply was never picked was hausky goes through a process of trying lots of doors in quick succession trying to find the solution to his growing problem. Just as he's he's about to give up. He sneaks into the tanner home and was else ski slips under. Dj's bet on a reconnaissance mission and there he discovers something phenomenal laughter and endless supply of laughter. Not from the tanner family or their surroundings. Fear of weirdo friends. No it's from some other source some source that the tanners seem unaware of but was sqi hears it loud and clear whenever anyone says anything even if it doesn't remotely resemble a joke there's laughter. Lots of it was else. Ski can collect enough in half an hour to power all of months strapless own week and so was hausky makes his way into the tanner home on a regular basis. He doesn't even have to do anything at all. Sometimes i will just say have mercy in a way that you know you can tell it's a reference to something but there's not really any oath behind it anymore. But for some reason the unseen audience laughs at it. Or stephanie will say how rude and boom laughter or heck. Dj will say. Oh my lanta. There's a ridiculous amount of laughter. Monster energy problems are solved. But there's a cost.

san francisco Stephanie fifteen percent tanner fifteen minutes kimmy gabler three kids three children richardson first brigitta mike both gabrielle collins today jonathan one half an hour more than one hundred stories dj tanner
Jobless Claims Fall to 498,000

Marketplace Minute

00:19 sec | Last month

Jobless Claims Fall to 498,000

"For the first time since the pandemic triggered massive layoffs the number of initial claims filed with state unemployment programs dipped to just below five hundred thousand last week. We'll get a fuller picture of the job market tomorrow. When the government issues it's monthly report for april analysts are forecasting nearly one million jobs

7 North Carolina Deputies on Leave After Killing Black Man

WBZ Morning News

01:03 min | 2 months ago

7 North Carolina Deputies on Leave After Killing Black Man

"News radio, seven county sheriff's deputies on administrative leave after the fatal shooting. Of a black man in Elizabeth City. North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper is called for body camera footage of Wednesday's shooting to be released after reports that Andrew Brown Jr was shot as deputies went to his home. Serve warrants this, according to emergency radio traffic from the scene. Now in North Carolina. Body footage is not considered a public record. Individuals have to go through the courts. File a petition for the release and that needs to change. According to Brooks Fuller, the center of the NC Open government coalition police body can law in North Carolina really only gives robust access to body cam footage to people who likeness or voice or recorded in the in the body cam footage. Or to those people's personal representatives. So their attorneys recordings of scanner traffic compiled by broadcast, if i dot com from the morning of the shooting include emergency personnel indicating the brown Was

Governor Roy Cooper Andrew Brown Jr North Carolina Elizabeth City Brooks Fuller Nc Open Government
Matt Gaetz Is Said to Face Justice Dept. Inquiry

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

01:51 min | 2 months ago

Matt Gaetz Is Said to Face Justice Dept. Inquiry

"Such a skis. That's how one campaign staffer described congressman matt gates after learning about the lurid accusations for which the florida republican is now being investigated. The justice department is looking into whether gates had a sexual relationship with a minor and paid for her to travel with him. Nbc news reports. At gates's communications director abruptly quit quote of quote out of principle. It's not clear what the principal is here but the daily beast reports that republicans have been waiting for years for a matt gaetz scandal daybreak. Why we'll see an end reports a gates used to show nude photos of women. He claimed to have slept with two colleagues on the floor of the united states house of representatives and business insight report. The gates took part in a game that scored female sexual conquests while he was a member of the florida. Legislature matt gaetz is denied that he's ever paid for sex or sexual relationship with a minor. He's not been charged in. The investigation is ongoing joining us. Now is matt fuller. Senior politics editor for the daily beast and cynthia ox me a former federal prosecutor who specialized in sex crime. She's an msnbc legal analyst. Cynthia joining us on the phone. Matt you have been reporting on the story or at least following this story for a long time and you suggested that we'd seen nothing yet. Yeah i think we've got a glimpse of maybe the endgame of this a little bit last night when the new york times reported that The justice department probe might be centered around basically a sex trafficking ring with this friend of his Joel greenberg Florida republican tax collector. On seminal county is insane story. This is a very serious very serious allegations Mckay has denied almost everything here. He keeps saying he's never had sex with a seventeen year old. Last time he had sex with a seventeen year old he was seventeen.

Matt Gaetz Matt Gates Gates United States House Of Represe Justice Department Nbc News Matt Fuller Florida Cynthia Msnbc Joel Greenberg Matt New York Times Mckay
Why mRNA Vaccine Technology is Totally Safe

Today, Explained

02:01 min | 2 months ago

Why mRNA Vaccine Technology is Totally Safe

"Dr deborah fuller. I'm a professor in the department of microbiology. At the university of washington. School of medicine. Dr fuller has spent decades studying the kinds of vaccines were now using to fight. Cove it one of the things that a lot of people don't realize is i think that Amarna vaccines just suddenly appeared as a brand new vaccine when covid nineteen started but there has been research going on in this field for over thirty years and i was one of those people thirty years ago who i started working on the idea of a code into your cells and express a protein that was stimulated immune response. So you're basically the perfect person to tackle a wide range of questions about all these different vaccines are you gain. I am totally game absolutely. Let's give it a shot okay. My buddy was too shy to call our voicemail line and admit that he's scared of 'em are a but this listener was not. Hey sean looking. For the science face evidence that suggests that lab created. Mr rene is not gonna trigger some sort of long-term averse affecting my body and say five twenty forty or sixty years. I feel like. I'm being asked to trust something that does not have published long-term medical research behind it. What school leaves my future. Something unknown risk. What would you say to people like. Dude let's start out with general with vaccines idea that they're gonna cause some sort of issue five ten years from now that's just doesn't happen back us to how vaccines work. They get in. They do their job. They go away. Vaccine does stimulate an immune response. And then when you get exposed to a pathogen that immune response is going to act on it and get rid of that pathogens so they do a very focused directed immune response and once they get inside your cell and they instruct yourself to do that. They disintegrate our body deals with 'em are a all the time we'll eat it were exposed to it were. It's in our environment and knows what to do with marina.

Dr Deborah Fuller Department Of Microbiology Dr Fuller Mr Rene University Of Washington School Of Medicine Sean Marina
Sharon Stone reveals Surgeon increased her Breast size without her consent: 'He thought I would look better with bigger Boobs'

Naughty But Nice with Rob Shuter

00:55 sec | 3 months ago

Sharon Stone reveals Surgeon increased her Breast size without her consent: 'He thought I would look better with bigger Boobs'

"Stone is alleging surgeon increased. Her breasts is without permission so in a new book she went in to have surgery to remove a benign tumor and when she woke up the doctor had given her bigger breasts at least warn fuller cup size bigger. She was not happy about it and he said he did it because he thought they would look better. We'll who's telling this who's telling the truth. You're like this like i hate. I hate being the judge here. But i feel like i have to be the judge like i don't wanna think sharon put a little lion her book but the subtly very strange about this story. String time big to clean your teeth and you come out with with a new with new knows those rug about this sharon. The story is an audience

Benign Tumor Stone Sharon
AstraZeneca Releases Fuller Data Backing Its Vaccine

WSJ What's News

00:42 sec | 3 months ago

AstraZeneca Releases Fuller Data Backing Its Vaccine

"Additional data from astra zeneca says it's kobe. Nineteen vaccine is seventy six percent effective. According to a fuller analysis of trial data released yesterday. The drugmaker came under pressure earlier this week. After provided preliminary trial data showing its vaccine was seventy nine percent effective. An independent monitoring board said the data were out of date raising concerns of us officials. Astrazeneca's latest results were largely consistent with the preliminary findings reported on monday. The company said it would submit the findings for peer review and publication in coming weeks and request authorization of the vaccine from the us food and drug

Astrazeneca United States
AstraZeneca Releases Fuller Data Backing Its Vaccine

WISH TV's News 8 Daybreak

00:28 sec | 3 months ago

AstraZeneca Releases Fuller Data Backing Its Vaccine

"AstraZeneca updated data on its Corona virus vaccine, according to the company. It's shot is 76% effective against symptomatic covert 19. That's slightly lower than the 79% efficacy, it first reported on Monday for its US vaccine trials. The new numbers from AstraZeneca calm after an independent board that reviews vaccine data raised concerns that information in that initial report was outdated. The company says it looks forward to filing for emergency use authorization with the

Astrazeneca United States
Chicago Bears Kyle Fuller Headed To Broncos

Kim Komando

00:27 sec | 3 months ago

Chicago Bears Kyle Fuller Headed To Broncos

"Broncos Saturday, The Broncos agreed to sign two time Pro Bowl cornerback Kyle Fuller shortly after he was released by the Bears a salary cap casualty Instead of making 14 million in Chicago, where he's played all seven years of his NFL career, the 29 year old Fuller will make 9.5 million on a one year deal in Denver with a chance to earn another 500 grand If he makes first team all pro, which he did in 2018 when Broncos head coach Vic Fangio was his defensive coordinator and shy down raining Crystal Gateway news radio hope you got a chance to get

Broncos Kyle Fuller Bears Fuller Chicago NFL Vic Fangio Denver
Effects of Social Media on Self-Esteem with Dr Lori Whatley

One Life Radio Podcast

08:41 min | 3 months ago

Effects of Social Media on Self-Esteem with Dr Lori Whatley

"Media is really starting to have an impact on on self esteem especially younger people And the almost to the point of making them somewhat delusional about the world that they live in and other people. So you know it's been linked as said to higher levels of of of you know self esteem along with loneliness envy anxiety depression and narcissism. So why are we so addicted to social media if it causes all of these issues dr wildly. How can we stop it. How can we. What can we do. You know it is so true. We there are a lot of research and more and more every day coming out about how we are affected but people people don't really put the two together they they don't realize that their anxiety and their question is is due to their online usage something lonelier because at first glance it looks like you know the world is out there living this amazing social life which is exactly the opposite of the person that scrolling through social media usually and and that's like to stay on that slippery slope things diety and and those things you mentioned and as i said most of us just don't relate that negative feeling that we're having To the social media usage but we have research that don't like the to. yeah. I mean i You know i just. I think a couple months ago got an instagram on my own personal one. I've only got like nine nine post on there so far. But i did it because i was almost forced to like you have to do it. Social media is so important. You know if you if you're on radio or whatever just just in business. In general social media is important for your advertisers. And all these things that you have to interact interact with if you own a business. But i don't like it. I never have. I was probably one of the last businesses to to get on social media. I fought it for years And so i'm way behind the game and you know what dr wildly don't care. I really don't care. is that a. Is that a bad thing. No absolutely not i. I understand what you're saying. I know when. I wrote my second book to find a as i was looking for a publisher. That was one of the questions. They all wanted like. Do you have a social media platform. Just you're writing a book about Media that it's not helpful though I get what you're saying. But but i think it's really helpful for us to hold on to our our values and what we know into typically that we need. And you know you you can do what i do and have someone else Manager social media if it becomes too much for you. Oh yeah yeah. Yeah no. I have someone but i even feel guilty about having them having to be on social media all the time. I just don't like it. I don't think it's healthy at all a little bit a little bit of something. I guess is okay junior. I'm going to pull you into this. How do you feel about social media. You've got two young daughters like me. Years are a little bit younger but do you like them being on social media and do you see it becoming potentially a a problem in their lives. So i'm kinda split on a two. Because i need social media for what i do as far as work goes But and i. I see that social media like the there is some good things so we do for my daughter's as we have the passwords to all their accounts So we get notifications just like they do if anybody tries to message them With they're not allowed to accept friends unless we see first We just had to put some restrictions on it and and we do check and we randomly check and they know that. So you know that. I think that's just what you have to do as a parent you kind of have to police their pages i. It's kinda hard to to completely take it away. 'cause they'll find a way. I mean kids. I have a friend whose daughter found a way to make fake accounts and they you know they they do things to get around so i i i. I don't wanna like tell them they can't do it but they do know that. I'm watching Your oldest did you thirteen. She just turned thirteen. She's from fourteen fourteen. Okay and minus sixteen going on seventeen and so they're very close in age and it does get more difficult to to manage it or oversee as they get a little older you want them to be more independent. You don't want them clinging to you Because you just want you wanna have confident and independent children so it is a very difficult line to walk. Dr wildly suggest that parents do well. I think is a very important part of parenting now and in this new digital environment that has become paramount in our world so we we need to Be educated on the things that can happen. And we need to educate our children and they need to understand that yes we are going to parent them responsibly. Around this i love the things that junior said that they are doing and there are many at now that you can get you know to monitor what's going on with your kids on social media and to block out offensive Website and whatnot because you we need to be aware there are some stories right now in the media about things going on that started on social media and it's really scary like what for example. Well i this one of the things that what predators how determined you know. Yeah who are who are out there posing as someone completely different than who they actually are and once story out there is of an actual predatory. Was you know pain to the home of a child an underage minor. And you know so. This is really frightening. Yeah it is frightening. You know it's so you know to go back to what we originally What i asked you about you know You know the higher levels of social media being associated with loneliness envy anxiety depression narcissism. What are some of the signs that social media is becoming an issue. Psychologically for not just a child but even an adult how do how do you know that you've you've entered into the danger zone if you will well the that. Social media's becoming a problem is when you know in in in the areas that you mentioned like loneliness and anxiety depression in the You know just like anything. We become addicted to be able to have import questions. Are we able to do without this are we. Okay with introducing balance. How much angst does it caused us to put this down and walk away from it for a while. Those are those are very telltale signs. If if we have a problem. Yeah i don't i think it's getting to the point almost like i don't know like it has with I gotta be very careful what i say here. I don't wanna. I don't want to come come off as i'm judging anyone but you know when when you put your picture out on social media and you've gotten to the point where you must put built around because nobody even knows what you look like really without a filter and there are so many of them That make you look younger. Make you look thinner. Make your you know your skin. Look amazing i mean it goes over basically as a swipe now as i understand it you can it can heighten your cheekbones. Make your lips fuller like change the tone of your skin your hair like all the stuff like why is that even necessary. Have we become a society. That is so shallow that we must see everyone at their best. Always like looking beautiful. Even if they're not really and say that beauty is in the eye of the beholder. We shouldn't even be at a point in our world where we're even looking at that anymore. But i don't know if that'll ever go away. I mean beauty something that we evaluate since the beginning of time right. Oh yeah but think of the thirty of what you just shared. I mean that that that's so sad. And and thank the pressure that is put on people especially teenagers vaults and what is the message that we are sending our young people with all these filters and whatnot. Yeah well it's it's certainly something that we all need to contemplate especially those that have

