22 Burst results for "Friendster"

"friendster" Discussed on Rocketship.fm

Rocketship.fm

02:33 min | Last month

"friendster" Discussed on Rocketship.fm

"Stuff and shipping it right away. So this is the future we're all headed towards, building something in a weekend and then having billions of dollars funnel through it. I mean, what could go wrong? Well, lots, right? But that's kind of the exciting part of all this. We still haven't really figured out what that thing is for web three. Here's Anatolia again discussing when he thinks that aha moment for web three will be. When we get to a 100 million people that use self custody keys on these chains for applications. For something in front of teas, I don't care what it is. I think we'll be there. And that's kind of like that moment in the Internet when you had a 100 million people browsing and you saw friendster orchid pop up and you're like, okay, that's the model. Somebody's going to get it right. We're not quite there yet. Not quite at that it's obvious that this is going to be the thing. So it's exciting because I'm like, what is it going to be? I have my ideas, but there's no way I could predict it. Which is crazy because they're building the foundation without a clear idea of what that core use case will actually be. Yeah, it's such a crazy time. And speaking of crazy, you're actually getting on a plane tomorrow and heading out to LA for what a cameo NFT party, right? All right, don't spoil it just yet. But yes, I'm actually about to head out to my first crypto NFT party and I'll be rubbing elbows with some crypto web three celebrities. Maybe some real celebrities. We'll see, but I'm doing it all in the name of rocket ship here. So I hope everybody's happy about this. It's amazing. We're going to have more from that party coming up. All on this season of rocket ship FM where we're diving into web three and trying to figure out this world ourselves. So for Mike belsito, I'm Michael sokka. This is rocket ship FM. Thank you so much for listening to rocket ship dot FM. It is your support that keeps the show going. If you can take a second and leave us a review wherever you listen to podcasts, it helps out the show so much. We're also part of the pod glamorous network and if you'd like to listen to more great shows from the go do the hot glamorous dot com to see the full show listings. Rocket ship FM is produced in partnership with product collective, a community for product people, go to product collective dot com and get access to our weekly newsletter, live video interviews, slack community product job board, and a whole.

Anatolia friendster Mike belsito Michael sokka LA
"friendster" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

02:15 min | 4 months ago

"friendster" Discussed on WCPT 820

"A lot to me I have one of those cars with a push button start It will not turn on unless I jingle the keys around And let me tell you every time I get in the car I'm like do I need this thing thinking for me It feels oh my God Like that I'm so irritated by the time I started I'm getting an older car Everybody else on the road believe me People are going to be irritated when they're trying to write their papers to turn in the next day This is just a terrible ideal What A deal I deal It's a terrible idea I was waiting for a say she was getting the car to go buy an onion for her belt I've been in a push button I rented one and I'm like I don't do it I don't know why I don't need to drink on my keys You just put it down You have to have your keys on you in order for my pocket Yeah Yeah I just they're all right through this close Like the old days When I need to get one of those windows drinking fountain to use Okay Wow Let's say idea and not ideally I don't think she has to jiggle her keys to what the car knows that they're there And also Microsoft got rid of clippy years ago when you need to update that on her MySpace Oh no friendster Friend sir Yeah Okay Yeah that's why I said I'm not blurring this stupid wordle It's just What is it Words with Friends Isn't Twitter words with Friends What is it Is it like Scrabble It's a word game It's a ripoff of the old chuckle every game show lingo where you guess if I let her word it tells you if letters are in the word and in what position Like hangman I'll explain to you don't break I don't understand We all have entirely too much free time COVID David shock is playing it I'm like I don't Well everybody is bragging about how fast they got And I'm like I don't care I don't care I do They are It's a useless brag Why do I keep getting Dylan Wilcox has posted his wurtele store on my why is why do I need that information You can follow him Why does he post that information Why He's proud of himself It's because with your friends and people who pay attention to that thing it's kind of it's like a fun thing that's going around It's just fun It's taking apart and engaging in society in a way that's not arguing about the pandemic or politics Can I have some nostalgia When I write chicken I just like.

David shock friendster Dylan Wilcox MySpace Microsoft Twitter
"friendster" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

They Call Us Bruce

03:31 min | 8 months ago

"friendster" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

"Wow that's crazy and also to to more things. sorry. I know. I'm talking about a lot of things. The mask dude. Oh that was going to be my. Wf reveal their out like a party. Like what did he just get killed. Or they got killed by a dragon or something like that. He was just eating. His soul was ripped out. Or it's kind of weird rule. Where like there's a dude mysterious due to the mask like you've got to show support right. It might have been a woman. So that's what i thought. So but yeah. That was one. That was one and again the shoes. I can't let it go so seem if you're listening or costume designer. Let's talk and it really it. It really upset. I'm gonna blame the mass guy for the shoes. Yes 'cause i that that guy is death dealer and he actually has a name like he's a character in the comics or in marvel so it is a little weird that he would just die like so half acidly and never no explanation really for anybody else. He trains them. You know anyway. Well maybe maybe they return. 'cause it's marvel people return from the dead and shit so who knows but still i was like i was waiting. Because he was were they. Were such a bad ass house on this splits persons. It's can be a good reveal and done and then. I was left with the shoes. All right ari are dino rebecca. We did so deal. Where can people find you online. You could find me at dino ray Dinor a wide pretty much on all the social handles twitter. Instagram zanga live journal friendster of take talk announced on instagram and twitter. You can visit the new slight diaspora at the diaspora. Times dot com that those social handles are real diaspora so con- out on alternative trade. That's all about people of color in the industry. People and disabled people and non white people out. Good stuff rebecca son. How 'bout you yes. My social handles are at the rebecca. Son t. h. e. r. a. b. c. c. a. s. u. n. And please check out. Our podcast t. Hr's podcast hollywood remixed. It's an inclusion. Themed podcast that takes a topical approach to looking at these issues so we do have an episode with c. mu that is specifically sit around centered around the theme of the martial arts stereotype and asian masculinity. So just a real light listen Check out if you just can't get your fill of shonky themed podcast episodes. Yeah and also. I want to add that. I have interviewed coming out with. Cyo before the release to just have to transcribe it and write it up We should mention that. We also have a podcast. Her this so i hope you guys liked listening to that..

dino rebecca ray Dinor Instagram zanga twitter ari rebecca friendster instagram hollywood
"friendster" Discussed on Whimsically Volatile

