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"frontal lobe dementia" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

Hollywood Unscripted

10:42 min | 3 months ago

"frontal lobe dementia" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

"Welcome to Hollywood unscripted. I'm your host. Got To law of the Malibu Film Society. Joining me today in the studio is our producer. Jenny Curtis Hi Jenny. And this is our final episode of the season. Our guest today is Sally Potter. Who has written and directed the roads? Not Taken starring. Javier Bardem L. Fanning along with Salma Hayek and Laura Linney welcome. Thank you very much indeed. Over the past several years we've had a steadily increasing number of films that have been dealing with dementia and I know you've had some personal experience with it. But what was the new territory? What was the difference that you wanted to get across with your story? I wanted to explore really the mystery of the mind. The sale is not necessarily only a really difficult and tough tragedy. Although there's often great difficulty involved but the fact that we don't really know what goes on in the mind when somebody seems to disappear. I ASK MYSELF THE QUESTION. Or maybe they're going somewhere really interesting. Not gave if you'd like a doorway into thinking differently about the mind about lives not adverts not taken us the title That somebody might be slipping in and out of different kind of a win. Says even of power lives the lives. They could've lived existing at the very least somewhere within the mind so it was using it not so dementia is not like the sum total of the stories. Not just about somebody with dementia but rather somebody in a state of mind in relationship with in this case of Dourson taking care of him and we're exploring that state of mind also through her is to know that you did. Dedicate this to your late brother. Nick and that he severed from frontal lobe dementia. Yes from a young onset dementia. He was very young when he got something. The symptoms took him over quite. He passed on within two years. As I understand it you were very involved in his care. Yes I was. So how did that inform the story that you wanted to tell me? It was accompanying him. If you like has his kind of witness and keg it there were other people carrying for him to but but being responsible for his car and going with him opened my eyes to many many things first of all how badly somebody in that condition is often treated as if they're becoming less than human song and I found that I became incredibly protective of ten. And also the people say as more and more hard to communicate with somebody in this state. Well I found. It was not the if I went into. Let's say his speech patterns and treated them like poetry and wrapped with him and stay in these fractured language. Other people couldn't understand that we could understand each other perfectly well also that we laughed alert through the you know sometimes humiliating experience. He was having. I tried to turn them into a joke into a kind of human comedy rather than human tragedy so I learned a great deal. Of course I was deeply deeply saddened by his loss and booze grieving and so on but I wanted to find a way of telling a story that might by transposing it and transforming it into something else might first of all be useful for other people who've been through similar experiences. Carrozza whatever semi off different questions about the mind the mysteries of the mind uncertainty from all the neurologist. I talk to all the specialist so that period I gradually realized there is still a great deal to learn about this and many other mental states and a great deal more respect owed to the people who are living with this illness but I didn't want to a portrait of him so the character portrayed in his from heavy. It couldn't be more different. Touch Lee is very different. The story is held by a father daughter relationship siblings so it went through many processes of transformation. But that's where it sprung from. The father daughter relationship is obviously the core of this film and the character portrayed by Al. The daughter is so incredibly sympathetic to what her father is going through to the point of sacrificing everything else about her life. It seems. Well it's left open at the end. Exactly what she is prepared to sacrifice. And what isn't but what we see is that she's split. We see the consequences that so many women face in their lives whether that's mothers caring for their children. How can they also have a life a guilt free life following their own trajectory and she is a doors trying to do the right and loving thing for her father's the guy she loves? She loves her father and Heart is kind of a King Fan and for his suffering but she also loved her and work on. She wants to do that for the very end. We see a signal that she's trying to do both she's trying to do both wants to an intends to do both. Did you start creating the story while you were caring for your brother know afterwards while I was coming from I was actually making another film so I know exactly what it's like when you're working and answering the phone and rushing out of the late at night is early in the morning to deal with crisis or something? I know not speeches like at first time but no when I was in the middle of it was kind of overwhelming so it was only later when I started to do all right. Just do which is transformed some of the biggest expenses they fought in the life and starts work with it and see what you can do it. Put it back out into the world in a way that will make sense others but at the time no. I couldn't now separate from the making of the movie. There is the business side. Was this a hard sell to either investors or to the actors that you approached it was very hard sell to investors not such a hard sell to the two because they could see in it the potential to explore an incredible range of profound human experience really even in the smaller parts like Salma. Hayek you know it's small but every good actor knows there's no such thing as a small part and for her. It was really interesting to play a Mexican woman that she recognizes as a total human being and not stereotype and so on so no. The actors were very enthusiastic and eager. Hardworking and intent I think for investors. It was difficult to see how this might work. Because it's quite a complicated structure to run. These kind of power lives into weaving through the mind of this but also because the subject of dementia or mental illness is kind of taboo. You know there have been some films. Yes but it's still a difficult area that people don't we want to look at and this was coming out in such a different way. It's not really the main focus of the thing. It's not dementia. The main focus of this loud. The many faces of love adores for her father. An ex wife. I somebody who she still loves. But it's no longer responsible for and so on and so forth so yeah I think it wasn't self-sided but there were enough. People who were finance who passionately committed to it from the very beginning core finances and then others came in late and talk to us a little bit more about the casting. Yeah but you want to know was how they are. Your first choice. Who WERE OTHERS CONSIDERED FOR? This role did consider others now conveniently forgotten once. I've ended up with somebody. How could I even thought if anybody else on that? It's often like that. Sometimes it takes bit of trial and error and kind of figuring out and initially I was thinking of somebody English speaking and it took a while for me. It was like a Eureka moment when I thought no this will be much more interesting. If it's a Latino person who's not only looking at life through the filter of this illness but looking at it through the filter of another language so in a way the issue of translation between the mental state and how people understand the more communication difficulties the feeling of a border line if you like a physical border between Mexican America and the United States but the border inside the mind between one state and another one thing became a metaphor for another. And I've thought many of the performance is that have you done in particular how he was in in your research foam beautiful which I think is an extraordinary film. How in it so I approached him with the script on T. was IGA take it on with some trepidation that he was eager to take it on. Vr BARDEM and Selma Hayek. They know each other in real life. Did that affect their casting or the way they interacted onset. She's very very close friends with penelope. Who Dare is hard to? But they made a decision early on while they were on such a while we earn Russell and working together the they would create a kind of professional distant as if they didn't know each other outside. But I think there was joking and sense of humor and kind of the rough and tumble of the fact that they do already know each other. That probably be helped shelley the ease with which they worked together and because SAMA is Mexican and she's playing Mexican and he's playing Mexican. He was looking to her for example to make sure his accent was correct and that everything he did aside was authentic to her as a Mexican individual. That was very helpful for me to so yea they worked off each other very well and in a very short space of time you know. We shot all of those things together in three days but we prepared for months beforehand and those people who like to prepare. Of course ELLE FANNING. You had worked with on. Ginger and Rosa eight years ago and she is outstanding performer. An outstanding professional young twenty one year old now Thirteen I I work with her and she brings a dedication and infuse the ousman lightness to to a role and is able to imagine herself into the shoes of others experiences. She's not hot directly herself. She somehow manages to empathize with and imagine in an incredible sunset way. And she's Joyce who was used as an extraordinary form. Did you have in mind when you're creating the character? When I was writing the script I was deliberately not allowing myself to imagine any particular actors in the row but rather let the characters themselves come to life under my pants so to speak to find out who they were. Now that's partly. Because if you get fixated on a particular actor. Will you know writing? And it doesn't work out for one reason or another show delaying or you know whatever you disappointed whereas if you allow the character to come to life and then start to think well who could play. This might take this car during the different direction. That can be very enlivening and now what I usually do. Once I've got somebody committed to the pot in principle I then what with them find out how it fits retailer it slightly to fit them more precisely to sit in that qualities. Whatever and so to the point where then I really content much? Anybody else.

Salma Hayek Sally Potter Javier Bardem L. Fanning frontal lobe dementia Jenny Curtis Malibu Film Society Hollywood producer Laura Linney Dourson ELLE FANNING United States Nick Lee Joyce Heart Vr BARDEM Russell shelley T.
"frontal lobe dementia" Discussed on The Essential Oil Revolution

The Essential Oil Revolution

08:23 min | 5 months ago

"frontal lobe dementia" Discussed on The Essential Oil Revolution

"Specializes in natural brain health. She loves teaching about essential oils and the role they play on our bodies and our minds and she provides private coaching and education for people looking to become the best versions of themselves. Kelly at such a pleasure having you here with us today. How are you I'm Great Samantha? And I'm very excited to be here. I want to start with your coaching work. First and foremost explain a little bit about the coaching. Work that you do and how oh you got started with my coaching. I've actually been a coach. Pretty much right out of college so I started with Nutritional coaching and behavioral management and I moved into business development and leadership training. And then I just a couple of years ago started my path onto brain health and coaching with rain. Help and mind why brain health. What specifically inspired you to to focused on that well rain health actually played a really important role in our life? Eight years ago. My stepfather was diagnosed with dementia. And it was a frontal lobe dementia. which is is pretty rare? However it's very fast progressing dementia and about four years ago? I it was brought to me Eh. It I would through my company that I worked through now. Would like to take some courses on brain health and how everybody you can go about improving their brain health and lessening or not making it as quick the onset of dementia or memory loss of old age or any type of disease that causes our brains to slow down may and of course aside jumped right in it. I think that most people especially as we get older age. One of their biggest fears is losing their mental capacity. I was just watching the documentary about Bill Gates. That's on Netflix. Right now and they asked you. What's your biggest fear? And I can't remember exactly exactly his words but it was something to the effect of. I don't WanNa lose I brain right. I don't want to become like visit. I don't care if I'm I'm physically incapable but if I'm mentally incapable that's my biggest fear and I think a lot of people feel that way. And how much do you know about the the rates of things like Alzheimer's and dementia and what's the research sane as to why. This is happening so much. That is so blast this summer. I went to a Alzheimer's Convention and I don't have specific numbers on how many people actually get dementia because or Alzheimer's because of the different ages of other things that can happen to you that maybe you would have gotten dementia later time. But we don't have that data so I don't have for sure exactly we how many people actually get dementia. But what I do now is that is not specific to anyone culture or country in the world So everybody same rate in every country will get this now. There is one country in South America that actually has a higher rate and they've done lots of studies and they cannot determine why it is most likely it's a gene factor. There are two different types of AH timers. One is where you're actually. Your environment. Plays a huge role in getting the disease and the other there is where you actually have a gene in your in your body that will at some point grow to develop your Alzheimer's or dementia depending on what it is and when you say environment explain that so that could be things like smoking heavy drinking being in city that's really compacted acted where you are exposed to a lot of toxins. Don't get a lot of green space. There's actually eight different areas that we need not to keep our brain healthy from that type of dementia and what they are is obviously a good diet nutrition. Making sure that we're getting a nice balanced balanced nutrition. I'm not saying that. We have to cut out everything completely but making sure that we're getting a variety of fruits and vegetables high-quality proteins instincts like that. I'd Imagine Maga's are big deal in the brain health world as absolutely making sure that we're getting those healthy fats. Direct correlation to you brain health just in general because there is more than dementia Alzheimer's there is just memory loss in. That is a different type of something of brain health that we can go into that like a whole the whole nother story but another some of those other factors would be mental stimulation. There are a lot of people in this world that do knock the proper mental stimulation that they need especially older people who spent a lot of home. Don't have a lot of friends that maybe we are still alive or family members that Gile or people who are retired who don't actually stimulate their brain. They just watch TV instead of doing things. I think we're puzzles and Going out which is another one. Social Interaction rate is amazing the importance thousands of social interaction in your life. Yeah valued in society. Whether it's you know a facebook community actually does count and what what also you know volunteering in your community or just having friends that you go and meet coffee with really is plays an important role with your brain health right right and it's interesting. You mentioned the facebook keeping unity's like I'm a part of a lot of facebook communities that I do have my essential oil communities that we you know it's like our own private little world and society in there and we interact all the time but that is different than real life interaction right in and when I look at especially teenagers teenagers growing up in this age are learning basically most of their communication skills through texting and snapchat. Add all these social media things in a wonder what effect that is having on the ability to interact in real life and suppose it's too early to know what what effects that might have long-term on their brain. Hell well you know what it does play a role and one of the next areas that we really need to focus on for her proper brain. Health is environment and even though the social interaction is really important. Getting outside for fresh air touching the ground and having having grass to walk in and trees to see actually stimulates different areas of the brain that contributes to overall brain unhealthy. I'm actually fiscal. Oh bean as well. So yes those. Social interactions are very positive on the computer. But if you don't get outside it's definitely GonNa Affect you as well now. Why no you've got different areas that you could go in and there's so much that we could go tackle in this topic of bring? How Memory Dementia Alzheimer's all these things? But I want to focus now on essential oils. What role can essential oils play? In this picture of brain how well essential oils are. Nature's way of helping US balance our body in mind on neurological surgical anatomy shows that our sense of smell activates this ancient part of our brain. Which I'm sure a lot of the limpets to stem and it is the center enter all emotions so essential oils? What they do is they really hope with areas were so in supporting people with dementia people people with Alzheimer's and people who are starting to build it? They have a lot of memory loss and who are stressed memory loss comes with also a response response will of stress. Everybody knows that. There's a lot of stress in the world versus ten fifteen years ago. Maybe not a lot more just different and our stress responses can become a lot a lot stronger in a lot.

