36 Burst results for "Friday"

Fresh "Friday" from WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:41 sec | 4 hrs ago

Fresh "Friday" from WTOP 24 Hour News

"Dropping musical Hamilton is playing at the Kennedy Center opera house come join this captivating performance on August 2nd through October 9th information at Kennedy Center dot org. Dave dildy and WWE traffic. Here's the weather with chuck bell. Pete and humidity will lead to thunderstorms as we get into the afternoon today. There is a small chance for severe thunderstorms, but there's a much bigger threat for flash flooding. Some of these storage could leave a quick one to two inches of rain, so stay weather alert never drive on a water covered road. If you can't see the pavement, turn around, don't drown. 90s today before the storms get going, mid to upper 80s tomorrow under a mostly cloudy sky and then sunshine with high temperatures only reaching the low 80s on both Friday and Saturday with delightfully low humidity. I'm storm team four, meteorologist chuck bell for WTO. 90 in Fredericksburg 91 in hyattsville, 91 in northwest D.C., high humidity, storms on the way, so stay with

Kennedy Center Opera House Chuck Bell Dave Dildy Kennedy Center Hamilton Pete WTO Fredericksburg Hyattsville D.C.
Pelosi to March Democrats Off Cliff With Inflation Bill Vote

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:05 min | 8 hrs ago

Pelosi to March Democrats Off Cliff With Inflation Bill Vote

"If we go back and again, you're a PhD. So you may not know much about the Declaration of Independence. But in the Declaration of Independence, there's the glorious language we know, but then Jefferson laid out what is an actual indictment of George the third. One of the particulars is they have sent out armies of officials to eat up our wealth. And that I just think 87,000 IRS agent. So your friends who are Democrats. And I know you've got some friends who are Democrat. I was talking to one last night. My college roommate, a longtime democratic friend saying, you know, Democrats are bent on self destruct, Elaine luria can not win reelection. Having cut the defense budget by inflation alone and having 87,000 IRS agents, she got a vote for that this week. Every Democrat in a tough district is being forced to vote on the IRS expansion act. Will any of them defect well because they did this for Henry waxman ten years ago. They voted for his idiotic climate bill then and now they're going to vote for climate bill that helps people in our income bracket by EVs. Do you think they're actually going to do that 9 weeks before an election? Pelosi seems to be marching them off the cliff right now. And even the New York Democrats and the other salt state Democrats who drew a line in the sand and said, we're not going to vote. Would you explain that? Again, we got steelers fans listening and they're not on peyote. So you could explain salt. Salt states. The state and local income tax state and local tax deduction, something we capped or effectively got rid of depending on what state you live in in the tax cuts and job with the intent of stopping the subsidization of high tax progressive states. Obviously all the members from high tax progressive states objected to that. And so they said, well, we want to eliminate that provision, go back to the status quo pre-tax cuts and jobs act. But even the moderate members who drew that line in the sand have now caved a speaker Pelosi. So with the possible exception of maybe Jared golden, I think she's going to have all her members vote for this. Come Friday,

IRS Elaine Luria Jefferson Henry Waxman George Pelosi Steelers New York Jared Golden
 Anne Heche in critical condition, on ventilator after crash

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 21 hrs ago

Anne Heche in critical condition, on ventilator after crash

"Car wreck last week A representative for Anne Heche says the actor was badly hurt in that accident and is now in a coma in an email statement Heather Duffy ballston says heche has a significant pulmonary injury that requires her to be on a ventilator to breathe and burn that requires surgery last Friday has car slammed into a house in the mar vista area of Los Angeles flames erupted and the actor had to be pulled out of the vehicle that had become embedded in the house

Heather Duffy Ballston Anne Heche Heche Coma Los Angeles
Kimberley Johnson on How Trump Ruined Bipartisan Mainstream Media

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

02:08 min | 2 d ago

Kimberley Johnson on How Trump Ruined Bipartisan Mainstream Media

"We you pointed this out, but it's just this mainstream media stuff just drives me insane. You were saying, I don't even hear them cover. They've covered Democrats doomed so many times. I know you're missing the Democrats and pulled ahead in generic polling. There's new polling showing Biden and Harris beating Trump beating desantis showing Harris beating desantis. And they just don't, they're so hard. They never report on that. Yeah. They're just so we D to this storyline, right? And meanwhile, like you said, I think roe is a huge thing, but I think it's not even the only thing. Like, look at the most legislatively successful president since LBJ with a 50 50 Senate. I mean, it is truly every barometer 50 year low in jobless. I mean, the jobless numbers just came out Friday. I mean, I don't know how you can spin it anymore that Biden is an incredibly successful. What do you make of the approval numbers for him because to me it's just this relentless mainstream media coverage that I don't know how we overcome it? Yeah, I mean, I think I know CNN, the guy who wants CNN is like Friends with Donald Trump. Obviously, these people who own, I don't know how many there are who own the major cable. And then obviously the big papers. You know, they're wealthy and unfortunately in some cases wealthy business owners, which prefer Republicans because they get all the tax breaks. And you know, and then they have the friendships and whatever. And I don't know the behind stories, but yeah, there's, you know, the fairness doctrine going away. Right. And 24/7 news that is reliant on views clicks and attention. I think that's where it's coming from an unfortunately people are more concerned about clicks and dollars than they are about just getting the news out. What we used to be as a country where it came to news and we could all no matter what party you were in, go to that ABC News NBC News CBS world news tonight, whatever it was. And we could all just, you know, we might not agree, but we all believed them. Right. No longer happened. We killed that. Right.

