35 Burst results for "Fukushima"

"fukushima" Discussed on Monday Morning Critic Podcast

Monday Morning Critic Podcast

07:23 min | Last month

"fukushima" Discussed on Monday Morning Critic Podcast

"Hi, my name is aiko Fukushima and the U.S. Navy Monday morning critic podcast. You know, I want to talk about, you know, mom is a piano teacher, dad has worked at Yamaha. I mean, I almost feel like you had no choice but to grow up as a musician, right? I mean, you have, you know, it's like you're in this. And how do you know that? I'm surprised that, you know, this my secret, but I try to do my homework. I try to do it amazing. Thank you so much. Thank you so much. So were they like super supportive? Were they, I don't want to say force, right? Because I feel like and another world where parent, like a child who has parents that are like coaches or they're almost create to do this sport. Did you feel like did you feel like if you said no to music, they would have been okay with it? Maybe. No, I didn't know what else to do. It sort of almost. And the place, the city that I grew up was the headquarters. It has a headquarter of Yamaha and the piano maker kawaii and the Suzuki, which makes a bunch of small instruments. Right. Right. So it was very musical. It is very musical city and kids are super competitive to kids and parents are very competitive too. So we had a really great musical education from early on. And everybody was and they had this amazing system that if they're good at the right music, they will send you to they were just a group them and send you to words tour and recordings and all that kind of stuff. So it was very high quality, like we had the high quality education education. Yeah, it sounds like it was pretty serious. Is it kind of good in a sense? Because, you know, being a musician oftentimes can get very expensive. Did you find that your dad's position at Yamaha provided maybe I don't want to say a discount, but you had easier access to instruments? I don't know. Yeah, maybe for the Yamaha, yes, yeah. For the instrument, yes, for sure. It might be my mom had the grand piano and also my husband thinks it's really funny, but Yamaha used to make everything that you can think of they made the bastard and the way they made us. The door. Kitchen system, not just a motorcycle. They made everything. Everything. Yeah, so we went to Yamaha having thoughts for the case to. My parents door. And entering door is still Yamaha. They made a really high quality stuff too. That's furniture. It was the first 18 years of your life in Japan or was it longer? It was a little bit longer. I wanted to university in Japan too. And I came to berklee college of music after I graduated from university. Oh, I didn't know you went to university in Japan. I thought you just went to high school in Japan and the major way over to Boston. I didn't know there was a step in the middle there. There was this guy in the middle that I became very into jazz music when I was in the university, which was. Studying classical music, but I started to be more into jazz music and I was playing too. Classical jazz and you're even in a Latin band, right? Yes. Yes, letting band and we toured and we played for schools. So our. Concert was at the 8 a.m. in front of kids. Wow, wow. How did you like Berkeley? It was really great. I had a really great opportunity to study with artists and residents and I got to know somebody that could teach how to who was composer for Star Trek. At the time. And many other opportunities. So it was really great. I got to compose for orchestra that could have orchestra and I conducted the orchestra at the school and that was really a big opportunity for me and I recorded a music to go to Harry Martin institute, which he does in the existing anymore, but that was a really great opportunity so that I got into it, Henry was an institute as a one of the composers. Yeah, when it comes to training, I feel like you've done everything you can do. There's no other, I feel like there's no other. I mean, we're always learning, right? But I feel like it's huge. When you came over from Japan, any homesickness, did you miss home at all? No, I didn't have time to miss home because I couldn't do really understand what was going on in the class because my English was so limited and I recorded everything. And the only thing that I could think of is that homework for next week because I couldn't catch what was going on. So I just, that was the only thing that I had to make sure to ask some people around me, but they somehow got through the school by studying a lot. And I really didn't have time to miss home because I had a lot to do. So it was very high to catch up. Yeah. Do you think if your major was something you went to another school safe you went to a law school? Do you think the language barrier? Because music is universal. It's like math. Yeah, it's like math. So do you feel like if it was the language barrier would have gotten in your way? Because I feel like that is so tough to go to another country to be fair. It's almost conquer that obstacle in addition to what you're doing in the classroom. That has to be so tough. I go doing that conquering that language barrier. Did you find yourself frustrated on a lot of vacations? Yes, but the you are right that the music really helped because I could play jazz and I was playing piano. So I was jamming with those people that I didn't really know, but I could play I was pretty okay with as an improviser. So I could just join the jam session and there will be like oh cool, cool. Kids, like 18 years old or something older than them. But they kind of accepted me and the respect that maybe because I could play and I could jam with them. So that was really, I really found that music was could be the language that you can communicate with other people, which was surprising to me and very interesting and fascinating to me. That's awesome. How did you come to learn to learn the language? Because that is very difficult. How did you how did you do it? Was it was it research? Was it watching television? I mean, people have all sorts of ways they learn the language. How

Yamaha aiko Fukushima Japan U.S. Navy kawaii Harry Martin institute Suzuki berklee college of music Berkeley Boston Henry
"fukushima" Discussed on Against The Odds

Against The Odds

04:56 min | 3 months ago

"fukushima" Discussed on Against The Odds

"Two, the pressure is spiking one minute and dropping to zero the next. Just thinking about that causes his chest the Titan. He tries to concentrate on one thing at a time. His top priority has to be cooling the cores with water, which means he needs trucks, pumps, generators, whatever it takes. He reaches for the phone on his desk and calls the prime minister's office. When his contact answers, he gets right to the point. We need to bring in the hyper rescue squad. The hyper rescue squad is an elite branch of the Tokyo fire department. The best of the best. The official sounds skeptical. Hyper rescue, we don't have any jurisdiction over them. Besides, it's not really a firefighting problem, or wait. Is it? Do you have fires there? No fires, but we need water. And that's what they do. Pump, water. Our trucks can't supply the volume of water that theirs can, especially if we have to pump water directly from the ocean, which I think is the only way we can save the plant now. I also think yoshida hesitates, he dreads having to make this next request. What? Say it. We should consider bringing in the military. The military, if it's that bad, we'll certainly explore every option, but there's nothing left to explore. We're short on trucks, pumps water, everything. If you don't get us outside help, we're finished. He slams down the phone and discussed, but he's not exactly surprised at the official's reaction to his suggestions. Ever since the phanatic militarism of World War II, the military has been a touchy subject in Japan. There's a skeleton self defense force, but there are taboos against mixing civilian and military affairs, calling in the military would be an unprecedented step. With the hyper rescue squad, the hurdles are more political. Japan is highly bureaucratic, and the prime minister has no direct authority over the hyper rescue squad. But this crisis is unprecedented. Now isn't the time for bureaucracy. If they don't get these reactors cooled and soon, they could explode. The radioactivity would poison the entire middle third of Japan and make it uninhabitable for decades. It's a dizzying thought. Yoshida passed his suit coat for cigarettes. He needs one right now. Maybe two. But when yoshida stands, he suddenly feels lightheaded. He hears a gasp behind him. Someone calls out his name, and he tries to look. But he can't. To his confusion, he slumps against the wall. Before he knows what's happening, he's sliding to the floor in slow motion. Unable to stop. Several people rushed toward him, but everything seems thick in distant, like he's underwater. His eyelids feel like they weigh a hundred pounds each. He tries to rally, he's the man leading the response to the crisis. He can't pass out. But his strength soon fails him. And his eyes fall shut. Yoshida's final thought is there's nothing more he can do. The fate of the plant he thinks. It's now in the hands of Buddha. And the gods. If you like our show, please give us a 5 star rating and review. Follow against the odds on Apple podcasts. Amazon music, the wondery app or wherever you're listening right now. Join one plus in the wondery app. Listen one week early and ad free. In the episode notes, you'll find some links and offers from our sponsors. Please support them. By supporting them, you help us offer the show for free. This is episode three of our four part series meltdown at Fukushima. A quick note about our scenes in most cases we can't exactly know what was said. But everything is based on historical research. If you'd like to learn more about this event, we highly recommend the books meltdown by yuichi funabashi. On the brink by ryujo, ado and station blackout by Charles casto. I'm your host, Mike Corey, Sam Keane wrote this episode. Our editor is Sean Raviv, our audio engineer is Sergio enriquez. Sound design is by rob Sheila. Additional research and script consulting by Simon Campbell, produced by Matt almos, and Emily frost. Our managing producer is tonja thigpen, our senior producer, is Andy Herman. Our executive producers are Jenny Lauer beckman, Stephanie jenz, and Marshall Louis for wondering..