Alzheimer Memory Dementia Alzheimer facebook Great Samantha Kelly Bill Gates Netflix US South America frontal lobe dementia. Maga
"frontal lobe dementia" Discussed on Let's Talk Dementia

Let's Talk Dementia

08:19 min | 5 months ago

"frontal lobe dementia" Discussed on Let's Talk Dementia

"Let's talk dementia. Glad you chose and join me today a little bit under the weather. I think I've I've got a little bit of a sore throat coming in. I've got a big event coming up. Thursday I'm Kinda need to be able to talk at Not a good feeling but you know that's the way life goes just when you think you've got everything figured out you find out you don't do. I hear an amen. You guys know about that kosher caregivers. You can't really plan too eighty four in advance because well. You just can't plan too far in advance. You never know what's going on in your caregiving role from minute minute. Much less Forget what about doing day to day or planning for next month. United's a challenge. It made me think about yesterday. Sermon at our church Our Pastor UH spend time talking to us about the serenity. Prayer was part of his sermon and was very meaningful. Not done a show before on a different version of this randy. Pair prayer taught as a really good episode but this is the actual version. That's used by alcoholics anonymous and I Dunno it just seemed to relate relate very well to caregiving for what we deal with as caregivers in understanding that there are things in our life we can change and there are things that are life that well we just gotta learn to accept because we're not gonNA change it. There are people we have to learn to exempt. Because we're not going to change those people either so let me just read region the serenity prayer shorts messed up. I'm trying to figure out how to adjust it here. Make it look right there. We go for you folks. Listen to podcasts. I know you wonder. Sometimes what is she doing doing. I wonder the same thing myself. Here is the entire serenity prayer for those of you who may not have heard it. The first few lines are going to be familiar. But it's the last few lines that really struck me as a care Graham caregiver here we go God grant me the serenity to accept the things things. I cannot change the courage to change the things I can and the wisdom to know the difference living one day at a time enjoying enjoying one moment at a time accepting hardships as the pathway to peace taking as he did this sinful world as it is is not as I would have it trusting that he will make all things right. If I surrender to his will that I may be reasonably happy. Be In this life and supremely happy with him forever in the next man will. There's just a lot of good. Let stuff in that prayer. You know what I'm talking about the The serenity to accept the things. I cannot change the courage to change the things I can. I think for most of you if if you're watching this show or listening to it. You're trying hard to do the things you can do to be a good caregiver. But in that data Jay Journey your finance. There's things you cannot fix aches. You cannot fix your loved. One's dementia if they unless they have a reversible under. Let's get it fixed. If you're dealing with an irreversible dementia like Alzheimer's or Parkinson's instance Lewy body disease frontal lobe dementia vascular dementia whatever irreversible dementia. You might be with. You can't fix that I I wish you could. I'm praying that one day. There will be a cure for all of these but as of today. There's not so we have to accept that in our world and I did with that APP. Beautiful woman in the picture right back here for those. You watching the video Mama Vera. I had to accept that That diagnosis and and that new change in my world in in in her world and how it rocked our world had except that mom accepted it. Well she I would say to me many times Kooky if I can help just one person. Because I have Alzheimer's it will have been worth it and I would tell her at that. Point how many countries these are show our video podcast Are In at this time. And and as of this recording of course mom has been gone for several months now but has this recording. We're in eighty three countries so mama's journeys helping other people and your loved ones journey can help other people if you allow that got to happen in your world if you allow. What's going on with them to shine through view in God's goodness in His grace in his mercy in all of it to shine answer you good things can come from it Trust me. It's true but then we have to know the wisdom know the difference between the things we can do something about in the things we can't because if we're beating our head against the wall to change the things we can't change in that's just not smart now is it. No it is not we want to be using all our energy on the things we can do something about in. If there's things in your world that need changing that you cannot change the imitate that one to the Lord up above. Let him do it. 'CAUSE girlfriend you not go build title to. It says living one day at a time. well as I said earlier as caregivers we do good to handle one day. We're living minute by minute. Because life is changing changing constantly. We think we have our loved ones figured out and then they moved ride into another stage or another phase of their dementia journey in life changes for us so living one day to tie enjoying one moment at a time and I hope you are enjoy those moments. I hope that in your journey you are not so concentrated raided on the negative in the hard in the difficult and the dirty The unpleasant the things you wish you could change that you miss the pleasant present moments in light. Your loved one still has a sense of humor. My mom the mom was inappropriate to and it was funny. I can't help it. It was just funny and she would say things that would make other people laugh and things that how would shake my hand go. I got no idea where that came from. But Mama would laugh and we would laugh tons when Mama would sing sing with us and she would reminisced whatever point. She was capable of wonderful moments in those times that she would look at Mingo Caroline. I love you off. Oh how I wish I could hear that again. Don't care don't cry don't do it. You don't look when you grind accepting hardships as the pathway to peace in boy. That's not the truth for everybody. If we don't learn to accept life as it comes along you've constantly fighting it there will be no peace in. We don't WanNa live a life without peace taking as he did as Christ in this simple world as it is not as I would have it because it's not what you want it but it is what it is like is what audience trusting that he Christ will make all things right if I surrender to his will in this one it's about is just realizing that we can do what what we can do. We can't do what we can't do but he didn't call us to do what we can't do. He only put us on this planet to do the things we can do. And for Oh you it's caregiving for your loved one. We do all this so that I may be reasonably happy in this life now. We're not promised Rose Garden. We're not promising. Every three days going to be Disneyworld for us. 'cause girlfriend is not but we know that we will be supremely happy with him with cries forever in the next life. A man will aim in the last quarter that prayer to I don't know you can see how potentially when I was sitting in that worship service in Riven Ervin Pratt was preaching any. Turn the message toward this randy prey on how to use this on an upcoming episode. Maybe you play this back in. Pray that prayer along Print it out you can google it and find it but keep it in your mind the serenity eight to accept the things you cannot change the courage to change the things. You can the wisdom to know the difference living one day to time enjoying one moment at at a time accepting hardships as the pathway to peace taking as he did this sinful world as it is not as I would have it it trusting that he will make all things right if I surrender to his will that I may be reasonably happy in this life in supremely happy with him forever forever the next.

Mama Vera Alzheimer frontal lobe dementia google Ervin Pratt United Graham Rose Garden Mingo Caroline Parkinson Lewy
"frontal lobe dementia" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

07:47 min | 9 months ago

"frontal lobe dementia" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"Back to this portion of the healthy that is we're talking about dementia today and if you want to call into question or text a case as of say begin same numbers six five one nine eight nine nine two two six here again is doctor hill thank you Danny were talking to doctor and Marie she is one of the nation's I would say I would even go a little further and that she's involved in international studies about dementia she works right with me on the department of medicine at Hennepin health care eight K. A. H. CMC in downtown Minneapolis we're talking about dementia thank you very well what causes it do we know what causes dementia we know a lot more now than we did twenty years ago so we used to think that there were really only two primary classes one was Alzheimer's disease and the other was due to the small blood vessel disease or multiple strokes we know now that there are many classes and that what we call clinically Alzheimer's disease is often due to a combination of changes in the brain different kinds of changes in the brain cell the plaques and tangles from Alzheimer's disease small or large strokes but also some other changes that are due are are caused by Louis by a disease that are different kind of cell change and then also some kind of stiffening of the area that are the blood flow to the memory center so there are at least four very common causes and usually after death of brain autopsy that's very evident now so we know that in general most dementia has at least three causes and probably more like five so it's very multi what we often say is multi factorial there's a lot of different things going on it is but in terms of size of risk factors that we can do something about the the only thing that we can we call modify change it's in our control that appears to have an effect is exercise and that's exciting we can't get out of it now I think we're gonna have to start liking exercise and like every day and telling the sector so if the if that it could be protective against cognitive decline yes there also trials going on right now in patients with mild cognitive impairment which is the early form of dementia and with dementia exercise trials to see if it exercise either by itself or in combination with other things might be able to decrease the progression of the dementia here you're not saying people have to go run marathons but you're saying L. incorporates some some guys in your life right so the standard recommendation is actually pretty much the same as to prevent heart disease and that is about thirty minutes a day of not rigorous exercise so that you're sweating necessarily but that you get your heart rate up and you feel like you've you've had a work out afterwards we say that in in in in running and stuff yeah to get the blood flow to the tissues your muscles and then last year the same blood flow to your brain that's the bottom line that's what it sounds like you're doing and that's what exercise probably does that makes told all sense do we have time to go to the phones yes we do let's talk to a Diane in rose by Diane what what is your question good morning good morning light let's turn all grandmother passed away with dementia and her son my father just passed away with frontal lobe dementia I'm just wondering what your thoughts are on the hereditary aspect of image thank you Diane for your call in sorry I didn't hear how old you said your you said your granddaughter a great no grandfather grandfather I'm sorry I couldn't hear you how old was your grandfather I think she must be listening on the radio she left us oh okay sorry okay so in general yes there is a hereditary component to most dementias for Alzheimer's disease there's a late a late type of Alzheimer's disease an early type the early type that occurs before the age of about sixty is usually strongly hereditary so if one parent has age the the son or daughter has about a fifty percent chance of getting it so that's if they if the parent had it at earlier ages right for older age there is still a rated Terry component so there is what's called an E. four genotype and that increases the risk and if you have one of those so if you get one from one parent and the other one is normal your risk is increased about three times if you have two of those jeans it's increased more about eight times so you talked about age at onset as being kind of important and now we know that there are some genes that but people darkened routinely tested for those to you know and it doesn't really make sense because those jeans art what we called penetrance for the older kind of Alzheimer's disease so if you even if you have the gene you may never get it in fact you're less likely to get it than not and but the more patients are starting to go to their doctors and as for the testing but we discourage it because even if you have a genius you may not get it and then you're you're maybe making plans when you don't need to when you don't even need to yeah that might be it might be at the forefront of research of what we're doing but maybe the if you're not gonna you're gonna be planning to get to mention you maybe not even going to and it's gonna affect your whole life I would get that yet right I certainly would I do that yeah right Diane thank you for your call I'm we do we have time for another couple for the break a show we until I let's do that let's take let's take Sharon chaplains a question and then we'll take a quick break go ahead sherry thank you for calling sure what's your question Hey and thank you thank you so much for this my husband had dementia for two and a half years and my question is I've heard that you know a lot of sugar in your diet has a lot to do with this old timers and then one other quick question to I've also read that people that are coming out negative all the time and just kinda their their attitude has plays a big part in this disease is sent in any one of those questions can you answer yeah good questions so the high sugar content in your diet by itself has has thus far not been called the risk factor but diabetes is a risk factor so it doubles the risk it increases your risk by twice if you have diabetes of having some type of dementia we're gonna come back I have a lot more to talk about on that one and and and sherry we're gonna finish your question after the break we're gonna break up of the bottom of the hour break here but we're gonna still talk more about mood and attitude and sugar and diabetes after the break sherry thank you for your call but stay tuned here's our phone number once again and the tax number same number six five one nine eight nine nine.