Whimsically Volatile

03:35 min | 9 months ago

"friendster" Discussed on Whimsically Volatile

"Of your life. If you're watching your brains are automatically tuned to wanna sut dick and fuck but that is from. I think to raw. Oh my god. I thought that was from high school. That was very recent. Yeah i love that. And i felt i had to fucked. I think i was. I went to precinct after the yacht. Because i i yeah. I thought that literally sounded like in high school. And i was like. Where did you find this. Because there's like very few creepy out. You know i love it. I'm like i i. I'll find out like your mother's address. Like i love buried that person too. But there's a few videos of like old videos of me from high school and i thought that was one of them and i was like you know it's coming back. We'll high school. I used to have a youtube We used to have a nice to have a youtube show called tranny. Talk a and we would just like go. I've always wanted to have a talk show so we will go on and just do stupid like talk things one thing. Yeah yeah but that was. And i thought it was something from that like. Oh my fucking what could yeah right. I know exactly some place. I think from ages ago. So what age did you start doing that. Because you've been on the internet for. I i did well. My mom didn't let me have internet at the house because she knew what kind of girl i was so i would go to my friend's house right go like the library after school. And that's where. I would get like my social media but i started going probably like fourteen lake my space time. It was like right after lake. Friendster vampire freaks kind of moment where it was getting into like social media. Not just like dark webby. Yeah friendster is interesting and then didn't hang around for awhile and got purchased by some company and became his other weird thing. I mean my spaces valid justin timberlake. Now this weird. I can still log into my no and it's fucking nuts. Does it still work the same way completely. Different can just get to my pictures. Okay but i was like the really bulletins vaguely he'd like you could posted a bulletin like it was just like a form. I guess i just if that show a fellowship. I used to say and do on their jail journals. But that's why we put we put a small gopro capturing everything backstage for the archive. For the time someone slips in powderpuff goes up in the air or something. You know what i mean that kind of chaos by there but i mean it's obviously fun. Yeah no definitely. Yeah i wanna ask you more humor things about horror movies though because you clearly a big fan of them. Yeah and you know a lot about the exorcist. Which i love to talk about that. Maybe if you ever wanted to move the club to be happy to What are some of your other favorite horror movies I it's not really hor- one of my favorite movies though. That really kind of isolate shaped me was job breaker. I like like dark comedy. Because that's how. I like. If i was the movies on i'd be like a dark comedy like there'd be like a little bit of murder but your leg upset about the person got killed. You're kinda like well. Maybe he deserved. It wasn't mean she killed the team. Dream deal with. It took. But i also i also really love like drop dead. Gorgeous is like hilarious. Because it's like hillbilly backwoods like podunk pageant. Like gun club gorgeous. Come line beautiful. I really love like the silence of the lambs sets a great one guy..

sut dick Friendster youtube justin timberlake
"friendster" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

05:28 min | 10 months ago

"friendster" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

"Was competing with friendster back in the day. Right so raider day. It was kind of pre friendster right around that time back then there were like we used to call them profile sites. There was black planet asia. Magenta there was mice based friendster. There was joy dot com. The dili dot com. There was all these kind of profile sites go and critical profile it was kind of social networks but nobody was calling it that yet and so i thought well the dating things like the stigma was hard to get people to join because the stigma dating and not everybody's looking to date right. How's it but i do think like the early days of aol chat rooms. I think people want to. Just hang out and communicate. I think generally people were kind of bored and looking for community connection. I saw that early on and i built social tree. We build a little audience. And i was trying to compete with friendster. Friendster got beat by space as we all know because we hear it all the time. Bitcoin is bitcoin. The knicks moist base right. So but it's not you can get into that but the lawsuit..

Friendster asia aol Bitcoin knicks
"friendster" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

05:33 min | 10 months ago

"friendster" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

"Nine percent of success is staying power. Like if you're in a big market and it's evolving and it's growing there's going to be opportunities you're gonna figure it out eventually but is the eventually on your time horizon or is it the next guy or the next guy who's actually going to get there and there's there's so many industries opportunities either like that. I mean if somebody's house where being i is actually not totally advantage like friendster right in things and even my space i will say i mean they. They did have their their heyday and they did have some success but obviously not to these that something like facebook and twitter an instrument or whatever else. Tom cashed out. I don't think he's complaining. All tom got a lot of friends. A swat team. You don't wanna be the first guy going through the door..

friendster facebook twitter Tom tom
"friendster" Discussed on Forever35

Forever35

04:20 min | 10 months ago

"friendster" Discussed on Forever35

"Friendster friendster people of a certain age will remember friend Well don just out of curiosity. What is the moisturizer that you've been using since you were eighteen super lame. It's just it's like one of the only ones i'm not allergic to it's called moisture al. It's like one of those ones that you're dermatologists will recommend if you are allergic to everything and there's a couple of them that they'll recommend but that's the one that's the only one that works for me so moisture out like you bite or that's perfect. I mean you're not the only person who i'm sure has this experience with allergies to products and also what i find interesting is that you've been using the same product since you were eighteen. Like you're almost like a. I don't know how to say this like you're like could you be proof that products are just all b. s. and marketing right like even using the same thing since you're eighteen. Your skin looks great. Maybe you don't need all the extra bells and whistles like maybe we're all trapped in a A capitalism skin-care frenzy. I mean i always feel like it would be so fun to be able to partake of all these different things. But i mean part of how i discovered that i could only use this one thing or i just had to find this one thing and use it was because i was using. I was trying to use all these other products and my body was just like not having it and i was really really miserable. Place that's why. I've asked like really bad eczema and so for those of you listening. Don't know what zuma as it's like you're allergic to your own skin and and so i just. I finally found a doctor but also found a roommate..

Friendster al eczema zuma
"friendster" Discussed on UnCommon Law

UnCommon Law

05:37 min | 10 months ago

"friendster" Discussed on UnCommon Law

"Because the court clue looks askance at the way that they define the social networking market essentially just so that it's only facebook but then they say even if we're willing to allow them that at this stage the motion to dismiss stage that this level of evidence which is essentially just the ftc's say so that facebook has sixty percent market share and has used predatory conduct to maintain it. They say that that wouldn't work even for standard markets whereas here we're dealing with a relatively poorly understood market. Okay fair enough. These are relatively new markets. And yes there are certainly other social media platforms. But i also don't think that it's coincidence that facebook happened to by the two companies that were these rising stars in photo sharing messaging company that we now know from internal documents that facebook viewed as its biggest competitors. So how is this any from previous monopoly cases say. At and t. buying up regional phone carriers and increasing prices. I think it's a good question and my answer. I think as a normative matter would be that. It's strange when you're dealing with market at least feels free for consumers so the just the ftc's unable to show any pricing power any predatory conduct because they're not trying to raise prices. Facebook is trying to charge us. The irony is the real underlying problem. I think is facebook's collection and use and the security with which protects large reams of personal data that the company holds about us. But that's actually not at issue in this suit. You mentioned the issue of data privacy and this is where i think these concerns about monopolies and competition do start to overlap with some of the other concerns about social media for instance through its acquisition and gross strategy. Facebook now has detailed data on almost three billion users worldwide. And many say that's just too much power to put in the hands of a private company with no government oversight so derek. Do you think the judge's decision to dismiss the ftc's initial case maybe bolsters the push for congressional solution either on antitrust or some other form of regulation so. I think that the question of whether this strengthens the argument for new trust rules depends really on how worried one is about facebook or twitter or google and what sorts of harms using. Their conduct is creating and there as i said. I think that it's perfectly reasonable to be skeptical about the massive data collection and data use of these companies. But i don't see much evidence. The ftc seems to. I found the best that could for showing that there is anti-competitive conduct in terms of blocking out competitors case i entered into a market. Were the one that was most likely to succeed. We would still all be on live journal and my space and friendster and who for search so. I personally think that there isn't a need for new antitrust laws. There is a need for more rigorous investigation and more rigorous factfinding.

facebook ftc derek twitter google friendster
"friendster" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"friendster" Discussed on 710 WOR