Desantis Biden Harris CNN Donald Trump Senate Abc News NBC CBS
Ship carrying grain from Ukraine arrives in Istanbul

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 2 d ago

Ship carrying grain from Ukraine arrives in Istanbul

"The captain of the first grain ship to arrive out of Ukraine under an international agreement spoke to reporters at the dock in turkey Ahmet Eugene Ali Baylor is the man at the helm of the polar net of Turkish flagship that em loaded cargo at the Ukrainian port of chana Moors before the Russian invasion in February He says this sad incident happened war broke out in the port was under blockade by the Ukrainian military They were finally able to leave on Friday forming a convoy with two other ships in a harbor guide near Odessa then followed a predetermined 17 leg route through dangerous corridors that had been cleared and deemed The latitudes longitudes and positions were provided by the joint coordination center They arrived at the Turkish port of Dorinda today with the 12,000 ton load of grain The first of a dozen ships authorized to sail under the deal between Ukraine and Russia brokered by turkey and the United Nations I'm Jennifer King

Ahmet Eugene Ali Baylor Chana Moors Ukraine Turkey Joint Coordination Center Odessa Dorinda United Nations Jennifer King
Senate Passes the Inflation Reduction Act

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:17 min | 2 d ago

Senate Passes the Inflation Reduction Act

"They did it. Joe Biden, the Senate Democrats spent another $700 billion over the weekend. Now the house will have to confirm that on Friday and they will. They'll pass it. And so Joe Biden's record after two years is pretty pretty straightforward. What they're running on. He's doubled the size of the IRS as of yesterday. They spent 80 billion of that 700 billion on the IRS. I know it's unbelievable. That's what they did. Basically doubled the size of the IRS. They spent three and a half trillion total over two years. Three and a half trillion. That was not needed because COVID had been recovered from that have been taken care of by in a bipartisan fashion by the last two congresses under the last two budgets under president Trump. But they spent 1.9 on the American recovery act that was unnecessary. 1.5 trillion, 1.9 trillion. 550 billion in infrastructure, 280 billion on the chips act, and 700 billion this weekend. So are you better off with a IRS that's double the size of what it was 87,000 new IRS agents in 9.1% inflation. Are you better off with Joe Biden and the Democrats running everything?

Joe Biden IRS Covid President Trump Senate
Democrats hit roadblock, but push Biden package in Senate

AP News Radio

00:59 min | 3 d ago

Democrats hit roadblock, but push Biden package in Senate

"I'm Julie Walker Senate Democrats push President Biden's health and climate built up passage in a stunning election year Turn around with the house to vote next the yays are 50 the NASA 50 the Senate being equally divided the vice president votes in the affirmative and the bill as amended is passed Vice president Kamala Harris who cast the tie breaking vote announcing the legislative victory The estimated $740 billion package is less ambitious than President Biden's original domestic gold but it embodies deep rooted party dreams of slowing global warming moderating pharmaceutical costs and taxing big corporations debate began Saturday and went around the clock into Sunday afternoon Democrats beat back some three dozen Republican efforts to torpedo the legislation the house seems on track to provide final congressional approval when it returns briefly from summer recess Friday I'm Julie Walker

President Biden Julie Walker Senate Kamala Harris Nasa House
Anne Heche in 'Stable' Condition After L.A. Car Crash as Family and Friends Ask for 'Prayers'

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 3 d ago

Anne Heche in 'Stable' Condition After L.A. Car Crash as Family and Friends Ask for 'Prayers'

"Actress Anne hesh remains in the hospital after her car crashed into a Los Angeles home Friday causing flames to erupt Hashes podcast partner Heather Duffy boylston said in a statement and is currently in stable condition her family and friends ask for your thoughts and prayers and to respect her privacy Police say hesh was speeding when her mini Cooper clubman came to a T shaped intersection ran off the road and into the house in mar vista No one else was injured It took numerous firefighters nearly an hour to put out the blaze in

Anne Hesh Heather Duffy Boylston Hesh Los Angeles Mar Vista
Israel and Gaza militants exchange fire after deadly strikes

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 4 d ago

Israel and Gaza militants exchange fire after deadly strikes

"Tensions between Israel and Gaza militants are in their second day Saturday Israeli air strikes flattened homes in Gaza and rocket barrages into southern Israel persisted raising fears of an escalation in a conflict that has killed at least 15 people The fighting began with Israel's killing of a senior commander of the Palestinian Islamic Jihad militant group in a wave of strikes Friday that Israel said were meant to prevent an imminent attack So far Hamas appeared to stay on the sidelines of the conflict whether it continues to stay out of the fight likely depends in part on how much punishment is real inflicts in Gaza I'm Julie Walker

Israel Gaza Palestinian Islamic Jihad Hamas Julie Walker
Indiana becomes 1st state to approve abortion ban post Roe

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 4 d ago

Indiana becomes 1st state to approve abortion ban post Roe

"I'm Mike Gracia reporting Indiana becomes the first state to approve an abortion ban post role Indiana has become the first state to pass new legislation severely restricting access to abortions since the U.S. Supreme Court ruling in June that overturned drove the wade The Indiana legislature approved the near total abortion ban Friday and Republican governor Eric holcomb then signed the bill The legislation does allow some exceptions including in cases of rape incest and to protect the life and physical health of the mother After the Supreme Court ruling that removed constitutional protections for abortion Indiana was one of the first Republican run state legislatures to debate tighter abortion laws I'm Mike Gracia

Mike Gracia Indiana Indiana Legislature Eric Holcomb Supreme Court
 Musk response to Twitter lawsuit to be made public by Friday

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 6 d ago

Musk response to Twitter lawsuit to be made public by Friday

"I'm Mike Gracia reporting Elon Musk's response to the Twitter lawsuit will be made public this week Elon Musk's response to Twitter's lawsuit over his attempt to pull out of a $44 billion offer to buy the social media company will be filed publicly by Friday During a teleconference Wednesday Chancellor Kathleen saint Jude McCormick directed the public filing be docketed by 5 p.m. Friday Lawyers representing Musk wanted to file a public version of their answer and counter claims in Delaware court Wednesday But Twitter's attorney said they needed more time to review and possibly redact

Elon Musk Mike Gracia Twitter Chancellor Kathleen Saint Jude Musk Delaware
Castillo, early power send Mariners past Cole, Yankees 7-3

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | Last week

Castillo, early power send Mariners past Cole, Yankees 7-3

"Luis Castillo won his Mariners debut when was staked to a 6 zero lead before he took the mound in a 7 three victory over the Yankees Castillo struck out 8 over 6 and two thirds allowing three runs and 5 hits He was acquired by Seattle from Cincinnati on Friday A eugenio Suarez Carlos Santana and Jared kell Nick Homer against Garrett Cole in the opening frame Cole blanked the M's the rest of the way but the damage was done as Seattle took the rubber match of the series Jesse winker homered in the 7th inning and shortstop JP Crawford made a pair of strong defensive plays with Castillo on the mound I'm Dave ferry

Luis Castillo Eugenio Suarez Carlos Santana Jared Kell Nick Homer Garrett Cole Mariners Castillo Seattle Yankees Cincinnati Jesse Winker Cole Jp Crawford Dave Ferry
Rain aids in fight against California wildfire that killed 2