Danny Marie thirty minutes fifty percent twenty years eight K
"frontal lobe dementia" Discussed on Uncommon

Uncommon

12:39 min | 10 months ago

"frontal lobe dementia" Discussed on Uncommon

"I think that's kind of where I thought hang on if I just being myself. I'm going to get noticed but it's always been. I don't really have any other setting in you know. Some people say oh you know thanks for being so honest and open Thanksgiving so vulnerable. I don't have love sitting if I did have another setting. I would have gone much better on big brother like I there people in that house. I might mention names. I spent ten months with these people and I thought I need them and then we got out of the House and me hung out and I was like Holy Shit. You literally had this and they're still being themselves. Just a much more refined perfected measured thoughtful version of themselves. They were Mon pays and QS. They were GONNA okay. We're on air. I won't say that whereas I was just like what you saw is. What is what I'm like twenty four seven seven. I just don't have another setting are telling US spoke with Jen. She highlighted about you like Austin few questions things about about you and I think that is a common theme. It's it's your vulnerability but I agree. It's it's a really I was thinking about. How could we help because there's so many people could you. How do you like heck. It'll be better at telling people things and Blah Blah and I think in a way. It's sort of just inherent aren't I wanted. I do wonder whether maybe being vulnerable on my social. Media channels. Now is a direct result of what I went through on the show because I think once you've been at that level and I say it was my rock bottom. I that was it was pretty bad and I think once yeah I felt like the country had sane me at my worst that sane me make a colossal fuck up that say me hurt. Someone that I care about a lot did sane me. You know humiliate myself myself at me in tears attain. We anxious dead same me at my worst. What do I have to hide off to that when someone seeing you at your very west it's kind of liberating in a way like why pretend that. I'm having a good day from what you've already seen me. Cry For ten weeks on on on and I'm going to pretend now I have my shit together. You guys know better but then I think about it and I wouldn't have been so emotional and stuff in the house. If I was Spain got it so obviously I've been like this my whole life. I think so I think it's just one of those things that people have like. I've always really for me. It was always like seek people's approval and so I would be always very open invulnerable as part of that process like I would just just keep him that comes back to our parents. It's no way we were brought up. Things I think for me was always seeking my dad's approval. I've only just really gotten over that in the last few years. I mean if he yeah I was speaking about saying approval. I it definitely feel as if I'm still trying to win back the country. It's a I constantly feel like. I'm trying to prove myself. It's a good analogy. That's what it feels like. I feel like they all assume this one version of. May and I have to go and wait. Wait wait but no I am a good person. There's more to me than that. I'm sorry I met a mistake really was from some people think well definitely this feeling of lack trying to prove them wrong trying to show that I care about different charities charities and causes trying to show that my vulnerability with my anxiety to help other people with their anxiety. I'm trying to show you that I'm not this. Bradey not selfish past that people sometimes think that I am and there's another chapter of misunderstood. I want to talk about dementia for we talk about your mom or just want to talk about dementia itself because when I originally spoke about Meyer iron family scares the absolute pitches. Yeah you had a really interesting story about how you went to your your grandmother passed wind and you couldn't take your mom and you had to repeatedly tell your mom. I can tell you with absolute assurance that he's the smartest decision you guys have made because my grandmother passed away in April. Oh and was there holy crap man ninety something else like it and I felt at the time I was annoyed of actually annoyed him but I can't believe that I was annoyed like so that's just part and Pasta with this shitty does as he was sitting there and he's like Oh who's that this is all. That's Jordan as I know him. That's teams that's teams. Sung and then he's sorry frustrated and it depends on the person listen as well because he's so happy so at least we've got that but I felt so bad for my cousin and like he would go up to my uncle. My Dad went obvious doing my like opening joining introduction to everyone before by this speech and like and he came up to me. He's like isn't it. Sorry good to see each other and it's like. Oh and there is this sense of an it's hard to describe someone who hasn't witnessed or experienced themselves but there is a sense of childlike one moment they they really do regret and when I say they regress I don't just main. They're losing skills. They go backwards. It's almost like Benjamin Button into Todd Liz the way they interact with you with the world the way they moved away they remember mom would pick up a boiling hot cup of tate and try and drink it like it's literally like you suddenly looking after a toddler and so would you speaking like that. That's maybe people that listing think that you're just putting on a funny but that's what it's live. It's like Oh my God I'd like. What are we doing here that this isn't this amazing and you're going? Oh my complete both amazing and horrifying. I remember like we're out for lunch one time and sitting there and he's just like what is this this is. This chain is never eight. Hundred forty is like pum. It's a yeah we've had plenty. He just Wendy. Stop Jesus go play along with a t G. Correct them like it gets to a point right. I think initially your knee jerk reaction is to correct them inside his pocket and you had a million on my dad would do that and I would feel myself. Doing it and I felt awful every time you helping hoping nobody all you're doing is upsetting them. Confusing them making them feel stupid. I just wanted to make him happy like I remember before. My grandmother passed why that's when you when it gets really bad obviously. She has no idea who you are and we're sitting NAM. We're having tain sort of like a not a pound cake but they all peoples the worst sort of cakes and she was she was saying these were. I don't know what it was but ashes like hallucinogen gibberish. Did you ever go to like a training session but like an inflammation. I remember went to like an info session that was run by group and it's through demetre cares. Maybe I remember like they were talking about. How the way that they communicate is as often indirectly away of had a feeling and so that was that was really really interesting and so that helped me a lot. I think those groups are amazing and they would help you with sort of dealing with I think I think those groups are amazing. I know that my mum's care and that she was at the laws pie she was at had a weekly meeting with families as of yet but Wade didn't have access to any of that firstly to different reasons firstly. We were very young. I was the eldest son. I was fifteen fourteen fifteen. What Fourteen fifteen year old is going to get out. There and racist sized Pisces has self. It wasn't something that I felt comfortable. Even now as thirty-one-year-old road walk into a place like that I need to sort of would up a little bit of confidence. It's a bit of a daunting experience so as fifteen fourteen year old I'm not going to actively go there and try and find support for it but just not something that you think about. You've got all this stuff happy. I was hard in high school like I thought so much else going on my brain and to be quite frank. Thank those initial couple of years I was into Nah. I didn't WanNa talk about it with my friends at alive with bunch of Strange's secondly because my dad bless him was the intent on taking care of moment harm not even using a respite nurse or anything like that. We weren't even on any kind of government care way when he wasn't privy to what was out. They're available to us and if my dad was carry isn't privy. It's not filtering down to us so it's only now as an adult. I'm aware that up on line and typed it into google. I would have found even again. Faisal wasn't around back Dan. I I couldn't these days I go on to facebook in Typing Dementia Support Group and probably get twenty groups that are in my area that that wasn't around back then it's true and it's yours is such a unique situation because of the fact that it is like early onset. Maya two thousand a two yeah. My uncle has early onset frontal lobe dementia yeah so it only a fixed that part of the brain which is super so it's really long even though it's it's just as devastating is it's horrible. I'm my my Auntie just sheds. I did like a video he human he's life and dementia Australia one of those support groups but yeah it's it's Shit Yeah. It's it's gut wrenching. It's as I've said it's sort of a few chats now. I think that the worst part about it is that there's just no heart. There is nothing to cling to there. There is no civil lining. There is no positively there is are it's just you know you're diagnosed and it's death sentence and it's a long eighty with Eliane set. I mean mom had it for twenty three years. That is long on too long long long time. Yeah I mean the way I look at it now. The only way I can look at it is that at least this is the worst ca get yeah in terms of the situation I mean I feel like it's you and I get it is not the worst that could be but I don't know like I think about. I'm like my I had this conversation. Michael the other day news like you. You want really nerve so it doesn't affect you affects everyone around cool nor I have no in certain ways. I can see it in my I and Satan my friends parents and grandparents I. I'm like a sniffer dog now. I I can see from a mile away do you do you notice it just in them on everything thing it's it's it's a blessing and accussed because I think with the baby boomers now parents are getting that generations getting older and what was Eliane from my mother. Now is now now not silently onset. I mean my dad's seventy two and really gaudy looks good for him. He will love you saying that or seriously you guys the family this. He's seventy seventy two yeah. He's almost sixty eight when she passed in dead seventy five years apart but what was early on eh a bit of a shocking and very unusual circumstance back then is now not so unusual so I'm it breaks my heart but I know I'm GONNA here. It's going to become more and more prevalent in my social circles but even like the other day and I wrote a blog about this Mama Mia. I was watching the latest series of season of Orange is the new black and one of the men. Can I knew the minute Meena. This storyline was being set out for us the first second of her having a weird mood swing off or forgetting I just I knew I was like they're gonNA dementia. She's got dementia. I can just I can sniff it so now he he's what I'm intrigued by. Do you think it is like do you think it's hereditary or d think like like I know this for example. My grandmother had vascular dementia. That's clearly lifestyle related to fit your affected by a mini mini strike. Whatever is Allison Allison is as more red etry frontal lobe. They don't know there's so many of them well. That's even the fact that we have to have this conversation. That we know more is terrifying. Why why do we know what am I gonNa give you an answer on that. All I know is that the form of dementia that my mom has has gained but isn't proven can be linked hereditary which means that I have a chance of having it may what I do know I'm from my and again I go through phases of wanting to know everything about it and then phases of eight causing me severe anxiety and just to Huma head-in-the-sand about this is just too much me right now and and I think that's okay..

Eliane frontal lobe dementia US Spain Allison Allison Austin severe anxiety demetre google Mama Mia Meyer Typing Dementia Support Group Todd Liz Jordan Jen Wendy facebook Wade
"frontal lobe dementia" Discussed on The News & Why It Matters