"User group talking over to another social networking site, one that for a while, it seemed like it was going to be the definitive social networking platform. My space Does this was, you know a little bit later after my space have gotten started, But we'll get back to my space later in this episode. Before that, I should probably explain what actually happened with Friendster. It floundered as a social media platform for several more years that lasted long enough to see my space eventually fall behind the upstart competitor of Facebook spoiler alert there. But in 2011 Friendster changed from a social networking platform to more of a social gaming network. And this was really kind of an effort to get out of the trap it had found itself in by competing directly with Facebook. It couldn't do that. That was clearly a lost cause. So Friendster was instead operate as a social gaming network. And they did that for a few more years, but ultimately shut down in 2015, and the brand is pretty much non existent today. So with Friendster. We have a social networking site that pre existed Facebook but was unable to scale to serve a growing user base and thus giving opportunities to competitors. And the next platform I should talk about is high five. It's a chai and the numeral five. This is a social network site that made a profit in its first year of operation. It was actually a profitable Web based business. Right out of the gate. There was an entrepreneur named Rahm. Oh, ya'll Amanti, who founded the site in 2003, and I do apologize for my pronunciation of his name. I am terribly ignorant, and that is all on me. But anyway, while I was researching this episode, and I came across high five, I thought, huh? That's a social networking site. I don't think I've ever heard of before. Except maybe I have because apparently, I already created a profile for it. See, high five is still around today. At least, theoretically, it is And so I thought, you know what I'll do. I'll make a profile on their create a profile to check out what this site looks like. Only when I tried to do that, when I tried to make a profile with my my private email address, I got a message that said that my email was blocked, which was odd, because it's not like I'm using a particularly, you know, shady email service. It's Gmail. For those who want to know it's nothing bad. S o. I thought how that's weird. Well, maybe what that means is that I may have already made a high five account. I just forgot about it. So I chose the forgot my password feature useful thing. And then I put my email address and the Littlefield and I hit the button, and the site said it was going to send an email to me with instructions on how I could log in. And as of this moment, I have not received that email. That was hours ago when I did that Nothing has had Been sense so there are a few possibilities. One is that it's just taking a really long time. Maybe high five servers are few and far between and overloaded. Another possibility is that the site just isn't active like I had been led to believe, and that it's really dormant. Another possibility is that I never had a profile on there, and everyone gets The message about an E mail being sent whether they have a profile on high five or not, If they go through that whole forgot my password process So I could find that out by just making up a fake email address and are making a brand new email address even then, putting it in the field. But I didn't go through that. That phase. I was already fed up, but anyway, high five started off as another social network site, where you would create a profile with information about yourself. There was supposed to be an age restriction. Users were supposed to be at least 13 years old. But the site had no means of authenticating a person's age. So you know, there you go. The site would prompt new users to add friends through their contacts with existing services like Yahoo Mail or Hotmail and Boy, those take me back, and users could customize their profile pages..

Friendster Facebook Rahm Amanti Littlefield
"friendster" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

05:43 min | 1 year ago

"friendster" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"Over to another social networking site, one that for a while, Like it was going to be the definitive social networking platform my space because this was, you know, a little bit later after my space have gotten started, But we'll get back to my space later in this episode. Before that, I should probably explain what actually happened with Friendster. It floundered as a social media platform for several more years that lasted long enough. You see my space eventually fall behind the upstart competitor of Facebook spoiler alert there. But in 2011 Friendster changed from a social networking platform to more of a social gaming network. And this was really kind of an effort to get out of the trap. It found itself in by competing directly with Facebook. It couldn't do that. That was clearly a lost cause. So Friendster would instead operate as a social gaming network. And they did that for a few more years, but ultimately shut down in 2015, and the brand is pretty much non existent today. So with Friendster. We have a social networking site that pre existed Facebook but was unable to scale to serve a growing user base and thus giving opportunities to competitors. And the next platform I should talk about is high five. It's a chai and the numeral five. This is a social network site that made a profit in its first year of operation. It was actually a profitable Web based business. Right out of the gate. There was an entrepreneur named Rahm. Oh, yeah. Lamont. She who founded the site in 2003, and I do apologize for my pronunciation of his name. I am terribly ignorant, and that is all on me. But anyway, while I was researching this episode, and I came across high five, I thought, huh. That's a social networking site. I don't think I've ever heard of before, except Maybe I have because apparently, I already created a profile for it. See, High five is still around today. At least theoretically, it is And so I thought, you know what I'll do. I'll make a profile on their create a profile to check out what this site looks like. Only when I tried to do that, when I tried to make a profile with my my private email address. I got a message that said that my email was blocked, which was odd, because it's not like I'm using a particularly, you know, shady email service. It's Gmail. For those who want to know it's nothing Bad s O. I thought how that's weird. Well, maybe what that means is that I may have already made a high five account. I just forgot about it. So I chose the forgot my password feature useful thing. And then I put my email address in the Littlefield and I hit the button, and the site said it was going to send an email to me with instructions on how I could log in. And as of this moment, I have not received that email. That was hours ago when I Did that Nothing has happened since. So there are a few possibilities. One is that it's just taking a really long time. Maybe high five servers are few and far between and overloaded. Another possibility is that the site just isn't active like I had been led to believe, and that it's really dormant. Another possibility is that I never had a profile on there and everyone gets The message about an E mail being sent whether they have a profile on high five or not, If they go through that whole forgot my password process so I could find that out by just making up a fake email address. And we're making a brand new email address, even and putting it in the field. But I didn't go through that. That phase. I was already fed up, but anyway, high five started off as another social network site, where you would create a profile with information about yourself. There was supposed to be an age restriction. Users were supposed to be at least 13 years old. But the site had no means of authenticating a person's age. So you know, there you go. The site would prompt new users to add friends through their contacts with existing services like Yahoo Mail or Hotmail and Boy, those take me back, and users could customize their profile pages. They could do stuff like change the background color of their profile. They could move things around on their profile if they wanted to. They could even go into HTML editing mode and really change things up and customized things if they if they so desired, But From the reports. I've read very few people went to the trouble of doing that now, like Friendster, and like some others that will be on this list High five would attempt to evolve as sites like MySpace and later, Facebook began to dominate the social networking sphere. In 2009. The site changed into more of a social gaming site, similar to what happened with Friendster company called tagged, acquired High fives Assets in 2011 and then tagged itself would get scooped up by a company called the Meat Group. That's in e T, not M E. A. T, which is a Totally different and frankly, horrifying Company But the way the meat group got them in 2017 jumping back to 2003 couple months after high five launched, we got my space. Now I've done full episodes about my space and the whole story of the rise and fall. The platform is fascinating. There's a ton of drama going on there. So for this episode, I'm not going to go into all that detail. I'll give you more of a high overview and I'll do that after we take this short break..

Friendster Facebook Meat Group Rahm Lamont E. A. T Littlefield MySpace
Social Media Risks Parents - Especially Of Girls - Should Know About