Tokyo fire department yoshida Japan Yoshida confusion yuichi funabashi Charles casto Mike Corey Sam Keane Fukushima Amazon Sean Raviv Apple Sergio enriquez rob Sheila Simon Campbell Matt almos Emily frost tonja thigpen Andy Herman
"fukushima" Discussed on Against The Odds

Against The Odds

08:15 min | 3 months ago

"fukushima" Discussed on Against The Odds

"Superintendent yoshida sits in a video conference room at the ERC. Watching nervously as the upper management of tepco appears on screen. He sees a dozen men in suits seated at a large table in an oak panelled room. Their faces are stern. Yoshida's stomach grumbles when he sees the catered plates of sushi on the table in front of them. He's barely had time to eat all day. Yoshida spots the manager he was speaking with on the phone. Just ten minutes ago before their call cut out. Without even a hello, the manager starts in. Yoshida, I want you to swear that you will not pump any sea water through that reactor. I hear you, sir. I will not give any such orders. Make sure your workers confirm this. Yoshida turns to his head engineer, who's standing a few feet away. Did you hear my order? The engineer walks away without saying a word. Yoshida feels his chest Titan. He hopes this ploy works. Yoshida knew that the tepco managers would forbid him from pumping sea water through the reactor. And he knew they would demand verbal confirmation from his workers that they understood the order too. So, before the video conference, yoshida secretly met with his head engineer and told him not to speak when he was asked to confirm the order. Now, if the engineer is questioned later, he can say he didn't hear what he was being asked. Responsibility for disobeying tepco's order will land squarely on yoshida's shoulders. But the manager in Tokyo isn't so easily fooled. I didn't hear him. Did he confirm? Yoshida chooses his words carefully. When my men hear me, sir, they obey. Now please, and let's get back to work. The manager looks dubious, but not. As yoshida logs off, he feels pangs of guilt. He's given his whole life to tepco. He owes them everything, and he just lied to them. He's going to ruin one of their prized assets, but in his heart. He knows he's doing the right thing. Under a moonless night sky, the firefighter sits behind the wheel of a bulldozer and stares at the tall, razor wire fence blocking his path. His uniform is slick with mud, his ankle throbs, and his hands are raw from lifting chunks of concrete, but there's no time to rest with the bulldozers finally fixed, he and his team are close to clearing a path to the huge pit of water. Now, it's just a matter of tearing down this fence that surrounds it. The firefighter turns to his sergeant, standing about ten yards away. The sergeant raises his muddy hand. Forward. The firefighter puts the bulldozer into gear and takes a deep breath and rumbles ahead. The bulldozer smashes into the fence, leaving a huge dent. Again, harder. The firefighter backs up and revs the engine. He screeches forward again. For the firefighter, tearing down this fence is a surreal experience. He actually helped build it a decade earlier after the 9 11 attacks in the United States. The fence was meant to prevent terrorists from gaining access to the reactors. But no one is worried about terrorists now. After the explosion and building one, the top priority is to get water pumping through the reactor as soon as possible. The bulldozer keeps slamming relentlessly until the fence is finally approved. The firefighter hops down and attaches a chain to the fence, so he can drag it out of the way. If all goes well, within an hour, they'll finally have water flowing through the reactor again. At dawn on March 13th, ikuo izawa enters the emergency response center building. It's the first time he's been out of the control room in almost two days. He feels overwhelmed by the destruction he saw around the plant, as he drove his truck here from the control room. He's also feeling tense, it's a relief to finally have some water flowing through reactor one, but the pit behind building three is only so large. That water will last a day, tops, at which point they'll have to find another source. Izawa walks down a long hallway, tiptoeing around dozens of exhausted workers sleeping on mats. Most are curled up in blankets with their feet peeking out of the bottom. Several are snoring. He steps into the ERC's main room, where superintendent yoshida sees him and waves him over. Izawa is stunned by how fresh and alert he looks. I'm glad you came. I need your help. Yoshida explains that he's been talking to the supervisor in another control room, who runs reactor three. Unlike reactor one, reactor three did have a functioning water pump, running on his own backup generator. But now, I'm not generator has failed. Yoshida wants to know whether the same cascade of events that doomed reactor building one might now happen in building three. Izawa are we headed for another explosion? Izawa can't say for sure, but he knows it's a possibility. Yoshida scratches his head. If we could get power to the safety release valves and reactor three, at least we should be able to keep venting the steam. What if we rigged up some car batteries? We've been using bus batteries to run our control panel. Good idea. Let's add that to this list. After a few minutes of brainstorming, izawa pauses for a moment and takes a deep breath. There's something else I want to say. Thank you for allowing the junior staff to evacuate to the ERC. Izawa meant it when he told his young engineers they had a duty to remain in the control room and protect the plant. But after the explosion, he decided to evacuate them to the ERC, where he knows they'll be safer. Yoshida Nas as he looks izawa in the eye. How are you holding up? I think you managers need to take turns getting some rest. But we can't. There's too much to monitor and do you have any idea how terrible you look izawa. I've seen bodies at funerals that look more alive than you. If you won't take rest voluntarily, I'll have to order it. Izawa nods, but on the inside, he can't imagine taking a break. Not when the plant is still on the verge. Of a meltdown. A staff electrician stands in several inches of water in the parking lot at the Fukushima plant. He's staring at his car or what remains of it. The low morning sun illuminates the smashed back window, broken mirrors, and dented sides. The steering wheel is draped in seaweed. A colleague next to him pats him on the back. Come on, let's pop the hood. The electrician holds up his car key and presses a button. Amazingly, the car unlocks. The plant managers have asked everyone to donate their car batteries. After the explosion in reactor building one, they want to open up the safety release valves on reactors two and three to release the steam, building up in their cooling systems. To do that, they'll need power from roughly 20 car batteries. The electrician opens the mangled door of his car and pulls a lever under the dash to pop the hood. His colleague lifts up the hood and starts to laugh. What's so funny? The electrician circles around to the front and sees a half dozen starfish in the engine block. He supposes it is funny in a way, but he loved this car. Once they've harvested his battery and loaded it onto a cart, the electrician turns to his colleague. Okay, where's your car? But his colleague shakes his head. I'm not giving my battery up. But we have orders. No,.

Yoshida Izawa tepco yoshida ERC Superintendent yoshida izawa ikuo izawa superintendent yoshida Titan Tokyo Yoshida Nas United States Fukushima plant
"fukushima" Discussed on Against The Odds

Against The Odds

07:46 min | 3 months ago

"fukushima" Discussed on Against The Odds

"Can't see anything. There was an explosion in reactor building one. Yoshida hears izawa swear on the other end of the line. He asked yoshida to describe exactly what he's seeing. He wants to know if the whole building is damaged or just the top story. Yoshida looks more closely. Just the top story okay. Then it was probably a hydrogen explosion. Izawa quickly explains to his boss what probably happened. When the water and the reactor cores tank boiled away, it turned into steam. That steam reacted with a zirconium that coats the uranium fuel rods and produced hydrogen gas, which leaked out of the reactor. Hydrogen molecules are lighter than air, so when hydrogen leaks, it rises. In this case, the hydrogen gas must have risen to the top story. There, something ignited the gas, probably an electrical short, and it exploded, blowing a hole in the roof of the reactor building. Yoshida has one question. Do you think the reactor cores damaged? Are the fuel rods exposed? I don't know. But we'll check our instruments. Yoshida tells him to hurry and hangs up. Then he pulls aside his head engineer. How are the plans coming for pumping sea water? Not good. The fire truck pumps aren't strong enough to pull water from the ocean. The hoses aren't long enough either. We need a source of water on site. Yoshida tells the engineer to start reviewing the video feeds from around the plant, with all the flooding from the tsunami. There's got to be seawater somewhere. A few hours after the explosion, a firefighter hobbles over a pile of debris behind reactor building three. He moves with a limp. He fell and twisted his ankle last night, and he feels lightheaded from a lack of sleep. He's been up all night, helping pump water into reactor one. But now all their fire hydrants are running dry. They need to find another water source. From the top of the debris pile, the firefighter looks down and smiles. He calls over his shoulder to his sergeant. Sir, I think I just found our water. The sergeant clamors up the pile and stands next to him. Together, they look down at their prize, a huge pit, 200 feet long, 20 feet wide, and 30 feet deep, and it's filled to the brim with water from the tsunami. The sergeant claps the firefighter on the back. We're back in business. It's seawater though. Won't that corrode the pipes? The bosses say it's okay. Come on. Let's go get the trucks. But as they turn back, they see what lies between them and the fire trucks. Tons of rubble and debris, plus a huge reinforced fence. There's no way the trucks will get through. The firefighter turns to the sergeant. Can we use the bulldozers? All being repaired. The tsunami damaged every single one will have to start clearing this debris by hand. The firefighter's size, his muscles ache with exhaustion. His ankle throbs, and he's desperate for sleep. But he climbs back down the debris pile and joins the rest of his crew, as they start clearing a path to the water pit. Plant superintendent yoshida glances at the giant television in the ERC. It's a news station showing images of the smoldering crater atop reactor building one. He shakes his head in disgust. He sure the explosion never would have happened if they'd been able to vent steam sooner and reduce pressure inside the reactor. But they had to wait for the prime minister's office to evacuate the surrounding area and the government bureaucrats took too long. Thankfully, the reactor core is still intact, but the loss of the building's roof has increased the risk of a radiation leak. There are pools of water on the top floor that contain old nuclear fuel rods, which are still radioactive. The explosion expose those pools to the open air. If the water in those pools starts to leak, or evaporate, the spent fuel rods could overheat and spew radioactivity into the air. Yoshida is anxiously waiting for an update from the firefighters. There's still trying to clear a path for their trucks so they can start pumping seawater through the reactor. When his phone rings, he pounces on it. But instead of the fire chief, he hears a manager from the Tokyo electric power company, tepco, the corporation that owns the plant. What's this I hear about pumping sea water through the reactor? Yoshida starts to explain about the explosion, but the manager cuts him off. If you corrode the pipes with seawater, that could cause long-term damage, we'd never be able to get the reactor back online. Do you have any idea how much that would cost? Yoshida closes his eyes in frustration. That's all the people at tepco seem to care about, losing money. They clearly don't grasp how bad things are getting, or how much worse they could get. But reactor one needs water now. It's already overheating, and our water systems, they're completely down. How else are we going to cool down the core? Figure something out, but under no circumstance. Suddenly, the line goes dead. It's not surprising. Communication outside the plant has been iffy since the tsunami. But it's a stroke of luck for yoshida. It's bought him a few precious minutes to think. His first impulse is to tell the tepco managers to go to hell. While they're sitting in their luxury offices, offering no solutions, he's the one working to save this damn plant, and seawater is their only option. But after a moment's thought, he realizes that he can't do that. If he openly refuses to obey, they'll just fire him and replace him with someone more compliant. Somehow, he needs to figure out a way to do both. Placate his bosses in Tokyo and save the plant from ruin. And he's got to figure it out fast because every minute that passes, increases the risk of a worse case scenario. Total meltdown. And there it is, the sound of another sale on Shopify, the all in one commerce platform to start, run, and grow your business. And listen up, if you're a business owner, upstart startup, already been at it for years, Shopify is gonna make your life so much easier because Shopify is more than just a store. You can connect with your customers, drive sales, and manage your day to today effortlessly. Shopify instantly lets you accept all major payment methods, and they've got thousands of integrations and third party apps from on demand printing to accounting to advanced chatbots and beyond. Plus, you'll gain insights as you grow, with detailed reporting of conversion rates, profit margins, and beyond. Shopify believes in liberating commerce for all, because entrepreneurship has the power to drive communities forward and commerce can be a force for good. That's why they power millions of businesses from first sale to full scale. Go to Shopify dot com slash the odds all lower case for a free 14 day trial and get full access to Shopify's entire suite of features. 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Yoshida tsunami yoshida izawa Izawa tepco ERC Shopify Sir Tokyo
"fukushima" Discussed on Against The Odds