The News & Why It Matters

12:15 min | 10 months ago

"frontal lobe dementia" Discussed on The News & Why It Matters

"Chad. Can you explain to me why I saw corn pop trending. It was trending trending big time like the biggest news yesterday was born pop in this two thousand seventeen video of Joe Biden speaking to a group of people at the pool dedication in Wilmington Delaware where he was the lifeguard back in the sixties and and this was a black community and they asking this. Why are you a lifeguard in this location in his response today is well? I wanted to get to know the black community better so he was very woke teenager back in the sixties right. He just wanted to be that aware of things but he has this episode where he's The lifeguard and he tells the story of this confrontation that he has with a man by the name of corn pop and apparently corn pop in the Romans was a pretty tough gang and the Delaware districts so corn pop was uh on the diving board bouncing up and down and Joe calls him out and says Hey S. Two Way who not Florida Florida from good times by the way was a famous well known swimmer in the nineteen fifties. He says hey esther waves throwing you out of here and so he throws corn born pop and his boys and I love it when Joe Trez to sound tough and he's calm pop was in bed do random bad boys and so I felt like at any anytime of sharks and the jets were GonNa Come Colin Powell porn pop the Romans and he says I'm GonNa meet you in the parking. Lot corn pop says the Joe Joe is scared so he goes and he talks to one of the mechanics. The guy who takes care the mechanics around the pool. You know the machinery that runs the pool and he says hey man you gotta fight corn pop so give him a six foot length of chain that Joe wraps around his arm and covers with a towel and he goes out there and corn POPs got is razor blades him and his boys and they've banged it on the on the sidewalk a little bit to make it a jagged edge and he said you know how we used to soak our razors in the rain barrels and get a brushed it up. Could you deep but at a cut you long put Selena on your face. We're going to war and he says they're standing out there waiting. He said You Mike Cut me but I'm a wrap this chain around your head and this is Joe Biden this the same man whose teeth fell out during the last presidential democratic the bake man's teeth fell out. We gotta feel sorry for Joe like who's putting him up for this. If you've ever seen go back and look at Brock Obama in two thousand seven in two thousand eight and then look at him in two thousand sixteen demand ages look at w when he went into came out for this age here's Joe he's dealing with a frontal lobe dementia already going on. I had to watch this corn pop story three times just to get the gist of what the hell he was safe because now he's he says hey go up. I'm on apologize for Calling Ezra William. I'M NOT GONNA apologize for throwing out. I'm apologizing for what I said. You jobs what you said. Yom apologized what does not for throwing out and so everybody's like he pulls up his razor blade and we were friends. Escort pop had my back for the rest of my Delaware days right so joe is who joe is these days and people said this Baloney man like this is the most embellished story ory you can imagine but then one of the people from N. double. ACP comes out and says no no there was a corporal there was a corn pop in the Romans and they ran a gang in Delaware where in Wilmington and it's true so now the NWEA CPA's corroborating Joe's story this stuff. This is really fun stuff when you start. We're seeing this thing there's evidence because now there's an obituary of a nude whose name was William Cohen Pop. What and what was that what was the Tobacco Company who made out of North Carolina come on this is the same? It's the same name but he his name isn't porn pop. Apparently corn pop got the cancers he became wheat thin and that was it dad in two thousand sixteen who just missed it. Joe was hard core. It does seem like there was legitimately corn pop and legitimately the Romans right if that's actually was a thing it how much of that story was excited actually hear the story of how much of that was actually Joe Story. How much were you making up Joe Story? Check entertaining cut joe telling it I was like interesting. What are are you saying William Morris? I'm sorry William William Corn pop more settles was name Data Age of seventy three in two thousand sixteen so the interesting thing here is like this thing got dug up from two thousand seventeen now now where where's the problem here with. He's a gaffe master. The thing that I have the issue issue that I have with Joe is not only do I started feeling sorry for. I really liked WHO's putting him up here. I mean this doesn't need to be president united. Nobody needs that in his life and I I think Joe probably a nice dude. I mean I've never heard most people who know him. They're like we like Jane. Probably a good guy and I'm not going to vilify the guy turned him into some kind of evil person but I'm starting to feel sorry for him but if you can listen to Joe he doesn't finish his sentences. He just gets to talk it and he's rambling on like. I don't even know what you're talking about anymore and the thinks he says you know hey look he was. He's he was the minority right. He was the only white white lifeguard at the pool and he did his street hustle and got his crafted from fighting corn pop and all this stuff so now he's going to talk about how corn pop ransom bad boys. How do you say that a black audience and get away with it? How do you get to say these things that are like it's in associates? This weird we're double standard. That's going on like Joe doesn't matter of Joe Grabs your hands and hold you stu. I woke up at one to explain something. I wouldn't grab your hands and hold you this close while I explain it to you. It's a weird double standard. That's going on that's out there and that in and of itself is bugging me significantly but hey we're in a world of double standards these days specifically with Joe Biden I mean he has a vast especially with making comments that are Westerner Ball about blacks and somehow still love them you you know he's Clinton or Obama was clean and articulate right and then there was then there. Was You know these these poor kids like the white kids just talented just as smart as the white kids and then you gotta you know talking about corn pop and his boys and there was a pretty good. There was some pretty fun twitter feed yesterday read through the threads of African Americans who were coming out and they were saying about you know this is this no. That's not how this works in the street. You know so it's interesting to watch joe gets a free pass because at the same time he's the only one who has not jumped completely off the the diving board. No Pun intended into this far left crazy place where so many of those candidates have jumped AH interesting too. We've got a lot going into debunking whether or not that was a real story right I mean everyone's like no it was real know Joe Biden told the real story in the end. ACP So meanwhile New York Times not so thorough not so thorough when they when they're writing about Brad Kavanagh on it is an interesting world that we live in was intentional with capital right. I know that's yeah I I think that was pollutant intentional like they're hoping to even at the very basic level. They're just trying to sell a bunch of books for this person right at the very the most innocent part of this is just try. They left it out so it would get a huge flare flare up and then whatever if it comes out later they've already sold a million books much more optimistic. I Yeah I would like to I'd I'd like to believe they're just trying to steal people's money but I think it's worse than that. Between Aurora get the bookies talking at the urinal and brick cavanaugh and joe bid. You know hard core. This has been a very phallic episode. Yes yes it's been did you come on the show and all of a sudden it's a Phallic episode happens speaking of Malik custodes the BBC has now released a series of educational videos targeting schoolchildren aged nine to twelve and in this series the network Instructs Fox kids that there are more than one hundred gender identities the BBC also goes on to tell the children in this series that they don't they just just don't know any better yet and they could go to jail if they question or disagree with it I know this is happening in the UK it is the BBC of course but as we find so often things that happened in the UK slowly trickle down to the United States. I'm concerned about the hyperinflation that's going on Zimbabwe level the number of genders unders that we have I swear like we're making jokes that it was ninety like two months ago and now we're over one hundred hundred they just keep coming up with them and Sam Smith who is the UK singer pop up singer who has had multiple hits in the UK nominated for Grammy says come out and says look. I've always I've always dealt with being binary but I want to identify myself as has they them but then in a statement he kept talking about. I and I and I and I and I am doing this and I'm scared of this and I'm like aren't you a we now like the how does this work. You're them. How do you keep identifying as an I that doesn't make any sense so that house of cards falls in on itself? All I know is of of Caitlyn Jenner goes missing. I'm putting his picture on bottle. Half and half teaching like children aged nine to twelve yeah I get it I get maybe a twelve year old. Could maybe wrap their brain around what they're talking about but nine. Did you see the woman who has has twins and she's she's raising. She divorced her husband. She's raising these twins and the husband has taken her to court because she's trying to raise one as a girl and the other twin twin as the boy. They're twin boys. He's raising one is a child abuse. I mean this is a child abuse so do they understand her crazy rear they should but not these are conversations. We shouldn't have to have in regards to children and I think this aspect of taking like conservatives. We often like are like I just don't understand. What do you mean boys? A girl and a girl is is sh she him her. Whatever and like we're we focus on the idea that you're naming yourself something that you're not which is an important part of this but there's another important layer I think of it is? Why are you obsessed with what people are calling? Can you like that is a ineffective defensive position from the start. What that we're America? We don't care what you're saying about US and yet we're taught the society now. That was all it is. We have to focus on this obsess that everyone is called the right thing and you get to identify what group you're in. It's a collectivist activists notion at its heart and that's not supposed to but America is I think a lot of times. That gets lost like I forget whether Caitlyn Jenner is a boy or a girl or why they she he she wants to define themselves. As why do we freaking care. Why are you spending any moment of your life trying to figure out whether you're a boy or girl like what does it matter? Just be what you are so in a recent episode of the Chat Show Leap Look Party. Steve brought up that point he said why does it matter and I said well because you you take a case that happened. A couple of months ago where this lady mis gendered someone in response on twitter. They came and arrested her. That's where that's why these conversations conversations have to be had because it's just a matter of time because if you inadvertently call someone by the wrong gender now it's considered a eight Gr. I'm looking at it from their perspective. Why does the person who is going to report someone on twitter for Miss `gendering someone? Why do they care? I mean I understand why we would care were saying I'm like well. Wait a minute. We check the box on the form that said mail and now you're saying it's female like the important facts. This is truth and everything else but it's not a like like if I were to say like am I you know I don't know if I am I an eagles fan or a cowboys fan now. Obviously the people are Eagles Fan and bad people are countless fans the game..

Joe Joe Joe Biden Joe he Joe Story Joe Trez Delaware William William Corn twitter joe bid Joe Grabs Brock Obama ACP Caitlyn Jenner Selena United States Colin Powell William Cohen Wilmington Delaware Chad. Ezra William
"frontal lobe dementia" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

09:36 min | 1 year ago

"frontal lobe dementia" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"The discontented, Pittsburgh, Newsline, and George welcome to Katie KYW radio. Good to have you. Thank you, so much your mom has dementia. Is that correct? Yeah. Is it properly classified as Alzheimer's dementia? Yes, it is. And tell us a little bit about mum. My mom. We actually we grew up in Philadelphia. So my mom is a United States army vet, and she has raised me on her own as a single mother in the in the city of Philadelphia, and she has been very stronghold of our family. She has been the cornerstone of, you know, us being raised brought up in a church and try to be good productive citizens. So in twenty fourteen my mother was diagnosed with early stages of dementia. So so she's has been struggling with, you know, memory confusion, and we've been trying our best to help her along the way, you know, just trying to deal with the changes, physically and neurologically. You said that she's an army vet. How how give me a ballpark age of mom knew what Iraq did she serve in? She is classified under the Vietnam era, Vietnam era. Oh, wow. Yes. The obviously not drafted. So she volunteered during that era. Yes. She did. She came straight out of high school. She joined in a believe nineteen seventy nine hundred seventy nine hundred seventy one somewhere around that time. Oh my goodness. Whatever remarkably brave woman to decide that she wanted to join the military, and you're seventy. Yeah. What did she tell you was her thinking about why he decided to join at that time? Well, she's she thought she never had the best upbringing. My mom wasn't raised with both our parents. So she was raised by a grandmother. So she figured well. She didn't wasn't sure what to do with her life because she never had the best example. So she figured well, what better way to dedicate her life in the server country, very very admirable. It must have been a a a great sense of pride for you growing up to know that your mom decided to make that commitment to serve our country. Yes. So you also met my she also met my father, and so my father and my mother were both an army. Yes. Did they serve for very long? Not surf about eight years. Okay. Well, it's still longer than a typical tour would otherwise be what else what else can you tell us about mum prior to her diagnosis in two thousand fourteen. Well, my mother she was working in early eighty. She was working at the naval shipyard Philadelphia. So I remember as a kid, you know, going down near checking out the ships then both coming in and talking to some of the sailors as run by the age of seventy eight years old, she has dedicated herself to serve in our country. And and some of the things she did what she worked at the state probation office in Philadelphia. So she worked real hard with working with inmates trying to get their life together. She also was active in church. She was also a a. Let me schoolteacher. I'm sorry school schoolteachers. So she did that about fifteen years up until about two thousand so darnold. Don, she also went back. She got her degree. She started doing briefly some driving off a health counseling down at our church, and that kind of brings us up in about two thousand ten so she decided to retire from the state from Beijing rule parole because she was starting to have some some physical issues. And so after that, she just volunteered is helping around the church. George white is with us. He's talking about his mum, and we're celebrating remembering mother's day today. Mom, now, dealing with Alzheimer's frontal lobe dementia. George your mother is an exemplary citizen of this country willing to serve in the military continued to help with the naval shipyard, and then all the work that she's done subsequent to that. Just an amazing. Woman living pretty remarkable life talk about when you first began to notice that something wasn't quite right with mom. Some of the things I noticed was. I would say it was more. We're starting with the physical. Start off with her legs. She had like one leg was working. You know, pretty normal than one leg was kind of dragging a little bit soda with some of the things I notice physically far as neurologically. She started become a little bit irrational. Sometimes also noticed that she kind of fallen behind on bills, and she would become a little bit confused at times at Tom went along. She started to repeat questions a lot. So she became very repetitive with, you know, just maybe not remembering what she said before. Or some of the things that I would tell her she would get and also sometimes you feel like a little bit anger anger outbursts of anger. So we'll see some of those things with our also to I noticed that her eating cheating much slower than what she knew. Normally does. So her processing is is is much lower than it was before. So that would be the much big thing that I noticed about her now, many of the things that you brought up are things that I've recognized and other people talking about the issues of cognitive decline except for the what you said about her legs, the doctors give you an indication that there was a physical manifestation of Alzheimer's as well. Well, I they thought it was they first diagnosed where normal pressure hydrocephalus that is where there was too much fluid in the brain where it's not coming down the spinal cord, so they thought about putting Sean in the back of her neck, but then after further testing, that's when they noticed that. Okay. Maybe it's not this is probably could be going towards dementia. So and then what also with the Menchaca just found recently that parts of her brain is deteriorating which controls the coordination. Okay. So she's been falling a lot lately. And when I met with the doctor they said this part of the brain being affected by the dementia, which is day or that controls coordination. She continues to fall. So that was some of the things that I notice in the beginning. But I couldn't pin couldn't tell if that's exactly what was the main cause of dementia until you know, years down the line that we noticed that other things we're starting to line up with dementia. Yeah. Ultimately, Alzheimer's is portions of the brains that are dying. And so it's manifesting in that portion of the brain that's responsible for candy coordination. And other aspects of physical motor function dying as well. Which then explains the eating slower to right. Yes. So when did you decide to take mom in to get valuated, and what was her reaction to being evaluated? Well, actually all started. I was I moved here to Pittsburgh for graduate school. So I was in the midst of Mike graduate studies at Chatham university. And then my mother became homeless. She lives actually in Philadelphia. So so that was some of the things I noticed that she was kind of falling behind on bills with her. So I called VA. I didn't know what to do. The Philip VA was very helpful with one Philadelphia ankles go via was able to help me with housing for her. And then they were you know, trying to set some things up. But then they start to know some things that were a little bit unusual like outbursts of anger. You know, irrational? So they started to do some testing at that time which was twenty fourteen but they couldn't notice anything. So when I finished my graduate study that Chatham this will be round like may twenty fourteen they were nice enough to have her moved up here close. To me, and Pittsburgh and the Pittsburgh VA him wall way, we do further testing. And that's when they started to notice that she had early stages dementia and at this time, she was about fifty nine years old. Oh, well, George white is with us. We're talking about he and his mum suffering from dementia Alzheimer's, and what he is doing on this very special mother's day to celebrate and to honor her and.

dementia Alzheimer Philadelphia Pittsburgh George white frontal lobe dementia United States army VA normal pressure hydrocephalus Iraq Philip VA Vietnam Chatham Katie KYW Beijing Don Chatham university Tom Mike
"frontal lobe dementia" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

