21 Burst results for "Frisch"

Climate Change Is A Top Campaign Issue  At Least For Democrats

Environment: NPR

06:54 min | 7 months ago

Climate Change Is A Top Campaign Issue At Least For Democrats

"This year climate change is a top campaign issue at least for Democrats. Yesterday, we looked at president trump's record. On the issue today, we'll explore toe Biden's plan, which is the most ambitious climate proposal. Any presidential candidate has ever laid out. We've got NPR's Nathan rods and NPR's Jeff Brady both of our climate team with us. Hi, guys good morning. So. Let's just the obviously our Joe Biden and Donald Trump do not exactly agree on climate? Change. Absolutely yeah I think that's a fair way to put it. President trump repeatedly rejects climate science and generally he depicts regulations to address climate. Change is bad for the economy and bad for jobs Joe Biden calls climate change existential threat to our health, our economy, our national security, the whole thing but he's also trying to frame it right now as an opportunity you know when? Donald. Trump thinks about climate change he thinks hoax. When I think about I think jobs. Good paying union opposite put. To work. Building a stronger more. Climate resilient nation I mean nate. That sounds great. But has he laid out a plan for how he would actually make that happen. Yes, and it is a lot Hewitt invest money for one climate. Change is part of his economic recovery plan for the pandemic. But he's also says he'll do executive actions right? Other Gate. He says he's GONNA re enter the Paris climate agreement and put the US back in the global climate conversation He's talking about conserving land for biodiversity stopping offshore drilling in the Arctic. Methane from existing oil and gas tell me when you want me to stop. But he's also putting money towards climate adaptation measures to make communities more resilient to sea level rise flooding hurricanes fires. You know the type of things we've experienced over the last few months and he's also promising massive investments in green energy and infrastructure. This is where the. Jobs part of what he's promising comes in. So that means more solar more wind high speed rail, electric car chargers all with the goal of zeroing out carbon pollution from our electrical sector by twenty, thirty five and making the country carbon neutral. So it's contributing anymore to climate change by twenty fifty. And I mean I know a lot of campaigns I mean the rhetoric is aspirational, right but even so I mean by twenty fifty shifting the entire US economy to be carbon neutral to sounds like a massive undertaking is he going to be able to accomplish that Jeff? You know most of the experts I've talked with thinking is possible. The plan includes a lot of executive actions. The Biden says, he would take right away some of the nature mentioned. It also this plan requires new laws passed by Congress to create policies for meeting that overall goal. Now, that's going to require a democratic majority in the Senate most likely I talked with Scott Siegel. He's a partner with the law firm Bracewell, which represents a lot of energy clients including fossil fuel companies, and you can imagine that they have a lot at stake care. He thinks guidance climate plan is realistic. He says, it includes both regulations and incentives for people. In Industries to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and I think when a plan has both and doesn't rely only on the carrot or the stick, it's a sign of maturity in approaching these issues. Siegel likes that it leaves room for some fossil fuels with carbon offsets and capture, and he points out that the electric power sector is already on its way to meeting that interim 2035 call some of those companies in utilities are setting net zero carbon goals all on their own. Yeah, and that's an important point. I talked to Karl Frisch who worked at the US Department of Energy under three administrations including trump's she's now at the Rocky Mountain Institute you know and I asked her if she thinks it could all be done by Biden alone if he gets elected. No. So to get where we need to go on climate in the United States to reduce emissions and build a sustainable economy, it takes action by the executive branch action by Congress. And action by state leaders, city leaders, business leaders on the ground, and she says, you know a lot of these actions are already happening at the local level. So a Biden administration would be smart to try to build on that existing momentum. So something we hear president trump attack Joe Biden on a lot is fracking fracking for natural gas. The president alleging that Joe Biden wants to ban it. Let's just clear this up Jeff Does Joe Biden WanNa. Ban fracking. No, he doesn't want to ban fracking. He has repeatedly said that he would not ban all fracking just new fracking on federal land and when trump says that it's aimed at voters and energy producing swing states like Pennsylvania, which actually has very little federal land but that's still a point of contention for for Biden, with mini climate activists who say the country should stop all fracking and keep all fossil fuels in the ground to slow climate change. So. What about the politics of climate change you know I mean we know what the facts are that it is happening that humans have contributed to it as well. But what about the politics of climate change because we know for Republicans it's an incredibly divisive issue where do Democrats stand on Biden's proposals? Well, polling indicates a majority of registered voters in the US view climate change as a real threat to the country, and when you look at Republicans climate change is actually a lot less divisive you get. But in terms of Democrats a recent poll by Pew found that more than two-thirds of Joe Biden supporters sit climate change is very important to them. So Biden's. Plan is not as ambitious as what some Progressive Democrats want to see it is not the green new deal despite what the president repeatedly says, but it is more ambitious than what Joe Biden had initially proposed. So for example, his plan now includes an environmental justice component which would aim to address the fact that people of color are disproportionately affected by pollution climate change and have been for a long time. His plan says he'd do that by investing in disadvantaged communities pulling polluters accountable I talked to Michelle Roberts with the Environmental Justice Health Alliance about this, and she has a long history with Biden because she's actually from Delaware, his home state and she says historically. Always overly supportive when it came to dealing with polluters like dupont over communities like hers he was a Filibuster for the political economy that was running the great state of Delaware. Does that make sense BA- Roberts says she's met with Biden since and she thinks his views have a she supports him but it's going to be important. She says if he's elected to hold them accountable all the things that he's promising to do now. NPR's nate wrought and NPR's Jeff. Brady, thank you for your reporting. Thank you. Thank

Joe Biden Donald Trump Jeff Brady President Trump United States Executive NPR Congress Scott Siegel Michelle Roberts Us Department Of Energy Nate Dupont Delaware Senate Nathan Hewitt
How COVID-19 Is Taking Us Back to the Core of Training and Human Movement

Just Fly Performance Podcast

07:34 min | 1 year ago

How COVID-19 Is Taking Us Back to the Core of Training and Human Movement

"Jeremy. Good to talk to you man. I feel like we talk about youth sports a lot and what would happen. I think about what happened if there was a big just atomic bomb so to speak dropped on the youth sports industry and it had to kind of restart from the ashes and on some level. Maybe were were there at least for the time being. But what do you think about that stuff with how kids are? What's what's what's happening in the level of kids in play right now with all that. Yeah well I think that you're stuck. You're stuck at home. You're stuck in your neighborhood and even are not even allowed you know. The kids are excited to be at a school right. You can't go anywhere you can't go to anyone's house you can't go on you know go play with any kids are not a close anyways so as we were saying before it's like. I think the one of the things that kids are doing a lot of that. I've seen it might have been doing it as ride bikes. You know because you typically away from each other. You're not too close not jumping wrestling like that. So I think that's one those things that You know we've talked about this before two things. The kids used to do that. Don't do anymore and this is one of a ride. Bikes is sort of like brought back from the ashes. Which is which is nice to see any other thing like we've been. We've been playing a lot of wiffle ball stick ball you know any of those games. We took the dog out the other day. I had up by one of my sons aluminum bat and I had aluminum bat. And we're GONNA tennis ball back and forth down the down the street to each other while the dog ran in the middle. You know what I mean. That's typically. He's at baseball practice or or or basketball practice. We even die. I don't know if you see my video but I we moved the We have a trampoline at our house and we moved the basketball hoop over above the trampoline. So that gets throwdown dunks and and play different games inside the inside trampoline which is pretty awesome too. So I know someone's going to get their hands header with gotten these days but still I'm worth I'll take that chance. Yeah they're gonNA be one of those youtube videos were like they're they're gets caught at their hanging upside down when I went out Saturday night my youngest son see seventy was like just hanging on the red after a dunk thinking these lebrons so you know it's keeping them busy and to keep it a move in and that's we need right now for sure. Yeah and it's going back at. Ci taking kids out of organized sports for the time being going back to the the fundamentals of everything the thing they probably should be doing more of right now anyways then I I like CR- with riding bikes to it. Just makes me think about all the all the creativity that comes out when kids ride bikes to you know you're coming. You're find different ways to go off curbs and and you know get around and then there's you know even though it's a bike and that's not necessarily running on the ground there's still. There's so many things that are happening. That are really exciting. Yeah Yeah for sure. There's a lot of like you know those those those little skills that you don't even think about like dynamic balance and and you know being able to like lateral balance. That's one of those ones right like side like you get you get good even like when you try to accelerate your like believing that bike like side to side while you're driving your feet it's route. I always loved how that looks when you see like Bmx guys racing stuff. So in of course the first thing my kids one of my kids did is the ramp who is that. They took their bike out. So everyone's riding down a little hill in China hit the ramp and jumping off the ramp and obviously someone falls right. Got To get up and scrape it off and stuff like that so but it's Yeah I feel like silver lining. I guess some of the things that are happening because of what's happening in the world where we're having to go back to things that that we did when we were kids you know so. It's it's exciting for I. Guess but I'm still not easy like my kids. Still my kids still have chromebooks and then they still WanNa go on there and and spend a Lotta time doing that. Stuff for playing. Ps four and all that but but You know that's one of those things where we have to deal with that to work around it yet. Yeah no I hear you. It's definitely a little bit of a balanced specially this age. But I I'd seen someone else posts out on social media. They said both for the first time in forever whatnot. I've seen Esau kids playing like in the neighborhood or something like that and I mean people like even just so many people who walk through my neighborhood as well you know what I mean just that I don't normally see just out for walks and trying to get outside Nocco stir-crazy inside their house so there was like two ladies walking around on Friday night at. They both had glasses of wine. Just walk into the streets hysterical hub. Jerry you had posted something about and I'm not too familiar with Something I I. I'm assuming someone had a more formal like he's pushups or like. Get your sweat on for kids. Type training thing you posted and versus as we've been talking about just kids playing and doing doing stuff right and so tell me a little bit about that in verse so that have been tallied versus some of the year. What your kids are doing. I think you ought to fund story to about your son had to run up the stairs and touch the various like furniture in a room and come back or so. Tell me about a little contrast between that type of mentality and then what you're doing so I think that it's not. I'm not trying to blame anyone but I think like you know. Probably some parents are adults. Think like Oh you know I do. This type of this type of exercise is good for me. It's probably good for kids and while moving is great for kids the only mean they don't respond or really care or have like the maturity to understand what exercise really is you know what I mean. They only movement they know games. They know things that engages them. It makes them happy. You know what I mean so I think that I think that trying to force them to do. Exercise is because you do it in or I should say an adult. Does it You Know I. It's obviously yeah. Movement is great but there's better ways in it's better ways to engage kids in there's better ways to get them to love movement that rather than get him to force them to do exercise in. It's like everybody way program. It's gotta be like just like you got to the ideas like to be out of breast while if you want kids to be out of breath outside play game of tag or play a game of hide seek or you know. Play a game of like a chase. Where like you have to run down. Play pickle those games kids have fun. There's objective they can they? There's A. There's a goal you know you've got to be safe for. You're going to be out you know there's things like that that they totally grasp and understand And so that's why I think those type of activities are so much better than just can't get the try to exercise you know. Obviously there's a point where a kid probably can exercise like I have a son that is He'll be thirteen in in a month right and he the day he was. He didn't WanNa go outside. Blais you know play with younger kids so I was like. Why don't you go downstairs in? You know go get a workout in. So he went out and did like you know thirty seconds so lunches medicine lamps and you know he did some he doesn't care about swings and things like that so he's sort of getting making that transition whereas like my younger my youngest son you know. He'll he'll plan a trampoline. He'll run around. He'll ask me to make him an obstacle course. Who WANNA wrestle? Daughter judge gymnastics so I brought home some gymnastics mats and she does cartwheels and flips and things like that. You know what I mean. So I think that's where you got to try to find movements and exercise and activities. That kids enjoy. That will lead them to do more than you know. Up Thirty minutes sweat of a body