AP News Radio

01:00 min | Last week

Rain aids in fight against California wildfire that killed 2

"The death toll in that huge Northern California wildfire the state's largest blaze of the year has risen to four The siskiyou county sheriff's office says search teams discovered two bodies Monday at separate residences along state route 96 Two bodies were also found Sunday inside a charred vehicle in the driveway of a home near klamath river more than 100 structures including several homes have burned in the McKinney fire since it erupted last Friday Mike linbury is a spokesperson It's really tragic when a fire gets up and moves this fast and basically takes out a community And that's what happened in the klamath river area And unfortunately it didn't only take out a community It took the life It says people need to follow evacuation orders and stay on their guard This virus is still very much alive Weather conditions have caused it to lay down but it still has great potential I'm Julie Walker

Siskiyou County Sheriff's Offi Klamath River Mike Linbury Northern California Mckinney Julie Walker
New York Post Defines 'Recession' for Joe Biden

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:30 min | Last week

New York Post Defines 'Recession' for Joe Biden

"Recession. Noun. Plural noun recessions, a period of temporary economic decline. During which trade and industrial activity are reduced generally identified by a fall in GDP in two successive quarters. The U.S. economy, as you know, shrank 0.9% in the second quarter, after a 1.8% drop in the first three months. Despite being the literal definition of the word, President Biden said we're not in a recession. Grandpa Joe stood there in the unselect recession to me. I have a stack of New York Post covers. This is the coolest thing we did. I'm pretty jazzed about this because we're taking time in August to feed the hungry. Through our food for the poor campaign, and many of you have already stepped up, I prayed on day one that your heart might be touched. Well, listen to how much fun we've been having. If you're watching me on the Salem news channel right now or you're watching us on rumble or you're watching this at Mike online dot com. You can see the show as well as listen to us on the radio. And the New York Post Friday had this banner cover showing the definition of recession. It is exquisite. It's the perfect SmackDown of Biden pretending that somehow he's rescuing the economy.

President Biden Grandpa Joe The New York Post U.S. Biden
Which Eric Will Win the Missouri Primary?

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:01 min | Last week

Which Eric Will Win the Missouri Primary?

"Tell me, David drucker, it's primary day. Is Eric Schmidt, who should win in Missouri is a head in Missouri, Eric brightens a disgraced and falling like a rock, is Eric Schmidt going to win. Well, I still keep my eye on Vicky hartzler, even though Trump gave her one of his signature on endorsements. I talked to a lot of people in Missouri over the past few days, Republicans. The only thing they have in common is they want somebody other than Eric brightens to win. And they all told me that data they're looking at reflects the public polling that we can see. And they thought the only thing that might have saved brightens would be a Trump endorsement. And I was checking with some people yesterday when we didn't know which Eric he was going to endorse, we didn't know it was just going to be the generic era. And they said, look, even if it's great as at this point, it will be really tough for him. That endorsement really needed to come in by Friday morning. So Schmidt would seem to be in the pole position here. But I'd keep my eye on hearts for it because you never know.

Eric Brightens Eric Schmidt David Drucker Missouri Vicky Hartzler Donald Trump Eric Schmidt
California governor declares monkeypox state of emergency

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | Last week

California governor declares monkeypox state of emergency

"California has joined New York and Illinois and declaring a monkey pox state of emergency Nearly 800 cases have been reported according to health officials Governor Gavin Newsom says the declaration will allow emergency measures and help get more vaccines something people in San Francisco like Peter tran waited hours in a very long line for The rollout of the vaccines throughout this nation is absolutely horrible Doctor Luke John day at Zuckerberg San Francisco general hospital says Friday they got 4000 vaccines Once we go to our vaccine allotment we'll have to close the clinic until we receive our next allotment Monkeypox spreads through close skin to skin contact most getting sick so far have been gay men though health officials note the virus can infect anyone I'm Julie Walker

Peter Tran Gavin Newsom Luke John Zuckerberg San Francisco Gener Illinois California New York San Francisco Monkeypox Julie Walker
John Strand Spoke to Dr. Simone Gold From Her Prison Phone

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:02 min | Last week

John Strand Spoke to Dr. Simone Gold From Her Prison Phone

"Did finally hear directly from doctor gold via the prison telephone system for a very brief Senate 7 minute conversation on Friday. And I'm very grateful to share with you in the audience that doctor gold is in very sound mind and in good spirits relatively speaking, of course, given that she's in a very not only difficult and unpleasant but very unjust and concerning situation. Well, it really is astonishing. And the reason I want to talk about this is because Americans need to understand that there has always been corruption in the world. There's always been evil in the world. But the reason America is the greatest country in the history of the world is because we have been the most successful at dealing with it. We continue to fight corruption. We continue to work to undo injustices and wrongs. And

Senate America
 Abortion ruling prompts variety of reactions from states

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | Last week

Abortion ruling prompts variety of reactions from states

"Louisiana has reinstated its abortion ban I'm Lisa dwyer with the latest For weeks access to abortion in Louisiana has been flickering with the state's three clinics relying on rulings and temporary restraining orders that allowed them to continue operations but procedures came to a screeching halt Friday afternoon after an appeals court ruled in favor of Louisiana attorney general Jeff Landry The court ordered that Landry be allowed to enforce the ban while ongoing legal challenges play out in court The clinics are still open however but staff members are calling patients to notify them of the

Lisa Dwyer Louisiana Jeff Landry Landry
Jaelene Daniels Refuses Gay Pride Jersey, Sits out NWSL Game

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:01 min | Last week

Jaelene Daniels Refuses Gay Pride Jersey, Sits out NWSL Game

"Lean Daniels, by the way. That's the name of the young lady over at the North Carolina courage. That's the soccer team. She was sidelined for Friday's game, she refused to wear a gay pride themed Jersey. Daniels has an open Christian. She made headlines in 2017, she chose to withdraw from the U.S. soccer team. Two weeks after it was announced that both teams men's and women's would be wearing rainbow jerseys in honor of Pride Month. The team says we're disappointed with her choice. We respect her right to make that decision. No, she's not making the decision. They're the ones making the decision. Now my understanding is that the courage they have a mascot, they have uniforms, now if the soccer team wants to change the uniform in the mascot, then why is that the fault of the players? Why should they be penalized? Anyway, it seems to me the only person with courage on that team is jailing Daniels.