Against The Odds

08:47 min | 3 months ago

"fukushima" Discussed on Against The Odds

"Since you're listening to this show, I think it's safe to say you love listening to podcasts, right? Well, you'll find a ton of binge worthy podcasts on Amazon music. Amazon music has millions of free podcast episodes to listen to plus music stations and playlists. If you want your music on demand and ad free, you have to try Amazon music unlimited, where you can listen to any song anywhere, offline with unlimited skips. For a limited time, new customers can try Amazon music unlimited free for 30 days. Just go to Amazon.com slash wondery. That's Amazon.com slash wondery to try Amazon music unlimited free for 30 days. Amazon.com slash wondery. Renews automatically cancel anytime, terms apply. On a cold morning in Indianapolis, Toni Carissa woke up, loaded his shotgun and drove to his bank, he wasn't there to steal anything. He was there to take his life back. American hostage tells the true story of one man who channeled the rage of a nation and took justice into his own hands. Follow American hostage wherever you get your podcasts, or you can binge all 8 episodes right now on Amazon music. Inside the emergency response center, plant superintendent, masao yoshida, summons an engineer to his desk. How exactly did you do it? It was my team. They're the ones that deserve the credit. The engineer explains just minutes ago, his team was able to improvise away to vent steam from reactor one. They jury rigged an industrial air compressor with some spare parts from other machines. Then they blew enough air through the building's ventilation system to force event to pop open. Steam came pouring out of the vent, the same thick white smoke that you see that had seen earlier. It was actually a good sign, not a bad one. Now they can continue to vent steam and reduce pressure inside reactor one without sending anyone into the building. Yoshida is relieved to hear that a cool izawa called off his latest suicide team, even before they knew what was causing the white smoke. Yoshida congratulates the engineer. You've bought us some valuable time. Tell me, how long will the compressor keep working? A day? Two. The engineers expression changes from proud to sheepish. More like a few hours. The engineer explains that parts of the setup are literally held together with duct tape. It's a temporary fix. They need to find a solution with more staying power, and yoshida thinks he might have one. He's been playing around with a radical idea all morning. He looks hard at the engineer. Don't tell anyone, but I'm considering pumping sea water through the reactor. The engineers eyes go wide, seawater. No, you can't. The salt will lead through. I know. I know. But we need to cool the reactor. Just drop some plants. The engineer leaves looking shaken, and yoshida understands why. Seawater is corrosive and could severely damage the reactor. It might never run again, which would cost the power company billions of dollars. But a meltdown would be far worse. Fukushima has 6 reactors, and if one of those reactors melts down, it could threaten the entire plant. Not to mention, the entire surrounding region. If one reactor has to be sacrificed to prevent that catastrophe, so be it. Inside the control room, katsuaki, hirano, studies a gauge on the instrument panel. He jots down a reading, then walks over to a new gauge, stepping over the mess of wires from the bus batteries that are still powering everything. The readings from reactor one are bad, but at least they're holding steady. He turns to report to his supervisor izawa, but before he can speak, a young engineer approaches a nervous expression etched onto his face. Mystery zawa, I was wondering if I could speak to you in private? Izawa shoots her on a look. Anything you want to say to me? You can say in front of everyone. The young man glances around nervously and takes a deep breath. Some of the junior staff feel useless. There's not enough work for us. You're monitoring the gauges and helping rewire them. That doesn't take a dozen people, and the radiation here, it's rising. We want to evacuate to the ERC, where it's safer. Hirano is shocked. Every worker here has pledged to do their jobs and keep the region safe. How can they even think about abandoning their duty, especially now in the midst of a crisis? He sees that izawa looks equally stricken. You want to abandon the control room? Not abandon. You can always call us back. Hirano looks at his zawa, wondering what he'll say. He understands the young man's fear, but fear doesn't override duty. To hirano's surprise, a tear streaks down his eyes face. Then another izawa has always been a model of composure, but now he's breaking down in front of his team. Hirano steps forward to shield izawa from the gaze of the others in the room. He understands why izawa is distraught, but he also doesn't want him to lose face. Hirano feels anger well up inside of him. How dare the junior staff abandon their leader at a time like this, he's about to tear into them when he feels a hand on his shoulder. It's izawa. His face is still streaked with tears, but he's also smiling. He steps forward to address the whole room. I've decided to stay at the plant until the end. Even if it means dying. But I have no intention of ordering anyone else to stay against their will. All I ask is that before you go, please think. I know you're scared. We all are, but young and old alike, we have a duty to protect the plant. And more than that, to protect the people of this area and the nation. They've put their faith in us, please. To not break that faith. By the end, hirano is also teary eyed. He hasn't wanted to admit it, but he's scared, too. Part of him wishes he'd stayed home after the earthquake instead of risking his life to come here. But he's moved by izawa plea for the greater good. Hirano sees that a few members of the junior staff are weeping as well. Isaah looks at them. Still smiling. So, as I said, you're free to go. But not a single person moves. As everyone returns to work, hirano turns to izawa. I would have screamed at them. Probably made everything worse. You struck just the right tone. Thank you, but I fear people are nearing their breaking points. You might be right. I. Suddenly, a huge noise rocks the room. So loud, it feels like a physical below. Toronto tumbles to the floor. Ceiling panels and fluorescent bulbs crashed down around him. Everyone looks around, stunned. Hirano's first thought is that another earthquake hit. But that didn't feel like a quake. There was no slow build up. It was just bam. It was even sharper than the tsunami, and much louder. Inside the windowless control room, it's impossible to know for sure what happened. But whatever it was, it can't be good. Inside the emergency response center, superintendent yoshida stands frozen, holding a bottle of water halfway to his lips. Seconds ago, a huge explosion shook the entire ERC. Now, everyone stands motionless, staring in horror out the window that faces reactor building one. Instead of the white vapor of venting steam, they now see the black smoke of a raging fire. Yoshida's phone rings, he puts his bottle down and hears izawa in the control room. What was that bang? We.

izawa Amazon Hirano hirano Toni Carissa Yoshida emergency response center masao yoshida yoshida katsuaki Izawa Indianapolis Fukushima ERC earthquake superintendent yoshida Toronto
"fukushima" Discussed on Against The Odds