Legacy-Dads Podcast

07:40 min | 1 year ago

Social Media Risks Parents - Especially Of Girls - Should Know About

"For us for US old fogies it's probably going to provide some context here. So let's go back and some of you remember this back in the early days of social media like around two, thousand, three, two, thousand, four. You've got social media back then like friendster my space. Really. Wow. Did you have a mind? Is Account somewhere out there. Too Much excalibur. And facebook was really so the facebook but it was mainly, you had to be a college student on a college campus, they have access to facebook. and. These were actually it was a nice place. Social Media was very tame back then. It's kind of like, Hey, look at me here's some pictures. Here's the bands that I like what I'm listening to here's the links to smile into my friends. You know everybody remembers here's another meeting right now at this restaurant look at this great meal. and. That was kind of the first few years of what social media was. There was no censorship. There was no you know multimillion dollar corporations coming in and taking over. And there was no political groups spreading outrage or propaganda on social media. It was not really a destructive environment back. Then it wasn't toxic wasn't a toxin environment in any anyway. So then some big changes starting to happen in the kind of the mid to late two thousand. So facebook. started. To allow anyone to join, you didn't have to be a college student. So anybody can create an account and then in two thousand nine. facebook introduced the like button, and now for the first time everything and everyone can be graded and ranked, and now everybody is rewarding or punishing everyone else by simply clicking a button whether they like or dislike you you know Lance I can totally hear some of our listeners right now saying who cares if you get a like or not and I wouldn't be surprised if listeners say facebook, what's that? But because of for mature adults, we are more developed in don't tire identity to social media but in this is critical because for younger adults or children social media has now become a popularity contest. So now, speech isn't just you and me talking openly it becomes how do I get more likes and approval? So other platforms like twitter come out and they introduced the re tweet button yet, and now the things that I'm saying that we're saying right here on this podcast that you're liking tend to be the things that are going to make people emotional or even sharing my frustration or anger, and then you or anyone compress re tweet and spread that. So now my frustration and anger can go to thousands or even millions of people within a day that share or want to have the same expression and like the way that somebody else says it. You're correct in an I think between two, thousand, nine, two, thousand, twelve kind of this is the next step when when the news media mainstream media began to realize, hey, the social media thing is not going away and it may even overcome and overtake us. So the mainstream media begins to adapt to this new world in which people now and they're not going to CNN. They're not going to the New York Times for their information as much. They're getting their news and their opinions from social media and often I can tell you without fact checking anything. It's like well, you know. God bless my mom but I don't know how many times she's like well I saw it on facebook it has to be true. It must be true. If you're rushing spy putting it on. I'm like. So now we can we can go down rabbit hole on how social media and also creates echo chambers and in confirmation bias because one of the things that facebook switched over to it used to be that you would get everybody get all this information. And it was kind of random. Well, facebook started optimizing that to where they're GONNA only gonNA show you social media is only gonNA show you the stuff that they think you want to hear and like. So this changed in became more of an engagement focused thing. So now, you this confirmation bias because now we can only we can choose to just watch and listen to the point of view that we agree with. and. Let's get an. So that that's a whole rabbit hole. We go down I don't WANNA do that. You can go back and listen to somewhere where podcast we talk about that. But let's get to what this means for parents and specifically for parents of daughters so. T this you know this is probably relate to a lot of our guys out there. So in the development process boys. Are. Our maturity are hierarchy or or the the Alpha male is kind of based on. You know things like our athletic ability are toughness. Our ability to dominate or insult can competition teasing. You know drinking soda through your nose with a straw. Those are the things like middle school boys are. That's important to them. Things like that. Now, I'm not. I'm not Dourson this behavior agreeing with this saying that you know what this type of behavior is admit just that's just what it is. It's the scientific fact that this is kind of how middle school and high school boys move through their child development process. We could argue that. I would argue this Dante that some boys never develop out of the state and we have thirty and forty year olds who are still clinging to this. Alpha, Male, I'm the toughest I can dominate an insult you model. By that. Maybe, fifty year old. That's me later there. But but for girls and for daughters, this is specifically different. It's about who's in WHO's out, who is included, who is ex colluded who's friends with who who knows who secrets. And so the Female. Tends to be not physical like boys like they're not going to wrestle and fight it's relational and it's a Lotta drama. girls don't bully each other. You know generally, girls don't bully the each other physically so much. But what girls do is they gossip and they damage each other's relationships and again, we could argue that they're grown women even in our churches that still cling to this model now again. Not. dosing anything. That this is we agree with this behavior and I'm just I'm just regurgitating medical science and facts kind of the development process so. Around two, thousand, eight, two, thousand, nine when we start seeing smartphones coming out, the iphone first comes out and now you have social media is in your hand and in your pocket at all times. Okay. So with girls and daughters, this multi by this multiplies, a girl's ability to be able to damage each other's relationships enormously. So in some homes and in some cases. Children Girls They have access twenty, four seven to this device in which their thoughts emotions and images can be reported can be rewarded or punished by. Clicking a button and so if you had a fight with a girl that day in school, she can get on there and spread nasty things about you and you everybody's not liking you or making fun of you via anonymous social media on a phone and while adults adults, we might shrug things off and say, what's the big deal I mean who cares but you gotta remember girls in this vulnerable stage in development middle school high school they're looking for approval they're looking for inclusion and they're being they're looking to you know being seen. As beautiful as much and they're much more susceptible to anxiety depression, self harm and even suicide this you know approval inclusion in comparison that they're dealing with is that make sense Dante?

Facebook. United States Dante Friendster Development Middle School High New York Times Twitter CNN Lance
How Jessi Hempel Went from Poet to Podcast Host

Inside Podcasting

16:28 min | 2 years ago

How Jessi Hempel Went from Poet to Podcast Host

"Let's start at the beginning. I as I said you've had an extraordinary career as a journalist but I'd love to know how you ought the writing bog were you. You know. Extremely curious a child yeah. It was extremely curious as a child but I also just was always a writer just from the beginning of time I was a writer I wanted to grow up and write poetry and science fiction and I went to college and I got a degree in poetry and remember coming out of college in going into the Barnes and noble which was Believe it or not the big corporate media of bookstores back then. Because that's how old I am and I looked in the big book of First Year. Salary is and I looked up poet. Remember 'cause I was with a friend and that friend was a nurse and she looked up nursing. It said fifty thousand dollars a year and she thought sweet. I'm set and I looked. Poyton said twelve dollars a year. Yeah and I knew I could not survive on twelve dollars a year and I was going to have to take the writing and do something with it. That was going to help me pay the rent. And that's really how I got turned in the direction of journalism. My mother is going to enjoy this because she is a poet and she can vouch. that You can't really make a living which is a shame. Do you still write poetry You know I don't. I still read a lot of poetry. I feel like my work is colored by the early work. I did around the construction of language but no I don't like a lot of poetry. I hope your mom's still. She does your mom she does. She doesn't she's she's published books and she was actually a poem. I was in a textbook at my arrival. High School so She's once in prizes and things like that. That's the only time you really make any money. So so when you made this move did you. What was your first job? Not Business Week somewhere else. No so I did a lot of different things in my early twenty S I. I ended up going to graduate school at Berkeley for Journalism. Had A great program and I came out when I was about twenty eight and at first I wanted to be a foreign correspondent and I went to Hong Kong and I did some writing for time time Asia and then I discovered business and I discovered business journalism and I got extremely passionate about it because I quickly I learned that if you want to understand how the world is working and you understand how business works he will. You will do a lot better at understanding how everything else worked. And so I went to Business Week and while I was at business. Week I met a very young mark Zuckerberg. Wow and that is really the start of how I started. Writing about technology I started writing about social networking in two thousand four and two thousand five. So we're you just assigned to detail you gotta go talk to the sky or like. How did that all happen? And what was he like Well so I'm embarrassed to tell you this because it's not gonNa make me out to sound like the smartest lady in the room by. I was a huge user of friendster and Earl Ya Ya Ya Ma and mice space and I thought that my space was really innovative. Was just something that I hadn't seen before in two thousand five at that time. Most of my colleagues were much older than me and none of them were actually using services like this and so I asked well. Can I write a little story about my space? And my editors honestly probably at the time just to give me something that was a passion project so I would keep doing the sort of grunt work that I was doing as an intern. Then said sure you can write a story about my space and I did. And then Rupert Murdoch did me a solid and paid five hundred and eighty million dollars for it and everybody looked up and it was my goodness. That must be a business. Didn't Jesse wouldn't you going to write something on that? And we quickly pulled out that story and made a bigger that became my first sort of big story and it was called the mice base generation. And why that slightly embarrassing is because as part of the big story on my space. I made a phone call to this other website that no one was paying attention to call facebook And of course my bet at that point that facebook was just you know the boring version of my space. Did you say something like that in the story? I don't think that of course many many more stories later I did. I chronicled really the rise of facebook in the rise of all of those Social software companies that served to connect to each other so that we could talk to each other on the web. The way that we didn't have you continued to talk to mark Zuckerberg over the years about how things have progressed willow. In a reporting capacity I continued to report on facebook during my time in the profession up until I guess the last big story I did on. Facebook was in probably twenty sixteen and a haven't spoken to him at all in the last couple of years so then of course we know that you go to Fortune I fortune. I and Ben Wired to have that right. Yeah so yep that's right. So as a writer I went from BusinessWeek to Fortune. I spent a lot of years at fortune. Had A great time there on really learned the craft and then I went to wired and I was at wired for the five years really until I came here to Lincoln. How fulfilled were you by that work? Oh Gosh that's a doesn't the truth. Is that the thing that mattered to me. Most was to become a better writer and better storyteller and become better at telling other people story so K. Sky I feel like it is almost more than a job is calling for me. I love the the whole process of figuring out how to tell a story and I love the trust that someone else puts in you when they invite you to tell them their story and really most of the time that I was a writer writing for magazines. I have been able to do that But you know sky as well as I know that that industry has changed so much over the last decade. It's so much So I definitely got to a point where I was looking to grow and I was looking around me and I had written a lot of magazines. Stories are a lot more magazines stories to be written but I was like well. What can I add to this like when I look forward ten years at this company that I'm at which at that point was Conde Nast? Is there a job for me that I can see that? I can't do today but I could grow into and I did stop being able to see things in my own industry. That excited me. Does that mean that you would have been eventually doing less writing and more managing or would it have taken it away from the core of what? You're enjoying yes. There were managing the you know as a as somebody working as a sort of early to mid stage writer and reporter in the sort of more traditional media industry. Often you get to a place in your career where there are two doors. There is the editor door in there as the writer door. And if you choose the editor door then you may go into a series of roles that involves Making other people's work beautiful and also managing people on and I chose the writers door I wanted to remain an independent contributor telling stories in doing that kind of work I guess when I say like ways that I could grow I meant sort of exactly what I'm doing now. Opportunities to try storytelling and other mediums on an opportunity to have bigger and better stages to do that.