Lean Daniels Soccer Daniels North Carolina Jersey U.S.
"friday" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

07:23 min | 1 year ago

"friday" Discussed on Science Friday

"In on the controversial line. Three oil pipeline project in northern minnesota but first president biden's huge infrastructure. Bill is finally nearing the end of the road. It's over two thousand pages. Covers wide ranging infrastructure improvements from roads to broadband. The package also includes funding for projects. That would build up. The country's climate change resilience. Some climate change experts say. The budget doesn't go far enough and other analysis says the bill would not pay for itself hip to unpack the highlights on this and other stories is fun staff writer at vox based out of washington. Dc welcome back home air. Thanks for having me back. you're welcome. Let's talk about the infrastructure. Bill i proposed in march. How is it different from what biden laid out. Oh five months ago. What has changed. Will the big top line thing is that. It's much smaller than what joe actually wanted. When he presented his american jobs plan that rounded out to about two point one trillion. Dollars and this bipartisan bill. That's being worked on by ten. Democrats and ten republicans this is valued at about one trillion with only five hundred fifty billion dollars in new spending so there were a lot of concessions made and some of those concessions were on things that were related to climate change particularly on mitigating and reducing greenhouse gas emissions although it does contain a fair number of provisions for dealing with the impacts of climate change adaptation and so it has about five hundred million dollars to protect homes against wildfires about eleven point six billion dollars for the us army corps of engineers to improve flood control and about seventy three billion dollars for power infrastructure. But there were a lot of cuts on the things that would actually reduce greenhouse gas emissions. So there was basically a compromise by did not get everything he wanted here. Right you know biden wanted about three hundred sixty three billion dollars in tax credits for clean energy that would boost the deployment of wind and solar power and he wanted about one hundred fifty seven billion dollars for electric vehicles and infrastructure and that was shrunk to about fifteen billion in this version of the bill and there was also five hundred fifty six billion in research and development funding that was also removed but there is one key provisions does reduce greenhouse gas emissions that still here and that's the provision to deal with orphan oil and gas wells. These are you know. Wells that have been abandoned that are still leaking methane which is a very potent greenhouse gas and so by closing them off they can actually get some out side reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and so there is still some money there to do that. Yeah they don't talk about this in general when we hear about some important little things that are in the bill but that's certainly is one of them. Yeah that's right and you know the all hope is lost here you know. Democrats are taking a two track approach. This is the bill that's going to pass with. Ideally bipartisan support. But there's also the reconciliation bill that you know. Democrats pass with just democratic votes and the thinking. is that a lot of what was cut out of the bipartisan. Bill will end up in the reconciliation. Bill bites there are some democrats that are starting to get a little bit wary about the size of that bill. And there's a question of whether the senate parliamentarian will approve all the provisions in it so that's not entirely a sure thing either and politically you know. A lot of environmental advocates are concerned that this may be the best opportunity we have in the by the administration to get these things done because after this then you know. we'll be entering. The midterm election sees and a lot of other things could come up and so they're saying that this is an opportunity. We need to seize right now to do as much as possible. Another announcement coming from the biden station. I is a new rule for electric cars. This seems to be a big step. Yeah that's right. Transportation is the largest source of greenhouse gas emissions in the united states and cars and light duty trucks are about sixty percent of the share of transportation greenhouse gas emissions and this week president biden said that he wants half of all cars and trucks in the us sold to be electric or a hybrid electric vehicles. And so that's a that's a pretty significant goalpost. You know this is a target. It's not necessarily binding but it tells the automotive industry but also battery suppliers and infrastructure developer. That the us has really wants to invest in electric vehicles. And the idea is that these industries will take that as a signal and start running forward and in addition to that they also announced new fuel economy rules. That would undo some of the rollbacks that were done under the previous trump administration but the ideas between the two of these provisions that you know with both the fuel economy rules and goal post electrification that will give a significant boost to. Evt's going forward. You just can't make more vs. You have to build the infrastructure to charge them to. That's right and you also have to build the demand for them. You know you also have to convince people to buy them and you know. That's been one of the other challenges. The auto industry has not invested a lot of money in developing them in and marketing. Them right now about two percent of new car sold in the us our electric so they need to do a much better sales job of trying to convince people to buy them and also need to pour a lot more money to research and development and there are indications that they're starting to do that you know. President biden was joined by leaders from general motors and ford. And they're saying that they're going to be pouring more money into coming up with better designs more efficient batteries and so on and now they just have to convince americans that these are just as good if not better than the cars. They're used to driving. Yeah a few weeks ago on the show. We talked about the future of batteries and there was a recent fire at a big tesla battery factory. Where was it in australia. Yeah that's right. This is a grid battery facility in australia. A caught fire of this weekend and it took just this week was put out. It took about four days to contain the blaze in more than one hundred fifty firefighters and when they looked at it they found out that this was just one battery unit inside a shipping container. So this is a thirteen ton. Lithium ion battery but it's part of a larger facility that can store about four hundred and fifty megawatt hours of electricity from the grid. There's two hundred ten of these battery packs. And so the concern here. Is you know how do firefighters and other first responders deal with batteries. Batteries are not necessarily more dangerous than other types of energy storage. You know if you compare them to things like fuel or other ways we condense energy into a small space but you know when they catch fire like this. You can't necessarily just use water you have to use other kinds of firefighting techniques. Because you know these are electrical fires and so That's going to be challenged because this is a new technology and a lot of a fire departments around the world as they're seeing these grid scale battery systems being installed in their jurisdictions are going to have to come up with ways to how to deal with them in case they deal with these emergencies. Yeah because batteries are certainly going to be part of our future and the old firefighting methods are are not working. Yeah that's right and you know that's kind of like one of the things that we don't always appreciate. When we incorporate new technology we've dealt with a gasoline fires and pipeline ruptures and things like that and power lines being dropped. And you know. Those risks are generally grandfathered in. But when you talk about these new kinds of technologies having these kinds new kinds of problems. It's not necessarily again that they're worse. It's just that they're different and oftentimes people can be caught off guard. Tis tesla does the industry also view this as a setback for tesla. Or just something as a bump in the road toward the future. I think there's a bump in the road you know it's not the first Battery fire we've seen at a grid scale energy storage facility..

biden us army corps of engineers Bill biden station president biden Evt minnesota united states President biden joe washington Wells
"friday" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