Anxiety Depression Loneliness Envy Anxiety Depres
Chicago Bears get under cap while keeping Fuller

Broncos Country Tonight

01:57 min | 3 months ago

Chicago Bears get under cap while keeping Fuller

"Improved today. Free agency her I come. That's from Jared. Thank you, Jared. Then how did the bears keep Kyle Fuller today? How did they get under the cap is a good question because it was floated out earlier this morning that Kyle Fuller might all of a sudden become available on my goodness. I would do some backflips here in the studio. Not that I could. And not that I would really try. But mentally, you know, figuratively. Metaphorically. I would do backflips if the Broncos somehow could pull off a trade. Or acquisition of Kyle Fuller. It was floated out there that he might even become available for, like, 1/4 round pick. That was this morning. Of course, the new league here has started. Every team needs to be underneath the salary cap so somehow The Bears were able to get in there. But that does not mean he's not Possible to become available. There's there's still potential there, because again, the Bears might see some other players they want to get. They still have some roster holes. Call four based on where's contract situation is is that could save 11 million to the cap? If they moved on from Kyle Fuller? If they could somehow find a trade partner right there reconfigured that kind of stuff. You know that a leak that out that came out from the Chicago side of the house to get Kyle Fuller to take the team to take the The restructure. That's exactly what it was. It's negotiating through the media s O. That was. I don't know if that was a surprise to people or what? I've seen that tactic to play before, so I knew what itwas on def he had had been Let go. Yes, the Broncos would have been very interested. They would been all over that, however, you know, I mean, that's that's just It's Organization. Negotiating to the meeting happens all the time you get the leak. Well, I think I had to let him go. And that that make sure that the player gets the message like, Hey, we're cutting you if you don't You don't get your cap number down. We need it s It's really wanna call Fuller here. It's strong arming people. Yeah, I know. You know, I hear you. Um, Yeah, I would like you to butt on. That would've made a nice a nice trio corners. But, you know, I think they're looking for lower tier veteran guy to be some beam or death, like the dime corner. On. I think their top three this year is just probably going to be, uh, Darby Callahan. And he's saying Bassi question

Kyle Fuller Jared Broncos Bears Chicago Fuller Darby Callahan Bassi
Betsy Parker And John Aprea, On 9 Marriages, Pilates, Love, And A lifelong Acting Career

The Skinny Confidential Him And Her Podcast

05:16 min | 3 months ago

Betsy Parker And John Aprea, On 9 Marriages, Pilates, Love, And A lifelong Acting Career

"Welcome back to the skinny confidential him and her podcast. I'm lauren everett's bostick. The creator of the skinny confidential and across from me is my husband. Michael boston cloudy today. We have an episode. That's kind of fun because it's kind of like you're happy hour with all of our friends. We decided to invite my pilates teacher who has become a dear friend of mine in la betsy grassi and her significant other jonah. Praia on the show to give you a little context. Betsy is a top celebrity influence. Pilates instructor she honestly has all the moves. When it comes to plaudits she trained me. Throughout my whole entire pregnancy was aasa. I- waddled over to her from our house every single day. She trained me. And then i would waddell back home up until the day that i gave birth. I think i worked out with her the day. My water. I'm convinced that's why the delivery was so quick strong. Tell she's absolutely amazing. Check her out on instagram at parker pilates and then we also asked her to bring on her stallion of a husband to use a stone. John my man. You're a handsome sob. They're very good looking couple. That's the has got it hit. She's got the body. She's got the clothes and then john. Her significant other is an american actor and comedian. He's best known for his role in the godfather part two. He was also in sopranos. He's also uncle jesse's dad in full house and in fuller house which is so hot. 'cause how fucking hot as uncle jesse i mean. Listen i don't know jesse is hard. I can't i can't long you can't live up. There's some guys you come across and you're just like well like i get it. I mean uncle jesse. When i was little my eyeballs were popping out of my sockets. Can't blame you and you know what's even hotter as uncle. Jesse has a hot dad john. Warren it's all fiction that right. I mean the people are real but you know come down so right now you'll be okay so i think that this conversation's really fun. 'cause they're telling stories of their life but they're also peppering in pilates tips and we're talking about acting or talking about the olsen twins of marriages letting there's like nine between them right nine marriages between both of them and what i love and what attracted me to betsy. So much is that. When i went to her studio i walked in. I looked around the studio. It was so beautiful good energy and she was so open with her life and every single time i work out with her which is a lot she just tells it how it is and she's unapologetically herself and i appreciate that especially in the world we're in today and i think that this episode so fun because they are both so open with that. Let's welcome betsy grassi. And john prior to the skinny confidential him in her podcast. This is the skinny confidential. Imon her donga great hair. He so much Now we're sure i got. I got one thing going for me. Doubt that you have two things going on my hot and everybody says it but we like a modest guy yet craig. Cranston was saying that you got competition like what we even with western would mean. Hit chris saying that you are very hot gossip. You're listening break you. Chris addresses betsy and my friend. Okay so we have betsy parker who is my palabras teacher. She is the hottest pilates teacher in. La and we have counterpart john who is also so hot in his leather jacket. Johnson actor and they have been together for twenty years. Own omar more. How long twenty two the to a. I don't even know if i can make two. Let's say twenty. We broke up twice. Okay yeah removed very care during this interview but probably not as it happens all the time. Okay what little breakup gut but we wake up every night. Just about this struggle but may listens fun. I want to get some context of both of you guys. And so i. I wanna go all the way back. Because i've heard working out with betsy about your childhoods but i wanna start with your child so maybe betsy you start and then john you can tell us about your childhood sure to get really specific so so yeah i was born in waukegan illinois if anyone does it know that it. It's a little a little suburb with a big suburb of chicago. It's on lake michigan and it is a factory town. My parents were born in latin america. Their parents were immigrants were armenian by ethnicity but were very american. We never liked gut clannish. I don't know i. There's no other way to describe it but there were probably fifty armenian families back then. So yeah and though i have Four siblings so there were five of us and we are one year apart and there were three boys and two girls while madaba busy busy. Mom and dad really didn't like each other that much but they liked having sex. I think they ended up getting divorced after we were all raised. Twenty four years later bought three brothers. I learned how to be tough. I learned to be funny. I was a tomboy. I learned sports but i think i loved still loved being girly and fashion for shirt.

Betsy Grassi Jesse Lauren Everett Michael Boston Aasa Fuller House Betsy John Waddell Jonah Betsy Parker LA Warren Cranston Craig Omar Chris
Wholesale prices surge 1.3%, led by health care and energy

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 4 months ago

Wholesale prices surge 1.3%, led by health care and energy

"A surge in health care and energy prices results in the biggest jump in wholesale prices in a dozen years the labor department says the producer price index which measures inflation pressures before they reach consumers increased by one point three percent in January that's the biggest one month gain since two thousand nine that increase reflected a roughly one percent rise in healthcare services and a five percent jump in energy prices analysts now think inflation is likely to rise this year after more than a decade below the federal reserve's two percent target for annual price increases an uptick in inflation would signal fuller re opening up the economy my camp in Washington

Labor Department Federal Reserve Fuller Washington
"fuller" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

07:24 min | 4 months ago

"fuller" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"This month encyclopedia manica is brought to you by macy's macy's believes different perspectives drive creativity and innovation. That's why throughout black history month and all year long they're honoring the brilliant legacies woven into the fabric of black history and experience is spotlighting black creators who continue to make their mark. You can support charities that help empower black youth and also shot from the all. Black owned businesses available at macy's at macys dot com slash honors. Inclusivity is an ongoing commitment. And macy's is proud to infuse it. In everything they do from wonder media network. I'm jenny kaplan. And this is encyclopedia lamonica. Today's journalists was an extraordinary american editor critic. Translator author feminist and public intellectual during the first half of the nineteenth century often associated with the transcendental movement. She's known for publishing a number of important books and essays including book generally considered to be the first major feminist work in american history. After taking a job with the new york tribune later in life she became the first full time literary critic in the industry she was also the first american woman to serve as a foreign correspondent. And as a war correspondent. Let's talk about margaret fuller. Sarah margaret fuller known as margaret was born on may twenty third eighteen ten in cambridgeport massachusetts to timothy and margaret crane fuller from a young age margaret received a rigorous education from her father who insisted that his eldest daughter have the same academic opportunities as any sun at three and a half years old. She learned to read and write and soon after that she started learning latin with a focus on translation. Marker was forbidden from reading typical books published for women such as etiquette or housekeeping books though. She did learn many of those skills from her mother. When margaret was seven years old was elected to the united states congress among other things. This meant that he had to spend about six months a year in washington. Dc and away from his family. He continued tutoring margaret through frequent correspondence. Margaret who by this time had surpassed her peers intellectually found herself in effort lonelier circumstances with few skills to make or maintain friendships in eighteen. Nineteen at the age of nine margaret was sent to the co ed cambridgeport private grammar school which was at the vanguard of the progressive education movement. It was quickly clear that margaret was significantly more intellectually advanced than her classmates so. Her parents moved her to massachussetts premiere. All girls academy dr parks lyceum for young ladies of boston. Still that wasn't the end of markets tore through a variety of schools. Her next stop came to her relatives. Fear that she wouldn't have the skills to be successful as a woman in nineteenth century society. Eighteen twenty four. She was sent to miss susan prescott school in groton which specialized in teaching young women from affluent families to be wives and mothers. Though margaret was deeply unhappy at the school and only stayed for one year. She did find a friend and lasting mentor there. The following year eighteen twenty-five margaret's father timothy moved the family from cambridgeport too old cambridge. Just a stone's throw from harvard. University margaret became significantly more comfortable in her surroundings. She regularly attended major social events and salons and became friends with many of the premier intellectuals of the period then in eighteen thirty one markets father announced that he was leaving politics to become a rural farmer. The family moved to a property in groton far from the excitement of cambridge. Suddenly much less. Well off margaret was tasked with the schooling of her six younger siblings. Still she continued. Her studies of the classics taught herself a number of different languages because of her years spent with the intellectual elites of cambridge margaret was well known within certain circles for her deep knowledge of literature and for her translation skills particularly with regard to works of german romanticism by eighteen thirty five. She was publishing literary reviews and multiple major periodicals. later that same year margaret's father died from cholera while his death devastated margaret enforced new responsibilities on her. It was also the impetus for a new chapter of her life. She dove into teaching. I eighteen thirty six taking a job at the temple school in boston. Then working for a stint at the green street school in providence rhode island margaret flourished as a teacher but moved back to boston after only one year in providence to focus on her writing by eighteen thirty nine margaret had published her first book a translation of famous german work about gerda and was making a living teaching private lessons. She also hosted a series of very influential salons for women called conversations. A local bookshop. These discussions were meant to broaden the attendees understanding of subjects like history literature the fine arts and the natural sciences market sought is her job to encourage women to question to define to state and examine their opinions in october of eighteen. Thirty nine margaret was offered a job by her friend. Ralph waldo emerson. To edit new transcendental est journal called the dial. She edited the famous journal from eighteen. Forty eighteen forty four and contributed a significant amount of her own writing. Her position quickly made her one of the most important figures. In the transcendental movement in eighteen forty three margaret spent the summer travelling through the western united states with friends. The trip gave her a new perspective on the country and particularly on the native american tribes who societies and histories had been largely erased. She wrote a successful book about her experiences called summer on the lakes in eighteen forty. Three one of the people who read this new book was horace greeley. The founder of the new york tribune. He was so impressed with margaret's work that he offered her a job at his newspaper. As a journalist and literary critic margaret accepted the offer and moved to new york city but she didn't begin actively working for the tribune until she finished her eighteen. Forty five book entitled women in the nineteenth century. This book is generally considered the first major work in the american feminist literary canon. While at the tribune margaret wrote everything from literary criticism to translations of articles from foreign press. Her most famous essays covered a wide range of topics including the growing wealth disparity in post industrial.

Margaret jenny kaplan margaret washington Marker Ralph waldo emerson one year Three october of eighteen cambridgeport first book first Sarah margaret fuller margaret fuller Forty five book eighteen thirty five nineteenth century eighteen thirty macys dot com cambridgeport massachusetts
Boston Man Arrested For Attacking State Police Trooper During Traffic Stop

WBZ Afternoon News

00:58 sec | 5 months ago

Boston Man Arrested For Attacking State Police Trooper During Traffic Stop

"An off duty state trooper helps rescue another who was being beaten by a suspect in the middle of the highway. WBC. Suzanne Saz Ville has the store. It was a wild scene at around 2 30 Saturday morning when a state trooper stopped a man for speeding on route 24 South and Randolph. Police say the man punched the trooper in the face and then pushed his head into the pavement and choked him when they got back on their feet. The suspect allegedly pushed the trooper into the middle of the highway, where he almost got hit. You say At one point, the man even tried to grab the trooper's gun and off duty Trooper was driving down the highway and stopped when he saw what was going on. The suspect, then got back in his car and took off. He was captured leader and Stone and arrested Devin Fuller of Boston faces a dozen charges, including assault with intent to murder drug possession with intent to distribute and driving under a suspended license. The trooper was treated for his injuries at Milton Hospital.