Against The Odds

03:28 min | 3 months ago

"fukushima" Discussed on Against The Odds

"He cool is our and his team of engineers huddle around a table, pouring over blueprints of the Fukushima nuclear power plant. It's been 24 hours since a massive earthquake and tsunami struck the plant. Izawa was mood, his grim. The tsunami knocked out power to the systems that keep the reactors cool. The water inside those systems has been boiling into steam, causing dangerous pressure to build. A few hours ago, izawa sent two teams of engineers into reactor building one. They were supposed to open two vents, which would release that pressure. The first team succeeded in opening one of the vents, but as the second team got closer to the other vent, the radiation levels around them were off the charts, and they had to turn back. Ever since then, izawa and his engineers have been racking their brains for another way to lower the pressure in the reactor. Izawa rubs his eyes and exhaustion. He's running out of ideas. Then he hears a voice behind him. Let me go. I know exactly where that valve on the basement is. He turns to see one of the younger engineers, a man named kazuhiro. He's our size. The radiation is too intense. Even three minutes in there could be lethal. I can do it in two. I used to run track. Izawa stares at him in disbelief, even if kazuhiro is a fast runner, sending him into that building would be insane. What if it's stuck? If it's stuck, I'll dash back, and I won't go alone. Sato agreed to come. Sato is another young engineer on the team who went to school with kazuhiro. He's a great athlete, even faster than me. This isn't some track meet. You have a better idea? Izawa lowers his head and falls silent for a moment. Then he looks into the eyes of the two young volunteers. Two minutes, not one second more. Okay? Kazuhiro and Sato start warming up. They stretch their legs and do jumping jacks. They joke with each other about who's going to run faster. It pains izawa to see how carefree the two young men are, as they prepare to put their lives on the line. Kazuhiro and Sato pull on their anti radiation suits, zip into their silver flame proof coveralls, and adjust their breathing tanks. As izawa watches them, he considers calling it all off. It's the biggest sacrifice he's ever asked of his employees, risking their lives to save the plant. If not the entire Fukushima region. When they're finally ready, izawa puts on a brave smile. And sends them off. Run fast. A minute later, the phone rings on his desk. Its plant superintendent, massau, yoshida, in the ERC, the emergency response center. What's that smoke coming from reactor building one? What smoke? There's no windows where I am. I can't see anything. Well, I can, and there's white smoke pouring from building one. What's going on? Izawa drops the phone and stands up. Someone stopped those two. Deputy supervisor, noboru homa, perhaps a flashlight in face mask and takes off running. Izawa has no idea what's going on in building one, but he just hopes he hasn't sent two men to their deaths..

Izawa izawa kazuhiro Sato Kazuhiro tsunami earthquake massau emergency response center Fukushima yoshida ERC noboru homa
"fukushima" Discussed on Against The Odds

Against The Odds

04:35 min | 4 months ago

"fukushima" Discussed on Against The Odds

"Superintendent yoshida stomps down a hallway in the emergency response center, nearly foaming with rage. Of all the crap he's had to deal with from the government, this is the worst. The prime minister himself now tolkan has just landed at the plant in his helicopter. Khan is claiming he needs to see the crisis at the plant firsthand in order to understand it. But yoshida suspects that the prime minister is just coming here for a photo opportunity, so he can look brave for the media. Yoshida reaches a conference room and throws open the door. When he sees Khan, yoshida's blood starts boiling. Khan is wearing a protective suit labeled Fukushima. Yoshida specifically told the prime minister's office to bring their own gear since Fukushima doesn't have enough suits to spare. But they ignored him. Before he does anything rash, yoshida takes a deep breath. Khan is still the prime minister. He deserves respect. And the man has a terrible temper. Yelling at him might backfire. Yoshida has to be smart. Khan sees yoshida and starts berating him without even a hello. What the hell's going on? We lost power. My men are working in the dark and dangerous. Why the hell haven't you vented yet? We're preparing a suicide team for that very mission. At the words, suicide team, Khan looks shocked and stopped speaking. Yoshida takes advantage of the silence to finish explaining the work the engineers have done so far. Khan seems to listen, but at the end, he returns to his original question. So why haven't you vented? What's stopping you? To be candid, it's because your office screwed up. That can't be. What do you mean? Yoshida explains about the evacuation orders. He wanted 6 miles, but the prime minister's office insisted on 12, which takes longer. Worse, the office didn't get around to issuing an evacuation order until 5 45 a.m., 5 hours after yoshida made his case. In fact, sir, I believe there are several towns that haven't even started evacuating, because you haven't signed the orders. What the hell are you talking about? I signed all the orders before we came here. At this cons aid clears his throat and nervously produces an evacuation order. He apologizes and explains that he's been trying to get the prime minister's attention to sign it for an hour. Khan looks furious again. He snaps his fingers, demanding a pen, and scribbles his signature. Then he stands and looks at yoshida. Thank you for your hospitality. You're welcome. Now, if you'll excuse me, I need to work. Yoshida Bao slightly to the prime minister. Then turns and leaves. He can sense Khan's angry stare, burning into his back as he goes. But yoshida can't worry about that now, with the evacuation orders squared away, he needs to alert his workers in the control room to prepare for venting. He just hopes they haven't waited too long, and it isn't already too late. The Shopify is the all in one commerce platform to start, run and grow your business. Every 28 seconds, an entrepreneur like you makes their first sale on Shopify. Entrepreneurs love Shopify because it gives them the resources that were for a long time. Only reserved for big business. That way, upstarts, startups, and established businesses can sell everywhere. Synchronize online and in person sales and effortlessly stay informed. You can reach customers online and across social networks with an ever growing suite of channel integrations and apps. Like Facebook, Instagram, TikTok, Pinterest, and more. Plus, you'll gain insights as you grow with detailed reporting of conversion rates, profit margins, and beyond. This is possibility, powered by Shopify. Go to Shopify dot com slash the odds, all lower case for a free 14 day trial, and get full access to Shopify's entire suite of features. Grow your business with Shopify today. Go to Shopify dot com slash the odds. Right now. One more time, that Shopify.

Khan yoshida Yoshida Superintendent yoshida tolkan Fukushima Yoshida Bao government TikTok Instagram Pinterest Facebook Shopify
"fukushima" Discussed on Against The Odds

Against The Odds

05:23 min | 4 months ago

"fukushima" Discussed on Against The Odds

"On the afternoon of March 11th, 2011, a giant undersea earthquake sent a tsunami racing toward the east coast of Japan. The 43 foot surge of seawater flooded the Fukushima nuclear power plant, knocking out the electricity and destroying vital equipment. That evening, the plant's engineers began scrambling to get water flowing through the reactors as quickly as possible. That water would help cool the reactor core, where a cluster of uranium rods was undergoing the process of fission without water to cool them, the rods would overheat and melt down, releasing.

undersea earthquake east coast Japan
"fukushima" Discussed on Against The Odds

Against The Odds

02:58 min | 4 months ago

"fukushima" Discussed on Against The Odds

"Is just beginning. Ikuo izawa stands in the darkness of the control room, flipping through the reactor's manuals with a flashlight. He needs to figure out why the backup generators cut out, but so far, he can't solve the mystery. Before they lost power, he sent two teams to the reactor buildings to check on the backup generators. Maybe they'll have an answer when they return. Suddenly, the door of the control room bursts open. It's the two teams, including engineer, Massa mitsu iga. Iga steps forward. We're screwed, screwed. What do you mean? Is that what points his flashlight toward iga and is startled to see that he's soaking wet. In fact, all four men are waterlogged. Why are you wet? There's water everywhere. In the reactor buildings, is there a leaky pipe? No. It's seawater. We nearly drowned and the basement of building one must be flooded. The other team has building two is the same way. It takes izawa moment to realize the full impact of what iga is saying. If the basements are flooded, then the backup generators are underwater and out of commission. Only one thing could flood the basements with seawater. A tsunami. At first izawa can't believe it, the plant is up too high. But then he looks again at iga and the others, standing there completely soaked. It's all the proof he needs. He can feel the worry in the room, emanating from his men. He and his team have run hundreds of drills on dozens of different emergencies, but every single scenario relied on the backup generators. What are they going to do without them? In the darkness, he hears a voice by his side. It's his deputy supervisor, noboru homa. Sir? Yes. Is this where someone yells freeze? Izawa is startled for a moment. Then starts to laugh. The rest of the control room does too. This whole situation seems like something those drill instructors would dream up. It's also absurd. How can a nuclear power plant not have power? When the laughter subsides, izawa takes a quick survey of where things stand. Without power, he has no idea what's happening inside the reactor course. Even worse, they can't cool the reactors. This is no drill. Isawa needs to find a new source of power fast. Because if he can't, and the reactors start overheating. Well, he doesn't even want to think about that..