Basketball Jeremy. Good Youtube Baseball Esau Tennis China Nocco Stir-Crazy Jerry Blais
"frisch" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"frisch" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"The road to you I'm right here with you I'm doing fine all rights yes the debate continues well known what is the fish sandwich hole because it's comes up for the same every year that you know them locally Mr going to benefit the fit filet a fish sandwich from McDonald's yes there was a final question on jeopardy the other day it was it's back and because of the snow because he said in an interview years ago that fresh is not a fish sandwich that was taken but around town and he thought that was the what the way to go in so whenever somebody says that he invented the fish sandwich which wasn't the question the question was what's the name of the sandwich that was invented and it was the filet of fish yes well that's true but now fridges steps up and does not know he invented he admitted in an interview he was inspired by the fridges fish sandwich to which I say what are the chances Mister Frisch never had before he started the restaurant never had heard of a piece of fish on bread somebody else invented the fish sandwich huh I'm saying for the fish sandwich is as old as bread whatever the inventor bread because of truly caught fish long before the advent of bread so the debate continues and it's back in the paper today this is big yeah is there a fish sandwich war brewing is the question well first century readings of excel yeah but still the question on jeopardy is an accurate question unanswered now this sandwich was invented so centenarians would eat Cincinnati Catholic Cincinnati application of animals would eat at McDonald's on a Friday right and the answer was fully fit so that's accurate yeah all three you got it and I did not know when I was researching this as I research reactors you always do that that fishes tartar sauce they use when selling that in a jar since nineteen sixty really there yeah their own charter since nineteen sixty huh so you don't have to go to Vietnam has for extra that could save all the little packs yeah no I was we always have a job for him we do two orders of service ten some last night him and so did I come to think yep see the economy like Kroger fish in a bag you can't beat that yeah yeah I'll try that all right what is second reading was up from the sea help traffic center use the help of your nose and throat program at UC Medical Center has been nationally ranked by U. S. news and World Report couple problems early this morning first direct westbound thirty two adult Palma in Clermont county then.

McDonald Mister Frisch Vietnam UC Medical Center Clermont county Cincinnati Kroger U. S.
"frisch" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

06:30 min | 1 year ago

"frisch" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

"Of much. More focused on upset wasn't but much more focused on the people I'm working with. You never know if a company he's GonNa be successful or not. I mean look we work right like a year ago it was like he just never know and look at other companies that were nothing like that's really hard to predict in for any any given company. There's always folks that are sure it will be amazing. Sure that'll be terrible right. And especially from the outside especially as a young person you have no idea but will you can get a sense of through the interview process process especially if you like. Hey let's go to lunch thing is who are the folks who are GonNa be spending that fifty sixty hours a week with because that's just so important in terms of you just liking them In terms of you thinking they're good people kind of ethical and all that stuff so you know kind of really focusing on that would be the one thing the second thing on on a sort of much more personal note like a have like an amazing wife and two kids now. The latest one just showed up three months ago and I really love that and I do Occasionally get sad that I started that so late and I think it's weird to tell my former self like hey start a family earlier but I think you know that's a real huge the happiness that I didn't have until recently and I really wish I'd have done that earlier own. I think that's great advice. What drives you keeps you going? These days Globally I really. I really focused on enjoying my day. I think it's easy to get in this trap Of sort of thinking every every day is an investment to some future day. Whether that's a near-term thing like you know I don't like what I'm doing right now but there's GonNa be this great vacation in three months i. I don't really like this job but to great career move for the next job or actually I don't like these this job the next job or the next job after that. But if I play this right I'll get to retire and by the time you're done with all this you're like okay. I haven't enjoyed anything but like tomorrow is going to be better. And it's like you know what focus on making sure you're enjoying right now and and honestly maybe I'd be further along in my career if I'd been more feature thinking I think there's a case to be made for that but I really try to enjoy kind of the moment and really focus on on that. And that's that's a pretty big guide for kind of what I do. I think that's great advice. You can live much more rich fulfilling life thinking thinking about the world that way so at blood your efforts I I need to do better at that myself to more marketing questions for you or business. Questions I think most people tend to Kinda watch what's going on around them. Other brands companies causes even. Is there anything that you follow or using other people's should be taking taking notice so I do have a bit of a passion partly because we were for two sided markets so I spend a lot of time thinking about watching them talking to friends about them and one aspect is like what sort of whether you want to call them. Industries or business problems are best solved by sort of kind of two sided sided network market versus kind of the old way of doing it right like what are the conditions that need to be true for that I'm also related like the legislations around like Ab Five Live in California impacting Gig economy workers in kind of what that will mean for this market. The first thing that means is like my Uber Loyalty Program just got way less interesting to me. I got very sad email on a few days ago saying that my surge protection just went away but aside from that Yeah so the two side markets I find really really interesting. Another industry watches the reality one. And Look I think and maybe just getting older right because I think technology will be bad. It's going to bring amazing things In benefits vets. But I worry that it can create sort of that social isolation. You know twenty years from now when there's less and less reason to ever get off your couch because you don't need to go you don't need to go to work during your commute. You don't have that interaction with people like Oh happy hours. You don't actually go out anymore. You just all meet at some virtual bar right and you're all in your living room. And what will that do to our society right and I. I don't know again I feel like I'm getting older for worrying about these things but I I sometimes ponder the impact that will have the cartoon was but it was some cartoon that I'm envisioning my head of these like plumpy. People being carted around in their autonomous beds Ed's but it is. It's not a pretty sight. Let's put it that way but last question for you. What do you think the future of marketing look like? Yeah I think they'll be an increasing of tech automation driving arriving decisions on the performance marketing side. I think more and more they'll be sort of people setting the strategy and then kind of tweaking and monitoring lean but not actually building campaigns. It'll be more like a let me throw a bunch of kind of here's what my high. LTV customers look like. Here's a bunch bunch of creative assets that are all disjointed and I'm just going to put it into a big system in. Here's kind of how much I'm willing to spend how value throw all this into some massive you've seen and it will run campaigns. It'll pick what channels to do. It will pick what to show and things like that. I think you're GONNA be sort of increasing movement kind of around that so put more of a premium on kind of having that technical knowledge and some of the analytics staff as opposed to the more nuance things that even come with performance marketing side. I I I do think that will do less than be less than helpful. For Resolving Sir of the ever present tensions between the brand and the performance side because I think that means that performance side will even get more and more technical and yeah whatever customers. I don't really whatever that is right and so I think it'll. It'll pull those who things apart further and not not really helping that kind of ongoing dynamic will Kevin. It's been fascinating and I can't thank you enough for coming on the show. All right. Well thank you so much. I enjoyed it as well I. It's Alan again. Marketing today was created and produced by. If you're new to marketing today please feel free to write us a review on Itunes or your favorite listening platform. Don't forget to subscribe. Tell your friends and colleagues about the show. I love to hear from listeners. And you can contact me at marketing today. PODCASTS DOT COM there. You'll also find complete show notes links to anything we talk about on any episode. You can also search archives. I'm Alan Heart. This is marketing..