Suzanne Saz Ville WBC Randolph Devin Fuller Stone Boston Milton Hospital
The American Jewish Philanthropic Complex with Lila Corwin Berman

Jewish History Matters

09:20 min | 5 months ago

The American Jewish Philanthropic Complex with Lila Corwin Berman

"Lila. Corwin berman is professor of history at temple university where she holds the murray friedman chair of american jewish history and directs the feinstein center for american jewish history. She's the author of numerous books including the jewish philanthropic complex. Which we're talking about today. As well as metropolitan jews politics race and religion in postwar detroit which appeared in two thousand fifteen and her two thousand nine book speaking of jews rabbis intellectuals and the creation of an american public identity. I'm so excited to share episode as lila points out in her book. Philanthropy is something that touches on all aspects of our lives and we should think critically about how it operates and what that means in historical and cultural terms. I hope you check out the book. And i've also linked to an excerpt. Thanks for listening. Hi lila will help to the podcast. Thanks i'm so glad you could join us to talk about your book which is really. It's just so phenomenal. I think that there are so many different things that we can talk about from this book and all the different issues that it really raises. I think that one place for us to get started really is to think about the manifold ways that philanthropy touches our lives. Well you know when. I started working on this book. Although i realize i had lived a life that was really very much shaped by philanthropy. It wasn't really something given a lot of you know. And then once. I sort of went back to try to create an inventory. I was a little bit shocked. I literally did try to sit. And kind of calculate like okay. How much money has been invested in me. You know my family. My children would ever through philanthropy. You sort of realized it's everywhere in in a sense. Maybe that's why i hadn't seen it that much because we're just seemed natural is just the world i lived in in. It's not just in my world as a person who happens to be jewish but in museums i go to newspapers. I read the radio station. I listen to kind of every facet of my life had some kind of imprint of philanthropy. So like in a certain sense. I think it makes sense that you know. This isn't a topic that people necessarily think of studying that much because it just feels very ubiquitous but then when you kinda take a step back from it and think about well how does this work and why does it feel like it so natural. It's so inevitable you realize like most things. It has a history and this thing that seems like it's so familiar and has always been the way it may appear in our lives today actually has really changed vastly over time and so that was kind of like the animating question that it had you know even on a kind of philosophical level like what are the things that we just take as being very natural in our lives and how can we sort of dig into them and understand how they formed at how they developed into feeling like these structures that are so so natural. Part of what you're pointing out here is the way in which so many of the tuitions that we interact with like you mentioned. Museums newspapers radio stations. Many of them are charitable in their structure. Right there five. Oh one c. Threes thinking about museums for instance or they are subsidized to large extent by foundations or other kinds of charitable donations. I think that this is an elements that people recognize. We understand this would just don't always give it a lot of thought. I think there's all sorts of ways that you can think about even when you go to university. I mainly thought about how. I pay tuition at the college. They went to his undergraduate in that tuition was paying for my education. But actually the college i went to had an endowment and it had donors who gave an it had a whole other structure that tied it not really contractually in terms of relationship to me right as kind of the customers paying my tuition to go there but actually tied it. In arguably a more contractual way both to the donors who gave money to it into the american state. That in various ways subsidize that. So i think that you suddenly realize the sense that like the room is much fuller than you might have thought or if you think about the people who are like eighteen to maybe thirty or whatever now who go on a trip to israel through birthright generally. I think it feels like you. Think of that as okay. Here's like this college student and ney get accepted into a particular birth-rate program and they go with a bunch of other college students in there are counselors or leaders. Go with then maybe you realize oh well who's paying for this right because it's free of course not free someone's paying for it right so who is paying for it. How do the mechanics of that work. And how is that person or that entity that foundation that federation whatever it might be involved in a relationship in terms of what the program is but also in a relationship again with the american state right because any of that money that is given to a five. Oh one c. Three is also tax wise being subsidized by the american state. So you suddenly have a much more interesting set of actors that really alight on these kinds of nonprofit institutions right that make them actually fairly complicated sites for thinking about how power so that is an incredibly kind of rich place to start to questions about different structures that inhabit and how those structures delimit the kinds of that operates and how those structures have changed retirement y. Yeah i mean you're talking about the way in which we have to have a critical perspective on philanthropy. I think that this is a very narrow line to walk as it were because on the one hand i think that we all recognize the philanthropy and charity are social goods and this is the reason why. The state subsidizes essentially through making it tax deductible so while we recognize that that flappy is a good thing. Why is it important for us to have a critical perspective to bring historical perspective. And how do we do this in a way that still also recognizes that philanthropies of social. Could i don't know that. I am so interested in starting from kind of normative statement of whether something is or isn't social good for me. The important thing to think about is how do these different kinds of forces that continue to shape people's lives. How do we understand their historical formation. And how can that help us ask different questions about the way they're operating and maybe eventually those normative questions about whether or not. They're doing the best that they might be able to do. So it simply is a fact that this system philanthropy exists in american life and certainly sust in american jewish life and it has a history and to understand that history. We need to ask what. I would call critical questions. Which doesn't mean that we need to condemn it or roundly criticize it but the very basic question of saying how did this thing develop into what it is is already itself a critical question. Because it's making us kind of pull back the fashioning of something being just natural or inevitable and having to ask know what were the different. Contexts enforces in conditions. That caused it to be developed. So one of the responses that i would receive when i would tell people especially people who were working in the world of jewish philanthropy when i was talking to them about the book i'm writing. They would say clearly. It's going to be very important that you talk about how generous american jews has been you know and they would talk about the fact that over time american jews have given high levels of charity in that they're very philanthropic minded and in my mind the critical question there is not to say we praise or do we not praise people participated in this system. The critical question is to ask how have people been conscripted into this system. Such that it seems like it itself defines. What is generosity because we also need to ask about other ways that people might have been using their resources or other ways of the american state might have been using its resources to have. Is this particular system. Come to define a mode of generosity. The intellectual project of this book is really asking about how an institution was shaped and how it was formed right. I mean. I think that this is a key distinction that we always seems to be making because critique does not always mean critical right those two words have a linguist relationship to each other but there are different modes of doing this and i think that intellectual critique is really a central animating process that we need to be applied to all aspects of life and all aspects of history even to things which we understand are generally good in their nature. They also have a history like you said they also can be looked from critical perspective without condemning them.

Lila Corwin Berman Murray Friedman Feinstein Center For American Temple University Detroit NEY Israel
International Salvation Army: Social Justice Strategy

Ending Human Trafficking Podcast

05:11 min | 5 months ago

International Salvation Army: Social Justice Strategy

"The issues. Be a voice and make a difference in ending human trafficking. Sandy you and i talk a lot about partnership on this podcast and we. It's been a central part of our work for many years. And one of the most important partners we have worked with over the years as the salvation army. And we're so glad to welcome a friend back to the show someone who's been a leader in the space were glad to have priscilla santos with us. Priscilla is the salvation army social justice commissions international coordinator for modern slavery and human trafficking response and priscilla is an adjunct professor at vanguard universities global center for women and justice where she courses on justice and holistic survivor care. She obtained a master's in intercultural studies specializing in international development and children at risk from fuller theological seminary priscilla. So glad to have you back on the show and you so much for having me. It's a joy to be here today. I was looking back to see when the last time you were a guest. It was in may two thousand fifteen and we recorded a podcast about mothers day and human trafficking and it was one of those podcasts. That just really grips your heart. So i recommend that those who have never met priscilla. Go back and listen to that. That's podcast number one. Oh one soper still. You're in a new role and your title is so long. I'm so glad. I already know you can just call you. Priscilla tell us what the international modern slavery and human trafficking. Response coordinator does us. So my new position is all of our international social justice commission office which is part of our international headquarters and our department is really to be the strategic advocacy voice for all things social justice into really lift voices from those on the margins and so within department now. They've created this role which is the international coordinator for monitoring slavery and human trafficking response and my primary function of my new role is to oversee the implementation of our international strategy to strengthen our response to trafficking all over the world. So let's get a little bit better picture of what you mean by all over the world. How many countries is salvation army in. Yeah so we are in over a hundred and thirty countries around the world. Wow wow what an amazing platform to have influence and voice in a hundred and thirty countries. That's amazing okay. So at salvation. Army has a very long and deep history in fighting slavery. And when i looked at the new strategy it's called fight for freedom. Tell us a little bit about how it was developed. Yeah so kinda like you mentions. Fighting and trying to end human trafficking is something that this ovation army has been a part of before. Even the term human trafficking was coins so for the listeners. That don't know the salvation army started an eighteen sixty five and actually. Our first encounter with advocating against trafficking happened in eighteen. Eighty five so very quickly after we started and it was where we advocated to change the law for the age of consent from sixteen to eighteen. It's one of our historical stories. Call the brinson maiden tribune. But i i think one of the things for us to realize. Is that the salvation army that this is a part of our dna. We have been doing this since the very beginning even before again. The the coin term was there for human trafficking so but more recently we have approved and launched this international strategy because throughout the hundreds of years that we have been working on the front lines. One of the things that could really strengthen is our coordinated approach and our centralized approach because one of the things that we realized was that we were doing so many amazing things all over the world. But perhaps we weren't really talking together. One side of the world didn't know what the other side was doing and so really to create some standards of care to create some promising practices among ourselves. We just launched. This is our international strategy. So it's the first time in our salvation army history that we have a strategy to help us all move forward together so it's very exciting.

Priscilla Salvation Army Priscilla Santos Salvation Army Social Justice Vanguard Universities Global C Fuller Theological Seminary Soper Sandy Brinson Maiden Tribune Army
Georgia names Josh Brooks athletic director

The Paul Finebaum Show

04:40 min | 5 months ago

Georgia names Josh Brooks athletic director

"Josh brooks who just recently took over for greg mcgarity as a new athletic director at the university of georgia where he had previously. Been the top assistant josh. First of all congratulations and thanks so much for coming good afternoon. Any thanks for having me fall. It's great to have you and you know. This is one of those jobs that all aspiring administrators want to have the especially working having. You got your masters there after going to lsu and working under greg. I'm interested in what it was like to be his opposition and ultimately to to move in as he retired well thankfully greg's been a great mentor from me especially these last few years. He's really giving me a peek behind the rope as a services number to give me a chance to be a part of those big decisions really see you know what he goes day basis how he makes those decisions. He's letting me sit in for him and eighty meetings Whether it be on campus or in the sec. So i really am thankful to greg for the opportunities. He's giving me these last couple of years. That have prepped. Me for this day. And i think combined with that with my knowledge of institution haven't been here. Ten plus years has really served me well and made me comfortable to sit in this chair on day. One genesis has been quite a year to be an administration that there was a time many many years ago when a lot of a lot of former football coaches would move into that position. I'm not saying it was ceremonial but there was usually someone underneath. Who did the heavy lifting those days are over. These are tough jobs especially coming off of a a difficult and challenging twenty season. What does it look like just short term to try to for all of us to get out of where we been from this pandemic and to start seeing some sunshine again. Yeah hopefully you know. We're all tracking the numbers. And we're hoping that that we're at that peak point right now coming out of new year's and knowing that the vaccines are starting to be distributed but you brought them interesting point about former football coaches or former coaches moving into the role and now primarily most or came up through administration. There's not a lot of eighties have actually coached There's a lot these who played but not who've actually coached so. I think that gives me interesting. Take that. I've been on that coaching side. Being football off-spinner assistant coach for number years. It's given me another perspective. Combine that with the ministry of experience. That's really helped me as well in this role but you talk about moving out of covid. We've got remain optimistic. We've got a hope for the best and the worst. You're already planning four g. day. We've got the limited seats ready in case but obviously like i said hope for the best keep progressing but we've got to prepare and plan for every scenario moving forward josh. I realize you're you're you're barely ended the job you start questioning you on on things that We'll take some time to sort out but with every athletic director and georgia probably better equipped at the most because of the success of the program. How do you deal with the loss of revenue. We're does it affect or how does it affect the program. The most well thankfully paul. We have a phenomenal team here. From our development staff and our ticket staff we put in a really great plan in august. We knew that we'd have limited capacity and it was a fan. I concept put forward. We offered every donor the opportunity to get a full refund on their tickets and that was without any caveat so if they got a full refund they would lose their seats for next year and that that was something that we really that was going to be tough because we knew a lot of people will take that refund put back into that our development ticket office went to those donors and said hey. Listen if you let us keep a portion or or the what we refund of your ticket portion donation portion and converted to a cova relief fund. We'll give you triple points towards your priority for seat back for seating so that effort and that was very meticulous and they put in a lot of hard work and we have the best fans in the nation we were. We were able to recoup twenty two million dollars of that that big number that we always strive for so that help put a big dent in what our financial situation was along with the fact that our business office has done a phenomenal job of being focusing on essential. Expense mission critical. And everybody's bought in and we are one of the few departments in the country. I would say that have not had to lay people off now. That fuller employs. And that's important to me. Because i'm a people person. People come first so a combination of what our development office and take it off so done and the business office were sitting in you know. We obviously still have challenges to go. And we're we're going through that but we're in. We're gonna come out of this. I think in pretty good shape when it's all said and done

Josh Brooks Greg Mcgarity Greg Football Josh University Of Georgia Ministry Of Experience LSU SEC Georgia Paul Fuller
Nearly 800,000 Americans filed for unemployment last week

Colorado's Morning News with April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz

00:23 sec | 5 months ago

Nearly 800,000 Americans filed for unemployment last week

"787,000 new unemployment claims last week. It's slightly less than the prior week, but jobless claims are stuck it historically high levels while the pandemic rages and businesses and consumers pull back Fuller look at the economic consequences of the virus comes Friday when the Labor Department publishes its monthly unemployment report. Economists expect that'll show jobs were created at a much slower rate than in November. CBC's Erica Ter Ski

Fuller Labor Department CBC Erica Ter
"fuller" Discussed on Around the World in 80s Movies