04:55 min | 1 year ago

"friday" Discussed on Science Friday

"Up in the environment a team of scientists wanted to study the effects of these antidepressants on streams wanting their way through ecosystems. So they look to none other than the crayfish they found that crayfish exposed to these drugs. Were a bit bolder. Their results were published this week in the journal. Ecosphere joining me now. To fill in this story are two authors on that study lindsay. Rice inger is an assistant professor in the fisheries and aquatic sciences program at the university of florida in gainesville. Aj rice sugar is in assistant professor in the soil and water sciences department also at the university of florida up to science. Friday inks extra having us now. Before i ask what does boulder meaning a crayfish to apologize. Who folks who called them crawfish rate depends on where you live Aj please tell us what happens when you take an antidepressant. Let's begin right there. How much of the drug ends up in. Wastewater or streams. Yeah so or prescribed a certain dose by our doctor that doses to ensure that we get enough of the medication into our bodies to have the proper affects. human bodies aren't one hundred percent officiant at metabolism drugs and so different bodies can break down the medications that they take in at different rates and so anybody might use seventy percent ninety percents of whatever medication they take in. I'm not sure of the exact percentages and it'll vary compound and by individual but some or shan of what you take into your body medication. Your body won't break down and so there or it will be excreted directly into your wastewater when you go to the bathroom and lindsay. So why is a crayfish. A good candidate to look at. Yes so there. Were several reasons why we chose crayfish. So one reason is that they just tend to be really abundant and their large so they make up a large biomass in freshwater ecosystems. So they can have major impacts. Another reason is that some species are tolerant of polluted conditions. So we might find them in a lot of streams or lakes that are receiving some water and then the third reason is that crayfish are actually a major model system to look at behavior and so we know a lot about chemicals like serotonin and its effects on crayfish and how that can translate into behavior. What we didn't know is whether trace amounts of chemicals in the water could affect crayfish behavior and you looked at one antidepressant in particular colder prime. The brand name 's alexa. You conducted this in a lab. Experimental stream lindsay. What did you find so we tested them in an aquarium where we first were looking at. How quickly they came out of shelter into a novel environments and the ones that had been exposed to drug came out almost twice as fast as the ones that were not exposed. We were pumping in water into this aquarium. Some of the water was from a bucket with a food source so that water smelled like food and then the other water had another crayfish in it so it smelled like a crayfish and we looked at how much time the cravers spent going after one of these two scented waters and if the crayfish had been exposed to the drug they spent almost three times more going after the food water compared to the crayfish water whereas the other cravers spend an equal amount of time in both sections that a bad thing for a crayfish to do well. It's not necessarily a bad thing. Particularly the fact that the crayfish came out of the shelter more quickly and our boulder. They might be more vulnerable to predators and if they are spending more time going after food they could have different impacts on the ecosystem and aj. You also looked at Possible downstream effects talking as we are about the ecosystem how could the ecosystem be affected by having these antidepressants in the crayfish and the water within the stream ecosystems themselves these artificial stream ecosystems refounded. The crayfish increase the amount of algae and the waterfall and they also increased the amount of organic matter at the bottom of the stream. But we found that it didn't matter if the crayfish had been exposed to the antidepressant or not they antidepressant had a major effect on crayfish behavior that lindsay talked about earlier. But that change in behavior didn't seem to change their impact in our artificial stream ecosystem however we think that might be because our study was fairly short is only a two weeks study and so the crayfish it takes awhile for that crayfish behavioral response to to show up. This is all hypothetical.

seventy percent two weeks gainesville two authors Rice inger this week third reason university of florida one reason ninety percents both sections one hundred percent first two scented waters three times alexa one Friday species twice
"friday" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

06:36 min | 1 year ago

"friday" Discussed on Science Friday

"Let's say we're comparing that product that t h c you're the cd to a placebo. Sugar pill and lastly one really important point is at all of this work requires funding. And so we as researchers were really hard to try and get funding to help support this research so all of this is happening behind. You know the doors of the university where the industry is ramping up very quickly and people's perceptions of how these products can be hopeful is increasing at a very fast rate and so as scientists. We are really trying to scramble and keep up with the current trends so that we can be able to answer the most relevant questions from a public health perspective. Donald the chiming please. I don't know where to start so with regards to the question of. Why don't the physicians still the patients what to take. Well i don't know what's available in my local dispensary so it. It is a conundrum. Because i say go ask the bud tender. What would work best for somebody with your condition. A few years ago as approach to doctor of pharmacy graduates from ucsf. Who asked me what. I would think if they opened a dispensary as well. That'd be a great idea. But they came back a year later and said it costs a million dollars down stope in a dispensary in californian said we're going to do a call shares cannabis platform where we're gonna discuss with patients. What it is. They're trying to treat what meds they take and will recommend to them an appropriate tincture. So that is something that i found very useful particularly for my older cancer patients who are not very interested in visiting a dispensary with regards to the issue of why. There's no data. I think dr cooper summarize it quite well. It is a schedule. One substance which the federal government thinks it has no accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse. And so you have to have many different regulations and procedures to jump through to be able to study cannabis and the only legal source of for cannabis. Research has always been the national institute on drug abuse whose products are not entirely up to speed with. What patients can get in the dispensaries. This is science friday from wnyc studios in case. You're just joining us. I'm talking with dr donald. Abrams and dr ziva cooper about cannabis and its use by doctors. Do you think then that the only way we would get enough research the funding and the the correct way of testing for the benefits or uses of cannabis would be. It's legalized nationally. You'll all jump in here from my own personal experience in dealing with this issue where having the federal scheduled one status is definitely a hindrance. But again i will say it's not the only hindrance for example. We cbd now nabbed. I'll it's a cannabis chemical chemical in the cannabis plant one out of seven. Us adults is using this chemical some indication and yet it is no longer schedule one but it is very hard to study simply because there are very few sources that i can get. Cbd from so again. I'm pointing to the importance of having a medication that really meets the fda standards so you need a medication that is free of metals mold. Pesticides it has to be carefully produced so that it can be given to people in a clinical trial that the sea overseas system capacity. I'm so for me. The federal one satis has definitely been a hindrance but it's not the only hindrance we are just lacking the supply of these drugs. That people are using right now to be able to study in people donald. Do you think that doctors are going to catch up cannabis. Laws state-by-state have changed so drastically over the past decade or so have you seen the perspectives of the medical establishment. Change over that time. Also well i think if you look at surveys of physicians. Physicians are highly supportive of medical cannabis over two thirds. In every study that's been conducted and for oncologists. It's a two percents in study from about eight years ago. Are in favor of medical cannabis. The issue is that they feel that they don't know enough to discuss it with their patients. And this whole issue. Dr cooper is talking about the fda approval. The pharmaceutical ization of marijuana. I think is incorrect. I think it's a therapeutic potential. It's been around for millennia. Patients should be able to access it like saw palmetto or explanation and it should be regulated like tobacco and alcohol. It's so much safer than all as a physician over forty years of my clinical experience. I have admitted one person to the hospital with a complication of cannabis that was dusted with. Pcp back in the nineteen seventies the number of people that have admitted to the hospital with complications of alcohol which is legal as a recreational substance. A hundred thousand people die in the united states every year from alcohol but the reason many physicians are also fearful is because it is a schedule one substance and especially people who have federal grants will not talk to their patients about cannabis for fear of having their federal grants retracted. I say i have federal grants to study canvas. So that's crazy but we now have administration where they're asking young people who have used cannabis to get other jobs so although people had high hopes i fear that it's it's not medicine. It's the politics that needs to change and we know how long that will take. Thank you both for taking time to be with us today. Thanks great thank you so much for having us dr. Ziva cooper director for ucla's cannabis research initiative in los angeles. Dr donald abrams. Integrative oncologists professor emeritus at uc. San francisco's osha center for integrative medicine. We have to take a break and when we come back a look.