Ikuo izawa Massa mitsu izawa iga noboru homa Izawa tsunami Sir Isawa
"fukushima" Discussed on Against The Odds

Against The Odds

02:43 min | 4 months ago

"fukushima" Discussed on Against The Odds

Experts to visit Fukushima plant to check water release plan

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 6 months ago

Experts to visit Fukushima plant to check water release plan

"Experts experts experts experts from from from from the the the the international international international international atomic atomic atomic atomic energy energy energy energy agency agency agency agency will will will will visit visit visit visit Japan's Japan's Japan's Japan's wrecked wrecked wrecked wrecked Fukushima Fukushima Fukushima Fukushima nuclear nuclear nuclear nuclear power power power power plant plant plant plant next next next next week week week week to to to to review review review review plans plans plans plans to to to to begin begin begin begin releasing releasing releasing releasing more more more more than than than than a a a a million million million million tons tons tons tons of of of of treated treated treated treated radioactive radioactive radioactive radioactive water water water water into into into into the the the the sea sea sea sea the the the government government government hopes hopes hopes the the the mission mission mission will will will assure assure assure people people people of of of the the the safety safety safety of of of the the the release release release is is is expected expected expected to to to take take take decades decades decades to to to finish finish finish the the the war war war has has has been been been stored stored stored in in in about about about one one one thousand thousand thousand tanks tanks tanks at at at the the the plant plant plant these these these need need need to to to be be be removed removed removed to to to allow allow allow for for for the the the plant's plant's plant's decommissioning decommissioning decommissioning a a a massive massive massive earthquake earthquake earthquake and and and tsunami tsunami tsunami in in in twenty twenty twenty eleven eleven eleven destroyed destroyed destroyed the the the cooling cooling cooling systems systems systems triggering triggering triggering the the the meltdown meltdown meltdown of of of three three three reactors reactors reactors and and and the the the release release release of of of large large large amounts amounts amounts of of of radiation radiation radiation water water water used used used to to to cool cool cool the the the reactor reactor reactor cools cools cools who who who since since since leaked leaked leaked extensively extensively extensively the the the plan plan plan however however however has has has been been been fiercely fiercely fiercely opposed opposed opposed by by by fishermen fishermen fishermen local local local residents residents residents and and and Japan's Japan's Japan's neighbors neighbors neighbors including including including China China China and and and South South South Korea Korea Korea I'm I'm I'm Charles Charles Charles last last last month month month

Japan International International In Fukushima Fukushima Fukushima The Sea Sea Sea Sea Government Government Governme Mission Mission Mission Earthquake Earthquake Earthqua Tsunami Tsunami Tsunami China South South South Korea Korea Charles Charles Charles
IAEA Sends Experts to Japan to Review Fukushima Water Release Plan

UN News

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

IAEA Sends Experts to Japan to Review Fukushima Water Release Plan

"The international atomic energy agency. I a and japan have agreed on thursday to a time line on monitoring the treated water to be released from the fukami shot chai nuclear power. Plant an i. E. eighteen met with senior officials in japan to officially launch a review process of the water that became contaminated with radioactive elements after an earthquake and soon nami in twenty eleven. The first in a series of visits to monitor the treated water. That will be released in. Twenty twenty three is part of a es commitment to keep the process under observation before during and after the water discharge the i a special task force for water. Disposal will meet in the coming weeks to prepare the reviews. I chief rafael marianna. Welcome japan's invitation to conduct the first technical review by the end of the year

Japan International Atomic Energy Ag Earthquake Rafael Marianna
Queen Elizabeth II to Attend Un Climate Change Conference

AP 24 Hour News

00:57 sec | 1 year ago

Queen Elizabeth II to Attend Un Climate Change Conference

"Queen Elizabeth will be at the U. N climate Change conference in November. Senior official Alex Chama who's president of the Cop 26 Conference, says he's absolutely delighted. The queen will be at the event which is due to be held in Glasgow from November. The first of the 12. Details of the monarch schedule, though, have not yet been released. World leaders, climate campaigners and activists from around the world are due to attend the talks, which were postponed for a year because of the pandemic. The host British Prime Minister Boris Johnson. Hopes to secure emissions cutting commitments to limit global temperature rises to 1.5 degrees Celsius compared with pre industrial times. Charles Tu la Decima London The U. N also says too little is known about melted fuel inside damaged reactors at the wrecked Fukushima nuclear plant in Japan a decade after the disaster. To be able to tell if Decommissioning can be finished. By

Alex Chama Queen Elizabeth U. Glasgow Charles Tu La Decima Boris Johnson London Japan
"fukushima" Discussed on More than Abstract

More than Abstract

05:22 min | 1 year ago

"fukushima" Discussed on More than Abstract

"I know there's a new radio. God it's a ton of bananas has a ton of bananas so the cleanup effort is still going on to this day. They've been able to clean up reactor three and i think to one is i. Don't i don't think i've heard anything about one. And all this started an anti nuclear movement in japan which is very understandable. Yeah i mean very understandable. Sure fool me once. Shame on need. Fool me twice. Don't put that new here. Yeah yeah. Right i guess. Generally i feel like nuclear power usually. It's pretty safe. But when people like have stories like i was thrown out of my home because there was a power play that there was a soon nami and stuff like that. It's kinda hard to argue with that it is. I think that a flip side to that argument though is if you're going to build a nuclear power plant don't make it beachfront. Just don't make a beachfront. Yeah just don't just don't make don't make a beachfront. You can have a destination there. You don't need to have a power plant atta here. Put a resort better be good business moguls and put a resort on the beach. Let them look at the seawall. Don't put a nuclear power plant there. See that's the thing that i'm scared of the great lakes in michigan there are nuclear power plants like on the shoreline. Oh like on the short line. I been to a nuclear power. Plant was like a mile away from lake michigan which mile sounds like a lot but the fact that but the fact that i can run a mile means it is not a very big distance right and like we get a lot of rain here. A lot of rain and snow like that could flood happen. We won't get you know salamis in the great lakes but like we get flooding like crazy. May maybe once that happens in michigan's pretty flat so like it'll get to the power plant if it does go maybe maybe they can start putting sandbags around the power. Plant like to save their homes. There's that good thing. We have a lot of sand here too quick. Just dig a hole okay. So that is the short version of the story behind the nuclear. The fukushima daiichi nuclear disaster. So what do you think. I think that we have established economically. You can be a middle child of two. that's insane. Lake both sounds horrible and not horrible all at the same time like the reactor flip-flopped right. It was bad it was good. It was bad it was good. It was really bad. It's kinda okay but the lasting impacts. They're still cleaning it up. It's been ten years. Yeah also side note. What is the half-life of the radiation was in the reactor. Oh like i didn't even think about that but like what's the half life on that because maybe you know maybe we should be more concerned about. If the half life of the radioactive material that was released in that steam is like a couple hundred years. that's bad half-life. Okay this is actually the thing. I will explain it. Half life is the amount of time that expires before half of the radioactive material is present. So if you think of it like an apple right the half life is how long it takes for half of the apple to decay. Believe it out in your counter. How much how. Much time elapsed before shrinks down or somebody takes a couple of bites out of seventy comes by just like there's an apple i guess he did exactly another half and the scary thing about that is if you think about it. If you keep dividing something in half it never goes to zero. It just keeps dividing in half and gets really really small and eventually you just call it zero. That's basically what it is. Yeah but in. The context of radiation started.

michigan lake michigan japan apple
"fukushima" Discussed on More than Abstract

More than Abstract

05:36 min | 1 year ago

"fukushima" Discussed on More than Abstract

"I don't know if i should be afraid or not afraid of happened. I'm getting so many mixed signals. Is it a banana. Is it ten bananas. Were how many bananas worth of radiation was i potentially exposed to. I mean look it up very little the minimum value. That's detectable this chart. So a lot of bananas worth of radiation. Potentially it was really sparsely spread out like it covered most north america most of the north pacific and parts of russia as well very sports so i i wouldn't be too worried but you probably didn't but a kind of blanketed everything. Yeah a lot. So we've been focusing on reactor one this whole time just because it was the most intense part just like when people talk about chernobyl. They're talking about reactor for and nothing but the rest that were just doing. Just fine until the fourth was throwing tantrum but reactors two and three were still a problem in in fukushima while about seventy percent of reactor ones fuel meltdown. Only thirty three percent of twos melted down and three was still dangerous. Precipice of meltdown. But it was that bad yet so reactor to treatment where they also events team and they use generators to pump more water into that rectors four five and six were all well behaved so good on them and were those day each year dany reactors two of them were dying. The other one was just I guess it was also being revealed. Of course they were dating danish just so well behaved all the time. Why don't they just leave mom. And now a daft of the earthquake. A whole bunch of radioactive material now the evacuation zone around the daiichi plant is ten kilometers out significantly bigger..

north pacific north america russia fukushima dany earthquake daiichi plant
"fukushima" Discussed on More than Abstract

More than Abstract

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"fukushima" Discussed on More than Abstract