Around the World in 80s Movies

16:09 min | 10 months ago

"fuller" Discussed on Around the World in 80s Movies

"North Carolina Victorian style farmhouse. It's actually shot in a small town within Los Angeles. County. That farm houses inhabited by this newly orphaned teenage girl named Deirdre Clark play by Oni sky and her grandmother. Grace Maureen O'Sullivan plays grace suspicions run high within the household resulting in the aliens taking casualties in this. Gunfight with some of the local yokels, they just want to be left alone they wanted to leave earth peacefully but police began surrounding the house and they're just barely able to contain some of those gun-toting locals who were out for revenge for these aliens for killing one of their own. That's pretty much the setup. It's a, it's a standoff for the rest of the film. Stranded does contain some decent acting Joe. Morton is especially good here. The SCIFI trappings are enough to keep this otherwise formula home under siege premise afloat for its meagre eighty minute run time I only sky she is the daughter of folk singer Donovan came into her own, most popularly as the star leap email star opposite John Cusak in see anything Marino Sullivan she's mostly known for playing Jane in the Johnny Weissmuller Tarzan films she also happens to be Mia Farrow's. They both quit themselves pretty well enrolls that are not particularly nuanced Joe Morton Played Hollis McCann a take, no Grefe new sheriff in town. The town is full of racist and xenophobic rednecks, and they kind of turned into a lynch mob. When one of their own gets killed by these allegations and to make matters worse, the hostage negotiations get gummed up. A meddlesome agent from the Defense Department or maybe she's dot who knows what she is. She's also interested in getting her hands on these visitors from space. But how is sheriff McCann's going to take all of these aliens in alive? When everybody around them seems to want them dead except for the hostages that they've taken in the house, they are playing for their safety they want them to just be able to leave earth without harm despite the fact that the murdered a local. Now that's the complication I suppose stranded is the first feature that's directed by veteran documentarian Fleming be fuller who takes his pseudonym of text fuller here he hails from North Carolina where the film is set. Fuller had been trying to break into directing commercial films for several years. He began his journey writing a screenplay based on his nineteen seventy seven documentary called death row. But because death row had bleak subject matter, he found very few takers on the project especially since he didn't really have a track record in making feature films. So full of decided, he was going to look for it low-budget endeavor that had science fiction appeal because he's a big fan of the science fiction genre. So we. Headed to this popular talent agency in Hollywood Paul. Kohner and he met with an agent there in Gary Salt Salt represented this unknown screenwriter named Alan Castle. So salt showed fuller castle script. The had this science fiction premise with a strong thriller element. It was then entitled Shockwave and Fuller read this and he thought that it was very reminiscent of a lot of other works that he liked James Faulkner because of the heroes coming together to try to protect this group of innocence from the Prejudice townspeople. He also liked that there were elements here that seemed like the aforementioned desperate hours there was also a thematic lesson on mob mentality and intolerance that was very reminiscent of Frankenstein and there was also a kind of either beauty and the beast or maybe a Romeo and Juliet aspect to the teenage girl and one of the aliens beginning to have some sort of romantic feelings for one. Another fuller felt he should make the sheriff in the script a black man specifically in. Order to add more thematic attention to the story based on judging people by their external appearance and with ripe thematic material, regarding bigotry and fear of the unknown and the kindness of strangers fuller felt this would be an entertaining science fiction film with an important underlying message for younger people over to have across the board appeal instead of a horror story about aliens attacking townspeople fuller felt at this be if he shaped it correctly a heart warming story about an alien misunderstanding. So he decided. That this would be a good first project to get into the movie business. So he took it to associates of his producers, Fourteen Wolf and many other films over the years Bark Levinson and Scott Roosevelt and the first thing that they did was the name of the script to stranded rather than shockwave they felt that shockwave was too similar entitled to this very, well known at least cult well-known Nineteen, seventy, seven Nazis Zombie film from Ken Wider Born called shock ways another change that. They may was reducing the dialogue within the film specifically of the aliens they didn't. WanNa have the aliens conversing so much and see a bunch of subtitles except for some occasional utterances, the aliens described castle script were also much more eerie and otherworldly in the way that he described them within historian. So Fuller decided that they should go for more humanlike alien appearances. So audiences could more readily identify and sympathize with them. The communication among the aliens would be mostly non verbal, they would use. Expressions and maybe some telepathy and once they had the script to their liking, they took it to new line cinema who specialized in genre films with a modest budget and new line cinema gave them three million dollars to shoot film Duane Davis. He was hired as the sound effects editor. He developed a language and he dubbed in the voices during post production, Academy? Award. Winning makeup artists be Shell Burke took him the Oscar for quest for fire and. Then later on Bram Stoker's Dracula she captures the look of the aliens here determining going really right down to granular things like what colors should be used for the weapons and other props that they have in their possession. The aliens here are humanoids they resemble characters that we might find on a typical episode of Star Trek, the next generation or something like that although the film was in the can before that show debuted, some might say that the. Aliens here look like a Glam. Rock band from the Nineteen Seventies. Certainly, it does have that appeal Michelle Burke for the look she researched ufo's and the descriptions of the aliens by witnesses for inspiration, and what she found had already been done pretty much extensively in movies close encounters of the third kind. So she thought that she would do the opposite here she would give the aliens colored contact lenses and headpieces with full heads of hair instead of. Just being these bald humanoid creatures, they would also look beautiful not eerie and they would be much more angelic rather than demonic although there robotic leather clad bodyguard is still intimidating to humans who may not understand such things after a month of conceptual drawings they came up with these five aliens that they eventually used in the movie. The aliens in the film cannot speak English, but we learn the background of their plight and the details of their escape. From their home world to Earth. Using the telepathic powers of this glowing crystal they have in their possession the to humans in the house give the aliens names clean is their leader. Queens son is dubbed Prince. Eventually, he becomes the love interest of a sort for Deidra. The Queen's right hand man is named Sir the silent. The silent fighter servant is named Warrior play by Spice Williams in the movie and their companion is named gestures kind of the. Comical one he's like a pet to all of them gesture here though is played by flee flee of course of the funk rock band known as the Red Hot Chili peppers fact at a wrap party flea introduced Red Hot Chili Peppers Frontman Anthony Kiedis to the female star of the film. I Oni, Sky Flea was certain I only sky was absolutely Anthony Kiedis hype now that the problem here said, she was still sixteen at the time that they. Met Anthony Keates was twenty four. He had just come out of Rehab for drug abuse, but he wasn't dissuaded by her age when they met. So they developed a romance. Keita's started taking her out and he became her first boyfriend and their relationship continued a couple of years till nineteen, thousand nine, and that's when Keita's recurrent drug issues proved to be too dark for I only skype cope with. So she left him for Adam Horowitz otherwise. Known as King Ad, rock from the Beastie boys had grown close to core wits when Keita's ran off with his drug friends instead of coming home at night. So and by the way, if you're a big chili peppers fan this film definitely not named after the Chili Peppers Song called stranded that stranded was a a well travelled parody of the theme song to this television show called branded but they changed the lyrics of that song to being about. Being stuck in public restroom with no toilet paper Kinda comical take their that has nothing to do with his movie at least I. Hope Not I'm glad they took that scene out if it actually appeared in the film now, this is a very dimly lit film. It's set almost entirely at night they filmed the external scenes every day between five in the afternoon and five in the morning it often feels very contained. It feels like it should have been a play nearly all of the action takes place either within or maybe just outside of the CLAUSTROPHOBIC farmhouse. Unfortunately, this is not really a very exciting way to spend eighty minutes especially since we don't really come to know much about these characters to. Truly care what happens to them by the end. The special effects here very minimal there really no better than a cheaply produced television show that has laser blasts and occasionally floating diamond shaped crystal object that records their collective memories veteran actress Maureen O'Sullivan. She. Took the part of the grandmother here because she regarded stranded as a very fun departure from the Types of roles that she normally took. She was in what was regarded as a science fiction fairy tale definitely something she had not done before and she had just appeared in woody Allen's Hannah and her sisters. So she received some acclaim for that prior to these films O'Sullivan as I mentioned she had been known more for playing Jane Opposite. Johnny Weissmuller in. Tarzan films from many decades before her relationship with gesture in this film was actually a callback to her relationship with the chimp named Cheetah in those films. Post Sullivan. Who hated working with Cheetah? She much preferred working with flea who is much more nice. Rather than those chimps there were several of them that plead Cheetah they were mean tempered and would occasionally bite her unlike flea who is actually quite a nice guy. I only sky she landed the GIG in this film after coming to success in river's edge, she had no formal acting training when she appeared in river said she was kind of spiraling off the success there she was to be the female romantic lead. In this film falling in love with an alien she feels she may have actually real life fallen for Prince, the alien in real time but it was disconcerting when she actually got to see Welsh actor Brennan Hughes without his makeup and not in character to really burst her bubble because she had come to him in his disguise. She felt like she knew prince but Brendon Hughes when she finally saw him without makeup was a complete stranger when she'd see him and she was not nearly as interested Joe. Morton. took up the project because it was the first. Hollywood scripted. He had read in some time in which the male lead character was black morton had come to some prominence starring in another film about a misunderstood alien talked about that. In the prior episode of this podcast, the brother from another planet in Nineteen eighty-four stranded had more studio funding behind it and it was more of a chance to go mainstream. So morten took the role hoping to get more exposure in films. Now, text fuller's direction here is workmanlike. Doesn't really have a lot of flash, maybe not a discernible style to attach to fuller. It's a collection of cliches very reminiscent of several well known in better films you will struggle to maintain teen interest. If you're even a casual filmgoer who have seen your share of movies just like this, it doesn't have a very strong sense of humor about itself a really about anything that have made it worthwhile for people who don't necessarily like kind of movie to Kinda get by unfortunately it's instantly forgotten once it's complete. Surprising developments to generate intrigue or suspense, but it's also not what I would consider to be a bad film released a so bad. It's good feel for those people like those kinds of ironic movie watching experience is it's too good to be bad. It's too bad to be good. So what's your left here is kinda straight up the middle as far as films go stranded did receive a small release a limited region based rollout didn't have press. Screenings afforded really tanked in the theaters it came and went about as quickly as a spaceship in the night it was produced for three million dollars. It did not come anywhere close to making that money back. So Fuller and the producers they had intended to do another castle script for their next feature. While the we're making this movie, but the results of stranded left them stranded as for where to go and another movie was never made with An. Alan Cassell script fuller did direct I think one more feature after this in the early nineteen nineties but his career never really developed into that feature filmmaker that he had wanted to become so all and I will give stranded too bad to be good too good to be bad. It's right up the middle. So I will give it two and a half stars out of four two and a half stars on my skill means it had the tools. Have the talent definitely had the actors here and a lot of the technical specs to be a good movie. But because the script is really nothing new despite having aliens in it and the direction not very inspired it just kind of languishes throughout and not even the good performances by the actors are enough to boost it into what I would consider to be a recommendable film for most people so to and ours is the best I can give. Stranded doubt if you happen to be watching this, there is a scene that plays over the end credits where reporter interviews the survivors of the aftermath was not in the original script tacked on just to kind of have a change of pace at the end. It's also the first sunlight and the first were of change that we see in the film. So it became kind of a a novel to kind of throw at the end the reporter by the way in that scene is played by the producer mark. Rosenthal he calls it his Hitchcock Cameo, he actually appears in most of the films he has produced. So kind of a fun treat I guess if you're a fan of such trivia as for next week, I'm going to be moving onto another film. Now, brother from another planet had one alien that appeared on earth that's refugee. This had five and the next one will be hundreds of thousands of refugees that have come to earth in their spaceship, and they happen to be like the brother from another planet slaves. Escaping for a better life on earth I'm talking about a film from nine, hundred, ninety eight. I've seen quite a few times over the years since one night enjoy rewatching from time to time it is a film starring James Caan and Mandy Patinkin, and it is called a nation. So if you haven't seen alienation or if you haven't seen in a while I, do encourage you to check that out before next week's reviewed that one by the way is readily available on home media and your vod streaming services. So you have no excuse but to check that out for next week's episode alienated from CNN Eighty-eight. Thank you everyone listening hope that you enjoy this look and fairly obscure film. Called stranded. I try to mix it up from time to time. I don't want to just cover all the classics because there are a lot of smaller films that are very interesting to talk about within the nineteen eighties and I. Hope you agree if you have your own thoughts on stranded if you are one of the few who have seen it, you can write me just let me know you actually have seen this film before maybe you're a fan, you can find my contact information on my website that's equipped stir dot neck. He wip S. T. E. R. Dot net twitter feed facebook page instagram, or also ways you can get in touch with me all of that at that site. Until, next time. Thank you so much for listening in joining me on this trip around the world in.

Fuller Joe Morton Maureen O'Sullivan Anthony Kiedis Johnny Weissmuller Michelle Burke Hollywood Marino Sullivan Keita Los Angeles North Carolina Victorian style Oni sky Defense Department Donovan Deirdre Clark Mia Farrow lynch Bram Stoker North Carolina
"fuller" Discussed on Unexplained Mysteries

Unexplained Mysteries

04:44 min | 11 months ago

"fuller" Discussed on Unexplained Mysteries

"State that there were no bruises, no cuts and no alcohol in his system. Some witnesses claimed that bobby had his hand on the keys in the ignition. Others the keys in the ignition at all. Both have very different implications. For All we know he could have been coming going or staying put. When officials pulled Bobby's body out of the car, they claim that rigor mortis had set in meaning his joints and muscles had stiffened. This third stage of death typically begins about two to four hours after someone passes. Experiments have shown that in high enough temperatures. It can start affecting some parts of the body in as little as thirty minutes on the day. Bobby died temperatures peaked at around seventy five point, nine degrees Fahrenheit. Up to nine hours of the day were recorded at over seventy degrees. And he sat inside a metal car. With gasoline fumes. Regard Mortis most likely would have set in quickly. Witnesses. However claim they saw no signs of a struggle as they watched officials, lift bobby out of the oldsmobile. If the Rigor Mortis was as advanced as they said, some suspect the removal wouldn't have gone. So smoothly in other words if the witnesses is weren't playing tricks on them, bobby's body was freshly. which brings us to the timeline, perhaps the biggest mystery of Bobby's death. As. We mentioned Lorraine Fuller check to see if bobby had arrived multiple times that afternoon. She. was certain that Bobby's car was not outside the apartment when she checked at four thirty PM. Randy Fuller was certain that his protective mother wouldn't have missed the car if it was, they're not after losing her eldest son Jack. But. One of Bobby's friends. Robin vinokourov claimed to have stopped by seventeen seventy, six sycamore around three PM two hours earlier than else noticed the car. When he did apparently, bobbies oldsmobile was parked outside Robin. Didn't see whether anyone was in it. BOBBIES, friends, tie grimes, and Mike. Ciccarelli corroborate. Lorraine's version of the story. Both insist that Bobby's car wasn't outside when they pulled into the parking lot just about fifteen minutes before police pronounced bobby dead. It's improbable that fifteen minutes would be enough time for anyone to kill themselves by inhaling fumes, but it might be enough time to park a car, move a body and lead. Grimes and Ciccarelli remember hearing vehicle pulling behind them when they parked in the lot just before bobby's body was found. They didn't turn around to see what the car looked like. They didn't think too. They never caught a color make or model. or whether they were alone. This is unfortunately where the investigation ends. The cold case from nineteen, sixty six is unlikely to ever produce new lease, and while any of these threads might suggest a more sinister explanation for Bobby's death. They've all long since unraveled. Anytime, Star dies, there's the temptation to ascribe more meaning to their passing. To claim it was a sinister plot or an act of revenge or jealousy from a less talented, less attractive individual. But as we mentioned, famed does kill and in the sixties and seventies when drug and alcohol use was rampant in the music scene. This was especially so many musicians of this period were beacons of light in uncertain times they sang about. Las but to an upbeat tempo and with a cheery rhyme. We like to think that perhaps the work they produced was too bright for the oppressive forces of the time. And that, their creative abilities were snuffed out decades earlier than they should have been, but ultimately, we'll never know. Bobby Fuller's death, and the death of so many other sixties and Seventies. Music legends remains a mystery..

bobby Bobby Fuller bobby dead Mortis Lorraine Fuller Randy Fuller Ciccarelli grimes Robin vinokourov Jack Mike
"fuller" Discussed on Unexplained Mysteries