Writer Facebook Mark Zuckerberg Fortune High School Friendster Hong Kong Editor Asia Poyton Ben Wired Rupert Murdoch Berkeley Intern Conde Nast Jesse Lincoln
The Only 3 Ways You Can Differentiate and Compete

The $100 MBA Show

07:20 min | 2 years ago

The Only 3 Ways You Can Differentiate and Compete

"I WANNA start by saying that I've come up with these. Three ways is just through my own experiences in business. Our Business Webinar Jar. Webinar software competes in a very busy market with some big players competitors veterans like zoom and go to Webinar have literally millions of users. How do I get a slice of that Pie? This is a question I had to force myself to ask. And it really just boils boils down to three ways a differentiation. Let's start with the first one and that's Nishi down. Whatever your product? Whatever your service you can serve lots of different markets but if you focus on one market on one group of people you become their choice because you've built a product of service and experience around their needs simple? You want to start a software business that helps go build their websites like like a website builder instead of building a website builder for anybody who needs a website. Let's say you focus on photographers and videography hours and your Website builders really cater to that market. These customers have unique needs and the certain things. They don't need that they don't WanNa be confused by so he become the website builder for photographers. Viagra offers all the videography in photographers. That are using something else can move over to you because you serve them directly. Let me give you another author example. A real world example CANVAS CANVAS DOT COM is a cloud based graphic design tool. It's incredibly popular. But it's a niche product. Product is canvas more powerful in feature rich than Adobe Photoshop Note. It's not it's a fraction of what photoshop can do but not everybody. It needs photoshop professional graphic designers. They need photoshop. And they're gonNA use Adobe Photoshop and they're a ideal customer for adobe before before people that are just trying to print a flyer for their book club or for Garage Sale. They don't need photoshop. They need something simple. Easy to use with limited limited features. So they don't get confused and this is where canvas comes in. Canada actually provides a product that's limited and they kind of force their market by saying. Hey we're for people that are trying to just easily design something in a few minutes without a graphic design degree this means they are excluding the professionals bunching down. They speak directly to people that they serve that their product release four so the first way of differentiating is initiating to a group of people in your larger marketplace. The segue differentiate is implementation. And I believe this is the most powerful way differentiate. It's what makes the biggest difference. The most popular example of this is facebook okay. FACEBOOK is not the first social media platform there was my space friendster but facebook implemented it in a way that made it easier. The concept is the same but their implementation was different and therefore they were easily able to differentiate themselves and stand out. There was a period of time where friendster and my space had more features. So it's not about feature sets but but it's more like hey they figured out a way to make social media work and the implement of the I did differently. Here's another real world example in the automobile industry before four. Tesla if you were conscious of the environment and you're a green customer you would buy at Iota Prius to Yoda's implementation to serve. This customer was to create a hybrid vehicle to compact car. It's not really a performance driven. It's not very fast as not really great to handle. It's not a great drive is not luxuriance but it was a symbol. If you drove that car it was a statement. I care about the environment. That's why Leonardo DiCaprio drove Prius until Tesla came around and Tessa Tesla said. Hey we want to serve this market. The people that care about the environment that want to reduce our dependency on fossil fuels. But we don't want to sacrifice style or speed or comfort or luxury. We're going to implement this idea differently. It's GonNa be a little bit more expensive but we believe people are going to buy it and enjoy our implementation of this idea. More more than Toyota and history speaks for itself. Leonardo di caprio drives Tesla now. But the point here is that they decided to implement this idea differently with your product. Doc with your service how you implementing your solution differently in a way that adds value with us with women are Ninja. There's a lot of different webinars offers. There was a different ways that you can create you know meetings and do mastermind calls. There's so many ways you could do this. Coaching calls why US while our implementation tation is quite different from everybody else. We actually really focus on ease of use a great experience in terms of building the Webinar an incredible quality. So this is how we want to really implement this idea. We understand if our users find easy to use. They're going to continue to use is it and they're gonNA use it more often and therefore they'll be long-term customers so we're attracting people that say. Hey I love doing webinars but I don't want another headache right. We actually have a testimony L. A. quote a message came from one of our users said I love with an tried other platforms but I said No. Because they're overly complicated. I need a Webinar service. Not another headache. And that's exactly who we attract all right number three. The Third Way to friendship is service. This is a game changer. When when you understand this you understand this is really a way for you to Propel Your Business your competition can copy you? They can copy your features then copier pricing model hectic and copier sales copy. And even your branding but the one thing they can't copy is your service how you treat your customers before before during and after the sale the customer service experience the whole experience of being customer the emails you send now the chats you have the live webinars. You do all that kind of stuff. That interaction you have with your audience with your customer makes the difference. Okay this is something that we tripled down on on an ARP business for the last three years and it's paid off and now when we look at our customer surveys. The number one reason why people love women are inches because one. It's easy to use to who the customer service if you're a small business. This is a great way for you to get a leg up on the bigger businesses larger companies. It's hard to regularly great service. They have large customer service teams and sometimes things become impersonal. But if you're a small team in your managing tickets yourself or you have a small team running customer service you could still train them and be very friendly and very very personal and helpful and be available in human. Our biggest challenges oranges as we grow the business. How do we maintain that to make sure our customer service never suffers because it's one of our biggest differentiator so you could differentiate with the your service the way you treat your customers throughout the buying journey pass Their purchase when they buy the next product with the Knicks Service. So the next you you know a thing that you offer them so they have niche implementation service. Those are the three

Photoshop Tesla Facebook Leonardo Dicaprio Friendster Headache PIE Adobe Viagra Knicks Tessa Tesla Toyota United States Canada ARP
"friendster" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