"Line starts three years prior to the accident in two thousand eight. Apparently the power company that runs fukushima. It's called tepco. They made a report that was like if we get a really bad earthquake nearby. They took the example of an earthquake. That happened about one hundred years ago. Then as army could be big enough to impact the power and gaza much damage but they didn't really submit this report to any regulatory bodies since. It's really unlikely that would happen since it was one hundred years ago and it wasn't really it hasn't been anything that was going to say. It kind of sounds like one of those of pigs fly if pigs. Laser beam is suddenly take to the skies like my house is not very safe. Well yeah that's true but like pigs with laser beam is flying through this. come on. just wait till the next episode bigs would later reunite kate i say we scrapped this. Hold nuclear power plant. And you just tell me about pigs with laser is all right so so people just went on with their day. maybe big Will come by when people get radioactive or something. So that's what's insure noble. Then the day of the earthquake hit it was march eleventh. Two thousand eleven to forty six pm so just a regular time of day..

tepco fukushima earthquake gaza army kate
"fukushima" Discussed on The Highwire with Del Bigtree

The Highwire with Del Bigtree

07:45 min | 1 year ago

"fukushima" Discussed on The Highwire with Del Bigtree

"Twenty eleven japan was hit by nine point. one earthquake. That was the biggest biggest earthquake. Ever in japan resulted in a su- nami thirty foot. Waves washed over Parts of the country including fukushima where there was a a power plant in the in the prefecture there that power plant suffered three reactor meltdowns explosions. There's incredible video of this and That's been an ongoing environmental disaster. Since twenty eleven they can with your noble in all the way back in two thousand eleven. It's time goes by so quick. So it's coming back around in the news again. As always has over the last years and what that looks like is japan is planning announced a plan to dump the waste water from the wrecked fukushima nuclear plant into the pacific ocean so the plant's operator tokyo electric power company. Tepco they said by next summer they're going to run out of room for the tanks. They're building to store what they consider about. One point two million tons of this wastewater. This is contaminated wastewater. So obviously this isn't gonna go over big for a lot of people around the globe so It's estimated a german marine research institute. Estimated that it's gonna take about fifty seven days for this stuff to get throughout the pacific ocean so it's gonna move pretty quick japan's got another problem on its hands though. The olympics is starting in july end of july. And this this topic is clouding. The olympic games And the the start of the olympic games. So it's a cascade of calamities. That's what the headlines are saying plagues tokyo olympic ambitions. Now there's a lot of pushback with in japan. So no leaders are fully supporting this so with in fukushima prefecture. There's none of the local district leaders are supporting this. This this plan by the central government to dump this wastewater not a single local government leader Even the us Seventy us groups are condemning this now. These are nonprofit groups And we'll get to the. Us government response in a second but There's a headline here says seventy us. Civic groups condemn fukushima water release. These groups like greenpeace The manhattan project for a nuclear free world and others and they wrote and they said quote the contaminated water stored at the fukushima daiichi is fundamentally different from the water coming from a nuclear power plant during regular operation. They said the contaminated water at the fukushima daddy. Nuclear plant was highly radioactive because it was used a cool the highly radioactive melted cores of at least four nuclear reactors at the plant where the loss of their cooling pats capabilities. 'cause meltdowns in march eleventh. Twenty eleven sorry so this is a gigantic issue. And it's also people are looking at it through legal perspective too so japan by doing this by announcing they're gonna do this The legal case against japan's fukushima wastewater decision it would violate japan's legal environment obligations obviously ignoring human rights It would violate maritime law. A huge issues with this. But here's the interesting thing We have We have countries like north korea. China russia south korea taiwan all opposing. This very vocally. And here's one of the headlines. Out of china it says that china china dares japanese officials to drink fukushima. Wastewater this is. This reminds me when the lobbyists from monsanto said glyphosate so safe you can drink. You can drink it. And he was offered a cup on live on air and he refused it so The the chinese foreign ministry A spokesperson said if this water so safe why don't they drink it. why don't they. Why don't they cook their food meals in it. So it's kind of interesting but now let's go to the us response. Because here's here's a real head scratcher. When i was doing the research. Us backs japan's plan to release radioactive water. For fukushima despite pushback from south korea china russia. the us. There's a united nations convention on the law of the sea. it's an international treaty. Signed on by one hundred sixty countries the. Us is not signed onto that. Because i'm sitting here looking for reasons. Why would the us not join these countries in opposing. This and i was looking for that. The the us under biden They elected or biden. Put in jennifer grant home. She's a former governor of michigan as the department of energy had. She's been out saying that. We must give subsidies to the nuclear industry because they're going to be the backbone while while we're moving to alternative energy here in the us so there seems to be some I guess you'd call it interest for the us to really make nuclear still look good but the fact that they're not they're not really stepping up and trying to stop this joining joining the rest of the world in opposing. This is really interesting. Turn of events at totally hypocritical. That i see john carey's name under that title. There is involved somehow in this decision making. He absolutely is. He's been doing a lot of meetings with south korea. he's the us climate envoy for the united states. so john kerry. He's been out front very vocal in letting japan handle this saying that they Not so much applaud. But they are in agreement with japan's decision. The international atomic eight regulatory agency is going to be overseeing this with standards and they trust that. They'll they'll do this the right way. So john kerry is all for this according to his public statements. I mean this is. What's so frustrating. Because you know. As as i've said time and time again the show i'm now politically maroon and this is exactly why you know the democrats that i used to you know be a part of always claim to be sort of the environmental party in carrying about the environment. This is an environmental president. That was supposed to change the world as we know it and yet here they are allowing the total destruction of the ocean. That came in. Imagine what's going to happen to the marine life directly around japan so much of their. You know their diet with a lot of fish obviously in that diet. I just can't imagine what's going to happen those people but it's sweeps across california. We've seen those maps of just the contamination as it just pours across and slams into california and you start realizing as you look at these things over years and years that these people talk about being environmentalists. They talk about caring for the earth but in the end when they actually have big decisions to make It's like they always just go along with the corporate interests and make sure that let's just make it easy. Just go ahead and dump it right in the ocean. I'm sure it'll be fine. You know and so. I still say this i'm in i. I'm an environmentalist. I want clean air. I want clean water. I want clean food for everybody. I think that we live in a modern age. We were able to do things in a better way. I'm not here to talk about global warming. I don't care what happens to the planet. Fifty years down the road of care about the exhausted. The baby in the stroller is breathing right now. If we can get rid of it but this just this just shows what hypocrites they really are and how. None of this is really. You know we're all sold and we both were things because we're told to care about them and they give us that knee-jerk reaction but i think if anything proves to me that the people i used to hold up as heroes john kerry being one of them. I know for those people out there. But you had john kerry being one of them This just it's show just disgusting to me that we would ever accept any form of and i'm sure they're gonna say oh they're filtering the water. I mean what are we going to get like keurig filters out there or something. And i mean this is ridiculous. They need to figure out a way to deal with it. And i'm really tired of the lack of what seems to be international.

japan united states fukushima china german marine research institu pacific ocean earthquake olympic games fukushima daiichi tokyo south korea chinese foreign ministry Tepco jennifer grant biden john kerry russia central government olympics
Can I Tempt You With a Glass of Radioactive Vodka?

The Gargle

02:00 min | 1 year ago

Can I Tempt You With a Glass of Radioactive Vodka?

"This is a radioactive news here. The first bottles of what what is being called an artisanal spirit that has been made using apples. Grow near chenobyl had been seized by ukrainian authorities who spoilsports will not let people drink this horrifying drink. Would you drink artisanal apple chenobyl vodka. You know what it is. It's the name really it sticks. You know snowball nuclear waste it sticks. I think whatever you're going to call it later on in life it's going to be tricky right in with various names. Would i ever be ready for a sushi restaurant fukushima. I'm not sure. I'm not sure as sort of nuclear disasters. Go named stick you know. I don't think i'm ready for a new steakhouse. Call to kevin spacey. I don't think i'm ready for that. So if there is a disaster that followed it does follow you throughout life. And i'm not. I'm not sure awe no matter how good the spirit is. I'll keep thinking about that. Hbo show featuring the nuclear thing. We yes so. Apparently the real issue for being seized has to do with excise stamps rather than the obvious issue with it being radioactive spirit made from radioactive. Apple's apparently the radioactivity left in the spirit is quite low but even so there's something about about that it's like you know somebody says they made salad. Oh using their own vaginal yeast send the during the process. The actual yeast is sort of dissipated or sanitized. But i still feel deeply uncomfortable taking that vegemite on toast. It's too much yeast for me. Vegemite is sufficient Rachel would you buy atomic apple spirit. By if someone offered me trier you take this out of red too though i listen. I'm not a hundred percent

Chenobyl Apple Kevin Spacey HBO Rachel
Can I Tempt You With a Glass of Radioactive Vodka?

The Gargle

02:00 min | 1 year ago

Can I Tempt You With a Glass of Radioactive Vodka?