Alan Heart social isolation California Ed Kevin
"frisch" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

09:43 min | 1 year ago

"frisch" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

"Yes so that campaign launched Dara had been an uber for about nine months and we were sort of waiting for the time to sort of of kind of do like the name of the campaign was moving forward for while it was called fresh? Start right and it was. It was like you know what's the right time. Say Hey kind of we understand these mistakes mistakes we've made and how do we move forward and there's a lot of debate is like tweak knowledge mistakes we refer to them. We just talked about moving forward. The usual stuff is actually funny. It came came out our ad on that is just too funny. came out the same time. FACEBOOK was having its own little recreational ads and then also wells Fargo. I think running the basketball game like I don't remember which one it was where like the three ads showed back to back like literally kind of in the same segment. Where like okay? Well Al so we have that but anyway so we were doing this ad and again uber is a very performance analytics driven culture. And we're basically trying to do this brand ish type campaign and you know I'm spending all this money I think it was a hundred and fifty million or so all told in a bean so it's a decent amount so it's like well how do we kind of measure this and stay a true to serve. The Uber Uber Roots of measuring everything. You do and we think about TV. There's you know a couple of ways to measure it. The first and I would say the most common is what I call the squint tasks test. Where you kind of look at some trendline whether it's of sentiment or of growth or whatever it is and then they're the vertical dotted line where your campaigns paints and you say you see see like well ignore the fact that I went down that's casinos but then it picked up note? Pick up casino and he serves squint to the graph and user. These were make a point. Like here's what it did but you know obviously it's not my favorite fare somewhat better testing control cities. And that's the kind of Maine where you where you can find a bunch of cities test in them and not in others and that kind of works well but especially for Uber. You have a lot of noise and cities ladies because each the cities is very different. Their regulatory issues going on you know there's a strike in Los Angeles like that so it's very hard to sort of have clean testing control cities because the the city's move very independently from each other based on local conditions. So we wanted to try and do it a better way and so we ended up using addressable. TV in. I'll just explain with it is. It's a little bit creepy but not to give and everything else that's going on. You know everyone has a cable box or anyone has cable cable box and about forty percent scent of the cable boxes are such that to various extents. You can target a particular at a particular household and know whether that household had the TV on and presumably saw that ad right so instead of just you know buying demographics of getting general reviews for how many people watched a particular show. You can basically say. Okay I know this many households so my ad and here was kind of the frequency frequency distribution and you can note exactly essentially at the household level. And so we wanted to use this say okay so Dr Campaign for moving forward campaign and we had big had a big national TV buy and then we looked at folks whether they were prospects or active customers or had churn customers and which ones of them had kind of a cable set top box that was addressable TV accessible. That was entered a split test among those so half of them got a bunch of additional. Add viewings we can serve. Show them the ad via their addressable. TV Half didn't you had like a true kind of random swift test on getting a bunch more exposures to these commercials and that's it's nice until like national got basically a sixteen x frequency on the ads and folks that were. You're kind of in this address while tests l.. Got Thirty to forty x right so sort of a big laugh and it's a true random split and the other thing is year not relying on did you. UCR Add to subtract things you know. They saw the ad so they can just look at their behavior on the con side though it was technically complex addressable. TV again. This is two years ago. It's probably gotten better. They were actually fairly good at reporting kind of what happened but they weren't really set up for us to say. Hey here's ended up being. Here's five million names. We want you to show them these ads at this frequency. They were reporting but they weren't so good at. Here's a list. We want you to show him this ad right. The technology wasn't quite there yet but still kind of you know worked reasonably well. We relied heavily on partner six O five like TV DMP and really helped us dish. This whole thing together like I said five million tests five-month control and kind of we ran it in you. It was interesting we can actually sort of track these individuals who had seen the ads to sort of see what their behaviors were some of the results. He so so I would say if you think about is primarily targeted writers driver thought also so you can split the riders into three groups those that were prospects I e it. They're not writers yet but you know everyone should be an uber writer at some point so pretty much. Everyone's a prospect those who are active and those who had churned and there was some splitting. We did within each of those buckets. But that's that's basically the biggest movement and then you can think about okay. We can see sentiment movement and we can see business results movement right A.. And so sentiment movement. We saw a fair amount of sentiment. Movement in the churned folks right and a lot of these were folks who lost due to delete Uber. We also so saw some sentiment change in the active group. We saw very little impact on sentiment in the prospects. They're just apparently just not really tuned in to all the drama right right. I didn't know they didn't know Uber was bad. They didn't know we've gotten so that you're not really listening right okay Thank you know and what was interesting though especially especially in children. We saw pretty good sentiment movement pretty quickly. It was about four months or so before we saw any movement in their actual activity right so there was a slag a- and you know we we dug into why that was and it seemed like so. Most these churned users Had not actually stopped using ridesharing. They'd basically gone to lift WBT and what it turned out was happy. So the sentiment change great but they're used to using lift right now and so what happened. Is We start to get them back if they had a problem with left of. Oh you know they had a really bad right experience or there was a lot of Surge pricing whatever it is and now continued to try. Thank you know what maybe Uber. Isn't that bad after all. Let me reinstall the APP or whatever it is and so. That's where we saw the effect but it was. It was four months out so would have been very hard to sort of detect normal means right. I love the approach because it. It's rare that you get a clean look at things for bring campaign any like you. Just described I've never heard of this use case for a addressable. TV so that's that's pretty fascinating. It did it surprise anybody. Nobody at Uber like the results you saw carrying so we saw the results. I just told you about I think the folks on the more brand side of the Uber World were a little disappointed that there wasn't more of a movement in the business metrics like I said there was some but in terms of if you think of the efficiency of spend spend way versus the efficiency of spending after we'd cut out the fraud to be clear versus the efficiency spending on performance marking kind of it wasn't there and then the question was like okay. Is there way that we should value this movement in sentiment beyond the business metrics that we can now track and maybe the answer is Yes for example. You could imagine if we'd had these things in place before. Would we have had more of a heat shield when libra happened when Susan Fowler happened when the TK video you broke that's really hard to measure even with addressable TV. This doesn't completely solve the okay now. He's cracked had a measure. kind of brand spend just one more four step in that right direction. Gotcha Gotcha. We talked a lot about. I guess writers to this point and I know you do probably even more frankly more marketing marketing or had done more marketing towards the driver equation. Anything come to mind in terms of lessons learned in terms of trying to drive writers. I mean it's hard you try Dr Drivers. It's very confusing. Also like when we talk about the drivers of something like the drivers of changes right like no no. I'm not talking about driver or is I'm talking about the the drivers out. Yeah yeah we would occasionally use the term driver partners internally just to help with that so it was actually there. Were a few things one of those. It was very interesting. Is that in. Your right. Drivers was always the bigger challenge We were spending a neighborhood of kind of like even pre the fraud reduction. We're spending spending more on drivers to three X.. More and then post the fraud related reduction. It was five six x more on drivers. There was one interesting trae off with and I can't say we really resolve this so I was acquiring drivers and looking at sort of CACTUS. LTV ratio and again. These were the heady days of growth so of course CAC was higher than LTV. Okay what are you talking about it. Because the debate is this should be to exit. Three acts and I was spending a decent amount of money doing that. And then there was the driver incentive team which is a marketplace team which was standing money on things to say. Hey driver if you at least a hundred trips this week will give you an extra two hundred dollars right. So those are the drivers they were spending about. I would say three three X.. Kind of more than I was a huge huge spend and there was ongoing debate.

fraud FACEBOOK basketball Dara Dr Campaign Dr Drivers Fargo Maine UCR Los Angeles partner writer Susan Fowler
"frisch" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