Unexplained Mysteries

08:05 min | 11 months ago

"fuller" Discussed on Unexplained Mysteries

"Believe it belonged to a gangster boyfriend, which is why Bobby and Rick never went in the house to pick up the LSD. When. Bobby returned to her house on the ninety disappeared. Maybe melodies alleged mobster companions Sabi, and followed him home. The theory has some legs throughout much of the forties and Fifties Mickey Cohen Viciously and successfully ruled the Los Angeles organized. Crime scene. Five years before Bobby's death officials sent Cohen to Alcatraz for tax evasion, but crime families like de Simoni and bonanno filled the vacuum. So well, the mobs hooks in Los, Angeles retracted a bit. Its presence in the sixties was still widely felt rick stone claimed that a car followed him and almost ran him off the road in the Hollywood hills on the day. Bobby died. He also stated that two men with guns tried to break into members of the Bobby. Fuller, fours owns. According to Randy Fuller, the Mafia ran the Hollywood music industry at the time. And Melody wasn't the only person suspected of underworld ties. The Bobby Fuller four through Delphi records had allegedly signed some sort of distribution and copyright deal with Roulette. Records. The Godfather of the American music business and suspected. Kingpin Morris Levy owned Roulette records and as negotiation tactics go. Levy had a history of using brute force to get his way. In his two thousand, ten book me the mob and the music musician Tommy. James claimed that Levy once threatened to disembowel him. In a dispute with singer, little Richard. Levy threatened to rip the singers face off. According to James Leave, he has connections to a number of murders that remain unsolved to this day. But why would leave need to resort to violence with? Bobby. Well. Levi's alleged motivations center around a controversy that had nothing to do with. Love? Life. In the days and months leading up to Bobby's death. Bobby was considering going Solo. By some accounts, the Bobby Fuller four and Delphi label executives were supposed to discuss bobby's desire to cancel his contracts and quit the band at the nine thirty am meeting that bobby never showed up to. If Bobby left Morris, Levy would have potentially lost out on a major investment and so would others at the band's record label? Delphi. And the owner of Bobby's record label Bob. Keane allegedly had an eight hundred thousand dollar life insurance policy taken out on the Rock and roller. Today that amounts to more than six million dollars. Maybe keen and Levy saw the money as severance pay for bobby leaving them in the dust. Maybe, they hired someone to kill the singer and make it appear accidental. So they could collect on their policy. There are some types of death and companies don't cover, but they do cover accidents. And as it turns out, keen supposedly hired a private investigator to ensure that Bobby's death was officially marked as accidental. But if Morris Levy had a hand in Bobby's murder concrete evidence has been difficult to come by that said, Levy. Wouldn't be the only suspect on our list capable of plotting murder from behind bars. Jim Res, the lead guitarist of the Bobby Fuller four suspects that notorious cult leader Charles Manson might have been behind Bobby's death. He masterminded a string of brutal murders in the late sixties and Jim's wife. Beth claims that Manson had once wandered into. PJ's nightclub asking for Bobby. He wanted to take guitar lessons from the Front Man. Manson. At the time was a wannabe singer songwriter who spent his days in and out of jail. Manson wasn't successful in music by any stretch of the imagination, but he wasn't talentless. He the Beach Boys Nineteen, Sixty, eight song never learn not to love. Originally titled Cease to exist the beach boys changed a few to the song and paid Manson out. So he was never credited. Maybe, bobby snubbed the unstable struggling artist out of guitar lessons and it cost him his life. It would be quite a leap in logic, but Manson wasn't known for being reasonable, and there is another bizarre connection between. Bobby and the cult leader. In nineteen, sixty, nine, three years after Bobby's death, the Bobby Fuller Force Hairdresser JC Brin, and see brings close friend actress. Sharon tate were killed on Manson's orders. Assuming, it was murder. Bobby could have been one of Manson's earliest murder victims without anyone ever knowing about it. Unfortunately there's no evidence. No murder investigation ever happened. which has led some to accuse the LAPD. And others to believe that they were involved in a cover-up. Negligence is certainly a possibility. Two days before Bobby, fuller died the famous chief of the Los Angeles Police Department Chief, William? H. Parker died of a heart attack after serving for almost four decades at the time, the department was in disarray as they dealt with his loss. The LAPD was infamous at the time. Police brutally enforced and supported racial segregation violently rated gay bars and repressed most forms of counterculture. And there are allusions to a cover up in a nineteen, eighty, two article from the El Paso Times. It reads to private investigators, Tom, pugh of the Stein Agency in Los Angeles in June webster of Berkeley were hired to study bobby's death. One investigator abruptly quit the case, the other quietly left town saying he had been threatened. If. True. WHOEVER'S SILENCE? Those guys could have been from the mob, the police or a combination of the two. But. It implies that someone didn't want the truth to come out. Unfortunately, no existing witnessed can account for what happened between three a m when bobby left his landlord's apartment and five. PM when Lorraine found his body. And the testimony of those who were at the crime. Differ drastically. There were a number of witnesses that saw burns covering bobby's body at the crime scene. The medical examiner however found nothing to suggest he'd been burned. This discrepancy can be explained. Witnesses. Likely Mistook bobbies. Many blisters caused by the intensity of the gasoline fumes in the car for. Burns. But witnesses also claim that bobby was covered in bruises and blood. They saw fresh tears, his slippers. And they say bobby looked like someone had dumped gasoline all over him. Not to mention Rick Stone Remembers. Bobby. Having at least five or six beers that night. and. Yet the autopsy and toxicology reports.

Bobby Fuller Kingpin Morris Levy murder Charles Manson rick stone Los Angeles Randy Fuller Los Hollywood investigator Mickey Cohen Sabi Angeles Levi LSD LAPD El Paso Times Delphi James Leave
"fuller" Discussed on Unexplained Mysteries

Unexplained Mysteries

08:03 min | 11 months ago

"fuller" Discussed on Unexplained Mysteries

"Volatile and palpable way. And in many ways, it still does. So when the newspapers published obituaries for Bobby Fuller that alluded to bobby being despondent in the days, preceding his death whispers spread that fame had taken another victim. People started to believe that Bobby Fuller had died by suicide. One persistent rumor claimed that Bobby Fuller had insisted on playing his bands songs another sad and lonely night ad. NAUSEAM in the weeks leading up to his death in the final verses, the Chorus Bobby Sings. But in the end, she led me through her love. It turned out was untrue another sad and lonely night another sad and lonely day another sad and lonely night without my baby. bobbies. Former bandmates have since dispelled a bit of gossip claiming it was romanticized daydreams of overly Maudlin fans. But as it turns out, there may be a kernel of truth behind it sentiments. Because shortly before Bobby's death, he received a letter from an old love interest. In it, his ex confessed that she still loved bobby and that she wanted their family to be together. Her. Bobby. and. Their daughter. Coming up some believed that notorious cult leader, Charles Manson had a hand in Bobby Fuller's death now back to the story. Almost immediately, after his July, Eighteenth nineteen, sixty, six, death police ruled that Bobby Fuller died by suicide even before a medical examiner conducted an autopsy. Later the coroner's report listed his death as an accident. Before. Lorraine Fuller found her son dead bobby received an emotionally charged letter from an ex flame. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, four, twenty, one year, old Bobbi had gotten romantically entangled with a young woman. For privacy reasons no source that we found listed last name. She is simply referred to as susie or DOE. Bobby, and Suzy's relationship blossomed over bowling concerts and home cooked meals in El Paso Texas. In early summer nineteen, sixty, four, the couple rented a motel room for the night. After. Arriving Suzanne form the musician that she was pregnant with his child. But. She didn't receive the reaction she'd hoped for. Bobby panicked fifteen minutes after arriving at the hotel. He jumped into his car and abandoned suzy leaving her with only her tears to keep her company. A child stood in the way of his chances at stardom, and so did a bride later bobby suggested. He drives Susie to Juarez Mexico to have a discrete abortion. But susie wanted to ring on her finger and a father for her child. Ultimately, the couple decided that susie would marry. One of Bobby's friends an air force veteran and salesman named Bruce. Bruce agreed to claim the child as his own. So Susan Bobby could avoid the shame associated with having a child out of wedlock. On August first nineteen, sixty, four, susie and Bruce got married in El Paso. Shortly after Bobby left for California. About a year and a half later in early March. Nineteen sixty, six, the bobby fuller four played a concert at the Coliseum in El Paso. Let Suzy attended. Afterwards. She introduced bobby to their daughter Allison. The Star didn't have much to say about his child beyond. She's all right shortly after Susie wrote a love letter bobby. It spoke of her undying love for him and how she wanted to raise their child together. The letter ended with a reference to the Bible's Gospel of Matthew. Chapter nineteen verses six often used during wedding ceremonies. wherefore, they are no more twain, but one flesh. What therefore, God has joined together. Let not man put asunder. The subtext of those words. You abandoned me. Win, susie discovered that bobby died a few months later, she assumed her letter had driven him to kill himself. And maybe it did. But susie was just one of many complex relationships. Bobby had been involved in. And Alison. Wasn't his only child. When Bobby met, Susie, he was already engaged to his childhood Sweetheart Pamela. Bobby and Pamela were long distance and on the rocks, but by no means over. Around this time, bobby wrote a song for his fiancee. Released after his death, the lyrics go. Say, you're in love with me, say it for all eternity, my Pamela and one day soon, she will be my wife. She'll live with me for the rest of my life, and at the same time that Susie told Bobby, she was pregnant. Another woman reportedly made to live in hiding in New Mexico for nine months was giving birth to their son. Ultimately the young woman named Mary is said to have put the child up for adoption and return to Texas. By April. Nineteen sixty six bobby had broken off his engagement with Pamela. He had a new girlfriend who was based in. New York. Attendant named Nancy Norton. The to spoke the night before he died. Well some point bobbies complicated. Love Life is motivation for suicide. Bobby had allegedly been trying to get Nancy to move to California. which indicates that he had plans for a future and seems to support the position of all of Bobby's loved ones. Who vehemently insists that they're ninety nine point nine percent sure that it wasn't an accident or a suicide. But Nancy wasn't the last woman bobby spoke to on the night he died, and there are plenty of existing theories that discount suicide. In the early morning hours, bobby placed a call to Melody Dawson, allegedly, she sold bobby drugs. As far as can tell, it's unclear whether bobby and melody had any sort of physical relationship. It certainly wouldn't be out of Bobby's character. That said melody is shrouded in mystery. Sources vary on her relationship to bobby her profession. Even, her name Melody or in some cases referred to as Melanie may have been a bartender at PJ's Los Angeles's first discotheque and to celebrities, hotspot Bobby and friends frequented the club along with crooner Frank Sinatra and actress. Mia, Farrow Melody may also have been a sex worker either way in relation to Bobby's death. Her name is sometimes referenced for her suspected connections to the mom. The unknown car that Bobby saw in Melody's driveway a few days before he disappeared. Some.

Susan Bobby Bobby Fuller susie Suzy Lorraine Fuller El Paso Pamela Melody Dawson Farrow Melody El Paso Texas Charles Manson Bobbi Suzanne Bobby. Nancy Norton Bruce California Frank Sinatra Juarez Mexico
"fuller" Discussed on Unexplained Mysteries

Unexplained Mysteries

07:55 min | 11 months ago

"fuller" Discussed on Unexplained Mysteries

"After, Lorraine the next people to see Bobby's body where his friends tie grimes and Mike Ciccarelli who pass Lorraine in the stairwell on their way up to apartment three seventeen. After realizing that bobby wasn't home. The two musicians turned around to return to their car. They passed Bobby's mother again, but this time her face was Ashen and she was in a full sprint. Panic and shock had sent her into hysterics. They didn't know it at the time, but she was on her way to call the police. When Grimes Ciccarelli got outside? They saw the door to bobbies oldsmobile open. Lorraine's emotions were immediately given context. Bobby sat in the front seat, unmistakably dead. Grimes claimed he saw blood on his friends shirt. After dialing nine, one one and informing them of the horror downstairs lorraine called her only surviving son. According to Randy, the only words his mother choked out before hanging up were bobbies, dead Randy immediately rushed home. Of course. When he turned onto his street, he found a mob of police reporters and curious neighbors outside of seventeen, seventy, six. Sycamore. As he made his way to his brother's car, he recalled how stranger in the crowd misinformed him that his road manager Rick Stone had been murdered. For a second, he thought he'd misheard his mother and his brother might be alive. But he hadn't. In fact, as the stranger spoke those words, Rick was driving back to the apartment. After leaving Delphi's headquarters earlier in the afternoon Jim Reese the lead guitarist for the Bobby Fuller four took rick to pick up his Volkswagen from an auto body shop. According to Rick. An unpleasant feeling bubbled up in his gut. As he inched closer to Sycamore Street the bands road manager had to elbow his way through the crowd. He recalled the police treating him as if he were a member of the Paparazzi and not one of Bobby's best friends. But. Eventually, Rick Gut close enough to see bobby for himself rick. Saw The singer holding a hose in one hand that connected to a gas can. BOBBIES, hair look slick, and oily as if someone had poured gasoline over him, his body appeared bruised as if he'd been beaten and burned in places as if he'd been set on fire. The slippers on his feet were worn down like he'd been trudging through gravel or had been dragged. His pinky finger appeared broken. Randy, fuller and Rick Stone stood outside until officials carried bobby's body away. The. Following morning headlines Ran in the press rock and roll singer found dead in car bobby. Fuller. Found did. On Wednesday July, twentieth two days after Bobby's death. A funeral was held at the church. Of The hills in Los Angeles. Afterward bobbies family buried him in Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Hollywood, hills, Rick, stone, claim that both ceremonies were veritable. Who's who of Hollywood? Among. The mourners were record producer, Phil Spector aren beasts or Barry White. Music, executive Bob, Keane and hundreds of fans. His headstones, simply red. Beloved son after the services, Randy Fuller claimed that his mother Lorraine turned into a vegetable. He said quote, we took her to the cemetery one last time the next day. She. Fell in the grave and you just couldn't get her off. We had to drag her to the car and quote. But. Bobby's mother wasn't going to get closure anytime singing. On July twenty, fifth nineteen, sixty, six, head toxicologist at the Los. Angeles. County medical. Examiner's office. Edward. Thompson submitted a report of chemical analysis. He tested bobbies blood for a number of drugs, but found no signs of barbituates, carbon monoxide, cyanide, chlorinated hydrocarbons, or other drugs common in cases of suicide. Oddly enough despite reports that bobby had been drinking the night before Thompson found no trace of alcohol in the singer system. His brother Randy later highlighted that Thomson. Never tested bobbies blood for LSD. He said they're superintendent last known person to see. Bobby. Alive Lloyd s injure liked to party. Randy said LSD for sure and hot. Though nonfatal, the hallucinogenic drugs would have left bobby in an altered state of reality, a recent medical school graduate, Dr Jerry Nelson conducted bobbies easy. Though the procedure happened shortly after Bobby's death, the report wasn't made public until October eighteenth three months to the day after the rain found her son dead, the medical examiner noted peeling and blistering on the skin on bobby's face neck chest back, arms and legs. Upon opening the body, apparently the organs and incised tissue emitted a pungent aroma of gasoline. But. Nelson said the contents of his stomach were unremarkable. which likely meant he found? No trace of gasoline inside other reported observations included an abnormal buildup of fluid in his lungs. The examiner listed the cause of death as s fixture suffocation caused by the elation of gasoline. bobbies bladder was also unusually swollen, which implied that he may have been in a state of unconsciousness, well, before his actual time of death. Nelson marked to question marks next to the words accident and suicide. Nelson may not have been sure about the cause of Bobby's death. But the Los, Angeles Police Department had already made up their mind, the gasoline and the hose was initially convince them that bobby had died by suicide. They never impounded bobbies oldsmobile or even dusted for fingerprints after officials took his body away possibly because to them, bobby. I was just another dead celebrity from nineteen, sixty, two, July. Nineteen, sixty, six, the list of celebrity suicides and overdoses in. America. Included actors, Margaret. Sullivan. Diana Barrymore, Marie McDonald. And Marilyn Monroe. Authors Ernest Hemingway and Sylvia plath. And journalists, Dorothy kilgallen among many others. Three years before bobby. Fuller died president of the United States, John F Kennedy was assassinated. Two days after his death. Kennedy's alleged assassin. Lee Harvey Oswald was shot by club owner Jack Ruby. Many of those names are wrapped up in their own mysteries, conspiracy theories and alleged cover-ups. But the point is that culturally the idea that fame and fortune came at a price permeated public consciousness in an incredibly.