"This is a radioactive news here. The first bottles of what what is being called an artisanal spirit that has been made using apples. Grow near chenobyl had been seized by ukrainian authorities who spoilsports will not let people drink this horrifying drink. Would you drink artisanal apple chenobyl vodka. You know what it is. It's the name really it sticks. You know snowball nuclear waste it sticks. I think whatever you're going to call it later on in life it's going to be tricky right in with various names. Would i ever be ready for a sushi restaurant fukushima. I'm not sure. I'm not sure as sort of nuclear disasters. Go named stick you know. I don't think i'm ready for a new steakhouse. Call to kevin spacey. I don't think i'm ready for that. So if there is a disaster that followed it does follow you throughout life. And i'm not. I'm not sure awe no matter how good the spirit is. I'll keep thinking about that. Hbo show featuring the nuclear thing. We yes so. Apparently the real issue for being seized has to do with excise stamps rather than the obvious issue with it being radioactive spirit made from radioactive. Apple's apparently the radioactivity left in the spirit is quite low but even so there's something about about that it's like you know somebody says they made salad. Oh using their own vaginal yeast send the during the process. The actual yeast is sort of dissipated or sanitized. But i still feel deeply uncomfortable taking that vegemite on toast. It's too much yeast for me. Vegemite is sufficient Rachel would you buy atomic apple spirit. By if someone offered me trier you take this out of red too though i listen. I'm not a hundred percent

Chenobyl Apple Kevin Spacey HBO Rachel
Japan to Start Releasing Fukushima Water Into Sea in Two Years

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

00:20 sec | 1 year ago

Japan to Start Releasing Fukushima Water Into Sea in Two Years

"Japanese officials say in two years they will start releasing radioactive water from the crippled fukushima nuclear plant into the sea. The waters been accumulating at the site since it's meltdown in two thousand eleven after a massive earthquake and tsunami both china and south korea. Say they've got grave concerns over this move but japan insists the water is

Earthquake Tsunami South Korea China Japan
Japan to start releasing Fukushima water into sea in 2 years

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:29 min | 1 year ago

Japan to start releasing Fukushima water into sea in 2 years

"Japan's government decided on tuesday to start releasing massive amounts of treated radioactive water from the wrecked fukushima nuclear plant into the pacific ocean in two years. An option fiercely opposed by local fishermen and residence the decision long speculated but delayed for years due to safety concerns and protests. Came at a meeting of cabinet ministers who endorse the ocean. Release as the best option. The accumulating water has been stored in tanks the fukushima plant since two thousand eleven when a massive earthquake and tsunami damaged reactors and the cooling water became contaminated and began leaking. The plant's operator. Tokyo electric power company said it. Storage capacity will be full late next year. The prime minister said the ocean release was the most realistic option and the disposing. The water is unavoidable for the decommissioning of the fukushima plant which is expected to take decades some scientists say the long term impact on marine life from low dose exposure to such large volumes of water is unknown onto the basic plan adopted by the ministers. Tepco will start releasing the water in about two years after building a facility under the regulatory authorities safety requirements. It said the disposal of the water cannot be postponed further as it's necessary to improve the environment surrounding the plant. So residents can live there safely.

Pacific Ocean Japan Cabinet Tsunami Earthquake Tokyo Tepco
Japan to start releasing Fukushima water into sea in 2 years

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Japan to start releasing Fukushima water into sea in 2 years

"Tokyo will permit for because she will water to flow into the sea in two years time Japan's government has decided to start releasing treated radioactive water from the wrecked Fukushima nuclear plant into the Pacific Ocean in two years an option fiercely opposed by some the decision long speculated but delayed for years due to safety concerns and protests came after a meeting of cabinet ministers who consider the move the best option residents fisheries officials on the barman pool groups have issued statements denouncing the decision I think nor an environmental safety and health while adding a further blow to Fukushima image this is likely to continue for decades I'm Charles the last month

Tokyo Pacific Ocean Japan Cabinet Charles
Japan to Release Fukushima Treated Radioactive Water Into Sea

Mornings on the Mall with Brian Wilson

00:16 sec | 1 year ago

Japan to Release Fukushima Treated Radioactive Water Into Sea

"Government decided to start releasing treated radioactive water from the wrecked Fukushima nuclear plant into the Pacific Ocean. Two years from now, the decision fiercely opposed by fishermen and residents. The water's been used to cool the melted fuel with plant damaged by the 2011 tsunami

Pacific Ocean Tsunami
Japan to Start Releasing Radioactive Water From Fukushima

Memphis Morning News

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

Japan to Start Releasing Radioactive Water From Fukushima

"Government announces plans for water from a wreck. Nuclear power plant 10 years after Japan's Fukushima nuclear plant was destroyed in an earthquake and tsunami, the Japanese government says it's decided to release treated radioactive water from the facility into the Pacific Ocean. Japan says it's not safe to continue storing the water on that similar processes happen elsewhere. China says the plan is irresponsible and South Korea causes unacceptable

Japanese Government Fukushima Japan Earthquake Pacific Ocean China South Korea
Japan to Dump Radioactive Water From Fukushima Plant Into Ocean

America's First News

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

Japan to Dump Radioactive Water From Fukushima Plant Into Ocean

"Government has decided to start releasing treated radioactive water from the wrecked Fukushima nuclear plant into the Pacific Ocean in two years on option fiercely opposed by fishermen, residents and Japan's neighbors and the accumulating water's been stored in tanks at the Fukushima. Dai ACI planted 2011 when that massive earthquake and tsunami damaged reactors and their cooling water became Contaminated and started leaking

Pacific Ocean Dai Aci Fukushima Japan Earthquake Tsunami
Japan to Start Releasing Radioactive Water From Fukushima Into Ocean

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

Japan to Start Releasing Radioactive Water From Fukushima Into Ocean

"In tanks at the wrecked Fukushima nuclear plant. It says the water will be released in about two years after it's been treated. The water has been accumulated and stored at the nuclear power plant since its 2011 meltdown after an earthquake and tsunami caused cooling water to leak from damaged reactors. NASA was hoping to fly It's experimental Mars helicopter this week, but it's going to have to wait a

Fukushima Nuclear Plant Tsunami Earthquake Nasa
Japan to Start Releasing Fukushima Water Into Sea in 2 Years

BBC World Service

00:23 sec | 1 year ago

Japan to Start Releasing Fukushima Water Into Sea in 2 Years

"Of contaminated water from the stricken Fukushima nuclear plant. China called Japan's decision extremely irresponsible. South Korea expressed its deep regret. Japan's prime minister said the water would be treated and diluted so radiation levels were below those set for drinking water. The Philippines has protested to China over what it called the illegal presence of

Fukushima Japan South Korea China Philippines
Japan to Start Releasing Radioactive Water From Fukushima in 2 Years

Tim Conway Jr.

00:19 sec | 1 year ago

Japan to Start Releasing Radioactive Water From Fukushima in 2 Years

"The government of Japan says it's decided to start releasing massive amounts of radioactive water stored at the badly damaged Fukushima nuclear plant in two years after its treated. The decision had been delayed for two for years because of safety concerns and protest. The water has been stored in tanks at the nuclear power plant since 2011 who's damaged by a massive earthquake and

Fukushima Japan Earthquake
Olympic Torch Relay Begins in Japan

WBZ Morning News

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

Olympic Torch Relay Begins in Japan

"A run up to the summer Olympics. Aziz runners begin the four month Olympic torch relay beginning in Fukushima, Japan, all the way to Tokyo. Some 10,000 runners will carry the torch to its final destination in time for opening ceremonies still expected to go off on July 23rd. Olympic organizers will prohibit international fans from attending, but will play host to more than 200 invited nations and nation states at the summer Games in a country that overwhelmingly believes Those Olympic Games should be postponed again or

Olympic Aziz Fukushima Olympics Tokyo Japan Summer Games Olympic Games
Delayed Tokyo Olympics Torch Relay Kicks off Amid COVID-19 Fears

Morning Edition

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

Delayed Tokyo Olympics Torch Relay Kicks off Amid COVID-19 Fears

"Is underway in Japan. The summer games in Tokyo were postponed a year by the Corona virus pandemic. NPR's Anthony Kuhn says the competition begins July 23rd without foreign Spectators hold athletes and white tracksuits carried the torch is they jumped out of a training center in Fukushima Prefecture. A few Spectators were urged to clap but not cheer in the relay will be rerouted or stopped if it gets too crowded. A total of 10,000 runners will carry the towards through all of Japan's 47 prefectures in 121 days, although someone is have pulled out Theo event is supposed to demonstrate Japan's recovery from the 2011 Fukushima earthquake, tsunami and nuclear disaster. As well as mankind's triumph over the pandemic. A Kyodo News agency pole over the weekend showed that only 23% thought the game should proceed while 40% thought they should be canceled. Anthony Kuhn.