08:33 min | 1 year ago

"frisch" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

"Human? So the normal sense sense of fraud wasn't really kind of flippable but we had was attribution fraud where basically ad networks were taking credit for installs. That would have happened. Organically Ganic -ly. That would have happened anyway and they deserve get inside that path and then sort of take credit so one example in the Google play stores these ad networks works with create apps. That would do things like monitor your battery power help you make. Your battery lasted longer. Whatever these APPs had root access to your phone? So you're you're on your phone and you decide. Oh I'm going down the UBER APP because it's so great you decide that on your own without seen any ads so you type in U. B. e. r. into the Google. Play store to find Uber. And as soon as you hit the letter R. This APP that's in the background. Fires a click on your device and then basically sort of makes it look like you clicked done an ad and then Lo and behold. You downloaded the UBER APP. Thanks ad network raises his hand says hey that download. Hey see I have click on that device now pay me twenty dollars all right. And that's just one of the many many of just amazing kind of methods that they have and it's like it's not like an accident. It's highly intentional. And then they kind of spend a lot of time because they're generating all these fake clicks. They have to spend a lot of time figuring out how to kind kind of hide them. SORTA they basically look at all the apps out there and say okay. Well we have these one billion clicks that most of them are fake. And so we're gonNA tell kind of Uber Okay. There were one hundred thousand clicks in this half two hundred thousand here they just start making up where those things were and they don't do it that well sometimes you can be like. Hey wait a second. This APP here only has a thousand thousand and year stain that drove twenty thousand installs. Like that's I mean. Thank you for my creative is so good but that seems unrealistic unrealistic. I'd expect like it to drive to right right. And so as you start really pulling this apart and refining. What's going on? It can get pretty easy to see but until you do that. If you're just relying on for the high level reporting our agencies you just don't catch it and so we ended up after a lot of back and forth internally. The Lakers remembered the league. Uber just happened so no one wants to risk giving up writers acquiring new riders. We turned off two thirds of our spend so we turned off one hundred million in of annual stand out of the one fifty and basically saw no change in our number of writer installs. What we saw is a lot of installs we we saw it coming through? Pay Channels suddenly came in through organic rice. You big flip flop there but the total number didn't change right. Well that's I a hundred million dollars out cutoff. no-change limited change the fifty million. That was still play. was that just. You had whittled it down to what was actually working at that point. That was the first cut because that was the stuff that was. I would say obvious when we started being more surgical and I think knocked out another twenty million of the remaining fifty so we about thirty million. Yeah I mean that's that's insane in part because you think I don't know you just you don't realize that there's bad people world I guess at that scale I mean that's a huge scale of just nefarious things at play. Yeah I mean the walk a couple of things first I saving one hundred and some odd million a year uber back in the the heady days of twenty seventeen. Actually people didn't care that much about it was actually pretty really funny. I I think saving one hundred million right now it would be like. Oh my God. This is life changing and kind of like okay. That's cool so how we reinvesting that money to grow faster right. There wasn't isn't the time at Uber and again this made it a little harder. There was no desire to really kind of save money. It was more like hey spend your budget. Spend to budget just always spent budgets. This was a very different culture in sort of like business attitude than what we're seeing right now if you're talking to other Other marketers there's that might be in a similar position in don't realize it or just are paying attention at this point in time. Like what actions would you say. They should be doing right now. I would start by assuming that like half of what's out there on the display channels is fraud like assume that and then ask yourself. Are you being smart enough to sort of get rid of it right but think think half of it is fraud. I I think there's estimates that that say it's it's even higher than that and I would say the main thing you have to do is keep an eye out for that fraud yourself. Your your agency won't do it the MP's don't do it man. Sadly even the folks on not do it because you know while agencies and as they get paid on volume of spend so again these are not bad people but symptoms new just the incentives are not really there and for all of us overcoming those basic human. Incentives is pretty hard hard to even your team. 'cause remember getting a sort of a true APP install like when I do it legitimately cost me forty dollars and I find the source that's only costing Emme five like now. I'm beating all my numbers. The first thing I'm GonNa do as a director of acquisition is not say. Hey wait a second. Maybe I'm not really crushing rushing my numbers. Maybe there's something going on here know that that's that's not how humans work like. Oh my God I'm killing it. What else can I do right? And so like there has has to be someone who doesn't have a stake in kind of this spend going away and Kinda your cost per acquired customer going up. 'cause remember fraudulent new customers are much cheaper than ones you actually incrementally acquire. Yeah would you still use programmatic spend today you know I. I would not do display without a pretty sizable are pretty decent analytics team. That could be processing all all the information. That's coming in and really looking at it right right so I think again. There are good players out there but the problem is if you kind of don't have of the tools and again it's you can't just sort of outsource like oh wait. Here's an anti-fraud to a let me just run it through that these fraud guys like they're constantly moving they're constantly we evolving. They're really smart. This is billions and billions of dollars. They're making right so you have to always be on it be like okay. Let me poke here wait a second. That looks so weird. Let me dig in. Hey I WANNA to see that file wait. You don't give it the fine. I'm cutting you off right. You have to be very on it. You can't just be like oh I'm GonNa have hire an auditor or I'm going to heighten you bring on a tool like you have to be super engaged engaged and you need a decent size number of team in tools to do that will and I. I think there's a ton of marketers. Today disowned the surface. They are taking their agencies word. They've got fraud detection. Whatever that means or they they're buying a fraud detection tool but I don't think any fraud detection to catch what you just described now? And even if it catched what ca I described. It won't catch with the next next right and none of those things. You're always looking backward and you have to be on it and you know eight. I mean fraud detection tools. Eliecer claiming to agents aren't experts in fraud. They're experts in line right and this is a very technical kind of difficult thing to do. Are there any. I don't know advice you'd give in terms of picking better partners or people to help you along the way. Yeah I mean there there are some folks again like I know a doctor who was on your show At some point and he he's someone I have a a tremendous amount of respect for an again. What he does you know? He has a few tools but mostly he does. He's like let me come in and like just look through what's going on right. They're putting in the hours do that and again. That is something you can have higher for. Bring our external to do. But you just can't you can never put on. Autopilot right can never put it on. Autopilot Department Now I know goes. Let's transition a little bit from fraud. Was Not your only measurement challenge Uber. You told me about in prior conversation Asian about the Bison Management Approach for the. Hello my name is I can't remember. Remember is Dr Darah. Darah so element name was Dr Campaign which was was really brand reputation campaign after all the tumultuous time right the new. CEO Comes in and tells a little bit about what you were trying to do. When you're incoming.

fraud Google Lakers U. B. Lo Dr Darah Dr Campaign writer CEO director auditor Eliecer
"frisch" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

11:39 min | 1 year ago

"frisch" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

"For acquisition engagement and retention in of drivers careers writers eaters he served as also the CMO of G. S. N. Games and snap fish which was a division of HP he he Started his career actually coming out of MIT as a Grad studying astrophysics later switched to economics and on the show today we talk about not only his his background background in his career and kind of what makes him unique coming from a financial perspective into marketing. But we talk about. I think the largest ever fraud case. This uber and it suppliers of Performance Marketing Advertising. And we kind of diagnosis. When did that when that become real during the delete uber the buckle if you will and what was the trigger and how did they diagnose what was going on and we also talk about some of the other measurement challenges along the way that he was able to come up with interesting solutions for so I hope you enjoy this conversation with Kevin Fresh Kevin? Welcome to the show thank you. It's great to be here. Let's start with with your your background and where you started your career in any federal twist along the way. If you don't mind sure I actually I graduate college and Went into consulting because it seemed like really fun as a twenty two year old to be able to tell these fancy executives what to do exactly zero experience in an excel spreadsheet achieved spent all night working on and that was good. I did that for a few years. And then this whole dot com thing was happening and so in February of two thousand. I moved out to California during the company that was doing video on a cell phone in two thousand and so it was a bit ahead of its time but interesting I went through the whole dot dot com kind of basically bust at that company and ended up moving around a lot. A company called packet video and I started out being pricing ended up in finance finance Moving between the marketing finance and lakeside. And then yeah and then the next job. I went to pro flowers and there. I was the finance guy on the marketing team. You can imagine how popular I was going around and this is before analytics Kinda cool so just go around and like talk to market bill. That's not really incremental. You're spending more than you think. That was dumb so I made a lot of friends there but it was. It was also kind of me. Still trying to figure out I want marketing cleaner dwight kind of more analytics finance and In terms of pivotal moments. I don't know that there's too many of them in my life but one of them happened as it related to brand a brand new project we had at pro flowers. You know I was again doing analytics in finance and we decided to do this. Big Brand thing and the CEO hired brand agency unseen on that kind of stuff. And I was very skeptical at first and as the project progressed and I got more and more involved. I remained sceptical to be clear but I also realized how interesting in hard brand stuff was and how that's part of this story and I think that really sort of kind of set me a little more down the marketing path as opposed to finance path. which up until then I'd been kinda straddling the two right? It's always interesting to see somebody transition from finance finance into marketing. We've had a number of them on the on the show and it's always interesting to see what the conversion cycle was like for each person. I don't yeah no exactly win in your career after flowers you ended up but uber your most recent CMO role but tell us a little bit about what happened next from flowers. ARS also pro flowers. I went to a bunch of different. BEAT AC- type companies. So I went to snapface which was doing online line. Photos than blue. Nile spent some time at G. S. N. which was doing kind of mobile slot machines not for real money for fake money but that was still very interesting and then from there to uber and I joined Uber in the summer of Twenty sixteen delete Guber. Everyone remembers happened January. Twenty eighth of two thousand seventeen so I had four months of peace. Two of those months I was on paternity leave so is really I joined. Uber was there for two months without on paternity leave. Came back a week before. Delete over happened so that some that was a pretty interesting experience and delete Uber happened happened there was a Susan Fowler blog and there was you know. Tk kind of having that recorded conversation with the driver followed in quick succession so it was a pretty tough off time to be there. I remember when I first started Uber. I was like Oh yeah Uber. I'm so cool and then kind of March April may like when I would make like team reservations at a restaurant. I would just give my name and not really say Uber Right. The real real account you look for external markers as to how you actually feel so it was was definitely rough there and You know a lot of things they said in the press you know. We're true a lot of things that were not true as well because they sort of kind of play it up but it was really a kind of a problem culture. Will I know there. I can't remember what magazine was in recently but there is a magazine may be a bit more online online publications but there was a kind of sequencing. If you will end up story odes have the confrontation with tk and actually ended up a meeting. Jeff Jones recently. who was the president? I guess during that period were And so you're at the company at that same time it didn't feel like inside with so much swirling around on the outside of the company at that point in time. Yeah I do remember I I remember. We're in the middle of a strategic the planning session when the video of tk Kind of broke and Jeff Jones like excused himself from the media. And like when you're with it right into that was you know it was. We were all there. Look I mean it was interesting there. There is definitely a group of folks at the company. Who'd been there for a while? Poor like hey you know this is kind of the personality you need to have to sort of drive this amazing company in this amazing product talking about tk. And I would argue. It's true like you needed kind of someone who kind of was willing to just run through balls and and do what you need to. But as the companies have matured like we have managed to make that transition to okay. How do we ten thousand people? Twenty thousand people were no longer a little startup. We're now like the dominant player are. We can't keep acting like or start up and so they're almost two camps those who are like no no no we should keep doing what got us here and others who were saying. Hey It's great that we had that to get us here but now we need to evolve and you really Kinda felt those tensions between those these those two groups now year roll over it was Correct me if I'm wrong but is head of performance. It's marketing it's a right. Yeah so I had I started out running performance marketing which was for the US and Canada which was responsible for acquiring all the riders and drivers and actually drivers is the bigger challenge for a few tried to get an uber during rush hour. You you probably know that and then over time I was also responsible for for a marketing for crm and for analytics and insights grip. Gotcha Gotcha now in the news. And is that in a large news cycles. Oddly but in the circles that I follow there's the fraud lawsuit between Uber and it's for Viner's yes I guess providers yeah that actually relates to funnel back to serve the delete uber moment. So it's a bit of a long story but it's a pretty interesting one so so delete Uber happens and all the politics around that are going on and tk is trying to figure out how to best navigate this s and one of the things he decides to do is sort of kind of get off Leave trump's economic council that he was on justice like distance himself more neutral and a and as all that was happening our ads for writers. In this case were showing up on a break the Breitbart site and there was this company. Any group called sleeping giants which every time our ad would show up on Breitbart. They would tweet at Travis saying like Hey why are you supporting this terrible sight. So Travis would call me or Kellyn Kenny. My manager in so many words they hey what the hell are you guys doing and I would go through these long explanations of like well. It's not like we're buying ads on Breitbart It's like you know display networks and this is like waving my hands all over the place and it was like. Yeah okay fine. Just make sure it doesn't happen again. Three days later another tweet from sleeping giants with another image of our ads. Breitbart the phone call start again. The yelling starts again so I'm looking at these ads and I'm like okay. Figure out which network is clean them on their haywire. Not Respecting our blacklist. It goes on for Awhile Awhile. It's like a week and a half felt like four yards and Eventually I said look any network that it has been kind of showing these ads on Breitbart. I'm just going to cut them off so I turned off what amounted to about ten percent of our AD. Spend on the Ryder at our side and a total riders. Spend at the time in the neighborhood. One hundred fifty million dollars a year so I turned off ten percent which by the way this was not super popular because remember delete Uber. It happens we just lost a bunch of writers here. I am turning off ten percent of span but anything to sort of stop travis from kind of going after me and nothing really happened. Our number rider didn't really you know new writers didn't really go down and I'm like Oh that's kind of interesting trusting other folks that come back. Oh my God. That's amazing Uber. So cool yeah. I knew we could do that. Might not work cool. That's just weird right right so so I was happy that you know it had impacted so I started digging in and started sort of looking at. Okay let's really understand kind of what's going on here so I started kind of pulling our own kind of log files like sort of asking kind of every single network. Okay tell me exactly kind of what APP the person was in that they saw the ad that they clicked on started gains reports our own analytics team and start seeing things. That just didn't make any sense like oh there's apt to has kind of a thousand. MEU's and in theory we got three hundred and fifty thousand installs from. That's probably slight exaggeration. But there were things that were just not making sense and so we kept appealing this back to understand what was going on there. Were also other interesting things that happened. Where for example there were some stuff where someone would see an ad and they in theory would download and open the APP within like two seconds which is just right and so we you? uh-huh discovered that we had what was called attribution fraud. So normally when you think about fraud an ad fraud you imagine that it's impression pressure fraud. Where like someone there's bought sort of you know create impressions or clicking on your ads? And you're paying per impression or click or they're saying they're showing your entire or fifteen second video and they're only showing seconds. But that's that's Kinda like fraud is and so. But we weren't pain on clicks in anything like that. We were playing basically beyond the first trip. When an actual writer like swiped a credit card took a ride in the car like we knew these were actual.