Bobby Fuller Randy Fuller Lorraine Grimes Ciccarelli Rick Stone Rick Dr Jerry Nelson Rick Gut LSD fuller Los Los Angeles Dorothy kilgallen Ashen Marilyn Monroe Lee Harvey Oswald Diana Barrymore Ernest Hemingway John F Kennedy Jim Reese
"fuller" Discussed on Unexplained Mysteries

Unexplained Mysteries

02:49 min | 11 months ago

"fuller" Discussed on Unexplained Mysteries

"Nobody had told them. He was missing. Despite not seeing his car outside there were on their way to ring his doorbell. But. Lorraine. Barely noticed them. If she did at all because as she made her way downstairs, she saw what minutes earlier they hadn't. bobbies blue oldsmobile parked outside. Ran, in, the direction of the car bobby still sat in the driver's seat. When she opened the driver's side door, the smell of gasoline washed over her according to rain. Bobby still had one hand on the keys in the car's ignition. At first, she thought he might be sleeping. She yelled for him to wake up. But unfortunately, not even a mother screams can wake the dead. Coming up question marks on Bobby Fuller's autopsy report. If you're in between episodes of unexplained mysteries, you should check out another great podcast called Radio Rental. It's not a podcast show, but it's a unique take on the thriller Genre podcast from the People at tender foot. TV brought you up and vanished Atlanta Monster and to live and die in La. Radio? Rental is the ultimate collection of bizarre true stories, the weird. The unexplained, the seemingly impossible. Every episode has new stories, and now it's returning for a second season. One of the things I like so much about radio rental is that the stories although disturbing are all told by the people who actually experienced? And these aren't ghost stories. They're the kind of stories that make you think that could happen to me. And to your favorites shop of horrors radio rental to experience it for yourself. So go to your podcast APP right now and subscribe to radio rental now back to the story. Around five PM on July Eighteenth Nineteen, sixty, six, lorraine fuller found her twenty, three year old son bobby dead in the front seat of their family car. The Front Man and star of the then famous band. The Bobby Fuller four had been missing for approximately fourteen hours. It's impossible to imagine the heartbreak that the former mother of three must have felt when she opened up the driver's side door. Bobby was her middle child and the second to be sent to an early grave. Five years earlier, her eldest Jack had been murdered a robbery.

Bobby Fuller Radio Rental lorraine fuller bobby robbery La Atlanta Jack
"fuller" Discussed on Unexplained Mysteries

Unexplained Mysteries

08:08 min | 11 months ago

"fuller" Discussed on Unexplained Mysteries

"Aw. The bobby fuller four I launched onto the charts in the spring of Nineteen, sixty, six with their hit song. I fought the law. Written by Sonny Curtis and filled with up tempo melodic harmonies therein became an instant rock and roll classic. Bobby, Fuller's voice traveled across American radio waves breaking rocks in the hot sun. I fought the law and the law won. The single is the reason that the band is considered something of a one hit wonder today. And there's some truth to the slight. Finding someone to Even they're more popular originals like dance or love's made a fool of you proves difficult. But if you remove the millions of songs that have saturated the industry since and isolate the band in time, it's impossible to dismiss the bobby fuller four as a mere momentary blip. In, one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, six, they were Beatles member George, Harrison's most listened to ban. Bobby. Fuller. Looked like a Kennedy and performed like, Elvis. Newspapers and media outlets labeled him the rock and roll King of the southwest edge in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, two article in the El Paso. Times recounts how the Bobby Fuller Four appeared at Dick Clark's ruled teenage fair at the Palladium in Hollywood, mobs of screaming girls lunged at Bobby and randy ripping their clothes and hair. Admirers were so hysterical that apparently one persistent fan escaped with bobbies, watch and cufflinks today bobby was found dead marked, just eight months since the band released their first twelve tracks studio. Charlie King of the wheels five months since their follow up record, I fought the law and only a handful of weeks since the album single landed in the United? States. Top Ten. In other words just as twenty-three-year-old Bobby Fuller's stood on the precipice of superstardom he vanished. Only to. Reappear dead. Bodies Mother Lorraine was staying with her sons at their apartment in Hollywood California seventeen seventy, six, sycamore avenue number three, seventeen. Bobby and his younger brother. Randy were both members of the up and coming band the bobby. Fuller. Four. Randy did love how the name turned him into a number and his brother into a star, but he preferred it to their record labels original choice. Bobby Fuller and the fanatics. Bobby was two years randy senior in the band Randy Played Bass and saying backup to bobbies guitar and lead vocals. The. Brothers road manager and close friend Rick Stone was visiting them at the time. The evening of July Seventeenth nineteen, sixty six was relatively uneventful. Randy had left to visit his friend and artist Boyd elder. Lorraine Bobby and Rick Drank Beers and watch television. At some point, bobby left the room to call his girlfriend. Nancy, Norton a flight attendant who lived in. New. York City. Over the course of the night, a handful of old friends from Texas, stop by the apartment to hang out. In Conversation Bobby, mentioned how excited he was about the corvette he planned by the next day. To those around him, he seemed in good spirits. Around one AM, Lorraine decided to turn in for the night. The place had cleared out. Rick was falling asleep on the couch with the television still on the only other person in the apartment was her son. Lorraine found Bobby in a corner picking at his guitar and listening to records. His favorite artists included the king of rock and roll Elvis Presley and fellow Texas rocker Buddy Holly. A freak plane crash killed holly seven years earlier. On February. Third Nineteen, fifty, nine. In his Song American Pie Don McLean famously referred to the accident as the day the music died. There was a time that bobby only ever dreamed of having a career like his idol. Buddy. Holly. The bobby fuller four had modeled themselves after Holly's for manned band crickets. Lorraine wished bobby good night knowing that his dreams were coming true. He really was just like buddy holly. After. His mother fell asleep. Bobby allegedly took another phone call with a different girl thirty, three year. Old Melody Dawson, she lived nearby. Rick claims that he and Bobby had tried to buy LSD from melody a few days earlier, but no transaction happened. Bobby was spooked when they arrived at her place and saw another car in addition to her blue nineteen, sixty four, Cadillac, Eldorado in the driveway. Bobby said, they'd try again another time. So around one, a m on the morning, bobby disappeared. He told Rick that he was leaving to finally pick up the acid from melody. Around two thirty, a M Rick Stone. Woke up to the sound of bobby either leaving or entering the apartment. He didn't see bobby himself, but he did see the front door open. Parched Rick, tore himself from the couch and walked to the kitchen to fix himself an ice tea. As he did, he heard what he thought were bobbies footsteps echoing down the stairwell. Rick didn't think much of the coming and going according to him. The Sun often came up for anyone in apartment number three, seventeen threw in the towel and caught a few winks. He assumed bobby left to grab a midnight snack or nightcap somewhere close by. He wasn't wrong. Bobby didn't go very far at least not at first. Stopped downstairs to visit his building manager Lloyd essence her whom Bobby considered a friend. and according to `Santer he bobby did share a few beers together around three a m. Nobody knows where bobby went or who he saw after he left his landlords art. All we can confidently say is the Lloyd s injure is the last person who admits to seeing the young musician alive. When Lorraine Fuller woke up on the morning of July Eighteenth Nineteen, sixty six, she noticed that their families blue oldsmobile wasn't parked outside. Around eight thirty, A. M. Rick Stone realized the same thing as he left to go to the headquarters of the Bobby Fuller fours, record label Delphi he assumed that he'd see bobby there in an hour. They had a meeting that started at nine thirty. But Bobby never showed. Five hours and a few fast food burgers. Later, the band, it's music technicians and their label executives gave up any hope of their singer gracing them with an appearance. When. The clock ticked past three thirty. PM They. Left? Around four thirty PM. Fuller's anxiety drove her to step outside to check her son had returned. It wasn't her first time that day. But once again, neither bobby nor his car where anywhere in sight. Thirty. Minutes later. She left again. This time to check the mail. On her way down, she passed to of bobbies, musician friends, tie grimes, and Mike. Ciccarelli. Days earlier, they'd made plans to hang out with body..

Lorraine Bobby Bobby Fuller A. M. Rick Stone Mother Lorraine Lorraine Fuller Randy Buddy Holly Rick Stone Elvis Presley Sonny Curtis Texas Beatles Rick Drank Beers Don McLean Charlie King Melody Dawson Kennedy George Nancy
"fuller" Discussed on Unexplained Mysteries

Unexplained Mysteries

01:45 min | 11 months ago

"fuller" Discussed on Unexplained Mysteries

"In? October. Nineteen seventy rock and roll legend Janice Joplin overdosed in the landmark Motor Hotel in Hollywood California at twenty seven years old. When police arrived at her room, they found her body between the nightstand and her bed. High heels on a pack of smokes in one hand. Spare change in the other. According to officials, Joplin had taken a bad batch of heroin. Once sufficiently high, she visited the cigarette vending machine in her hotel lobby before drifting away to a slow inevitable death. Peggy Caserta however doesn't believe that version of the story as Joplin's good friend. She claims that if the heroin really was as fatal as the police said, the Star wouldn't have been able to walk in heels. Let alone operate a vending machine. Ask for the quality of the drugs. Peggy says that she used the same batch herself and she's alive to tell the tale for years earlier in one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, six, the twenty-three-year-old, eponymous front man of the Bobby Fuller four was found dead in the driver's seat of his mother's blue. Oldsmobile. Parked about two, hundred, fifty feet away from the hotel. We Janice Joplin took her last breath. According to the coroner's report, Bobby Fuller die by suicide or accident. The pair of deaths is considered an interesting coincidence. One unusual celebrity death doesn't necessarily inform another. But if the circumstances surrounding bobby's death, prove anything, it's that when coincidences pile high enough they deserve a closer.

Janice Joplin Peggy Caserta Bobby Fuller Motor Hotel heroin Oldsmobile California
"fuller" Discussed on Christian Podcast Community

Christian Podcast Community

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"fuller" Discussed on Christian Podcast Community

"John is the founder and host of argue real finding EFENDIC. This is a podcast where he has real raw authentic conversations with Christians that are changing their families, communities, cities in nations is a devoted husband, father and entrepreneur that has chosen to make a difference in the lives of those around him. It took him sixteen years to understand and receive God's healing restoration into find his real self. And he is still in the process of walking out daily just like most people. He has had many setbacks in struggles statistically, he shouldn't even be where he is today, but he believes in living, life. But he believes in living a life that is on purpose. He is the voice of manifestation. What does that mean? John is calling out the gifts and talents and other people, so that they will manifest, and they will be equipped to walk in their destiny and calling. Here's my interview with John Fuller. Right John. What's up, brother? Good man how you doing doing pretty good doing pretty good things so much for coming on in joining us today appreciate. It ran absolutely. Do excited to be here and excited. Hang out with you. Yeah, yeah, I've been looking forward to this conversation ever since we first connected. So why don't you tell us a little bit about yourself which you got going on in this type of things? Yes, so I am first and foremost a husband and a father to three amazing kids. This was going to be my twenty year anniversary. So pretty excited about that, and besides that I am an entrepreneur owns multiple businesses. Have a tendency to over. Extend myself sometimes in life to do lots of different things on a construction company with buying flip houses do a Lotta remodels new.