08:58 min | 1 year ago

"frontal lobe dementia" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"I need the time. You're going to time out of my time for Steve to put somebody in time out. Ryan. Did you notice what I'm about to talk about during the airing of game of thrones last night? I did not just enjoyed it. Another fantastic episode. Although there are some harsh critiques coming our way. Really, the there's some folks who say the character development is getting a little lazy that the right is our mailing it in. And now this huge story that's going viral. It just kind of is further evidence of perhaps getting a bit sloppier. Jameh throws the please tell us. Let's go on fire definitely thinking editor would pick this up on. Last night. There was a very brief scene at least of this item that was out of place, and that would be what appears to be a Starbucks Coffee Cup. Okay. So this was a I guess there was a celebrate Ori feast in winter Phil and there's a Cup on the table right next to what's her face. Right next to her couldn't she probably didn't even know that. She was in the shot. It's it's pretty good. This happened pretty early on. I think right towards the beginning. They were all celebrating because they survived the battle of winter fell. So there's a big feast everyone getting drunk and getting laid and just having a good time and. Oh, yeah. It was very jovial. But no, I did not catch this little mishap. Maybe maybe they did it on purpose. Deliberate kind of inside joke or something. It's referred to as I just learned this word. Good word for a solar today. An Anna cronyism, Anna cronyism an-, Anna Cronyn is a chronological inconsistency in some arrangement, especially a juxtaposition of persons events objects or customs thing belonging to a period other than in which it exists. So the Starbucks Coffee Cup was in Anna cronyism. I accept that. I feel like we said the word Anna criticism recently in a different context, but that's an anti Cronyn. Bre nuts. Announ if you keep score these at home, I know a lot of you do Ana cronyism into somebody posted denarius storm born of health tar Garin the first of her name Queen of the Endel the first man protector of the seven kingdoms the mother of draft the colle- of the green the the burnt the breaker of chains. End drinker of pumpkins. All the way at the end. That's a good one. That's a good one. You can go back and watch it and you'll see it. During the sloppy a little sloppy. You know that can happen. It's amazing. You just become blind to something right too close to become blind to it. Yes. I mean, I I would get it. If you know, maybe sometimes a boom mic which up in a shot, that's more acceptable than this. This is just ridiculous. I love finding these though because you can find them in all sorts of movies TV shows these things that didn't catch an editor's. I for whatever reason too bad. All right. Someone's calling in could be someone from targets O'Neil. You're on the done. It's mytalk one zero seven one. Who's this? Why the call? Has anyone corrected you yet? Not yet. But I feel like it's coming. It's not it's anachronism. No Ryan, we get a pronunciation. Anoc renouncing. Also. Okay. Sorry. Now, worry she's on strike played again. She's right. Okay. And you said I said, Anna chronicity. The emphasis, well, this is everything criticism. Because if I call Mark. Right. Right. Memphis, right and Fossas vases. Yeah. This is important. Anna imported. That in game of thrones the Starbucks Coffee Cup, two more episodes. Mondays from taking it off just a week. Justin, I and pelts pelts health health. That's a good one. May I throw sixty minutes in timeshare by not love, sixty minutes. I think it is pound for pound. The best news program from beginning to end that we're offered nationally. It's a great show. I of DVR for years and years. However last night, I watched this morning. So maybe the timing of which I watched it like it was like five forty five this morning. It wasn't great story last night on sixty minutes on something called ransomware. And this is an example of when you find out about something that otherwise, you wouldn't have known, and you could argue you as the person the person who doesn't know how to do anything about the problem don't need to know about it. Ransomware. And you hear it in the name there. It's a type of malicious software or malware designed to deny access to a computer system or data until a ransom is paid. So they go through and they're giving examples of these ransomware occurrences on sixty minutes. City hall in Leeds, Alabama. I think it was and it was like, you know, small town, but it doesn't care because somebody types in just go find something where we can hack assist them, and it hacks. It could be big the city of Atlanta. This happened to could be small the same ransom amount was demanded that's one of the things that ransom. Hackers. Do offer a consistent amount of ransom. Because if you decide I need five million dollars, then they're not gonna give it you need to get ransoms paid. And that's what makes people take your threat more seriously. But here's why they're going in time out. It was interesting very well on story, of course. But then they started talking about a hospital where this happened where suddenly all medical records or digital right? And they are trying to access this. And then they find out. Oh, my goodness there. We have no access to any patients files. And then so they're writing things down they fill out actual paper ten thousand documents span of three days at this hospital. But then the. CEO of this hospital said the concern that he had was who's to say because we live in a world of the internet of things things are digitally connected. Who's to say that this couldn't jump to a pacemaker or in IV or some of the machinery, which is all very technical. If you've been in a hospital anytime, recently, it's all digital. It's all connected to the internet. Who's to say couldn't jump to that? And then some life saving thing that somebody knows couldn't get impacted by this ransomware right now, they keep it the files used to say that it couldn't jump and then they said some guy from the FBI comes on. I wasn't afraid of this this morning now afraid of it. And he said one thing that we're concerned about is these ransomware folks, locking up nine one one in a city that they could do that until they say, look if you pay ten million dollars or we don't unlock the phone lines. It gave me an generally, what am I like? Who cares? We're all going to get hacked at some point, whatever. But on this kind of level digital terrorism. Cyberterrorism? It was like do I need to know about this. Because I can't mean knowing does not help you know, what I'm saying. Ransomware. But was the piece on sixty minutes last night. And it just leaves you thinking, well, we're screwed gang. We're screwed. So, but that's what sixty minutes does. You know, they teach you about things that you might otherwise never come across. Are you never know where the? And then it's like what three stories are we here tonight. And then there's usually some kind of a profile piece, which is fun. There was this other thing about this frontal lobe dementia that you can get which was also so tragic and so terrible. And that was how I got my morning starting just go back. Cinema of. Yeah. CBS Sunday morning. You gotta watch it. Feels like it's a little bit happier. Coming up at ten fifteen. I will tell you about a show that my wife, and I watched that we were loving. I cannot war with that is how about this. Did you know that captain Marvel's things? Tell you about that.

Anna cronyism Ryan editor Starbucks Anna cronyism Anna chronicity Anna Cronyn Jameh Steve frontal lobe dementia City hall CBS FBI Phil Atlanta captain Marvel Alabama Memphis Justin
"frontal lobe dementia" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

04:45 min | 1 year ago

"frontal lobe dementia" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"But by Nate dreamt, just a person who is much more collaborative and collegial rather of combative uncompetitive, so Buckley fit my mentality better came out here. Whether it was great, California. It's an immense the easy place to arrive in a very difficult place to leave. And I think I probably won't. I know that feeling I'm probably leaving California. I'm going through the morning process of accepting the departure because back you'll be fast. Leave when the switch sort of flip in terms of your passion for sleep. I think back at medical school. I was always interested in states of consciousness, I guess you describe it as I was fascinated by an these era fascinated by even hypnosis I remember actually went out to to meet this hypnotist to try and understand not, you know, the act and the show I wasn't interested in that fundamentally wanted to understand what did he think happened within the brain to produce this altered state of consciousness, so I got really interested in how the brain can switch between sort of states mental states, and then just fundamental awareness states that then naturally led me to just fascinated by sleep. I mean, there is no better demonstration of a gigantic shift in conscious state that happens to almost every single living creature on this planet every twenty four hours. Hours and back then this twenty years ago, we had this fundamental question. Why do we sleep? I'm what was staggering to me is that it took a third of all lives. Every species that we've studied today does it sleeps. It seems to have evolved with life itself on this planet, even more. We've understood the functions of the other main biological drives eating drinking and procreating full tens if not hundreds of years, but the full frame biological drive. The drive to sleep had continued to elude scientific judgment was that possible and back then twenty years ago, if someone were to ask you, why do we sleep the crass answer was we sleep to cure sleepiness. And that's the factious equivalent of saying what we eat to cure hunger. Will that tells you nothing about the fundamental nutritional benefits of? Macro nutrition. But that's where we were at with sleep. So it was fa- me this puff it collision of fascination in an innate biological problem and universal behavior conserved cross evolution together with the fact that we did it for a third of all lives. Plus, the fact that science had not been able to crack this this nut. It was one of the last great remaining scientific mysteries. I thought. Well, if you want to pick something that's going to sustain you for the rest of your life, and some of the most SABIC brilliant minds in science had tried to crack this nut and failed including Francis. Crick wonderful scientists who discovered the helix structure of DNA is unlikely I'm going to do it in my lifetime. But at least it will sustain me as a problem, and I could not let it go. And so that was where the intellectual bite happened the data the empirical scientific bite happened. When I was doing my PHD. I was studying brainwave patterns in. With dementia, and I was trying to do differential diagnosis very early on in the course of cognitive decline seeing which type of dementia. Did they have was it frontal lobe dementia with Lewy body dementia Alzheimer's dementia, and it was failing miserably Fatu years of getting nothing used to go home. I was living in this doctors residents this sort of in the middle of my room this igloo of journals that used to sit in our Sunday, just this kind of sort of sanctified circle of of knowledge, and I was reading one Sunday. And I realized that the different pathologies in these different dementias some would hit the Sleep Centers and others would leave though Sleep Centers completely untouched even within forms of dementia. That clinically presented very similarly. That's right. Yeah. You could see certain brain stem. Nuclei sentenced centers within the basic base of the brain some of those getting road by the dementia and those asleep generating. Centers whilst in other of those pathologies though sentence was spud until very late in the disorder. So they probably want to acting my L E patients. So I realized I was measuring the brainwave activity at the wrong time measuring my patients whilst they were awake..

frontal lobe dementia Sleep Centers California Nate Buckley Francis SABIC Crick Alzheimer twenty years twenty four hours
"frontal lobe dementia" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

11:48 min | 1 year ago

"frontal lobe dementia" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"Is that people have to make as we go through that E process, not only our own aging process, but the aging process of our parents, which I always liked to do a show like this before the holidays because often we get together with family members. And sometimes if we're seeing our parents every day, we don't often notice the changes that have occurred, but are siblings coming in. At this time might say boy, you know, mung seems not to remembers much or the house doesn't seem cleaner or there's a lot of stuff laying around. And do you think those bills that are piled up in the corner paid and for me, I have to say that my whole life? I've not had a great memory. I've always I've always. You know, what was that name? What was that name? And as I've been aging, I think to myself, boy, I hope that you know, I'm not going through any kind of memory loss. And I go Karen, you never had a good memory. And so, but I think we we all worry about those things and Mary Pat is a certified dementia care specialists. She's also developed the first Alzheimer's ability based program in the medical center of Princeton in Princeton, New Jersey. She comes with a passion for celebrating meaningful moments in recognizing the person was before dementia while supporting the person they are now, which is I think. Something that's so important. I was talking to one of my employees today. And she said my dad has had dementia now for about three years and one of my dearest friends. Mothers had dementia for fifteen years. And so there's a big span in between there. And I know my friend Dede tried to keep her mom at home as long as she could. And currently, our employees, mom and dad are home. And it's when do we make the decision and Chris looked at me today? And I said she said I really have to make that decision because the impact of my mom has been so great. So Mary, Pat, let's let's talk about memory care, and what that's like for a family to go through. And I know my friend Dede will always say, I don't have it. I don't have it. You know, she'll remember something she'll say, I don't have it. And so there is an impact. There's such a. Unfolding that happens in families and even friends when this happens. So what does that look like? And how does that? Well, let me let me reassure you. No, you've never had you say a good memory. I too I think most people get a little nervous when we forget things. But the rule of thumb is if you forget something, but no matter how long it takes you to recall it, remember it. If you do you're good, don't worry. Right because it is a natural part. But to your point, yes, Alzheimer's disease in particular has a significant impact on families as well. And as many of your listeners might know there are well over a hundred different kinds of dementia. Some is reversible some are reversible. Some are not, but Alzheimer's disease is the most commonly diagnosed many times, so they just say Alzheimer's. But yet they're somebody levels beneath the word. Actually. Yes there. So you've got your umbrella. The saying is as you've got your umbrella of all of the dementia, and then you have different dimensions underneath that umbrella. But Alzheimer's disease is the most commonly diagnosed, unfortunately, we get a lot of folks that are looking for places to live, and we just get a straight diagnosis of dementia with not really understanding what kind of dementia they have which can make a difference or where they are in the stages. So for example, frontal lobe dementia does not really have a memory impact as much as it has a higher executive function planning organizing impact descended facials still might retain some of that good memory. So it's different. But I think what's really important to remember. If you do have a loved one who has the diagnosis with dementia to really try to see if there's some test to figure out what type of dementia because there are different. Symptoms. So you know, when we look commonly at dementia. It's just not about memory loss. As I said before, you know, it can't be challenges in language that might mean word finding problems being able to form a sentence together. Express express thoughts there's some visual spatial things that may be going on. And so that is where objects are in space and time, so you might see someone walking across the floor, and there might be a rock or something that they see might be or feel might be a hole or something that's not safe to walk through. And that's an addition to any kind of vision changes that age brings along as well. So that's complicating there's also changes in personality that can happen changes in attention, organizing planning. There's a lot of things going on. It's just that memory loss. And what about age to this only happened to elderly people? Now, we've had. People that have been diagnosed in their mid forties late forties. And because there are so many different. You might even be looking at a Chris Goss, which is alcohol induced dementia. And that might you know, if someone is drinking excessively, you might see that in younger person as well. So no there, and it's funny because I don't even know if you have a statistic on this. But I happen to be talking to an individual the other day and a physician, and they said that their statistics showing that for eighteen people and young people that are using marijuana. That they're see memory loss associated with that. Have you heard anything on that yet? Nope. I have not yet. That was an interesting statistic. And I thought oh my goodness. Because everybody's talking about that. That's kind of the interesting subject right now when you talk about. The memory loss. And and you talk about. Dementia. Is that something that one season a family is pronounced within families are just real it's ugly had at any time. Well, there there is a lot of research going on with that. We do see that it has some train and some families. I was just part of a lecture that I was hearing, and they were focusing on like a lot of us in the field are focusing on prevention. Now, just to be clear when you're talking about prevention, we're talking about slowing the process down, there might be other factors environmental factors and things that that we do that might not be warranted with good. Good. What am I looking for advice? Good decision making if you will right right things that we do. But there are things that we have to pay attention to what we eat reducing the stress level in our lives making sure that we are getting some relaxation, some stress reduction. Making sure we are physically active making sure that we're also doing some cognitive challenges to ourselves. Most people think and believe that crossword puzzles everybody's doing every word agent, crossword puzzle, right? We gotta go for it. And while that is beneficial, and it is helpful. We're talking more in terms of challenging your your brain. And things that are much more challenging due situations problem solving kinds of things which are healthy. So while you have to embrace all of those things there is a way to slow it down. There was an interesting question about what about the food that we consume, you know, all of these new chemicals, and all of these things that that we're not quite sure what the long term effects are when it comes to dementia. And so there are things like lot of sugar in your diet, making sure we're eating were eating and consuming some of the Amiga that that are available. And so in some sense, there are it is about some of the things that we are eating. But I really I know we're talking today about making the decision of when someone has to decide whether or not they're going to keep their loved one home or not. When when these children adult children are coming home to visit parents over the holidays, what are some of the signs that that they might be looking for that would be an indication that there is something going on. Well, things that were possibly important to the individual. I've had some changes. So for example, if they've had things a particular way, either in their bedroom or in their kitchen, and they noticed things are becoming a little disarray. If you will if they notice that perhaps medications are in some way, not being taken or they're taking too many. So if they're familiar with medications are gotten once a month, and it seems like they're not stretching to the end of the month. Or they seem to be going beyond the end of the month. That may inadvertently have an impact if people are getting a little disorganized and even lost with inside their home. That's an issue maybe a little bit more hesitant to drive there could be many things, but it might be because they're starting to get lost. And they're realizing they're getting lost. And so they stay a little closer to home. And I know that husband and wives. If it's a mom and dad, they sorta cover for each other. But if they do cover for one another you began to see some wariness. Yes, some fatigue. Maybe even a little short short bursts of frustration from the person that is doing most of the caregiving or most of the guiding them as a couple because it can be extremely fatiguing and stressful, and we talk about how that stress really impacts the caregiver, and how the people the person that they're taking care of can feel some of that stress. Yes can feel what's happening and knowing that they are not probably quite one hundred percent. But not sure what's going on. What's wrong? My guest today is Mary Pat McCallum, and she is the director of memory care services at Capri senior communities, and we're going to take a break. And then let's talk about what those decisions look like. And how. They make the decision to move to that next level of care. We'll be right back. This thanksgiving.