fraud Breitbart Travis MIT Kevin Fresh Kevin HP Jeff Jones California snapface CEO ARS Susan Fowler Nile US trump writer Ryder president
Climate change: Melting Arctic ice

Environment: NPR

04:39 min | 1 year ago

Climate change: Melting Arctic ice

"Arctic Sea. Ice is one one of the most dramatic indicators of the change in climate some months the ice cover on the Arctic Ocean is about half of what it was decades ago and its thickness has shrunk substantially changes in the ice may also mean a host of other changes in the Arctic system and around the globe to better understand the scientists. I just have frozen an icebreaker alongside and Arctic ice flow that they will absorb for a whole year. And that's where our reporter Ravenna chaotic. Caught up with them out on an the ice floe about five degrees from the North Pole. A bunch of scientists are setting up equipment. It's part of a project called mosaic or the multidisciplinary drifting observatory for the study of Arctic climate climate. And the primary question. They're trying to answer is what are the causes of diminishing Arctic ice and what are the consequences ocean physicists. Tim Stanton stand surrounded by boxes of tools and equipment next to a hole in the ice about fifteen miles from where the mosaics chef is frozen in. Good here dry hairdryer. Well it's a trickle. Would he he got frizzy here. That's for sure. It's about eighteen degrees Fahrenheit and the heat gun is for warming up electrical connectors actors on a science buoy. Stanton is in the middle of a grueling eight hour process to install the buoy. It'll operate independently out here throughout the year. Collecting team data from all sorts of scientific bells and whistles that hang below it in the water flux package mounts on and that's what Beige is the transport of heat. Salt Mamane plugged back in the water column. Here's why Stanton's interested in those things as more sea ice melts in the summertime. It's contributing fresher water to the top of the ocean the salty ocean water which sits lower. Because it's more dense can create a barrier that prevents the fresher water from going down if that top water is trapped near the surface surface. Stanton thinks that can absorb a lot more heat from the sun and lead to even more melting of the ice you can get these Frisch WOM- liars that with a little bit of wind comes along. Does a little bit of mixing really mounts the heck out of the is. He thinks this might play an important role in why the disappearing as fast does it is while Stanton is asking questions about things that are going on. Below the ice other scientists are looking at things going. On above it like Jesse Cremation. WHO's out on the ice testing gene? A device that collects tiny particles from the atmosphere called aerosols. Ampler to say no. We're not talking about the ones in hairspray. Aerosol balls can be dust pollen or fungi and they're the seeds that clouds need to grow and in the Arctic scientists thing that they can also come from tiny organisms in the water like bacteria. Algae less ice on the ocean could mean more aerosols getting blown from the water into the atmosphere and CD more clouds by hypothesis from open water sources. We get generation of these particles from microbes and the ocean. There's a lot that signed to still WANNA find out about clouds in the Arctic. But one thing they know is that they're important for regulating leading temperature like a thermostat depending on the season whether the clouds are over water or ice and the features of the clouds they can wind up cooling or warming the earth below slowdown that affects. How much heat can basically help melt the ice or it can actually reflect sunlight from the CIA so it has a big role in controlling? How much we we have here creaming and Stanton to among hundreds of scientists from different disciplines? Who are trying to better understand? How different parts of this changing region work how? The atmosphere interacts the CIS how the ocean interacts with the ice The ecosystem the biogeochemical processes. That's Matthew shoop an atmospheric scientist and one of the coordinators of the expedition addition. So why do scientists need to know all this. This whole project is aimed at improving our models. When shoop says models he means the computer simulation and scientists use to get estimates for things like how much the earth could warm in the next fifty years the better? You reflect reality in the simulations the better prediction you'll get but because so little is known about the Arctic system. shoop says that the predictions for how it will respond to climate. Change vary a lot. The Arctic is a place where the models agree. The least so that tells us that we're missing something improving. The models will help forecast things like when the Arctic Ocean might have. Its first ice free summer how quickly the globe is going to warm. As as a whole and how the melting greenland ice sheet will add to global sea level rise by observing. How all the little pieces of the system fit together over the next year scientists hope they it can bring that big picture into clear? Focus for N._p._R.. News I'm Ravenna. Kinik in the central Arctic Ocean.

Tim Stanton Arctic Arctic Sea Matthew Shoop North Pole Reporter Ravenna CIA Jesse Cremation Atmospheric Scientist Eighteen Degrees Fahrenheit Five Degrees Fifty Years Eight Hour
"frisch" Discussed on Here We Are

Here We Are

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"frisch" Discussed on Here We Are

"Bees do see color in fact honeybees as determined by Carl Frisch Way Back in the nineteen thirties learn very well blues especially Greens yellows and they distinguished contrast color shapes patterns all kinds of things visually they can see polarized light so compared to honeybees commissions quite different so we see Roy Deep Red Orange Yellow Green Blue Indigo violet typically and we have a bias obviously humans I think anthropocentric so we ignore the infrared and beyond or the altar violent and beyond for the most part so who sees in those either short or long wavelengths and there are a lot of organisms a lot of non human animals that do some say that the butterfly some applies may have the widest range of color vision from reds into ultraviolet honeybees a little bit limited relative to the the average butterfly where at least some tests suggests that they see ultraviolet which is beyond what we see into maybe oranges and not really reds so typically won't see bees honeybees visiting red hummingbird feeders or visiting red flowers if you see honeybees visiting red flag I it's probably because the reflecting patterns in the ultraviolet which we don't detect but you put an ultra violet camera on one of those flowers and it's landing strips going down the corollas down the pedals into the nectar sources of these flowers whereas maybe a butterfly this is a part of mate selection or something NBA because of the varied colored the wings it can be have having a little more distinctive I then you know who's really got the the hottest wings in town Astute point because the honeybee is not going for colors for reasons of mate selection there are all kinds of mottled brownish butterflies full gamut I mean you've got basically the secondary sexual apparatus in the form of these colorful wings flapping around gaudily they're using it sometimes for camouflage sometimes for startle response sometimes APO Semitism warning coloration I'm toxic in the case of Monarch Butterfly is who will forget a yellow black white right nobody nobody that's right with one nasty taste of sequestered milkweed booze one another bite of a of a monarch viceroy for that part now but as you said sexual selection can play a huge role this well so I guess I'm a little still stuck on the brain parasite honey it's one of my favorite con all just talking about the Mortis APPs aunt's getting affect it and going onto the trees and wonderful so bs some stuff like that going on Oh yeah I mean every parasite has its own parasite so you bet now thinking of course that fungus can burst the head capsule of an aunt or basically any part of certain insects there are a delicacy in some parts of the world and that could be a segue into at least one part of what we might discuss cultural entomology how insects humans and half throughout the world and across span of time yeah we're going to definitely get to that we also need to do a sleep I still have a couple questions because do I wasn't expecting to in here and you just threw it at me while one you know there's things that get in in B.'s parasites that that Dr Bs behavior do you think that bees have somehow may be infected you and now this obsessed person I would be an easy host let me tell you it'd be totally easy oh so so I walk in so this is this is in a little extra effort into heaven the glass the observable high is you're looking in there and you're in you're going look this Waigel dance Oh this in I was actually kind of I wasn't surprised that you could easily identify a waigel dance but the ease of which you are able to be like look this guy found a source girl the sorry this this girl I it's like when you say you guys there's girls and Paul the whole patriarchy confessing my own mind but but but you you look and you go you go this lady over here's waggling around to this food source that was that was a completely different direction to this lady's waggling and they were they were equal distance you you had a sense of the direction you you had a sense of the distance you are a beeper your ear officially are your part B. now you can easily be on Abi decoder a waggled unstick odor and classic.