John Fuller founder
"fuller" Discussed on The Breakdown with Shaun King

The Breakdown with Shaun King

08:00 min | 1 year ago

"fuller" Discussed on The Breakdown with Shaun King

"Just a few hours ago. The hanging death of Robert Fuller. The twenty four year, old black man who was. Found hanging from a tree in the middle of the town square. The hanging death of Robert Fuller was ruled a suicide. Now as you may recall the police there. Ruled it a suicide initially. Within a day of his death, which not only angered the family, but also angered the community and the nation, and rightfully so the family felt like. Police and investigators did not take enough time and care. To actually determine the cause of death, and I understand that frustration and It's the same thing that we see with police brutality that. Police have so little care and so little concern and so little heart for black people. That they are willing to abuse and murder, black people, and it's the root of that is just. Not, just hate, but it just A. A general lack of concern. That's why we see things. Repeatedly happen to black men, women and children that would literally never happened to white folk. At the root of it is is a feeling. And so that feeling seemed present. When police really a matter of hours. Just said Nah, this is. Not a lynching. It's not a homicide is not a murder. This is a suicide. And because of community, pressure and protest. Police basically the the same police agency with with some outside oversight, but not much. The same police agency did do a longer investigation. But this morning. They released the results of that investigation. And, several of my friends who are journalists that I respect and trust. wrote a few different articles about the investigation. And the police found several things that they could not have known. Within the twenty four hours he was. Robert died on June tenth. Just. Exactly a month ago today. That they couldn't have known on June tenth or June, Eleventh. But we now know. That Robert Fuller had been hospitalized multiple times. For severe mental health problems in challenges. And on multiple occasions. Said to? Doctors and nurses that he was considering suicide. Including less than a year ago, this past November. Where he communicated to doctors that he was considering setting himself on fire. Want us to pause there. Anybody, who is considering? Setting themselves on fire. Could also take their life. In any manner of ways. and. Here's the mistake that we make. When we say. And I see right now right this very moment on my instagram page I see people saying. Black people don't hang themselves. Only to have other black people in my comments say. Actually I attempted to hang myself on multiple occasions and have been hospitalized for it. Only to have other black people say. Actually members of my own family. did that to themselves in committing suicide. and. I readily admit. that it is peculiar, crazy, wild suspicious. For young black man in this time. To hang himself from a tree. We could call it cruel. You could call it outrageous. But here is where I want us to talk for a moment. You are thinking about what you would do. Right now. You are reasonably healthy. Your mental health is stable I. Don't know I don't know if you are healthy. Mentally emotionally, but you are reasonably stable, and in your reasonably stable state. You know that you would never hang yourself from a tree. I can say right now. That I would never hang myself from a tree. I can say that. But what none of us can say? Is What we would do. If our mental health deteriorated so much. That we had a break from reality. Something else that I rarely talk about it in part because of the confidentiality of the work, but. I used to work. Add a hospital for children in Atlanta. And I worked in. It was a it was a residential. Mental Health Hospital for children. One of the most celebrated centers of its kind. And it was arguably the hardest work I've ever done. In my life I was a counselor there. And I was a counselor. They had children there from the ages of. Seven to eighteen. and. Kids only lived with other kids. Their age and I worked full time. As a full-time counselor in. The wing for the youngest children, they actually had a completely separate building and facility it was. On hundreds of acres of land in Atlanta. A beautiful place in the concept was wonderful Ford, they were trying to do there. And the children it was a trauma center. For children with severe mental health problems. And forty now this was. Over ten years ago and I was in my twenties when I was working there. And Gosh I'm trying to good thing. It was almost fifteen years ago. And Every day I would often work weekly. I would often work. To Sixteen hour shifts, and then one eight hour shift to do forty hours. Sometimes, we'd get overtime. Fill in somebody else's shift. and. I saw things. that. Are Only. Only, repeat it to my wife. And even most of that I didn't even say to her. These kids and every day out. Part of my job would be to take. Copious notes, pages and pages of notes. And each child had a detailed binder. Tracking their progress their struggles, their issues there challenges..

Robert Fuller Atlanta murder Mental Health Hospital Ford
"fuller" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

The Virtual Couch

09:22 min | 1 year ago

"fuller" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

"I really appreciate you taking the time and And so in thank you for joining me today on the virtual couch and so today my guest is Tina Fuller and Tina is the author of the book. It's my turn how to gain freedom from a manipulating and self centered parent so Thanks for joining me. Tina Oh thank you for having me on your show I appreciate it. Yeah so hey I've And I actually picked up. Tina's book probably a little over a year ago and at that time I was working with a woman who we had identified that she grew up with a narcissistic mother and And she really just was struggling. I think she felt guilty of wanting to blame. All of her problems on her mom and Interior book helped so much with that. So is that something you run into? Aachen yes. I'm glad to hear that it helped her. That's great really wonderful Yeah a lot of times People do get stuck in either anger or guilt. Okay and I think what I was seeing was guilt and And it actually kind of I thought was funny. Was She would continually ask me but wait a minute. Am I in our sisters? Well in what do you say when you hear that Actually the first thing I tell them because a lot of times people be literally in fear that they're turning into their so I'll tell them first of all a narcissist doesn't know that a narcissistic I love. And it's yeah it's everybody else's fault right so by you even questioning yourself tells me you're not nice right. Yeah I think I'M GONNA I WANNA cut that clip out of this Podcast because I think that is the ultimate sniff test right if they know Earth they're asking that question than that kind of rules amount right. Okay so I guess before you go further to tell me a little bit about your background How did you how did you come to right? It's my turn okay. So I found out that my mother was a narcissist. I guess I was about thirty nine and it just decided to Once I started healing healing process about I guess mid way to three quarters of the way through I thought well you know I think since I'm learning so much and I'm I'm going through this process I should help other people so I thought well you know once I get myself to a point where I am healed by will sit down and start your right. And that's exactly what I did. I just took notes as I went along actually and referred back to my notes. And that's really where the whole thought process came from. I've got to help other people. I know there's other people out here that had are going through the same thing I'm going through and I went through it basically alone. There wasn't as much information out Back then we'll and so it's interesting that you you say you came to that realization when you were thirty nine so What led to that? What was it all of a sudden a Pitney in the skies part in in the sunshine and you get it or was it a slow build up well. Basically part of it was I had asked my parents to watch my kids because I was having surgery and My Mother's response To that was well I don't WanNa feel like driving that day. So something's wrong. That's not a normal response. Yeah I started that and also I had a neighbor at the time That just made me question. And the way they were acting. So I literally went onto Google and looked up narcissism and bells and whistles just started going off and like oh my gosh okay go back to some of those initial bells and whistles were or what did when you read about narcissism what what clicks somebody who is self absorbed have no empathy for others raging. I mean now it depends on for talking over it or covert but you know raging Just has absolutely no you know caring for someone else And like I said Very self-centered Okay and and I think one of the things that is important to note is I if you've lived with a narcissist worked with the narcissist You're often like you're beating yourself trying to convince them of certain things that you think are true. Or if you just say the this one final thing or make this this really good point that then all of a sudden they'll get it right and all of this negative patterns and behavior from the past will disappear and they will become this wonderful lovable person experienced dream right. Yeah exactly what if we could just get them to see it The other thing I wanted to add was there. They're not at all. They tend to believe they know everything. Yeah you know I looked up On the I think it's the American Psychiatric Association website and it's talking about personality disorders and narcissistic personality disorder. It says a pattern of need admiration and lack of empathy for others a person with narcissistic personality. Disorder may have grandiose sense of self importance sense of entitlement take advantage of others or lack of empathy. And did you see that? Especially the taking advantage of Did you see that in your mom? Oh yes okay. And the like. I said the The know it all manipulation everything you just mentioned basic. Exactly what she's done and and still will try to do. Yeah Okay and so. What was that research like early on? Said there wasn't a lot out there. I mean pitcher a movie where all the sudden there's this montage and you've got the pencil behind your ear and you're in the library and the stacks late at night or I mean. Where did you go? And what did you initially find? Well I started looking for videos. I looked at the DSM for Tom. I just you know dove head in headfirst into it and wanted to understand it more and kind of took the emotion out of it. A really Because I I looked at it for more of a almost like a clinical type perspective just so I could understand it and then I thought well I'll I'll put the emotion aside for now and learn as much as I can and then deal with the emotion okay because otherwise I had to keep a clear head otherwise I wouldn't have got. I feel I wouldn't have gotten anywhere. Yeah do you remember that when you when you put the emotions aside and I love that I mean that is one of the hardest things to do right to Disengage and at point that you become more of an observer I did okay As I mentioned in my book it was almost like The Cartoon Charlie Brown where I would go and see her and it was like Whoa. Whoa WHOA WHOA. Whoa whether it was raging or whatever she was doing and I was like. Oh there it is. She's doing this now and then it became almost like a game because I would say I think she's going to do this next. And I would like to see if I was right and so yeah exactly. That's exactly disengaged okay. And we're pretty good at the game. I mean were you able to predict. Actually I didn't keep score but with narcissist. If one thing doesn't work they do tend to try something else but yeah no I did. I did I did fairly well. I'M GONNA shut down no narcissism the board game. I think that has I don't know what that would look like And when you say that I think of the clients I work with and I have to say As far as I can literally count on one hand with a couple of fingers not being used how many actual nurses society worked with in in working with a you know a long list of clients and so we. Kinda referred to him in therapy. Is there a Unicorn I mean you you rarely see and typically you get a nurse? Assistant Therapy If their marriage is about to end and their whiteness finally said Okay and notice how they wipe them. I assuming that all the nurses store are males which I mean. That's what I think is unique about your and your situation right. I mean it was your mom. Yeah but I think in my practice. I've seen a pretty fair amount of of men actually on that. I little tangent there do you know. Is there much. Research around is primarily Male or female nurses. Well I can give you my opinion. it to me in my opinion. It's pretty much fifty fifty kind of like a can seek out okay. I'm only going to strike males. You know thirty five to whatever age it it. It can show up anywhere. I think it's more reported With men because They tend to be Ceo's or were you know owners of companies or the supervisors and that because There are more in the public eye whereas women.

Tina Tina Oh Aachen Tina Fuller Google Ceo Pitney American Psychiatric Associati Charlie Brown
"fuller" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

13:16 min | 1 year ago

"fuller" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"That discussion of re platforming or modernisation. The decision of whether to re platform onto cooper Kluber Netease or whether to me modernizer to modernize it often falls on the platform engineering team and at these last few conferences is. I don't know if this is some kind of sample bias or just variants or whatever but I got the sense that there are more and more companies that are creating a platform engineering department or a platform engineering team. It's almost like an outgrowth of the trend or something like that and it's kind of a new role. I think the in the sense that platform engineering in the modern sense seems to mean like a selection of technologies. It's like you've got this huge buffet of cloud providers others and then you have individual companies that you can buy some particular monitoring solution or logging solution that the company particularly emphasizes sizes. It's like platform engineering. Some mix of technology selection and architecture and determination for how a re platforming is going to be determined. Do you have a sense for how big a company needs to be to start to spin up a platform engineering team interesting one. So maybe this is a controversial answer but I think this it's a similar job right that we always have a different for name for and sometimes his are- exits devops. Sometimes it's I don't know A platform team or an OPS team or an infrastructure team. I think there are all kinds of solving similar challenges and the the term is changing as the people change and as kind of technology that we're working with changes and and I think a lot of it is kind of the same question that folks have have already been always been solvent. which is how do I make smart architecture? Infrastructure and tool choices is how do I make that scalable twenty developers to to move to production as quickly and as safely as possible and keeping our availability as high as possible I. I don't think that you have to have a team of a certain size to be thinking about those things right. I don't think that's a function of team size. I think at a really small startup up. That might just be a single person. It might be two people. It might be six people but I don't think that's a function of team size. I would actually maybe spend that in a different direction. which is that? I think everyone should be thinking about that at any size of company. And maybe when you get to a certain size you have folks that just think about that but but Amazon has very much culture of you build it you run it so I would actually say that the the the responsibilities that fall to an OPS team or a platform team. I really think that we should all be thinking about right. So how do I how do I deploy quickly and safely and keep my availability up as something that everyone in every free kind of area of software engineering. We should be thinking about that right. If we build the star best we should run it and we should be responsible for keeping it up. Maybe we get some help around around the the tooling in the infrastructure and the platform itself and the tools that I have available platform or an OPS team. But they're they're really more like cultural changes that we should be thinking about from the very beginning and regardless of size who should adopt a service Mesh. Today I don't know. Does anyone have an answer to that. You you me you know I think service mash kind of as a concept is something that we're still very much feeling out as an industry and I think it's it's coming out of folks running into two similar kinds of challenges right. which is Hannah my services? Discover and talk to each other. Is there an easier way of monitoring in all decide cars so I think people are talking about service mashes coming from a set of of similar problems. Switches basically monitoring networking is tough. And I don't want to do all of that for tribute systems and Security Policy Management Insecurity Policy Management. That's a big one so I think it's coming out of folks talking about the same the same kind of challenges running into some of the same roadblocks. I think it's really really early. I re talking about things like standardizing service purpose meshes. I don't think they know enough to know what the right standard is so as who should be adopting it. I think when you're when you're running into challenges like that right like applying security policies across your infrastructure. Or how do I monitor from a single place rather from every application individually that. I think maybe it's time to start looking at them. But I am very comfortable saying that. I don't I don't quite now. I don't know how to get this one right yet. I think the only way to get it right is by listening to the folks running into these challenges that our buildings should beat it. Applications that are solving challenges like that and working backwards from there so we have we have aws at Mash which service Mesh but it is the first time on our side that we've sleeve on a product in the open like this so at Mesh has a preview channel so everything hits the preview channel before it hits Geno availability so that customers and developers can play with things in give feedback even earlier in the product development process because we don't quite know customers consumers. Want and I think the right way the way for us to build the right things is by is by working really closely with folks this ourselves as challenges to make sure that we're solving all the right issues so embedded in what you said there was A hint of skepticism over the the SIDECAR model and I know that one alternative to that is the library based model and I think the maybe one way to contrast those two is that the library requires a developer to who embed the service Mesh or service proxy library in their Application Code and then they proximity. Sorry the SIDECAR ride car model just requires the platform operator which may be like a centralized platform team to just you know. Click that they want a sidecar car container alongside every other service and and so the trade off there is that the you know. It's just it can be the platform operators duty but then you have the additional overhead of all these SIDECAR containers is there another approach we could potentially have or either of these approaches worthwhile. You know I think anything that you can manages inches is worthwhile and I think my my skepticism is not the sidecars themselves right. Because I think that's were. Were solving a problem. That's challenging but in the I don't necessarily WanNa manage all the sidecars. So if there's a platform team or service that can do the sidecars from medically like an ATM Astro Service Mash. It's like great If it works it works but I do try to be mindful of giving people more and more kind of bits to manage in the interest of solving a problem problem that originally came out of having a lot of bits manage so the library model as a way of doing that. I think people like x ray use. SDK In a lot out of monitoring tools have used that approach which is you instruments and then agent picks up what you've instruments incense it somewhere else. They're all valid but I'm not sure that I have a one size fits all right answer here. How does cube con differ from aws? Reinvent well guess as previously previously discussed I think is a is a is a divergence there the big difference to me and I went to coupon Barcelona here and reinvent but The North American in coupon was two weeks before reinvent. Tonight could not like sphere or truly make that work. The big difference for me. Is that the reinvent enters reinvent is about aws. And I think that that's actually kind of telling to the ecosystem in general right so coupon is rightfully so about coconut. And it advances with kind of a single community in the set of toiling in products and companies have sprung up around it and reinvent vent definitely has folks talking about Cooper Netease E. K. S. E. C. S. in far gade but it's also about aws in general. And I think that folks when when they when they go to build on. Aws It's because of aws and a lot of folks are using Kubina. These tools because of Cooper nowadays so I think the kind of the the range of what you cover at reinvent is is pretty fast and that it involves more than just the container orchestrator. So you have folks from easy easy to there. From networking from database and storage to you know different kinds of instant types to machine learning to serve or less tied entity insecurity. So I think there's an incredibly wide range of reinventing I I think the when I get out of that so I go to coupon when I when I when I WANNA learn about advances in in Cooper Nettie specifically so how are people deploying and managing their Cooper natives customers. I like reinvent because it gives me a I think. Thank a very wide view of kind of the the whole Shebang right. So not. Just the container orchestrator. I'm using but Katoyi management networking. How do I manage my identity and access policies? What are people thinking about for c. v. e. and vulnerabilities and how to do secure isolation so the range is much broader? Better than I think. That's the big difference for me. That one's about a single community in once about a giant cloud provider. What reflections you have from reinvent twenty nineteen specifically? Yeah so a couple of interesting ones for me. I really enjoyed the focus this year on more more under the hood talks so you saw in inverse keynote on Thursday that clear Liguori who's a pe principal engineer from the container side. I did a really nice deep dive under the hood on on Far Gate and firecracker we also talked about five Salia another kind of parts of the US infrastructure. And I thought that was. I really enjoyed that this year. Because I think what a lot of folks WANNA learn is is how and why we build the things that we do and I think that was also reflected in the launch of the Amazon Builder Library so that is a collection of articles from principal engineers and senior principal engineers. About how we think about things like load shedding in isolation in shuffled charting and QS and exponential back off so I do really like what I think is the beginning of a of of more push push from US talking about how and why we build the things that we do the way that we do in in sharing some of that kind of hard one internal engineering knowledge so those are a couple of big takeaways. The one that did not surprise may was interest on I think that's something that customers have been really interested in. It was an interesting reinvent from the container sides because in November of last year. Right at right actually. During coupon last year we open sourced all of our road maps APPs so for UCS e KS Far Gate ECR at Mesh we run all of our product. Roadmap son get up so I definitely felt like I had a I was pretty clued into what are customers looking for before we got to reinvent in. It's nice closing that loop even more so that the feedback during reinvent feels really targeted cadet. Like I see. You're working on this but what I'd like you to do is tweet this a little bit and bring us this other thing and I found that really interesting and I think it makes it more productive for all of us. The one thing this year has really been the increased granularity of what open source means and what the different options are for for ways that companies can be successful in open source or perhaps debates whether it's debates around licensing or what is the definition of open source. HOW RELIGIOUS YOU WANNA get about it? It's like whatever your opinion. I think that the exploration of all these different ideas is useful useful long-term to the community as a whole. Yeah you know I think a lot of a lot of what stands out to me for for open source in general. It's a community community that you can always get in other ways right. That sense of were building this thing as a group that works for all of us were solving similar problems and the challenges were. We're building something that that solves ad or I can learn for other people or from other people or I hadn't thought about running it right that way. It's a huge benefit of open source for me. It's being able to learn and listen to that community night. I think that's a lot of why we open source. The roadmaps is is we wanted people to feel like they had transparency and visibility in in a community around something that the astronauts had that Eddie Fuller thank you for coming out software orange daily. It's been fun talking to you for having me. Being on call is hard but having the right tools for the job can make it easier.