Alzheimer Alzheimer's disease frontal lobe dementia Mary Pat Chris Goss Dede Princeton Mary Pat McCallum New Jersey mung Karen marijuana Mary executive director one hundred percent fifteen years three years
"frontal lobe dementia" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

09:54 min | 1 year ago

"frontal lobe dementia" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"And John's been traveling the countryside the last couple of months, he's brought back some insights. So John kind of a segue from okay? These people are at the age that they've got to retire brought up the fact they have to have health insurance. And and then, you know, you've gone through some stuff this red rioting had some people around you that have gotten sick of become ill and some that even past and as you go through that yourself and the people around you as you went through that experience. Does it give you some insight into fact that life isn't forever and that somewhere along the line you better figure out how to retire before? It's too late. Or is that just something doesn't come to mind because you're in the middle of all the turmoil of the challenges of illness? Yeah. It's a it's a very good question. We've had you know, as as we age is late fifties early sixties. We we even things start to happen in life dot only to us, but to our loved ones and those around us so a couple of the things that you know, that I have that have personally impacted our family is that we have a a relative very close to us same age in the same age category. That's been diagnosed with a frontal lobe dementia. And so every you know, when I look at it, and the plans that they had they had been talking for years about, you know, hey, when we retire where they were going to move to what they were going to the activties that they were going to have. You know, those are now dot they're just not they're and they're not available to them. Furthermore, his wife is not in a position to retire yet. So she's still working full-time and trying to manage the care, you know, and hope that she's calculated out. She has about two years left to put them in a, you know, a a tenable retirement physician, and she's just hoping that she can make it make it to that that benchmark. Debbie, and I had another close friend who was a couple of years ago diagnosed with less, Lou Gehrig's disease against same age kids which school together, and he you know, he passed away. And and he was, you know, still working was not skier heading towards retirement and kind of had that planned out, but it's still several years several years out. And so, you know, yes, I I'm very very grateful for the for the the lifestyle that we are able able to do through our investments through the, you know, the things that I've worked at at lifestyles unlimited. What are the other things that we've gone through that? I think demonstrates this is the. My dad was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer earlier in this year had surgery in April and was you know, in his now going through chemotherapy. And luckily, you know, had he had a scan couple of weeks ago at a meeting with his doctor a couple of days ago that I had had the fortunate to be there, you know. And it's looking good. It's cancer still there. It's better hasn't grown. And you know, so they they feel you know, with a positive outlook that it's going to be a you know, that they're on the right track of treatment. Yeah. He's eighty two years old. And so he moved out of his house that he'd been in for. Probably thirty years and recently into assisted living, and in that transition has been that Transition's been relatively smooth working on getting his house ready to sell prepping it to sell and which he is now under contract and that piece of it should be done by the end of September the. My mom, and by the way, my parents were divorced long long time ago when I was twelve and my mom lives in in Kansas and recent kind of short-notice visit to her and we've made the decision to gather that it's time for her to move from Wichita down here to to the Houston area and go into a system of living. She's been in her home for forty five years. And so, you know, when these life events come up one of the challenges that any of us have and a lot of us are going through. This is that your your time the require time changes dramatically and very quickly without warning. When when we went through this with with Debis Paris. Particularly her mom. Debbie was still working fulltime. I was in was working fulltime and a corporate job, and she was alternating with her with her siblings. So she was in Florida for a week like every three or four weeks and made several trips and. You know for for those in in the corporate world when that happens, it's very difficult. It's hard on the family because now you're eating all of your vacation days and sick days taking care of parents. You know, while she was in Florida. It was a you know, I was here. We had young kids. You know? So I was here. Watching the kids making sure they got school practice bed L those things and in in way of my complaining about doing that at all because it's it was what was necessary to get done. But I will tell you. It's different today. And you know because of. Because of my current financial situation. I'm not in corporate America. You know, I don't have that corporate job anymore. The that stress, and that case of it is not, you know, I I don't have that that part of the part of the stress, you know, it's stressful enough going through this, you know, with our parents with our loved ones, but it it I will say it it makes it easier. Because now that I'm you know, we're going up to which saw next week to help Mont you'll get mom packed up. We'll bring her back with us that you know, I'm not taking time off from work and able to do that. Yeah. I can see there's a big difference. Because when I worked in corporate America, it was, you know, sixty hours a week minimum sixty eight many weeks, and they almost made you feel like you were. Trying to think of the right word for it. I probably can't come up with the exact right word for it. They made you feel guilty as close as I could come to that. You didn't care about your job so forth. It was terrible because you feel bad about life and that. Yeah. And it's a it's a a lot of companies talk about family. I and I am a true believer in the family family. Does come first. And we do what's necessary to take care of the family. But yeah, there is always that pressure of, you know, are you really dedicated to the job, and, you know, in kind of going back to our theme of you know, that fear of, you know, economic, insecurity. It was always the even though it's a legitimate reason that I'm not at the office that I'm taking care of something that really needs to be taken care of. It was you know. Wow. So next time reviews come up will they remember this does this impact? Make does this allow me the opportunity to continue working there? Long term. You know, does does it impact promotions? Does it m? You know, in, you know, in some of that stuff was just, you know, paranoia at times, but you know, when when when I relied on and was you know, dependent upon the. The company for you know, to provide that paycheck, all those things go through those through your mind. And you know, I would have that feeling in the pit of my stomach even though I'm doing the right thing in you know, that this week. Yeah. I know the feeling the feeling that when I get back. There may not be a job waiting for me. I've had that feeling many times we're short break be back in the last segment radio show..

Debbie America John Transition Florida frontal lobe dementia Lou Gehrig Debis Paris Houston Mont Kansas Wichita eighty two years forty five years thirty years sixty hours four weeks two years
"frontal lobe dementia" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

09:57 min | 1 year ago

"frontal lobe dementia" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"And John's been traveling the countryside the last couple of months, he's brought back some insights. So john. Kind of a segue from okay? These people are at the age got to retire. And I brought up the fact they have to have health insurance. And and then, you know, you've gone through some stuff this red Ryo ping had some people around you that have gotten sick become ill and some that even past. And as you go through that yourself in the people around you as you went through that experience. Does it give you some insight into the fact that life isn't forever and that somewhere along the line you better figure out how to retire before? It's too late. Or is that just something doesn't come to mind because you're in the middle of all the turmoil of the challenges of the illness. Yeah. It's a it's a very good question. We've had you know, as as we age is late fifties early sixties. We, you know, we things start to happen in life dot only to us, but to our loved ones and those around us, so, you know, a couple of the things that you know, that I have that have personally impacted our family is that we have a a relative very close to us same age in the same age category. That's been diagnosed with a frontal lobe dementia. And so every you know, when I look at it, and the plans that they had they been talking for years about, you know, hey, when we retire where they were going to move to what they were going to the activities that they were going to have. Have you know, those are now thought they're just not they're and they're not available to them. Furthermore, his wife is not in a position to retire yet. So she's still working fulltime and trying to manage the care, you know, and hope that she's calculated out. She has about two years left to put them in a, you know, a tenable retirement position. And you know, she's just hoping that she can make it make it to that that benchmark. Debbie, and I had another close friend who was a couple of years ago diagnosed with less, Lou Gehrig's disease against same age kids which school together, and he you know, he passed away. And and he was still working was not you heading torch retirement and kind of had that planned out. It's still several years several years out. And so, you know, yes, I I'm very very grateful for the. You know for the the lifestyle that we are able able to do through our investments through the, you know, the things that I've worked at at lifestyles unlimited. What are the other things that we've gone through those think demonstrates this is the? My dad was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer earlier in this year had surgery in April and was you know, in his now going through chemotherapy. And luckily, you know, had he had a scan couple of weeks ago at a meeting with his doctor a couple of days ago that I had had the fortunate to be there, you know. And it's looking good. It's cancer still there. It's better hasn't grown. And you know, so they they feel you know, with a positive outlook that it's going to be a. You know that they're on the right track of treatment. Yeah. He's eighty two years old. And so he moved out of his house that he'd been in for. Probably thirty years and recently into assisted living and. In that transition has been that Transition's been relatively smooth working on getting his house ready to sell prepping it to sell and which he is now under contract, and that piece of it should be done by the end of September, the my mom, and by the way, my parents were divorced long time ago when I was twelve and my mom lives in in Kansas and recent kind of short-notice visit to her and we've made the decision to gather that it's time for her to move from Wichita down here to to the Houston area and go into a system living. She's been in her home for forty five years. And so, you know, Wendy's life events come up one of the. Challenges that any of us have and a lot of us are going through. This is that your your time the require time changes dramatically and very quickly without warning. When when we went through this with with Debbie's parents, particularly her mom, Debbie was still working fulltime. I was in. I was working fulltime and a corporate job, and she was alternating with her with her siblings. So she was in Florida for a week. Like every three or four weeks and made several trips and. You know for for those in in the corporate world when that happens, it's very difficult. It's hard on the family because now you're eating all of your vacation days and sick days taking care of parents. You know, while she was in Florida. It was a you know, I was here. We had young kids. You know? So I was here. Watching the kids making sure they got school practice bed L, those things and in no way, am I complaining about doing that at all? Because it's it was what was necessary to get dot. But I will tell you. It's different today. And you know because of. Because of my current financial situation. I'm not in corporate America. You know, I don't have that corporate job anymore. The that stress, and that piece of it is not, you know, I I don't have that that part of the part of the stress, you know, it's stressful enough going through this, you know, with our parents with our loved ones. But it it. I will say it it makes it easier. Because now that I'm you know, we're going up to Wichita next week to help Mont, you'll get mom packed up. We'll bring her back with us that you know, I'm not taking time off from work and able to do that. Yeah. I can see there's a big difference. Because when I worked in corporate America was, you know, sixty hours a week minimum sixty eight many weeks, and they almost made you feel like you were. Trying to think of the right word for it. I probably can't come up with the exact right word. They made you feel guilty as close as I could come to that. You didn't care about your job so forth. Yeah. It was terrible because you feel bad about life and that. Yeah. And it's a it's a a lot of companies talk about family. I and I am a true believer in the family family. Does come first. And we do what's necessary to take care of the family. But yeah, there is always that pressure of it. Are you really dedicated to the job, and you know, in kind of going back to our theme of you know, that fear of, you know, economic, insecurity. It was always the even though it's a legitimate reason that I'm not at the office that I'm taking care of something that really needs to be taken care of. It was you know. Wow. So next time reviews come up will they remember this does this impact? Make does this allow me the opportunity to continue working there? Long term. You know, does does it impact promotions? Does it? You know, in, you know, in some of that stuff was just paranoia at times. But you know, when when when I relied on and was dependent upon the. The company for you know, to provide that paycheck, all those things go through go through your mind. And you know, I would have that funny feeling in the pit of my stomach even though I'm doing the right thing in you know, I don't have that this week. Yeah. I know the feeling deep feeling when I get back. There may not be a job waiting for me. I've had that feeling many times. We're short break be back. The last segment of the del Watson radio show..