03:54 min | 2 years ago

"friendster" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"And welcome back goes to coach George nori with you Douglas Rushkoff with us our final segment here as we talk about high technology Douglas we saw with Facebook did the my spaces or anything out there that will do the same to Facebook I always like to wonder that you know because you know my space did it to Friendster and transported it to something else you you would think that there's something else would come along and I do think that the spokes monopoly if you can call it that is way more precarious than some other ones you know Google has a whole Lotta technology Amazon has warehouses and robots all Facebook has is up and could see people deciding you know I want to go to a platform where I own my own data we're on he need to look at ads where I choose whether or not my data is going to go to someone else and I think you know mark Zuckerberg knows that that his hold over us is much more you know psychological than it is technological so well I don't see it yet I do get an email pretty much every day from someone building an alternative open source egalitarian people owned in a pro human platform so I'm I do think as people become more conscious of how they feel after they've been on Facebook for awhile and realize they don't feel so good they're going to look for alternatives didn't say spoke by Snapchat is kind of a a back up yeah they bought a whole bunch of things about it bunch of of and and stick Graham and and messaging apps and they're trying to fold them all into one thing to sort of make it impossible and for them to be broken up but I don't know if consumers are fickle you know who would have believed that you know people would stop buying you know even things like Levi's is you know he is the I don't see everybody wearing those anymore so that eventually when something is driven mainly by a consumer choice rather than some other kind of foot hold things change to the phones now we go Joe on Long Island New York's with us Joseph go ahead two quick questions first you were talking about the psychological hold on Facebook and then you were talking earlier about of Vegas and some of the psychology of maybe the near mass being imported into the original web though I didn't really see that in the original web with a well but maybe I'm wrong and my second question would be about identity theft for example in the was up on so I think the the wicked witch imitated the good wage and fake Dorothy out now do you see something where they could fake someone's voice or even that personality and you think you're talking to a friend or neighbor on the phone and you're talking to somebody from another country or computer or something like that yeah and it's interesting stuff I mean know that IT regional web or the the original net didn't have any of this manipulation no doubt even a a well I mean they wanted us to to to to you for dialogue we were the customers of AOL so they didn't really have any reason to manipulate us we were the ones paying them in on Facebook we're not the customer we're the product of face brought the customers of the company where the where the data with the thing being colonize where the where the land so where is that where the flip happened really was in the mid nineties when wired magazine said look the real estate online is internet we can keep building more and more websites the only thing that's fine night is human.

Douglas Rushkoff George nori
"friendster" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

04:50 min | 3 years ago

"friendster" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"To like cloud okay a snap face so that pace is another place where you can get it Friendster myspace get it anyway ask Jeeves is probably the most prominent place home to get the podcast ask Jeeves big a Lycos yes like us a medic crawling lot of people's it will Lycos S. Jeez what are those it's amazing how that stuff seems I mean that's like ancient history isn't I know I love throwing in the Friendster joke as is my favorite one because if you don't know was a social network before Facebook and really I can be your I think might and there was like the one that everyone said was gonna make a big run but never really caught on right and we're like it's like twelve generations ago now but my references are generally is you get to a point where your wheels used to make fun of you because all of your impersonations are dead they're either dead or log retired video there's no active person you impersonate all the people have passed away are there their key children barely remembers a weird thing as in their current I can't do their whole as soon as they can get there now so yeah I know it's a it's a it's a long road it's yeah yes anyway I think eventually were to get to that point where people have to feel the same way about CNN gonna because see an enjoyable what what is what is CNN what is that if they keep going they currently are that will happen this is pretty bad a you know they did this big gotten town hall thing over the last couple days which I'm sure they thought was going to be massive the last one was right I mean I thought it was a big deal at least I don't know how we I don't know I don't remember but I think it did pretty well in the ratings that night actually let's see yes Jake tapper did the first one and it's a little bit better so last night they had are they did America under salt the gun crisis at nine PM drew in one point two million total viewers on average Hannity who interviewed a democratic candidate in last place build a velocity all while three point one million and Rachel Maddow did two point three million so they only lost she came in third place and came in half of second place is how many people actually watch J. timers town hall was that had fifty eight percent more viewers and crisp almost so this is not work very well this time now you look at the it's the same trick they tried last time right he he come out if you try to take advantage of a tragedy and I tried to ramp up ratings and that's not a good idea I don't think people think of that as a is in balance you know it feels really a key to try to take advantage of something like that it may be the first time you do it for like art look to try to get solutions are trying you know when you hear the voices of some of these people in the community I mean you can make those arguments he tried it out again after how bad of it we went last time when you got to a point where the people that you brought in as guests completely stacked the deck against Dana who is still there to be spokesperson for the NRA yeah and and they they just tried to bludgeon her the whole time and in some ways literally I mean like she was it was a legitimate security threat for her right and the you know the luckily she was able to get out of there but they did not treat it well they they did not handle it well the biggest mistake they made as far as the actual program went was having the large loud cheering crowd that's not look if you're if you're trying to get argument that you're coming up with real solutions we care about this and we care about the community you know you don't turn it into a W. W. E. event yeah and that's what they did last time I don't know if they did that this time I don't remember seeing a crowd it could be that the invited a crowd but then they heard it was Chris Cuomo sitting com that's a very possible thing here but it did not do well finish third place for their big gun town hall and you know at some point you got to pull the plug on the Chris Cuomo experiment touching some point you just have to realize think so yes yes he has a famous name in the state you're in okay that's about what you have with Chris I think it's about time just that you know you just turn it off you know you sometimes you try things and they just don't work yeah you know you see saw guy he said Hey I remember like I used to be governor and now as brothers his dad used to be governor was brothers governor maybe we should put him on TV and it seems like a good idea at the time and then it falls apart and you can try to beat up put it back together over and over and over again but at some point you just have to say look this is not working and I think we're there with Chris Cuomo are we not all yes we were their date I think to for me what it takes to see in a little while to catch up okay but they should be caught out by now all right much more coming up sixty.

Jeeves Friendster fifty eight percent
"friendster" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"friendster" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"What I meant is like. I am not the expert geopolitics on this issue. She may not be the expert on much. But her stupidity is expertly getting need a fall in love day by day hour by hour minute by minute with each and every utterance I fall deeper and deeper in love with AO sees stupidity on her was it Snapchat live Instagram live. I don't know. She's got about every, I think she, he's on so many social media sites. She's the one person who still on friendster she's doing friendster live videos. Classmates dot com. He's on my space. Well, she's one of these social media sites, and she does a live video. And well. She compared detentions of illegal immigrants at the southern border to Nazi concentration camps. Running concentration camps on our southern border. That is exactly what they are. They are concentration camps. And. If that doesn't bother you. I don't. I like it. We can have whatever I'm gonna talk to the people that are concerned enough with humanity to say that we should not that never again. Okay. First of all, we can have. Okay, whatever.

friendster
"friendster" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

04:27 min | 3 years ago

"friendster" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"So the example, you mentioned Peter till so the example, I use is. I think I. I met a first-rate about this from Ken. How're you probably friend? So I think Ken was telling me this one time over drinks like many years ago. Yeah. Can't who's who was at pay pal with with Peter part of the papal math, mafia. That's right. Each other from Stanford days or something and then later founders fund and so Ken head started working with Peter on his private investments. This was just a few months or year before it turned into founders fund. And so he was kind of helping him out. And he mentioned that disguise burger come by Mark Zuckerberg with this idea for social network and everybody had been social networks have been around for a decade at that point. And they'd all gone nowhere. There was a dozen of them like you. And I can remember all these crazy names of all these, you know, small world, try, whatever all these things went. And flamed out. And at the time there was another one that was rising sort of popular one at the time called friendster with some people may remember, and that was just starting to flame out and people were leaving friendster for the new thing at the time, which was called my space. So in Zachary was going around Ken was telling me the story. Everybody had kind of passed. Passed on investing because everybody said well, look at look at all the social network every minute Bishop takes spun they had all these guys fail. You know? And you know, why they we know why they failed because you can see that. They're all these users are hopping from network to network, and that's the outcome. Right. That's the Bishop take fun at lost the game. All these social networks are going nowhere. There's no money in them. So no, we're not giving our money to this kid or whatever his name is and Ken and Peter. Said is that really why they're failing? Let's take a look. And so they had friends behind the scenes that friendster. I don't remember if they went best out or whatever. But you know, it's a small community. And they said let's ask for the data for the user retention data. Like people are clearly fleeing, and we know that they they were using France. And like the website was kind of glitch e and it was sort of crashing. So they got the data on the user attention friendster, and they found holy crap. Like people are staying on the site for hours. Now, this is a site. It's crappy no offense to whoever's listening who is part of that team. But like this site is crashing all the time. And they happen to know that they'd been given advice on like, listen, you need to build, you know, you've scaled from few users to humiliate you need to improve your systems because your site is glitch, and what they realized is that people were staying on for hours, even though as a crappy glitch e website, and that the my space just had a better website. So they realize it wasn't that it was a bad business model like clothing fads and everybody, that's what people thought it was like, you know, you just switch. Everybody will switch on mass. Every every season they were actually great people were staying forever on these sites. These guys just had a bad website had a software glitch. So it was a false fail. It was a false fail of friendster. They it was a flaw in the experiment in the in the in the process by which people were making the judgment, not a flaw and underlying idea the Lynch out the created social networks had some value. So -til wrote Zuckerberg a check for five hundred thousand I think is the first outside money or non family and friends and Facebook. That's right. And I think an eight years later he sold it for a billion dollars. And that's how paying attention to a false fail can be very lucrative. So. Let's see here. There's another name. I wanted to bring up who I am planking here. It's begins with, sir. James Blake lack excuse me. James black. So who is Sir James black? And what did he say to you at one point that that sticks in memory because this this may relate somewhere?.