Anthony Kuhn Japan Fukushima Prefecture NPR Tokyo Fukushima Earthquake Theo Kyodo News
Shadowed by Pandemic, Olympic Torch Relay Begins in Japan

BBC World Service

00:20 sec | 1 year ago

Shadowed by Pandemic, Olympic Torch Relay Begins in Japan

"The Olympic torch has begun its four month journey around Japan ahead of the delayed opening of the 2020 Games in Tokyo. Members of the Japanese national Women's football team started the relay in Fukushima. Japan is determined to deliver the Olympics despite continuing disruption caused by the pandemic on the absence

Japanese National Women Japan Olympic Tokyo Fukushima Football Olympics
Torch relay for Tokyo Olympics kicks off its 121-day journey

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

00:28 sec | 1 year ago

Torch relay for Tokyo Olympics kicks off its 121-day journey

"Its journey tomorrow, Right? Yeah, Doug. It's kind of fun. We know the Olympic Games opening ceremony in Tokyo will be July 23rd. Well, guess what? Starting tomorrow That torch will travel for 121 days. All of Japan's 47 prefectures. It starts out in Fukushima traveling through 859 municipalities. Very cool. That's the Tokyo 220 2020. Olympic torch relay getting underway tomorrow. Joys of fun thing. So witness. Meanwhile, SCR

Tokyo Olympic Games Doug Fukushima Japan Olympic Torch
"fukushima" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"fukushima" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Possible. Time fetching twenty punch. You definitely need to stop the punching by. Oh it just as soon as possible. How dare it looks like we passed the threshold. What it's just a often. Wow climate change. It is one of the most beliefs subjects i can think about. What is the benefit of approaching climate. Change with humor. I think it allows people in. I think with climate change. People are so scared of climate change itself but also so scared of getting it wrong. It's this immense topic. And i think using humor allows people away in to understand it but also to join that conversation and i feel invites people watching to ask questions to say. What the uncertain about in an non-judgmental forum and i really hope appeals to people who who onto already on the streets campaigning and helps those people understand what they need to understand about climate. Change one of the perks. Of course social media is that it's all about engagement. What have you learned from the public as you've made these videos over the years as the engagement change the way you think about climate change or what needs to happen. Yeah definitely. I mean. I think as someone who started working on climate change around nine years ago there was this real attitude that the waiting gauge people was always to emphasize hope we always needed a hopeful narrative. And that was how we would inspire people and engage people and actually. I think we've seen that shift in the last few years we've seen a lot of people hugely engaged and active in the climate movement through conversation not of despair but realism and of discussing. Open the things that are scary. And fearful i think actually talking about these things openly and honestly is really valuable. I mentioned earlier adam. What kind of drudges to cover climate change you've written about. How making youtube videos has helped you deal with. Climate anxiety explained climate. And how has your project helped you. Climate anxiety is this fear this anxiety about what's happening to the planet what we're doing to the planet in a sense of helplessness. As we see ourselves continued to do that. I felt this most severely when i was researching because it so frustrating to be going to these seminars nine about this amazing research and then see the state of the public conversational political action just lagging ten twenty thirty years behind and so for me talking about climate change actually spreading that information chang information and starting conversations gives me a lot more hope and alleviates anxiety. A lot better than actually doing the research did adam. Levy the creator of the youtube channel climate atom. Where he makes his climate change with comedy. He's been speaking with us from berlin. Thanks very much adam. Thank you a year ago today. Tedros ghebreyesus the director. General of the world health organization confirmed our worst fears. We were in fact living in a pandemic we have dragged the island bill loud and clear. The pandemic is far from over. Some museums are already looking ahead. Though to how this time may be remembered here in the us smithsonian just announced that they've acquired the empty vial from the first corona virus vaccine administered. Here that was given to nurse sandra linzie in new york city in december in toronto. The royal ontario museum has been collecting. Perhaps the most common artifact from the pandemic face masks museum curator. Alexandra palmer says it's not just hospital blue. They've gotten a lot of unique ones. Choose what to wear and they will choose something that reflects them. It's not going to be your shade of lipstick. Is going to be your mass. The museum has more than two hundred masks from twenty different countries. Funny ones like a cheeky. Patio mask with a flap for your cocktail or beverage of choice other masks political declarations like no justice. No peace and black lives matter masks reflected everything that was going on just as t shirts were kind of where you put your political lawyer. Social cultural messages mass kind of took over the museum's exhibit his fall. Covid nineteen masks will also surely be viewed by people decades from now palmer. Thanks masks will retain their symbolism mattresses survival and caring for people and that comes through in a very powerful way the mass. Your face may be covered. But as we've seen we're still communicating the world. Comes you each weekday from the nanna bill harris studio at gbh in boston. Stay safe strong. We'll be back again with you tomorrow..

Alexandra palmer tomorrow toronto Tedros ghebreyesus Levy youtube berlin sandra linzie nineteen masks palmer december boston twenty different countries a year ago ten twenty thirty years more than two hundred masks twenty punch one nanna bill harris studio adam
"fukushima" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

02:55 min | 1 year ago

"fukushima" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Is now being turned into an official memorial. Back down the hill near the psyches house. Work is being done on a water pump station and a bridge. The river embankment. They can see from their living. Room window has already been completed. It's a smaller inland version of seawalls. That now stretch hundreds of miles along the japanese coast. Neither ako nor isis's steady embankment makes them feel much safer know media night. The community and i knew are the other. I want to be able to see the ocean. Or whatever if you can see the water. Know what's happening. She then the in the benin getting my article to israel now. I've seen firsthand. How nature is more powerful than what humans create so. Don't feel entirely safe because people never returned to this area neighborhoods at once. Had their own identities have disappeared now festivals and community activities. Draw people from a much larger part of the city so their community has changed back in her living room. Isi icky tells me that its importance has not but quote on designing the. She's i gotta go. After the covid. Nineteen pandemic hit us. I realized that during the disaster we were able to laugh cry and do things together now. That's not possible. that's what's difficult. It was tough during the disaster but not being able to be there for each other. Physically now is difficult for everyone still. Now that i look back. I can see how it was important that we were there for each other. Isi eckes advice on getting through this slow moving disaster. The pandemic on this one is a the future is full of uncertainties and everyone has something. They're worried about place importance on what's happening right now and the people were with right now this same for tomorrow and the day after tomorrow Grateful of the people who have passed and the people who you have in your life now kost and that will create the future seiyaku staple today mirror young the day. Thanks to david. Cabrera for production. Help and yoko nishimura and sahgal ogasawara for their interpreting to see photos of issue no machi and idea and ako psyche. Ten years ago and today visit our website. That's the world dot. Org you're listening to the world. I'm marco werman you're with the world one of the top priorities for the biden administration is tackling climate change to give it the attention it needs. A president created a new cabinet level position special presidential envoy for climate. John kerry got that job this week. Carry has been busy in europe spreading washington's new message as he did at the european commission in brussels. This.

marco werman david John kerry israel tomorrow Ten years ago today Isi icky Isi eckes brussels hundreds of miles isis this week europe sahgal ogasawara yoko nishimura ako japanese biden administration european commission
"fukushima" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

03:39 min | 3 years ago

"fukushima" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"Marshall you with us. Interesting Marshall, sorry sorry. I'm muted. My get the break. The I don't I don't see with Fukushima that it would be affecting us that way Fukushima is a nuclear volcano, the cores are down there pumping a tremendous amount of radiation into the Pacific. I think they're going to basically just kill off most of the Pacific. And we're going to see more of these Fukushima style. I think you're the caller has got a good point in terms of his concerns. That's the G E Mark one reactors which are known defective by design. They should have been pulled a long time ago. But they said we spent so much money to build these defective. Ridiculous things. We're gonna keep them. When things start going sideways, and we lose the power grid. Our own government tells us that if we lose the power grid nine out of ten Americans are going to die documented this extensively in my new book Radio Free earth. I even have three and tired chapters devoted to EMP electromagnetic pulse. Both natural and weaponized. And so these are real concerns, and we're going to the grid fails. We're going to have. Powered nuclear power plants going Fukushima on us from shortage shore. As a whole lot of areas because you can scramble the core. But it takes two years to cool it afterwards. And if you don't have electric city to run the pumps to cool the core after you scrammed it you're going to have a Fukushima. That's it. So this is between the nuclear and the fracking, I see vast areas of the country that at one time would have been highly survivable, no matter what planet x threw at us. And we've got more depth zones across the country. Now, it's I do a lot of consulting with people that are asking me about locations. And fracking took a huge chunk of that. Right there. And these are he's definitely concerns for your caller. I would say that. The general rule you want to be at least fifty miles up wind or one hundred miles down wind of any nuclear plant or nuclear facility, and you don't wanna be around fracking fields because those casings you're gonna fail like crazy when things start going sideways, and it's all going to be poisoned water and dead earth, and yank on make it there. You're not going to be able to survive. So we're the industrial threats that we have on top of the natural threats. Are what are going to be awful? And then for those who do survive that one in ten who survive when this fly by happens? They're not going to have long life spans because they're going to be dying from cancers as a result of all of this industrial and nuclear and fracking and all of this stuff. So magnetic field will if it dissipates will be having widespread chancers as well. So, you know. I want them to do mcglinchey..

Fukushima Marshall Pacific two years