Carl Frisch
"frisch" Discussed on Marketing Trends

Marketing Trends

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"frisch" Discussed on Marketing Trends

"If you have an oversupply of this product. How do you adjust the pricing to sort of maximize it. It's even more interesting cresting if that product is going bad like it's flowers right so you can't just leave it in a warehouse somewhere so a lot of companies that you don't think of as marketplace companies actually have a lot of those same dynamics mix but the marketers don't always think of that way. They're just like okay. I'm just focused on demand. They're not always looking back at like. Wait a second. Let me understand kind of what my supplier inventory looks like an adjust accordingly final piece on that i do wanna touch on your time at at pro flowers because one of the things without super fascinating was that you help the company avoid hidden high cost orders. I'm curious to to what that is what you did so this was a while ago before four. There was a lot of sophisticated analytics around and what was happening at many companies was at a lot of folks. Were going kind of on averages and not really understand the concept of incremental right so let's say hey i know new customers worth twenty dollars and right now. I'm paying fifteen dollars. The new customer see might say hey. That's great. Let me kind of pay twenty dollars per new customer and i'll get a bunch of new customers the promising and it's so obvious b-best now but this is this is my time ago right like yeah. You can get your average up to twenty. But how much did you pay for those additional customers that that you got from moving from fifteen to twenty dollars because now you paid more acquisition costs for everyone and was turning out that you know a new customer is worth in this example twenty dollars and we're you're paying like three hundred dollars per incremental customer 'cause we were based on the average and not really realizing that by paying more. We weren't getting that much more but we were paying a ton more for everything we would've gotten already knew revolutionary time now. It's kind of obvious hey you know we stand on <unk>. We shoulders of giant air. We stand on the shoulders of giants all right. Let's get it. That's newton right. I think that was new from <hes> detainee. Lean on me as <unk> <hes> all right. Let's get into lightning.

newton twenty dollars three hundred dollars fifteen dollars
"frisch" Discussed on Marketing Trends

Marketing Trends

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"frisch" Discussed on Marketing Trends

"Destroyed. All are sort of infrastructure for a couple of weeks. It was amazing is really i mean that's a product marketing at one is like take. The use case is that people don't know about yet that in front of you know people in a creative way. I mean like it same thing same thing with wag with like. Did you know that x. Type the dog it goes <hes> goes to the bathroom more than the other dog like you're actually educating and informing people of just how to the live their life but your product is is at the end. That's one of the solutions yup exactly you talked about one campaign you know in our prep that you lower the price of one one of the products can show that sure <hes> snap fish used to be the standard price of twelve cents a print. It all seems so quaint now we we spent months deciding deciding. Do we want to lower it to nine cents print because the idea was that we potentially would have such volume growth because people are very fairly price sensitive to the cries single go double digits. Yes e- exactly this time it is it is and it had an amazing effect on the business really kind of kind of grew that part of the business quite a bit there or others within the industry that were really kind of upset because i thought we were commoditisation commoditised industry but for us we really trying to basically have more pete really more democratizing sizing them commodity right. Let's let's make this available so everyone can afford to just print more but i think it's funny that i think a lot of the competitors when you do certain things that you know when you drive. You're driving your competitor's crazy. It's probably a sign that like you're either doing something really dumb really right and it mehta's both yeah. That's what i say. We're used split testing. How are you doing now. What were the type of like. Were you paying for digital ads where buying t._v. spots redoing that. One was actually very hard to split test. We knew the impact that doing pricing on a promotional basis would do so we had all that information but the question is what would serve in everyday low price strategy so again. We built out a bunch of scenarios but we we basically had to just sort of jump in and do it. There was only so much you could task again at a lower everyday price. I did what about existing customers where people like happy upset. I mean i guess existing customers are gonna keep buying anyway like you know this was across the board. This was for existing. It's not i just an acquisition campaign for existing new customers. Wow so basically existing customers selling found out like hey going forward from now. It's nine cents a print and again. There volumes went up quite a bit as well. I wanna talk about your c._m._o. There for a little for years right longtime. Tell me i mean we. We've talked a little bit about games games on the on the podcast before but this time of epic growth for the gaming community with the rise of mobile low to look to pick into some the best practices that you saw marketing games so this one was really interesting. I <hes> you know our our main products..

mehta pete
"frisch" Discussed on Marketing Trends

Marketing Trends

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"frisch" Discussed on Marketing Trends

"It's just nice to be part of the company. That's trying to make this experience of owning a dog and having a pet just be easier so more fulfilling more people can do it and i just. I just really enjoyed being part of that. You know as someone who owns a dog and we have an office dog obviously obviously that we mentioned as well shot toasty and i and i watched host the relatively often there is so much like you know talk about customer pinpoints. There's so much pain around opportunities were dog owners feel like they can't do something right or they feel guilty about being late or going away for the weekend or those type of things that you kind of get that hamstrung effect. It seems like it's really valuable place to be a marketer because they're such like an obvious this like love for the animal but you also have this guilt side of things which it kinda sucks sometimes exactly we try to not do guilt marketing but you know i it can work pretty well. L. and there's almost this no pet parents have this realization this feeling of guilt but they don't necessarily say wait. I can actually solve that by kind of using accompany like wag to do it. They sort of feel bad and come home early and have their dogs not having optimal life whereas just making sure people understand. Hey there are options out there. They're not expensive. They're easy to use why not do that. Yeah and i think the thing that is really cool about the business for me as someone who is a dog owner her that it's just in time and scheduled right and or right and i think that a lot of the times you as a pet owner just things come come up right. It's the same you know same thing as any anything in life is like you have yet to work later. You have to do this or something or horrible traffic accident the fact that you can then and you know take action on that immediately whereas in the past you're like oh. Can i call my mom is she works. She add all she stuck in traffic like all those different things that come into play yeah exactly and and it's even you know what we see from more and more of our pet parents is. They don't use us when they need to the u._s. when they'd like to so yeah maybe your dog doesn't need to take a walk. If you're gonna be out you know you won't be home till seven but why not you know it's better for your dog to get more exercise. They have a better day and they probably have a new fund friend to play with. So do you feel like for those of you listening. You may not know this but it is one of the questions on our questionnaire or when you come to work for the company of is it okay if you walk the office dog. That's real thing. Some people don't wanna walk the dog. That's fine but shout out to catherine or customer. Success manager always always ends up walking naito. Stay nice <hes> this type of market place where there is you know this huge explosion asian of the gig economy. There's huge explosion of people who can figure out to make money in new ways especially doing something like walking dog which is really fun and you have breath millions and millions of americans who who owned dogs sixty million households. If you're counting yeah there you go. Tell me a little bit more about like what it's like marketing this marketplace in particular and some of the things that are really exciting. I think <hes> there's a few things that make wag as a marketplace business a a little different. The first one i would say is that the dog walkers really love their job..