friendster Ken head Peter Lynch James black Sir James black Mark Zuckerberg planking James Blake France Facebook Zachary Zuckerberg billion dollars eight years
Cake, a forum for interests without fighting

Talking Tech

04:24 min | 3 years ago

Cake, a forum for interests without fighting

"Talking tech is brought to you in part by northwestern. University offered in partnership with north Western's Feinberg school of medicine. The program prepares students for emerging opportunities across the healthcare spectrum. Details are at SPS dot northwestern dot EDU slash informatics. Cars motorcycles, parenting travel, photography, the sort of things people like to talk about online without getting into fights as Chris mccaskill will tell you. He's got a forum called take dot CO. He's the co Pounder of the smug monk photo site, and we're going to hear all about cake today on talking tech when you follow people, you get everything that they have to talk about like on Facebook, you primarily follow people for your friends and family your nieces and cousins and so on, but you've got an uncle who likes to talk politics and it gets quite divisive. And so on with us you follow your interest and your interests may be mountain biking or photography or whatever. It may be and maybe you don't care about politics. So you can't always talk about your interest with your friends and family because you wanna talk about some specific lens on your camera or whatever, and they're just not into that. You would bore them. So cake is really good for that you can drill into your interest and for a lot of that the anger just kinda disputes. So what motivated you to start cake? You know, I had a motorcycle message for him that I started that actually provided to me at least the idea for smug mug. It's called adventure writer now is three point two million active users on it's amazing and. It was just this unusual hobby that I have I happen to love motorcycles and writing through places like Mexico and up to Alaska, and so on they're the kind of adventurous motorcycles that Comey like BMW makes and it the idea was you would write travelogues of your stories, and we had a mantra picture didn't happen. So he'd write a paragraph of text in then pick and so on. Riding through Africa or something like that. And it didn't have good photo hosting in. That's what gave birth to smug MC. I always thought adventure writer, we'd go away because of the dawn of friendster and Facebook and Twitter in them, having their billions and artificial intelligence engines in, you know, tuning for, you know, your interest in. Knowing your psychology and trying to get to engage in aids. And so on but it never did. And with just need ministering. It it grew to where it is today and people just love it. But the problem was it wasn't general enough. We wanted to talk about iphones in watches and cameras, and and parenting and everything else, you can think of and so we in also the forum software that was built on was older. You know looks like twin the nineties. So we wanted something fresh, and modern and broader than motorcycles and house kick, do you know, we have thousands of customers not millions. So it's a fairly intimate size of community. But it's a growing well at Leeds overcome. I think the chicken in the problem, which is so hard to get started in the beginning. And is kick dot CO, correct kicked that CEO and people have questions for you just look for at Chris on cake. Yep. Are you going to send me Email at Chris kick dot com? Already crispy Cascal. Thank you so much for telling us all about cake. Good luck with service. It's a lot of fun. I'm Jefferson Graham with USA today. You can find me on Twitter at Jefferson Graham. I think you could find me on cake at Jefferson Graham, right? Great sounds like something like that. So I look forward to having a conversation with you there. Talking tech is brought to you in part by Northwestern University. The huge amounts of healthcare data available today as well as advanced as in technology are making a profound impact on health care students enrolled in northwestern university's online master's program in health informatics, build the expertise needed to use that data and deliver more efficient ineffective patient care offered in partnership with north Western's Feinberg school of medicine. The program prepares students for emerging opportunities across the healthcare spectrum including specializations that are perfect for healthcare. Business and IT professionals. Details are at SPS dot northwestern dot EDU slash informatics.

Chris Mccaskill Feinberg School Of Medicine Jefferson Graham Northwestern University Facebook Twitter Writer Africa Alaska BMW Leeds Friendster Mexico CEO USA
"friendster" Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

04:02 min | 3 years ago

"friendster" Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

"That isn't bundled with your monopoly market service. Read also warned EBay about the dangers of crossing pay pal. Making sure that they understood that there would be a huge cost trying to shut us down making sure that pay pal customers were being very public and vocal about how much they love the service. Ultimately this customer. Love is what saved pay pal? Ebays customers overwhelming preference for pay pal made it diplomatically difficult for EBay to oust them, but how did pay actually win over EBay customers in this case? It didn't involve making anyone a hero. No, sometimes fortune favors the fast or hold trick to dominating that platform was to be faster than the EBay technology, the EBay technology determine the auction winner. And then sent an Email, and here's the crazy tiny detail that allowed pay pal to win. So you would frequently get a notification from paper eighty ninety percent of the time that you and won the auction before EBay had notified you that you had won the auction because oh you won the auction here you can pay with PayPal. So EBay customers us pay pal because pay pals emails arrived. I you just never know which small tactic will let you emerge the hero. As you mayo. Already know read story at pay pal ends well EBay buys pay pal for one point five billion dollars and read has what you might call freedom fund that will make it possible to launch his long delayed second startup, but the timing isn't great. This is fall two thousand and two when the deal closes, and the Silicon Valley intelligencia, everyone is concluded that the internet trend has played out like every other technological trend which had been semiconductors and enterprise software and networking equipment. Some winners then you move onto the next trend. Investors assume that the web was dead but read sought differently and what I realized was that the internet was just starting. It's going to transform how we live our lives. How we were how we buy stuff. All that was actually still in its infancy. Read now had a movie playing in his head, and that movie the biggest wins of the internet age were still ahead. Some of them would come from social networks anchored in your real identity and read would be among the heroes who had helped create this new world. Now, he was considering which kind of hero. He wanted to be when I was interested in was playing out this new rebirth of the internet both as an investor and as an entrepreneur, and I didn't know it'd be a good investor or not I was like I'm doing some investing to see if that's what I understand. I'm doing some entrepreneurship to see. That's the thing. I would do. And so I wanted to kind of place a set of bets. So what was the I bet that read placed the first pure angel investment was friendster friendster. Of course reads. I investment was friendster if you were writing a movie about a character named Reid Hoffman. You had have his first angel investment. Be in friendster. Here's why friendster was the first. First of the modern social networks. It was everyone has a real identity. Everyone connects people whose names and pictures, they see a huge believer in real entity real relationships on as a platform for applications, but how you navigate your life. And so that made friendster very easy. It was easy for me to invest in friendster and not just because it had the potential of great returns read invested because friendster was building the kind of social network. Read believed in France success would make read a hero in his own story. And this is such an important lesson for anyone seeking investors. Don't just look for money. Look for people whose personal mission.