Debbie America Florida Wichita frontal lobe dementia John Transition Lou Gehrig Wendy Houston Mont Kansas eighty two years forty five years thirty years sixty hours four weeks two years
"frontal lobe dementia" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

09:52 min | 1 year ago

"frontal lobe dementia" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"So John kind of a segue from okay? These people are at the age that they've got to retire. And I brought up the fact they have to have health insurance. And and then, you know, you've gone through some stuff this rather. I opening had some people around you that have gotten sick of become ill and some that even past. And as you go through that yourself in the people around you as you went through that experience. Does it give you some insight into the fact that life isn't forever and that somewhere along the line you better figure out how to retire before? It's too late. Or is that just something doesn't come to mind because you're in the middle of all the turmoil of the challenges of illness? Yeah. It's a it's a very good question. We've had you know, as as we age is late fifties early sixties. We we evil things start to happen in life dot only to us, but to our loved ones and those around us, so, you know, a couple of the things that you know, that I have that have personally impacted our family is that we have a a relative very close to us same age in the same age category. That's been diagnosed with a frontal lobe dementia. And so every you know, when I look at it, and the plans that they had, you know, they have been talking for years about, you know, hey, when we retire where they were going to move to what they were going to do the activities that they were going to have. Have you know, those are now thought they're just not they're not available to them. Furthermore. His wife is not in a position to retire yet. So she's still working full-time and trying to manage the care, you know, and hope that. She's calculated out. She has about two years left to put them in a, you know, a a tenable retirement position. And you know, she's just hoping that she can make it to make it to that that benchmark Debbie, and I had another close friend who was a couple of years ago diagnosed with LS, Lou Gehrig's disease against same age kids which school together, and he you know, he passed away. And and he was still working was not which gear heading torch retirement and kind of had that planned out. It's still several years several years out. And so, you know, yes, I I'm very very grateful for the. You know for the the lifestyle that we are able able to do through our investments through the, you know, the things that I've worked at at lifestyles unlimited. What are the other things that we've gone through those think demonstrates this is the? My dad was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer earlier in this year had surgery in April. And was you know, in is now going through chemotherapy. And luckily, you know, had he had a scan couple of weeks ago at a meeting with his doctor a couple of days ago that I had had the fortunate to be there, you know. And it's looking good. It's cancer still there. It's better it hasn't grown. And you know, so they they feel you know, with a positive outlook that it's going to be a you know, that they're on the right track of treatment. Yeah. He's eighty two years old. And so he moved out of his house that he'd been in for. Probably thirty years and recently into assisted living and. In that transition has been that Transition's been relatively smooth, you know, working on getting his house ready to sell prepping it to sell, and which he is now under contract, and that piece of it should be done by the end of September, the my mom, and by the way, my parents were divorced long long time ago when I was twelve my mom lives in in Kansas and recent kind of short notice visit to her and we've made the decision to gather that it's time for her to move from Wichita down here to to the Houston area and go into assisted living. She's been in her home for forty five years. And so, you know, Wendy's life events come up one of the. Challenges that any of us have. And and a lot of us are going through. This is that your your time the require time changes dramatically and very quickly without warning. When when we went through this with with Debbie's parents, particularly her mom, Debbie was still working fulltime. I was in style was working fulltime in a corporate job, and she was alternating with her with her siblings. So she was in Florida for a week. Like every three or four weeks and made several trips and. For for those in in the corporate world when that happens, it's very difficult. It's hard on the family because now you're eating all of your vacation days and sick days taking care of parents. You know, while she was in Florida. It was a you know, I was here. We had young kids. You know? So I was here. Watching the kids making sure they got school practice bed. L those things and in in Delaware. My complaining about doing that at all because it was what was necessary to get done. But I will tell you. It's different today. And you know because of. Because of my current financial situation. I'm not in corporate America. You know, I don't have that corporate job anymore. The that stress, and that piece of it is not, you know, I I don't have that that part of the part of the stress, you know, it's stressful enough going through this, you know, with our parents with our loved ones, but it it I will say it, you know, it it makes it easier. Because now that I'm you know, we're going up to Wichita next week to help Mont, you'll get mom packed up. We'll bring her back with us that you know, I'm not taking time off from work. And you're able to do that. You can see there's a big difference. Because when I worked in corporate America, it was, you know, sixty hours a week minimum sixty eight many weeks, and they almost made you feel like you were. Trying to think of the right word for it. I probably can't come up with the exact right word for it. They made you feel guilty as close as I could come to that. You didn't care about your job so forth. It was terrible because you feel bad about and then. Yeah. And it's a it's a a lot of companies talk about family. I and I am a true believer in the family family. Does come first. And we do what's necessary to take care of the family. But yeah, there is always that pressure of, you know, are you really dedicated to the job, and, you know, in kind of going back to our top theme of you know, that fear of, you know, economic, insecurity. It was always the even though it's a legitimate reason that I'm not at the office that I'm taking care of something that really needs to be taken care of. It was you know. Wow. So next time reviews come up will they remember this does this impact? Make does this allow me the opportunity to continue working there? Long term. You know, does does it impact promotions? Does it? You know, in, you know, in some of that stuff was just you know, paranoia at times. But you know, when went when I relied on and was you know, dependent upon the. The company for you know, to provide that paycheck, all those things go through go through your mind. And you know, I would have that funny feeling in the pit of my stomach even though I'm doing the right thing in you know, I don't have that this week. Yeah. I know the feeling the feeling that when I get back. There may not be a job waiting for me. I've had that feeling many times we're short break be back in the last segment of the radio show..

Debbie America Wichita frontal lobe dementia Florida Transition John Lou Gehrig Wendy Houston Delaware Mont Kansas eighty two years forty five years thirty years sixty hours four weeks two years
"frontal lobe dementia" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

WDTK The Patriot

10:19 min | 1 year ago

"frontal lobe dementia" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

"Welcome back. Now, here's some more unconventional wisdom to set you free from the men on a mission to retire. American one person at a time. Welcome back to Dell wisely radio show. We'd be here today is Johnny Laba Ridgway. Oh. You know, vice president of multifamily consulting lifestylesunlimited and judgment traveling the countryside the last couple of months, he's brought back some insights. So john. Kind of a segue from okay? These people are at the age that they've got to retire brought up the fact they have to have health insurance. And and then, you know, you've gone through some stuff this red rioting had some people around you that have gotten sick or become ill and some that even past and as you go through that yourself and the people around you as you went through that experience. Does it give you some insight into the fact that life isn't forever and it somewhere along the line you better figure out how to retire before? It's too late. Or is that just something doesn't come to mind because you're in the middle of all the turmoil of the challenges of the illness. Yeah. It's a it's a very good question. We've had you know, as as we age is late fifties early sixties. We, you know, we things start to happen in life, not only to us, but to our loved ones and those around us, so, you know, a couple of things that you know, that I have personally impacted our family is that we have a a relative very close to us same age in the same age category. That's been diagnosed with a frontal lobe dementia. And so every you know, when I look at it, and the plans that they had, you know, they've been talking for years about, you know, hey, when we retire where they were going to move to what they were going to do the activities that they were going to have. Have you know, those are now not they're just not they're and they're not available to them. It's Furthermore, his wife is not in a position to retire yet. So she's still working full-time and trying to manage the care, you know, and hope that she's calculated out. She has about two years left to put them in a, you know, a a tenable retirement position. And you know, she's just hoping that she can make it to make it to that that benchmark. W I had another close friend who was a couple of years ago diagnosed with L S, Lou Gehrig's disease against same age kids which school together, and he he passed away. And and he was still working was not know heading towards retirement and kind of had that planned out. It's still several years several years out. And so, you know, yes, I I'm very very grateful for the. For the build lifestyle that we are able able to do through our investments through the you know, the things that I've learned at lifestyles unlimited one of the other things that we've gone through that. I think demonstrates this is the. My dad was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer earlier in this year had surgery in April and was and is now going through chemotherapy. And luckily, you know, had he had a scan couple of weeks ago at a meeting with his doctor a couple of days ago that I had had the fortunate to be there, you know. And it's looking good. It's cancer still there. It's better hasn't grown. And you know, so they feel you know with a positive outlook that it's going to be a. You know that they're on the right track of treatment. Yeah. He's eighty two years old. And so he moved out of his house that he'd been in for. Probably thirty years and recently into assisted living and. That that transition has been that Transition's been relatively smooth working on getting his house ready to sell prepping it to sell and which he is now under contract and that piece of it should be done by the end of September. The my mom, by the way. My parents were divorced long time ago when I was twelve and my mom lives in in Kansas and recent kind of short notice visit to her and we've made the decision together that it's time for her to move from Wichita down here to to the Houston area and go into a sister living she's been in her home for forty five years. And so, you know, Wendy's life events come up one is the. Challenges that any of us have. And and a lot of us are going through. This is that your your time the require time changes dramatically and very quickly without warning. When when we went through this with with Debbie's parents, particularly her mom, Debbie was still working fulltime. I was in. I was working fulltime and a corporate job, and she was alternating with her with her siblings. So she was in Florida for a week. Like every three or four weeks and made several trips and. You know for for those in in the corporate world when that happens, it's very difficult. It's hard on the family because now you're eating all of your vacation days and sick days taking care of parrots. You know, while she was in Florida. It was a you know, I was here. We had young kids. You know? So I was here. Watching the kids making sure they got school practice bed all those things. And in in the way of my complaining about doing that at all because it was what was necessary to get done. But I will tell you. It's different today, and you know, because of because of my current financial situation, I'm not in corporate America. You know? I don't have that. Corporate job anymore. The that stress, and that piece of it is not, you know, I don't have that that part of the part of the stress stressful enough going through this, you know, with our parents with our loved ones, but it it I will say it it makes it easier. Because now that I'm you know, we're going up to Wichita next week to help get mom packed up. We'll bring her back with us that you know, I'm not taking time off from work and able to do that. Yeah. I can see there's a big difference. Because what I worked in corporate America was, you know, sixty hours a week minimum sixty eight many weeks, and they almost made you feel like you were. Trying to think of the right word for it. I probably can't come up with the exact right word for it. They made you feel guilty as close as I could come to that. You didn't care about your job so forth. It was terrible because you feel bad about life. You live in. Yeah. And it's a it's a a lot of companies talk about family. I and I am a true believer in the family family. Does come first. And we do what's necessary to take care of the family. But yeah, there is always that pressure of, you know, are you really dedicated to the job, and you know, and kind of going back to our top theme of you know, that fear of you know, of economic insecurity. It was always the even though it's legitimate reason that I'm not at the office that I'm taking care of something that really needs to be taken care of. It was you know. Wow. So next time reviews come up will they remember this does this impact me does this allow me the opportunity to continue working there? Long term. You know, does does it impact promotions? Does it, you know? In, you know, in some of that stuff was just you know, paranoia at times. But you know, when when when I relied on and was dependent upon the. The company for you know, to provide that paycheck, all those things go through those through your mind. And you know, I would have that. Funny feeling in the pit of my stomach even though I'm doing the right thing. And you know, I don't have that this week. Yeah. I know the feeling the feeling that when I get back. There may not be a job waiting for me. I've had that feeling many times the short break me back the last segment of the radio show..