donald abrams los angeles a year later united states Donald donald. Abrams today friday over forty years both ucla one person seven One substance few years ago dr. one two percents cooper about eight years ago
"friday" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"friday" Discussed on Science Friday

"The danger is that we are going to default to not holding the manufacturer accountable but holding the car accountable. Or even holding a driver accountable. Who was told that they need to be paying attention to the road. One hundred percent of the time even though the robot is doing ninety nine percent of the work. So you have these handoff problems so it is a very complex issue and i think the important takeaway that i really want people to be thinking about. Is that when you compare the car to a horse or an animal. You have a very different sense of who should be held accountable than when you view it as some science fictional robot that can make its own Decisions should be saying. It's not the robust fold but rather the manufacturer the trainer we need to be looking for the accountability in the people who build these systems because we default so easily to giving the robots themselves agency science friday from wnyc studios. Talking with kate. Darling research specialist for the mit media lab author of the new breed would our history with animals reveals about our future with robots. D think we should be making robots that look like humans. I'm thinking of data in star trek. Data and star trek had such a crush. Data was growing up. Really one of my favorite androids. But i think my answer to that would be generally no. I do think that we have this inherent fascination with recreating ourselves in that. We're always going to make humanoid robots for art entertainment purposes. And i think that's fine but for the most part. I don't think that the human form is particularly useful. People argue that we need humanoid robots in order to relate to them. We know from human robot interaction research. That's not true. At all you can create a robot in any shape that can be compelling and emotionally and socially compelling to people if you even think of pixar animators in the way that they can put emotion into a blob. You know that something doesn't have to have a human shape and then the other thing that people say is that we need humanoid robots because we have a world that's built for humans with stairs doorknobs and narrow passageways. But i think sometimes we forget that that's not a world built for humans but for able bodied humans of a certain height. And i think that if we thought a little bit more outside of the box about how we build our entire infrastructure and made it more inclusive to wheelchairs and strollers and children than we also wouldn't need to have these very expensive to build humanoid robots but could have robust on wheels and robots of all different sizes and shapes. Which would be more practical. What's your opinion abed. Who will decide a robotic future. Well that is the tricky part because despite all of the headlines saying new jobs blame the robots or you know this technology is coming and we just need to learn how to deal with it. I truly believe that this is all about our own choices as humans and unfortunately those choices are made against the backdrop of an economic and political system that we have in place. Currently that to me is the true danger that going to see uses of the technology that don't support human flourishing that aren't in the public good that harm certain groups of people because the choices are being made by the current politicians in the current corporations against the backdrop of corporate capitalism. That is not always in the public interest. And so i think it's so important for us to remember that the robots don't determine the future that we determine the future whether we're designing robots were voting for. Who's in office. I think that it's really important to remember that we determine what this robotic future means kate. Darling thank you so much taking time to be with us today. Thank you so much for having me. Kate darling author of the new breed. What our history with animals reveals about our future with robots..

today Kate ninety nine percent One hundred percent one kate androids friday star trek star trek wnyc
"friday" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