"frisch" Discussed on Marketing Trends

Marketing Trends

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"frisch" Discussed on Marketing Trends

"Welcome to marketing trends. I mean phase phase on chief content officer here emission at oregon. We have in studio kevin what's gonna. How's it going great to be here. It's great to have you. This is a particularly particularly fun episode. We have a dog culture here. Toast your office dog running around and we're huge fans of wag and huge fans of you so we're gonna gonna get into a lot of the really cool stuff. You're doing it way ba i. How did you get into marketing. I started out way back. I'm a little older than i look. I have i have great skin and i'm sure your audience can see that i did consulting for a while and then i started doing pricing work with some companies and i ended up doing finance for for marketing departments and i spent a decent amount of time doing that and slowly over time i said wait. Why do the boring finance part in the marketing departments. Let's just be more of an analytical. A person involved directly in markings shifted from finance to marketing as as some of the best marketers. Do you know it's funny. There's so many martyrs has that ever different path and the financial path. I think really positions you will to be next to the business right yeah. I think you know when i'm talking to people. There's always like these two paths. There's the market is who were very much. Brand focused kind of you know they come in with the you know the black turtlenecks and kind of explain these mysterious things. There's the folks who are the other path. Were much more quantitative like you know. I'm not really sure what works and what doesn't but we can test it and figure it out and with technology. It's been kind of the the the accelerator to giving the analytical folks the like ammo they need and the storytelling folks the m._o. They need to do that further listeners who might not know. Can you share for more about wag. Yeah wag is basically <hes> in on-demand dog-walking platform so you know you're at work and you realize you're going to work late or even. If you have a sort of a regular recurring thing that you need to do we also sort of walk your dog whether it's during the day or during the evening we give your lock box. We can access your house. You don't need to be home. No walk your dog and you've had some really interesting stops at companies like uber jia sen snap fish fish. Tell me a little bit while you were so excited about the opportunity to be c._m._o. Egg well. The first thing is i love marketplace businesses. They have this this beautiful complexity to them. Which many days just hurts my brain and makes it very hard to do things but other times really exciting and then you know wagon particular condition being marketplace..

chief content officer oregon
"frisch" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

06:13 min | 2 years ago

"frisch" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"It's my addiction to frisch's big boys. It's my diction to Montgomery and every week or two. I gotta have some of that by wife doesn't like meet that. But when she goes away on a vacation by herself or the girlfriends or whatever I wanna do it. So it's what addiction that we consider acceptable, what addictions, we consider unacceptable, and I consider it unacceptable to be a heroin addict and to be heroin dealer, and to be Fenton will talk about how many deaths and what's happening in the heroine. I ever a former client of mine who was a drug dealer in, in price hill. And he told me about two months, I ran into him at a service station. He said, businesses better now than it's ever been. He said, there's more people at thick that the heroin and Percocet and drugs in ever before. And he said businesses. Good wise business, so good in price hill, and maybe. Newtown? What will the why because it's extremely powerful drug fifty. The carpet. Has more powerful in. Here's the thing, we would have an addiction issue and still need to work on the addiction issue. And go through these, these discussions are having now. But the problem is causing this to be an emergency would on average fifty to seventy people overdosing every week, we can talk about the numbers that we know about the what about the numbers. We don't know about seven people died this weekend. I gotta be honest that alone would not have triggered an alert which figured it was Columbus. And in trouble county comes out today, and they're having higher numbers and what they've seen the past few months. And then we had double digit numbers of overdoses, those once we know about that with high of that there was a multitude of factors that. No. And what bothers me is that we need to make all the stopping a national priority. It would help reduce the first responders responding to all these people wouldn't be overdosing. You won't be dying families wouldn't be wouldn't be impacted. I have read generations in my small town impacted the last two by Caroline. Channel and grandparents are raising the kids. Now the kids don't have families. We need to stop coming in not being mass produced in the United States being produced in China Mexico now. India's talked in India productions of and look, I'm not going to debate whether we should have a trade war, not I don't know nothing about that. But I can say there's not tens of thousand Americans dying from a trade war, we got puff on China for that. Why aren't we put Nekunam extinctions on them? Why aren't we being Saint China stopped us now here on taking action? I know the administration a lot more than they've been working on China, says he'll stop, but China's not a democracy. They have right now. They wanted to. The pressure. We need to be doing chief about seventy thousand Americans are killed every year by drug addiction, mainly fed, no car no heroin, and cocaine, and the great bulk of the artificial aspects of heroin comes from the mail service. It comes from China, head on Senator Rob Portman in December who laid out tons tons of Fenton car, feno are coming from China, number one. They make a boatload of money and number two, they rot away the inside of their main adversary, so they're incentivize, now, you're talking about tariffs. That's an important thing. But how about seventy thousand Americans killed every year over a decade at might be close to a million Americans or killed? We're not getting tough with communist red China. They're making money off of it, and they're, and they're hollowing out, many of our cities. And we gotta be tougher on them. What other what other thing would we allow another country to have such influence seventy thousand Americans died? And that's not just the individuals of families are impacted community five hundred billion dollars to spend. It is a national crisis and should be dealt with. And that's why I'm calling for a long time or a declaration of a national mercy -mergency on the opioid epidemic. Stop the flow from coming in. We stopped the overdoses, we stopped them multiple death. We can start catching our breath and bilby systems from revival onto recovery, no matter what the drug is. I mean, we're trying to build a healthcare system for addiction alone. So Beth part of the issue the other issues, we can't get that done while we're in emergency mode of carpet, constantly being pushed into the United States from other countries the bat, and we start gaining some ground. We can stagnate that and we start building foundation. We you got a few more years to go and your gig. I got a few more years to go in my gig. At the end of the day are things getting better or things getting worse, or they about the same. I think they're about the same to be quite on foot. Here's my thing is at least we're trying that I'm not going to ignore the bunch of people that aren't ignoring. It and we'll put the effort in and my thing when people talk about complaining, or judging or putting an opinion on it, that's not action what we need is action to try to make a difference in the world. And that's what me and all the people, the coalition of the firefighters nurses, doctors addiction specialists. The media, a lot of people are now taking this and saying, hey, we need to do our part, and you need to at least try, and that's my thing. I'm gonna leave try at least gonna try and make a difference in the world. I've mode the hand the mothers who have shaken because they lost their kid at a father, beg Davis, daughter's life from an overdose and to me, that's what it's about. I'm gonna make a difference in somebody's life, Chievo say this communist red China is a dictatorship. It's a communist country. Nobody owns anything in China. Everything that happens could be stopped in a heartbeat by Z if that's what he desired to do. And he doesn't do it because they make billions of dollars off of us. And Secondly, they're hollowing out the character, and the soul of our nation. So the communist red Chinese have noticed outta do it. And I think we ought to be harder on. Them on that issue. Then on tariffs chief, we got to go. And by the way, captain, Greer, and Butler county says, Hello you. Hey. He's a great man. Well, I mean he's he's back. He's a he's a bit liberal for my taste, but I've been working with them. Trying. I've been trying to my he's he loved Hillary Clinton. I know that. And right now, he kind of enjoys Bernie Sanders, I think so. You can't take them the ice cream down the creamy whip down. They're staying in line for a while. Tom is the creamy whipped open up both windows they doubled their business. I'll tell them to do that. Chief sign in your great American, and thanks.

China heroin overdoses United States Saint China frisch China Mexico Montgomery Hillary Clinton Fenton Bernie Sanders India Senator Rob Portman Columbus Caroline Tom Chievo Beth
Universal Language of Honey Bees

Curiosity Daily

02:20 min | 2 years ago

Universal Language of Honey Bees

"Scientists have made a real life breakthrough in understanding how he's talked to each other in a paper appearing in the April edition of animal behavior. Researchers shared the discovery of a universal calibration that makes it possible to decode honeybee waggled dances. It works across subspecies and landscapes and this finding could help us maintain existing be populations. Pretty important stuff. We've talked about waggled dances before on this show. But here's a refresher. When a worker bee finds a new source of nectar nearby it dances in a distinctive figure eight pattern to let other bees know about the good news. There's even a designated dancefloor near the entrance of the high where Wagle dances take. Ace honeybees aren't waggling willy nilly, though. Certain aspects of the dance communicate details about the nectar source. How long the dance lasts corresponds with a distance to the source, for instance. And the angle of the bees dancing body. Relative to the sun indicates the direction of the source figuring out the meaning of Wagle dances was such a big deal. It led to a Nobel prize for Australian zoologist Karl von Frisch in nineteen Seventy-three. But researchers at Virginia Tech recently noticed that bees communicating the same nectar source. Sometimes vary their waggled dances. So they developed their own distance duration calibration system that factored in what they called noise or variation between bees who visit the same source. They discovered that that be to be variation is so high it renders the location and subspecies of the be biologically irrelevant that made it possible for them to create a universal calibration for decoding waggled dances. This universe. Calibration makes it possible for researchers worldwide to understand where bees are collecting food. And this knowledge can inform be friendly planting practices Beazer kind of a big deal because according to Greenpeace USA seventy out of the top one hundred food crops are pollinated by bees. If you do the math that means that bees are responsible for one of every three bites of food. You eat the biggest threats to bees right now are pesticides and habitat loss. And those could be minimized by using information about where bees forage pretty important research for us to be spending our time on wouldn't you say, no, I know what the buzz is all about.