EBay friendster France Reid Hoffman PayPal eighty ninety percent five billion dollars
"friendster" Discussed on Grumpy Old Geeks

Grumpy Old Geeks

03:06 min | 3 years ago

"friendster" Discussed on Grumpy Old Geeks

"They have apologized, and they said it, of course, it was human error the in the quest for curbing illegal activities related to our vehicles are legal team is overstretched in Senate take down request related to the issue to a member of the media bird celebrates freedom in many ways freedom from traffic congestion as well as freedom of speech, you q-bert. I finally saw my first bird scooter in the neighborhood, they the birds have landed. Now, I'm sorry to hear that. Yeah. Of course, it was it like in the middle of the neighborhood night. Not anywhere. Just in the sidewalk for no reason. Yeah, I guess they're just they're everywhere. I want to go back and watch that south park episode again because that was just genius. And it's so true. So true. Yeah. Now, we've talked an awful lot about how nothing lasts forever. I there was friendster, and then came along my space, and now there's Facebook, and certainly Facebook is is enjoying a much longer shelf life than most of the others did thanks to many factors including just having peak saturation and all of that. But we've often wondered well what's going to be next. There's gonna have to be something. I think we may know what it is. Or certainly at least a model for it. Because in China. Nobody gives a crap about Facebook. Everybody is on something called we chat. And there's this great New York Times article with a Chinese journalists talking about the basically they do this recurring series where they asked people. What apps they're using? And she just basically goes on and on about basically, it's not an exaggeration to say, I live and work on we chat a messaging app. That's the equivalent of what's app, plus Facebook less pay L, plus Uber, plus grub, plus many other things it's basically an all in one apple China that everybody is on. And if you're not on it, you're out of the conversation, and you're out of social life. So Facebook, you better watch your ass. There's already something beaten you in the biggest country in the world. And it's only a matter of time before somebody is able to unlock something like that here. Well, Facebook's trion I mean with with all of the different properties, they're buying and trying to integrate everything into it. You know, the the problem, their integration integration is horrible. And they're not entirely one hundred percent convinced that they want to integrate because you can see the separation that Facebook always tries to keep between themselves and Instagram. It's weird. Like, obviously people want integration. You have eight hundred million internet users in China all of them and over a billion, we chatted counts, which means that users are making multiple accounts for different. Personas which is even crazier. Well, there's a there's a little difference that happens in China noticeable. No, no Facebook in China, the government stifles competition because they wanna be able to watch everything and the best way to do that is to have everything under one umbrella, which is we chat and she addresses that she says by now some readers must be screaming. How about the censorship and government surveillance on we chat? Sadly, it's just the way of life in China. I'm not trying to make light of the issue. I've been very critical of how the tech companies work with the government to censor and monitor the Chinese public. But the reality is that ordinary Chinese often feel powerless and fatalistic when it comes to censorship and surveillance. How're American starting to feel about censorship and surveillance Jason parading much?.

Facebook China Senate friendster New York Times Jason apple one hundred percent
"friendster" Discussed on Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"friendster" Discussed on Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

"Only four kinds of forces. Yeah. They're four kinds of forces. So electromagnetism weak nuclear force strong nuclear force. And then of course, gravity is the fourth force that we've discovered. Okay. The fascinating thing is that different particles feel different forces, right? Like some particles feel this set of forces some particles field, those that affords, for example, right particles with electric charge feel electromagnetism the electron for examples negatively charged. The proton is positively charged. You bring them close together. They're going to pull in each other. They're gonna suck the each other together because they have opposite charges. We all know that. But you bring a neutral particle nearby. It just totally ignores it, right? It doesn't feel it at. All. Right. It's like it's like somebody's walking through a crowd of people shouting. But they have headphones on. So they can't hear anything old Lee oblivious to it. It's kind of like how he talked about in a previous podcast almost like languages or like social media platform. Like, some people are unclear some people are Facebook. But some people are non this. And so somebody if you not on Twitter, and Sony sense, you tweet you're not gonna get it. And so it's just different ways that particles interact. That's right. Gravity's the Google plus social media, right? Nobody's friendster. The is ancient, but powerless. Yeah. And so different particles feel different forces, for example, an electron while it feels electromagnetism because as a negative charge. It doesn't feel the strong force at all. They will pass right by a bunch of particles that are really tugging on each other with the strong force and not be affected at all. Whereas corks corks feel all the forces. They feel a strong force with which is how they get pulled together in the nucleus. Remember protons and neutrons are made of quirks quirks, feel electromagnetism because they have electric charge. They feel the weak force. They also feel gravity, of course, because they have mass so quirks get their fingers in everything they they get the feels for everything they feel like they got the strong feels. Really deeply emotional. And on the other side of the spectrum. You got things like neutrinos Gina's don't have electric charge. So they nor all trinity magnetism. Right. They don't interact with light..

Facebook friendster Twitter Gina Lee Sony Google
How Amazon became the world's biggest e-retailer

Triangulation

03:46 min | 3 years ago

How Amazon became the world's biggest e-retailer

"Amazon is a really unique one of the most unique companies in your book because it it started out as the it wasn't the first they weren't the first people to sell things on the internet. But they were the first biggest and they're still the biggest so talk a little bit about the beginnings of Amazon. Yeah. Well, real quick though. I wanna point out like there's so many stories in this book of where the the one that wins is not the first one. It's like the that saying that leaders always get EROs in their back. You know, it wasn't a Facebook one. It wasn't my space. But the even before my space friendster even before. There were six degrees. The fact that to this day, the the number one e commerce company in the world by far I think last week I heard fifty nine cents of every dollar spent online is it goes to Amazon. It was was the first is actually we got to give them a lot of credit for that. Because again, like, you know, no, one swooped in and and eight Jeff Bezos is lunch. What? So how how did it get started? Jeff Bezos is he's working on Wall Street at a firm, the aquatic firm, that's actually competing tooth and nail with Bernie Madoff squad firm and the internet and web takeoff and he's assigned by his boss. The Shaw to David Shaw to to research this as a business opportunity, and there's fame the famous story of he sees how the internet's taking off and he realizes this is the biggest thing of his life. Is he going to regret leaving Wall Street behind leaving his Christmas bonus behind? No, he's going to go off and do this internet thing, and he and MacKenzie his wife drive across the country and he's typing the business plan on his laptop. And he they don't even know where they're going to go. Okay. There's a several different internet stories internet founding stories that I've had to debunk in this book. I spoke to shell caffeine who was employee number one at Amazon he said, well funny story. The Jeff had been out to San Francisco the month before to hire me and the other employee number two. I can't remember his name at the moment. Oh, and we knew we were going to Seattle because he had already done the research if they're going to do books the Ingram and Taylor are the big book warehouses, and they have warehouses in Oregon. He doesn't want to be in California because California has a sales tax or higher sales tax. And so see we knew we were going to Seattle. So okay. And same thing happened with EBay, the whole idea that EBay was they he wanted his fiancee that have a place to to trade Pez dispensers that these are these are stories that are made up because they're nice cute little PR stories. But I think the bottom line story of Amazon is that Jeff Bezos, I believe this saw the internet saw that it was the greatest thing that would ever happen is lifetime the greatest business opportunity. And I what I don't believe is that he knew. I think he wanted he intuited from day one that it could be an everything store. I think that commerce could have efficiencies of scale and efficiency in terms of being more convenient for for consumers. But he he started with books because I believe in. I if everything we've read about him, I believe his mind works this way, he was going to test the hypothesis now as soon as he proved that books that people would buy things because remember in ninety five I in fact, again back to my library research as late as nine hundred and ninety nine I'm reading articles after article after article in Forbes fortune and BusinessWeek people winner people ever going to trust buying doing commerce online putting their credit cards online.

Jeff Bezos Amazon David Shaw Seattle Mackenzie Friendster Facebook Ingram Ebay Bernie Madoff Caffeine San Francisco California Forbes Fortune PEZ Oregon Businessweek Taylor