06:45 min | 1 year ago

"friday" Discussed on Science Friday

"This is friday. i'm jan kaczynski in for is as you may have heard the robots are coming but what could coexisting with them truly look like in this conversation. Ira in robot assist kate darling for vision inspired by our age old relationship with dogs oxen and other animal partners there are stories you see a lot about robots the first is the robot uprising right. You're probably thinking about arnold schwarzenegger in terminator or i robot. The second is robots will replace a story. You recall that movie he i. The story is much more present in the news. This fear that will soon have robots and is that can and will put people out of work. My next guest doesn't believe either of those stories is inevitable and she wants us to look at a different story. One that has already happened. And i'm talking about our history with animals as co workers as a guide to the future with robotics. Kate darling is a research specialist at mit media lab author of the new breed. What our history with animals reveals about our future with robots. Welcome to science friday. Thanks for having me well. What does our history with animals reveal about our future with robots. You know it's struck me in all of the conversations that we have about robots that we're subconsciously comparing them to humans. We compare artificial intelligence to human intelligence. We compare robots to people. And that's what leads to these science fictional notions of robot uprisings or robots replacing us. It just seems like that's the wrong analogy because artificial intelligence is not like human intelligence at all so if we look at our history of working with a very different type of intelligence animals and we look at how we've domesticated animals and partnered with them throughout history. That seems like a much better way to think about these technologies moving forward. I remember in college studying bef skinner using pigeons to guide missiles. You mentioned pigeons as the original drones. Here that's right. I mean we've used animals for so many different things. And i love that. You mentioned the ultimately cancelled project where of using pigeons to guide missiles. So you could say. It was the first autonomous missile system of before we had machines that can do this for us. And we've used the economy of animals in the intelligence in the sensing ability of animals for millennia to help us do these things and are so many fun parallels to howard using robots today and what is ultimately the best use case for robots which is supplementing human ability. Doing things that were not able to do on our own. Not that i'm particularly a fan of self guided missile systems and some of the ways that they're being used but it's just an interesting example of how these things aren't new. We have partnered with these humans that can sense and think and make autonomous decisions and learn for such a long time. Why aren't we thinking about that as the analogy when we talk about robots. Yeah because we all can recall and there is still some societies that use oxen for example to pull carts and do work. Is that where you're going to using animals as companions for helping us get worked up. That's one of the ways that we can use robots so like you said we've used oxygen and farming. We've used horses to let us travel the world in new ways. We've used pigeons to deliver mail. But the point isn't that animals and robots are exactly the same or that they have the same abilities there are a lot of differences between animals and robots. You can't dictate an email to animal and a lot of animals are better at staying on their feet. For example than most robots that tend to fall over the point of the book. Is that this analogy. Let's us open our minds to new ways of using these technologies that aren't replacement for human skill. Because this idea that we can will or should replace people is very limiting and. I don't think that we should be trying to recreate skills that we already have. When we have the opportunity to create something supplemental that can help us. Pull the plows. That is disruptive in the way the animals have been but not this one to one replacement that we're constantly hearing about in the news. Okay so open my mind up to some of those ways that we can work with robots traditionally in robotics the most compelling use case has been anything. That's dirty dolor. Dangerous the ds and we've already been pretty successful over the past five decades at using robots in factories or in settings where it's dangerous for people or not great for people to be doing repetitive or harmful work or going to space. These are really the really good use cases for robots that we've already seen but beyond that i mean robots have so many physical and sensing abilities that we don't have. I think that we should really really be thinking outside of the box on how we use these technologies. I mean we've used animals for so many different things. We've used them as tools. We've also used them as her companions. And i also believe that robots might be useful in a social sense and in fact robots might actually be able to offer something in health and education of when we used them in the social way as well. Let's continue talking about the history. We have with animals. Even pets are a relatively new innovation. aren't they. They are in western society. This idea of you know having a dog that's a member of the family and is only there as a member of the family not there to guard the house or perform. Some function is relatively new and in the beginning when we started having more of an emotional connection to animals there were even some people some psychologists who raised some concern about that and said well this could be too much may take away from people's ability to form human relationships and friendships if they get too emotionally involved with animals and of course that quickly turned out to not be true they have taken away nothing and provided much to us as we think about robots moving forward. I wonder whether we might be able to fold them into our diverse set of relationships rather than fearing that. They're going to take away you in your book to talk about animal. Robots in how people really get close to their robots even to the point of thinking about burying them like animals. That's right for example. Sony had this robot dog called..

arnold schwarzenegger Ira jan kaczynski Sony friday today first kate Kate darling mit media lab second One first autonomous missile past five decades one of the ways millennia terminator
"friday" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

08:30 min | 1 year ago

"friday" Discussed on Science Friday

"This one known as a living fossil. But first this week. The fda gave the green light to a drug for the treatment of alzheimer's disease. It's a monoclonal antibody called. I do canham ab it targets. The beta amyloid that forms the amyloid plaques found in the brains of people with alzheimer's the drug will be sold by the company biogen under the trade name helm and the price. It's gonna list for about fifty six thousand dollars a year but the data is less clear on the efficacy of the drug wall. Researchers agree that it leads to less amyloid plaque. No one's quite sure what that means in terms of real benefits people with the disease and outside advisory panel had recommended a the treatments approval. Joining me now to help sort through the approval and what happens next is pam belic. She's a science and health writer for the new york times and you'll find some links to some of her recent articles on our website at signs. Friday dot com pam. Welcome to science friday. Thanks for joining us. Happy to join you so first of all. Walk us through this drug. What does it actually do. Yeah so educated or is it's going to be branded as you said it is an anti amyloid drug. What it does is targets a key protein. That is involved. In alzheimer's amyloid is the protein that clumps into flats in the brains of people with alzheimer's edgy canham. Oh does a pretty good job of clearing amyloid out of the brain and the question is does it actually produce any benefit and the evidence has really been pretty contradictory. There were two large phase three trials that were nearly identical that biogen conducted of this drug and they were both stopped early by a data safety monitoring committee because the committee said we looked at the data. This john doesn't look like it's working and so everybody thought that this was yet another failure and then a few months later by sifting through some data that had come in in the three months between when the data that the data monitoring committee was looking at and the time they sort of pull hog and they said you know in one of these trials we see a swipe benefit in people who are taking the high dose. They saw a slowing of cognitive decline of about twenty two percent over eighteen. That's about four months of slowing over eighteen months. Were a little over two and a half months of slowing a year. That was in one of the trials. The other nearly identical trial showed absolutely no benefit of the drug over placebo. And so this is why this struggle so soundly rejected by the fda's advisory committee and by a number of alzheimer's experts and they say it's look it's you've got one positive and one negative trial and and why should we prioritise the results of the positive trial. And then there's also a question that even if we do prioritize that was of that trial is the benefit so slide just a few months of slowing of decline that it outweighs the risk of the strength in there are some risks. What and before we talk about the risks. I mean maybe you can just talk through a little bit more. How unusual this is to have trials that are in some way so unsuccessful actually result in a drug being cleared for use it. I think it's very unusual. Certainly very unusual in the alzheimer's space this kind of pathway to approval has been used by the fda for a lot of cancer immunotherapy drugs. There is sort of a suggestion benefit. But they don't have the kind of slam dunk evidence that the fda likes to see. Typically they're supposed to look for to significant now convincing clinical trials to grant approval and this pathway that the fda us it's a program called accelerated approval this often used for cancer drugs where there's sort of this sign of benefit but it isn't a slam dunk and it's combined with some sort of additional action that we can see that the drug does usually sort of acting on a biomarker or some kind of physiological underpinning of the disease. And that's what the fda shows to do here. They said we get the. The clinical evidence here is not a slam dunk. We think there's a suggestion of benefit. But we get. This is really not as convincing as we would like. But we're going to take that and add in the fact that the one thing everybody does agree on is that the drug reduces amyloid. And we're going to take that and give it this approval and the approval is contingent on biogen. Jin doing another trial. Which kind of sounds like. Okay you know get it out there and then have them come back and doing other trial and see if it works but in reality there are some issues with that because the trial could take up to nine years and so while that is going on there are no restrictions on who can receive this drug that a significant number of people in the scientific community are not confident actually works so so what then happens as this very long trial goes on. Let's say they find out it doesn't work overtime. Can it be unapproved. Yes and and they. The fda has done that with some drugs in the past. If the what they call the confirmatory clinical trial does not confirm benefit then. The fda can revoke approval. But it doesn't have to revoke approval and in fact there have been Some pretty strong fights waged over cancer. Drugs that has not shown benefit in their follow up trials. And sometimes the fda has said just gonna let it stay on the market anyway And their stated reasoning for that is that these are very serious diseases with not a whole lot of other treatment options and so i think there's some element of we understand the desperation of patients with these diseases. And if there's any kind of suggestion that something might help. The fda seems to be leaning in that direction. You mentioned side effects. What are the possible side effects of this drug so the most serious ones are that the dragen clause rain swelling and brain bleeding and in the phase three clinical trials forty percent of participants experienced though side effects. Now that sounds really serious and in actuality it can be very mild and many of those cases. It was very mild. People had the brain swelling. But they didn't have any symptoms or they had relatively manageable. Symptoms like headaches and dizziness but in some cases it can be very serious and in those trials six percent of participants had to drop out because these effects were very serious. So anybody who gets. This drought will need and balance given as a as an intravenous infusion. It's not a pill. It's a monthly intravenous infusion so you have to go into a center and then you will need to get periodic brain. Mri is to monitor. And see if you're getting any of this swelling or brain bleeding when you're when you're doing this kind of regimen in a clinical trial. There's a whole lot of safeguards. It's very strict. it's very carefully conducted. It's going to be harder to make sure that be very clinics and the providers who are going to be giving this out to potentially millions of.