aws cooper Kluber Netease US principal Cooper Netease E. K. S. E. C. Amazon Cooper Nettie Cooper Hannah Eddie Fuller Far Gate ATM Astro developer Amazon Builder Library Katoyi Barcelona product development Liguori
"fuller" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

09:45 min | 1 year ago

"fuller" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Engineering daily. Thanks for having me. When a software engineer is evaluating the the different managed coober Nettie systems that are on the market? There's a spectrum for how much control the developer has versus the specific diffic- cloud provider managed. Part of the Cooper Netease experience. You have the basic coober netease experience and then you have. The management layer on top of it. What are the components components of that managed experience? Yeah so I I think what you're getting at right is that I think Amazon in general talks about the shared responsibility model and the difference I think between all those different management layers are how much of that is on us. And how much of that is on you and I think it ranges from you can run your own Cooper Nettie than EC. Two we'll None of that managed by us. It's all it's all done by you. To E K ASS on EC two which we manage the masters I to something that we not Kukoc a few weeks ago called managed node groups men that lets you automate the provisioning in life cycle of your worker notes so you're EC chances and then we'll we'll handle things like note updates in terminations to train them from your application and then it ends. I think with something. So East. E- KS Hey s on on far gates. We announced that reinvent a few last week. Wow feels like feels like many weeks that we know that it reinvent last week and that's basically basically running your Kuban Hannity's pods on our day capacity so you handle everything only at the at the PODS BAC level. And I think you know how you how you choose between clean the Between that sat depends on on how much you WANNA manage. So if you're a Kuban Eddie's expert in you WanNa manage everything down to the master. Nodes you can do that if you're just interested in using API's in tooling but you don't want to have to worry about the worker nodes in the master's you can run your your Cooper Hannity's Qods on Friday capacity. You just gave a good description of how a software engineer or an architect should evaluate the different managed Cooper Netease systems but there's also the decision that a cloud provider has to make so aws for example has to make decisions in their design of a managed. Cooper netties tell me about how. Aws has assessed the different trade offs. That could be made design decisions and making managed Cooper Netease. Sure I mean assuming that I can. I can figure out how to unpack that question. I think on our side to there are parts of Cougar. Nettie is that the community feels really strongly about and I think that's the open source shoreside and that's the the community cooling side and I think something that's been kind of nonnegotiable as we've designed. These pieces is that we never WANNA lose that. So we don't WanNa lose kind of the upstream part of Kuban entities. So I think a lot of our discussions have been around. How can we make things like upstream? Kuban Eddie's work and the exact same anyway that it does if you manage it yourself but with US managing a different percentage of the pieces for you as you mentioned at reinvent this year there was the announcement of off. Aws Far Gate. Interfacing with Amazon E. KS and this was a pretty useful announcement because far gate has always seemed like a pretty interesting and useful project since it launched. Because it's the idea of running a single container in a managed fashion. which for many kinds of applications is really desirable? Because you know like a hobbyist project doesn't need a full cooper netease cluster. In fact it's going to be really wasteful to have a full auburn as cluster. If all you need is a single node but of course if a application becomes successful you want to be able to scale up that single well not too complex distributed system and you WanNa have all the granularity there and so the ability for for for gay to interface with the SS pretty useful and what. I'm wondering is. What was the engineering work that was required to make that a reality? Because I'm sure that was part of the vision from day one but there must have been some significant engineering work that was required to make it a reality. Yeah it's definitely. It's definitely the kind of projects that we we spent a ton of time thinking about and thinking through before we kind of brought it out there. It would challenge something that you said a couple couple minutes ago on. Fargo being a single container. You know foggy I think is is ultimately capacity provider for easy to so by using far gate. It's the same as But we're managing them and all that means as you define things at the cogs back for chaos or the task definition for CS level does not limit you to running anything less than a full distributed system anything anything you can run in kind of upstream coober or ECS EC two mode workshop. Fine in chaos on far gate moving into kind of the architecture choices not a lot. I think that we want to share super publicly on that I think someone one of the software engineers that worked really closely on a afar gate and on e. k.. Aside a couple of them did some really interesting. I thought twitter threads on kind of how we had thought About some of the process so one was a was an under the hood talk on. Aws Far Gate from Konta and owner felice and they talked about basically what happens when you call run task. So what happened under the put on for age owner also did interesting threads on how far gate works works and one of our kind of designed tenants from the beginning is that you need to be able to use your existing tooling so any of your kind of higher level abstractions like Clemens Sir replica sets. They worked fine on top of you cast on far gate and then from what the team has said the next piece of that is what else do we need to do. Too Far Gates to make it work for things like E K S and they talk through some of this at at reinvent but easiest far gate work work in similar ways they get dedicated hardware virtual environments to run on so that means a dedicated in I which is attached the customer. UPC DEDICATED EPHEMERAL storage which base so scratch base and then far gate is what handle setting up all the computer network in storage the next part of it I think is rolls part of it. So how do you do things like capabilities and permissions so e KS and forget uses a profile. The profile includes name the sub nets that you launched that profile in an a pod execution role which is similar to the task execution role in CS and that includes permissions that you basically need to run the pod so for example sample Poland image from NPR or apply labels so this are a couple of the of the things that we thought about building this. The threat was a good. I had read the Fargo under the hood. Talk Hat is on Youtube already. So if you're looking for a deep dive from some of the engineers that worked on this ed I'd recommend giving out of luck all right. Well we'll have to add those as some related links for this episode. The twitter threads shifting back to the point of view of the engineer the software engineer the devops person. Whoever is managing the container infrastructure for an enterprise for a startup and let's assume they're managing urging that container infrastructure on aws? What are the common operational challenges that they're dealing with on a day-to-day basis? Yeah Yeah I operational challenge that people people tend to run into. Is that a lot of the work that goes in when you're setting up a cluster for for the first time or you're just trying to run a single task or a single pod or you're trying to follow the workshops for the documentation is that you know they they kind of end right and that you've you've set it up you've pusher image you've pushed your test finishing pods back. You have your test. Application running on the cluster. And then it feels it's like all the kind of day to operation stuff is is sometimes missing and I feel like that's the biggest challenge right is that with distributed systems and containers come Lots of extra moving pieces and that kind of the first hurdle right is that. How do I monitor and observe scale all of these moving pieces basis in a way that that actually let's benefit from from hobbies containers are working so the first big challenge me? Oh it seems like how do I get the right amount of information about the health and Chow Mein application is doing. And how can I use that to inform choices like scaling and I think that's kind of the big first one that that people think about with the kind of the one and a half thing that that people are thinking about being things like identity in access controls. So how can I make sure that following the principle of least Privileged that all of these pods or tasks or containers or services have just the access that they need to do their job effectively. But without anything else because I think that's been one of the benefits right of of breaking down. All these systems is that I don't have to just have this. Application can do everything. Even if it doesn't need that I have lots of different moving pieces that only have to access kind of the bare minimum. I think implementing that and production can be really challenging. Apache Cassandra is an open source. Distributed database that was first created to meet the scale ability and availability needs of facebook Amazon and Google. In previous episodes of software engineering daily we have covered CASSANDRA's architecture and its benefits..

Cooper Netease aws software engineer Cooper Nettie Kuban Eddie Aws Far Gate Cooper Hannity coober Nettie twitter netease Fargo engineer Amazon Cooper Kuban Amazon E. KS developer diffic US Youtube
"fuller" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"fuller" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"What are customers looking for before we got to reinvent in it's nice closing that loop even more so that the feedback during reinvent feels really targeted cadet like i see you're working on this but what i'd like you to do is tweet this a little bit and bring us this other thing and i found that really interesting and i think it makes it more productive for all of us the one thing this year has really been the increased granularity of what open source means and what the different options are for for ways that companies can be successful in open source or perhaps debates whether it's debates around licensing or what is the definition of open source how religious you wanna get about it it's like whatever your opinion i think that the exploration of all these different ideas is useful useful long-term to the community as a whole yeah you know i think a lot of a lot of what stands out to me for for open source in general it's a community community that you can always get in other ways right that sense of were building this thing as a group that works for all of us were solving similar problems and the challenges were we're building something that that solves ad or i can learn for other people are from other people or i hadn't thought about running it right that way it's a huge benefit of open source for me it's being able to learn and listen to that community night i think that's a lot of why we open source the roadmaps is is we wanted people to feel like they had transparency and visibility in in a community around something that the astronauts had that eddie fuller thank you for coming out software orange daily it's been fun talking to you for having me being on call is hard but having the right tools for the job can make it easier when you wake up in the middle of the night to troubleshoot shoot the database you should be able to have the database monitoring information right in front of you when you're out to dinner and your phone buzzes because your entire application is down you should be able to easily find out who pushed code most recently so that you can contact them and find out how to troubleshoot the issue.

eddie fuller
"fuller" Discussed on The Good News Podcast

The Good News Podcast

04:45 min | 1 year ago

"fuller" Discussed on The Good News Podcast

"I'm calling your host of the good news. podcast the other host the good news podcast is your source for Good News Fun Stories Auditory Delight and Sonic Joy. We're bringing all of this goodness to you from the cards against humanity studios in Chicago one of the most original spirits of our time Buckminster Fuller sings of Man's potency everyone. I'm aware of his work agrees at Buckminster Fuller's one of the original minds of our time. I was born in the era of the specialist. I said about to be purposefully comprehensive. Just this is opposite and I made up my mind that you don't just find out something to entertain yourself. You must find out things in order to be able to turn everything now distant philosophical statement but into actually she tools I Miss Marie organized environment of Man Lines Nineteen twenty. Seven second child was born at that time. I have a certainly a new child after five years going out that much I said I got a chance to look out for this new life and I'm going to have to I think everything I have had absolutely no money under this no child ever own a living. I think this is absolutely blinding thing. I'm are they GONNA say. You're GonNa make you either make money or you make sense. I actually just left a corporate gig and I don't really have much which of a plan right now. I have a little bit of savings and meeting meetings of interesting folks. Here are making making the work that I think needs needs to be maiden that I WANNA make studs. It was people he was people he was of the people and he knew that people had a voice and you didn't have to be Muhammad Ali or Bob Dylan. You could be Johnny at the park. We all have a story one last question. I like this last question. I WanNa see your God. Let's say you're God. You got all power. Okay underworld yeah and you know. What kind of world do you like to see? What kind of world like make you tell it to a fight? If if I can control all the people I will like everybody get along with each other not not in the high nothing to be ashamed of. You know everybody can trust each Cheddar. People can help each other. You know like you have nothing to eat healthy eating. Here's assault on the land. Go by yourself either. We need any money now. This net this goes if if I had to power but the because the have a daughter and I have to nurture her and I think about her a lot in the I think the world that every generation leaves the next generation you WanNa make it better bucky once upon a time you would call strange far out today or accepted as seeing tomorrow the way other men look at yesterday. You still optimistic as you were. The last time we met about prospects for humanity I see the whole of mankind seems to be in a state of Justice John. I think the whole of mankind is about to emerge from a universal womb into belly a new kind of relationship to invest Thanks for listening. Do you have good news incredible or maybe WanNa tell us a joke or idea excellent email us at hello at the good news this podcast dot F. or leave us a voicemail at seven seven three two one seven zero one five six you can also tweet us at the Good News as pad and follow us on instagram too and if you loved good news podcasts think about supporting us on our patriarch in page mustard music is by Paddington bear.

Buckminster Fuller Miss Marie instagram Chicago Paddington Muhammad Ali assault Bob Dylan Johnny Seven second five years