Karl Von Frisch Waggled Greenpeace Usa Nobel Prize Wagle Virginia Tech
"frisch" Discussed on Everyman Podcast Show

Everyman Podcast Show

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"frisch" Discussed on Everyman Podcast Show

"Grab a bottle Frisch out of prison. Grandfather and shit. Fuck is triple of holding over issue. Those may want to go. I just seven years you fuck you should have been the first one in there. I'm still in jail. Won't I'm looking like sharing. Then the inmate. Just let it in. Hey into the giraffe elephant in the headlines. Is good. Some of a liquor store get some liquor. Nobody. Back in jail, April. You can do it. And they've been there for you got a new I could make it. But believe we hit one. We haven't gotten the answer. But what do you ladies feel that may be stripping thirty thirty five old? I think. No because is coming now to Miami and stripping play yours twenty now with saying. Yeah. And unite you got all the young axe college kids, don't ask experience who are still got old of crowds that they might for you got those girls that also come from those little countries that they think that they look young because they're young, but they. Strong area the parental really calling out the Peruvian. So, but if looks like she's in her late twenties, but she's reaching her fourteen or seen any that's completely acceptable. As to why style she wants to leave your if you're forty years old, and you look like your damn near sixty five. Yeah. Are you get life suction, and you too much demigods low working like on the side of that on the side of that logic where good I understand him. Honey. They need to all have like auditions. 'cause I worked. Editions what they usually always puck and higher you afterward. Yeah. Hiring menus. Okay. The graduate know who gets okay. No. To deter you. Go in there and there later this. Yeah. And there's another house seen. I've seen a lot of hair them. The mobile ads. She already go into Trey me. What are you doing? You'll get a hassle longer. One time to stand out even fucking move all the pool like this like an arm and a scientist. I've eaten a steak enclaves doing the econ- stay Isla, super hungry and hate them twenty dollars. I was like dopamine onstage twenty dollars. They've amass onstage such as I sat crisscross L sauce. Aim fucking snake sexy? Fuck no, really, I hate that shit. Like, I was hungry because I was. Zoo's watching us from trying to did they throw money at you know, what this came in. And they got like five hundred again. Really on the ball. Was it her pure eating pizza on the pole? Yes. Is it the same when she had with the hurry? Oh, wait. So you ate a pizza put that you do it to eat it sexy at least now, but I was dancing while the desert. Did you get in your? Yes, I did because that is phenomenal. I would've took the girl seven. Hey, how often people just go up on stage and eat managers are like you didn't go on stage right now. And they're like half the girls tip out to go on stage in they're eating and I make them on stage. Yeah. But right now in Texas. There's this thing they're doing like this lawsuit. And it's supposed to be like like cattle. It's like, we're however, many hours you worked, but they're like cutting us out of via tip, outs and stuff. They're trying to get like in a tax return for dancers. So like, we get all the money that they made about back for hours. You have with still like as far like everybody else. Yeah. They're digs Marie. They think themselves legal for you. Go to what fuck and you can have you can have you can have. Like. Be able to do that while they're really around having..

Frisch dopamine Miami scientist Marie Zoo Texas twenty dollars forty years seven years
"frisch" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

KKOB 770 AM

02:37 min | 3 years ago

"frisch" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

"For pat frisch he'll be back on tuesday him in jim freezer during the morning show correct has the your hard work i'm not doing the morning show i'm just jen's doing that but oh i thought you were but later later coming up i will be ooh confused time so two four three thirty three thirty three lots going on in the world and i i came in rather melancholy today i gotta be honest really yeah i i'm teaching english this summer and it's just sometimes the novels resonate with me we did of mice and men and it just it's that's depressing and just the human condition and how many sad people there are in the world so this story kind of resonated with me this morning and it kind of took me places i didn't think i would go but i i don't know if this is gonna play or we'll see let's see city we're talking about panhandling there are arguments on both sides some say it's free speech others say it's dangerous but one albuquerque teenager says something needs to be done after she caught some women on video dancing provocatively at an intersection in the heights colton shown has the video and a warning though you might wanna tell the kids to close their eyes team many of us are all too familiar with and people on the side of the roads asking for money some plant themselves on the freeway on and off ramps others on busy streets sidewalks but monica padilla saw something she hadn't seen before at the intersection of central and tramway let's stop here because if monica body as a teenager and she hasn't been to prom or homecoming it's basically they don't let me just narrate this for you for all you parents and millennials and young people out there there's no more dancing let me tell you it is called i don't see nothing wrong with a little bump and grind model seen them raw so if if the teenager is clutching her pearls at this point i'm kind of shocked because if you haven't been to a high school dance lali don't go they should sell their she might be offended there should be a parental advisory on the door of every high school dancing down so let let this is the video she recorded of two women dancing suggestively immediate one swings around the paul in this video you can see.

pat frisch colton monica padilla jen albuquerque
"frisch" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

Ben Greenfield Fitness

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"frisch" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

"Because i can know the theory of yes you know this is good for you but if we can make tasty and simple people then people are going to gravitate towards okay so you've got some recipes and flavor combos in here that i find just fascinating because a lot of people don't think about this stuff when it comes to bone broth like for example you've got the adding coconut milk and ginger to bone broth or adding brag liquid amino and then whisking that with an egg yolk in a bone broth you've got about twenty different recipes in the book which which one would you say would be the top bone broth flavor combo or the top couple that you really like you think people should tap into right away well a really easy one it's just coconut mocha jinja but that needs to you that you need to use chicken for that doesn't that doesn't work as well with the beef but just a gaudy puree and sometime my favorite it one because it it's got so many different spices is coconut milk with a pinch of gratitude generic and sub grant jinja and smash garlic and pepper salt i mean that he's absolutely delicious but once again when you using coconut milk it's better to use chicken broth and beef then beef broth breath but full beef just using jinja and some frisch or sub ground turmeric also works well and also once again has some anti inflammatory effect in the two merican defense in the in the bumper says only things will to get i love ella.

frisch milk
"frisch" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"frisch" Discussed on AP News

"Frisch is big boy double decker burger restaurant chain is opening in ohio the museum a tale of frisch is big boy is scheduled to open to the public on friday at the chains original main liner restaurant the main liner opened in nineteen thirty nine in fairfax just east of cincinnati atlanta based private equity firm and our d capital bought the chain from its family ownership in two thousand fifteen long and i can make cincinnati brand frisch has the big boy trademark in the region there are a total of one hundred twenty one restaurants in ohio indiana and kentucky frisch is urging people to loan they're big boy memorabilia for shortterm displays the daughter of the former russian spy targeted in the nerve agent attack in england has been discharged from the hospital thirty three year old you'll es repels doctor says it's not the end of her treatment but it does mark a significant milestone she's been taken to a secure location which the british government will likely keep secret her father sergei scrippshoward who sixty six is still in the hospital with doctors saying he and his daughter are at different stages of recovery british police say the lethal nerve agent novi junk was pleased on the door handle of scripps house in salisbury in early march both were in critical condition for several weeks after the poisoning if she is well enough then you'll es cliff how will likely be extensively questioned by british security officials and police about her recollection of events leading up to her poisoning listening to the ap radio network did you know that you can purchase prints of ap's photography for your personal or small business us every day a piece photographers capture incredible images from all around the world there on the scene of wars and conflict concerts movie premieres championship games and parades you can browse ap images dot com to find iconic photos to display in your home office restaurant or to give to friends and colleagues for more information visit atheist dot com what about syria i'm ed donahue with an ap news minute french president macron says france will decide within days along with the us and the uk how to respond to the syrian regime over a suspected chemical weapons attack president trump didn't talk about syria with reporters during an appearance with the emir of qatar the.

president ap shortterm kentucky atlanta ohio qatar trump uk us france Frisch ed donahue syria salisbury scripps house novi junk nerve agent
"frisch" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

KKOB 770 AM

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"frisch" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

"Be held liable attorney benjamin taylor tells twelve news charges could come thanks to an executive order issued by governor doug ducey just weeks ago saying tech companies could be held as accountable as a human would be such an accident i'm jim rupe i'm ed hartley and i'm judith jenkins on ninety four point five fm and am seven seventy newsradio k k o b ha ha mayor you lou lose they still caught him i'll explain a my show today at one o'clock pat frisch newsradio k o b i was betrayed in this case was very important to show that those that betray it do pay that price i that is former metro court judge kevin fitzwater and he's talking about the socalled gang of eight this dates back more than twelve years folks when the indictments i started coming down but they're they're back in the news today at least one of the metro court administrator toby martinez he was one of the masterminds of the scam that ultimately stole four point three million dollars from taxpayers during the construction of the new courthouse and state senator of albuquerque very powerful man up in santa fe manny aragon was also caught up in all of this and all eight of them were eventually caught and convicted after being indicted about half of them served time in prison others got probation but toby martinez he got forty six months in federal prison for what he did any personally pocketed two million dollars of the four point three million stole alan from taxpayers only serves his time he's out of jail now.

benjamin taylor jim rupe ed hartley judith jenkins kevin fitzwater toby martinez senator manny aragon attorney executive doug ducey lou pat frisch administrator albuquerque santa fe three million dollars two million dollars forty six months twelve years
"frisch" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"frisch" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Peter frisch who who are they they're journalists correct while the full agendas i mean clan simpson was there was a distinguished correspondent for the wall street journal he he specialized him what you michael postsoviet muck russian organized crime and the the way that that the kind of vitamin preachings kind of country has has seen a a merger between criminal elements in states and so he he was someone with a kind of track record he he's he's a gun for harmony he's wefa kind of different plants over the years but i think he i'm and i can't speak for him but i think he's been increasingly frustrated with a sort of partisan way that republicans have gone off to his firm and this one very important aspect to his kind of article which is this the the fbi he says began investigating trump on russia not because of the steel dossier because of separate warnings from from intelligence agencies in my country the united kingdom but also in europe and indeed australia who are picking up meetings between donald trump camp pain people and russian intelligence assets and this is won't galvanized the whole inquiry and just two two why is it so important to glenn simpson to make it clear that the steel dossier did not trigger the russia investigation because these these attacks saw on fusion and glenn simpson's personal credibility full away if the dossier was the only source reporting and you can say 'yes she pressed making the dossiers bully career but if you say it's all wrong falls fake news and so on then you have no inquiry but more problematic for for the white house he's the fact that the ice is very good allies to routinely share intelligence worst sang as early as late two thousand and fifteen in spring two thousand sixteen wake up but there are some worrying contacts going on in london and other european cities between basically russian spies and trump peak paul and you should know about this now that that's much harder to dismiss and i think it's more problematic full president trump and what investigators on he'll become so interested in investigating fusion gps eventually they sat for one hours of testimony or something the yeah i mean i i mean i think this is probably one f against things and to answer but i think it's a kind of classic smear and and you focus on on process.

Peter frisch wall street journal fbi russia united kingdom europe glenn simpson london michael postsoviet donald trump president one hours