America Wichita Debbie Johnny Laba Ridgway Florida Transition Dell vice president frontal lobe dementia Lou Gehrig Wendy Houston Kansas eighty two years forty five years thirty years sixty hours four weeks
"frontal lobe dementia" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

10:19 min | 1 year ago

"frontal lobe dementia" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Welcome back. Now, here's some more unconventional wisdom to set you free from the men on a mission to retire. American one person at a time. Welcome back to the Delwan radio show. We'd be here today is Johnny lobby Ridgway. Executive vice president of multifamily consulting lifestyles unlimited and Joshua traveling the countryside the last couple of months, he's brought back some insights, so John kind of a segue from okay. These people at the age that they've got to retire. And I brought up the fact they have to have health insurance. And and then, you know, you've gone through some stuff this red Ryo ping had some people around you that have gotten sick or become ill and some that even past and as you go through that yourself and the people around you as you went through that experience. Does it give you some insight into the fact that life isn't forever and somewhere along the line you better figure out how to retire before? It's too late. Or is that just something doesn't come to mind because you're in the middle of all the turmoil of the challenges of the illness. Yeah. It's a it's a very good question. We've had you know, as as we age is late fifties early sixties. We, you know, we things start to happen in life, not only to us, but to our loved ones and those around us, and so, you know, a couple of the things that you know, that I have that have personally impacted our family is that we have a a relative very close to us same age in the same age category. That's been diagnosed with a frontal lobe dementia. And so every you know, when I look at it, and the plans that they had, you know, they've been talking for years about, you know, hey, when we retire where they were going to move to what they were going to do the activities that they were going to have. Have you know, those are now not they're just not they're and they're not available to them. It's Furthermore, his wife is not in a position to retire yet. So she's still working fulltime and trying to manage the care, you know, and hope that she's calculated out. She has about two years left to put them in a, you know, a a tenable retirement position. And you know, she's just hoping that she can make it make it to that that benchmark. Debbie, and I had another close friend who was a couple of years ago diagnosed with L S. Lou Gehrig's disease against same age kids which school together, and he you know, he passed away. And and he was still working was not whiskey, you're heading towards retirement and kind of had that planned out. That's still several years several years out. And so, you know, yes, I I'm very very grateful for the. You know for the the lifestyle that we are able able to do through our investments through the, you know, the things that I've worked at at lifestyles unlimited. What are the other things that we've gone through that? I think demonstrates this is the. My dad was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer earlier in this year had surgery in April and was and is now going through chemotherapy. And luckily, you know, had he had a scan couple of weeks ago at a meeting with his doctor a couple of days ago that I had had the fortunate to be there, you know. And it's looking good. It's cancer still there. It's better hasn't grown. And you know, so they feel you know with a positive outlook that it's going to be a. You know that they're on the right track of treatment. Yeah. He's eighty two years old. And so he moved out of his house that he'd been in for. Probably thirty years and recently into assisted living and. You know, that that transition has been that Transition's been relatively smooth working on getting his house ready to sell prepping it to sell and which he is now under contract and that piece of it should be done by the end of September the. My mom, and by the way, my parents were divorced long long time ago when I was twelve and my mom lives in in Kansas and. Recent kind of short-notice visit to her and we've made a decision together that it's time for her to move from Wichita down here to to the Houston area and go into assisted living. She's been in her home for forty five years. And so, you know, Wendy's life bench come up one of the challenges that any of us have. And and a lot of us are going through. This is that your your time the require time changes dramatically and very quickly without warning. When when we went through this with with Debbie's parents, particularly her mom Getty was still working fulltime. I was in style was working fulltime. A corporate job, and she was alternating with her with her siblings. So she was in Florida for a week. Like every three or four weeks and made several trips and. You know for for those in in the corporate world when that happens, it's very difficult. It's hard on the family because now you're eating all of your vacation days and sick days taking care of parrots. You know, while she was in Florida. It was a you know, I was here. We had young kids. You know? So I was here. Watching the kids making sure they got school practice bed all those things. And in in the way of my complaining about doing that at all because it was what was necessary to get done. But I will tell you. It's different today. And you know because of. Because of my current financial situation. I've not incorporate America, you know, I don't have that corporate job anymore. The that stress, and that piece of it is not, you know, I I don't have that that part of the part of the stress, you know, it's stressful enough going through this, you know, with their parents with their loved ones. But it it. I will say it it makes it easier. Because now that I'm you know, we're going up to which ITAR next week to help you get mom packed up. We'll bring her back with us that you know, I'm not taking time off from work and able to do that. Yeah. I can see there's a big difference. Because when I worked in corporate America was, you know, sixty hours a week minimum sixty eight many weeks, and they almost made you feel like you were. Trying to think of the right word for it. I probably can't come up with the exact right word for it. They made you feel guilty as close as I can come to that. You didn't care about your job so forth. It was terrible because you felt bad about it. Yeah. And it's a it's a a lot of companies talk about family. I and I am a true believer in the family family. Does come first. And we do what's necessary to take care of the family. But yeah, there is always that pressure of you know. Are you really dedicated to the job, and you know, and kind of going back to our theme of fear of you know, of economic insecurity. It was always the even though it's a legitimate reason that I'm not at the office that I'm taking care of something that really needs to be taken care of. It was you know. Wow. So next time reviews come up will they remember this does this impact me does this allow me the opportunity to continue working there? Long term. You know, does it does it impact promotions? Does it m you know, in, you know, in some of that stuff was just, you know, paranoia at times, but you know, when when when I relied on and was dependent upon the. The company for you know, to provide that paycheck, all those things go through go through your mind. And you know, I would have that feeling in the pit of my stomach even though I'm doing the right thing in you know, I don't have that this week. Yeah. I know the feeling the feeling that when I get back. There may not be a job waiting for me. I've had that feeling many times. We're short break be back. The last segment of the Watson radio show..

Debbie America Transition Florida Johnny lobby Ridgway Executive vice president frontal lobe dementia S. Lou Gehrig Joshua John Houston Wendy Kansas Wichita eighty two years forty five years thirty years sixty hours
"frontal lobe dementia" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

08:11 min | 1 year ago

"frontal lobe dementia" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"And John Smith traveling the countryside the last couple of months, he's brought back some insights. So john. Kind of a segue from okay? These people are at the age that they've got to retire. And I brought up the fact they have to have health insurance. And and then, you know, you've gone through some stuff this red rioting had some people around you that have gotten sick of become ill and somebody passed, and as you go through that yourself and the people around you as you went through that experience. Does it give you some insight in the fact that life isn't forever and that somewhere along the line you better figure out how to retire before? It's too late. Or is that just something doesn't come to mind because you're in the middle of all the turmoil of the challenges of the illness. Yeah. It's a it's a very good question. We've had you know, as as we age is. Late fifties early sixties. We, you know, we things start to happen in life, not only to us, but to our loved ones and those around us, so, you know, a couple of things that you know, that I have that have personally impacted our family is that we have a a relative very close to us say h in the same age category. That's been diagnosed with a frontal lobe dementia. And so every you know, when I look at it, and the plans that they had, you know, they've been talking for years about, you know, hey, when we retire where they were going to move to what they were going to the activities that they were going to have, you know, those are now dot they're just not they're and they're not available to them. Furthermore, his wife is not in a position to retire yet. So she's still working fulltime and trying to manage the care, you know, and hope that she's calculated out she has about two years left to put them in a tentacle retirement position. And you know, she's just hoping that she can make it to make it to that that benchmark. Debbie, and I had another close friend who was a couple of years ago diagnosed with L S. Lou Gehrig's disease inch same age kids what school together, and he you know, he passed away, and and he was still working with your heading towards retirement kinda had that planned out. That's still several years several years out. So, you know, yes, I I'm very very grateful for the. For the lifestyle that we are able able to do through our investments through the you know, the things that I've worked at at lifestyle unlimited one of the other things that we've gone through think demonstrates, this is the. My dad was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer earlier in this year had surgery in April. And was you know in his now going through chemotherapy? And luckily, you know, had he had a scan couple of weeks ago at a meeting with his doctor a couple of days ago that I had the fortunate to be there, you know. And it's looking good. It's cancer still there. It's better hasn't grown. And you know, so they feel with a positive outlook that it's going to be a you know, that they're on the right track of treatment. Yeah. He's eighty two years old. And so he moved out of his house that he'd been in or. Probably thirty years and recently into assisted living and. You know, that that transition has been that Transition's been relatively smooth working on getting his house ready to sell prepping it to sell, and which he is now under contract, and that piece of it should be done by the end of September, the by mom, and by the way, my parents were divorced long long time ago when I was twelve and my mom lives in in Kansas and. Recent kind of short-notice visit to her and we've made the decision to gather that it's time for her to move from Wichita down here to to the Houston area and go into a system Levy, she's been in her home for forty five years. And so, you know, Wendy, wife, you bench come up one of the challenges that any of us have and a lot of us are going through. This is that your your time the required time changes dramatically and very quickly without warning. When when we went through this with with Debis parish, particularly her mom. Debbie was still working fulltime. I was in. I was working fulltime and a corporate job, and she was alternating with her with her siblings. So she was in Florida for a week like every three or four weeks and made several trips and. You know for for those in the in the corporate world when that happens, it's very difficult. It's hard on the family because now you're eating all of your vacation days and sick days taking care of parents. You know, while she was in Florida. It was a you know, I was here. We had young kids. You know? So I was here. Watching the kids making sure they got school practice, bad L, those things and in in Delaware. My complaining about doing that at all because it was what was necessary to get done. But I will tell you. It's different today, and you know, because of because of my current financial situation, I'm not in corporate America. You know? I don't have that. Corporate job anymore. The that stress in that piece of it is not, you know, I I don't have that that part of the part of the stress, you know, it's stressful enough going through this, you know, with their parents with their loved ones, but it it I will say it it makes it easier. Because now that I'm we're going up to which ITAR next week to help you'll get long packed up. We'll bring her back with us that you know, I'm not taking time off from work. And you're able to do that. Yeah. I can see those big difference. Because what I worked in corporate America was, you know, sixty hours a week minimum sixty eight many weeks, and they almost made you feel like you were. Think of the right word for it. I probably can't come up the exact right workbook. They made you feel guilty as close as I could come to that. You didn't care about your job so forth. It was terrible because you feel bad about..

Debbie America Transition Florida frontal lobe dementia John Smith S. Lou Gehrig Debis parish Wendy Houston Wichita Delaware Levy Kansas eighty two years forty five years thirty years sixty hours four weeks
"frontal lobe dementia" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

02:59 min | 3 years ago

"frontal lobe dementia" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Imagine you all close point out when contacted by the time andrew jackson was inaugurated he owned roughly a hundred and sixty people including women and children so that was that people i mean math the number of slaves obviously someone with considerable wealth for the time and included women and children yes and included of you know is the way collection of slaves what the hell would even call that but he you yeah the digital slaves because they they were having children and things like that people who were slaves to him for generations in some cases in the national donald trump hero i don't know and the donald trump with andrew jackson which the atmosphere he's completely upset boy you're watches superman wants to put the towel around his neck is the roof he's if i did huge amount of people more people pretty cake enslave all we had the most beautiful chocolate cake and that's another thing donald trump can relate to you you also tweeted day for baby can't handle tough questions awkward behind his desk literally has so much whining my the whining that was one of my favorite moments when john dickerson corners him a about wire tapping and instead of confronting the question with the white house correspondent we had a runoff to harrisburg to know go within the apple his supporters and then and then he did it again with john dickerson worried about wire taps in east wanders off like he did that time when he was asked about mike flynn during that executive order signing where he just forgot to sign a thing of yes yes that's what i said the other day i think that was a response to the snl sketch the big news little desk could be visible you if i wanted to you could see that moment for the first time i didn't feed donald trump i saw alec baldwin donald trump i thought donald trump for the president show i like all of his imitators in that moment where it's completely scream to me that donald trump has become self terror goal this kind of ridiculous behaviour only just over under days yeah know exactly what the two sides the sociopath malignant narcissist i don't know frontal lobe dementia just oh man dickinson was like was clear i was to let myself out now was one.

donald trump andrew jackson white house correspondent harrisburg apple john dickerson mike flynn president frontal lobe dementia dickinson executive snl alec baldwin