six percent new york three months forty percent about twenty two percent one two both friday over eighteen months over two and a half months one positive beta amyloid one of the trials about fifty six thousand dolla one negative trial a year first about four months few months later
"friday" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"friday" Discussed on Science Friday

"Accessibility of counseling accessibility to crap accessibility to testing and ultimately adequate treatment if you prove to be infected or living with hiv whereas in some areas of the country particularly in rural areas of the south which demographically overrepresented with african americans that the stigma the lack of access. All of those other factors have made it very difficult to have that kind of accessibility to all the things that you need to really stop. the outbreak. Easy testing lack of stigma accessibility to care accessibility to drugs. When you needed there are certain areas of the country where it is not as accessible as in other areas I just have a few minutes left. I wanted just change gears for a second. Because i could not help but ask you something that i just saw by your office this week. And and that is concerning Were going on with a universal flu. Vaccine clinical trial is that correct. That is correct. Ira and say viral like it's a nanoparticle that has on it. At least four separate hema gluten molecules from various different strains of flu. So what we're doing now has a number of ways to do that. You can do it by looking. For example at the various hot of a single virus or you can clustered together on a nanoparticle. The hema gluten in from multiple different ones. we're very I would say cautiously optimistic about this. Because we feel that this type of technology this type of platform technology As new as it is as really has a really extraordinary degree of potent immunogenetics city of a wide array of responses. So we think that this is hopefully going to be a winner. But we don't know for sure unless we test as you well know. Yeah that's simple question for you. How do you feel about your emails getting leaked well. You know the trouble with that. ira is. when people look at emails. They then can take anything out of context. They could pull a sentence out without the rest and say that tony fouled. She said this in an email and it could be a real misconstruing of what the real context of what the email is but the ones that were published in the washington post on. There was nothing. No problem with that. I think it showed me to be honest straightforward person and chose that yet. You're working very hard. Yeah eat meals at one thirty in the morning. Yeah you're not getting those out you don't get that many hours sleep anyhow. I'm sure i don't well. Thank you very much for taking time to be with us today. Appreciate that thank you. It's good to be with you as always are dr. Anthony found Recipient of the presidential medal of freedom and director of the national institute of allergy and infectious diseases in bethesda maryland. And hopefully. We'll we'll try this again ten years from now and see where we stand indeed. Hopefully i'll be here too if you want to go back in time to learn more about the history of the aids epidemic in america including some of my reporting for npr back in the eighties. You can check out. Our science friday rewind story at science friday.

america today dr. this week bethesda maryland eighties Anthony friday one thirty in the morning national four separate hema gluten mole african americans science single virus years washington of ten second
"friday" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"friday" Discussed on Science Friday

"Science Friday, is supported by IBM, the world needs a technology company that applies smart technologies at scale with purpose and expertise, not just for some, but for all, let's expect more from technology. Let's put smart to work. Visit IBM dot com slash smart. To learn more. Listener supported w NYC studios. Hi, everybody. Thanks for listening. I wanted to give a quick. Thank you to everyone who donated and celebration of cephalopod week and help build our online. See of support we can't do this stuff, particularly not these fun things like cephalopod week without your help. So thank you. And if you missed out just reminded that you can make a donation at any time to support Sifi by visiting our website. We're a nonprofit and we rely on donations from our fans and listeners, so go to science Friday dot com slash give to donate once again, that science Friday dot com slash give, and thanks. This is science Friday. I'm my reflect a little bit later in the hour. We'll talk about signs that science may be under fire at the US department of agriculture including liquid. Why the USDA's keeping quiet about its own climate change research? But I and the democratic presidential. Bates. There were quite a few mentions about climate change. He candidate seemed to have at least some thoughts about addressing climate change. But last week, the Trump administration rolled back the clean power plan and Obama era proposal to address climate change by setting limits on emissions on power plants now the Trump EPA has replaced that with a new plan called the affordable clean energy rule here to fill us in on that story is mayor fine staff writer for vox, welcome back to science Friday, Hira..

IBM USDA Bates NYC Sifi Obama EPA staff writer
"friday" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

04:24 min | 3 years ago

"friday" Discussed on Science Friday

"We still don't know that one if he's right or wrong. I personally think is right. But I don't know this is my it, it's one of the open open question, you know scientists out about closing questions is about opening question and opening civility and the possibility of a final universe. It's very interesting. I think intriguing let's go to the phones. Let's go to Savannah, Georgia. One of my favorite cities and Omar I welcome to science Friday. Thank you for taking my call. I hope I'm posing this question correctly, but are the, the observations of as they pertain to general relativity, the same and the experience, so to speak the same around a large gravity, well versus a smaller gravity? Well. Versus like the sun versus the moon, something like that. I hope I posed that correct. I think he got it. Let's get Karl. Thank you. Yes, grabbing grinding effect can be smolder or stronger or weaker depending on the mass, but is exactly the same the same phenomenon Wednesday, go very strong. We go to black holes and let me put this way, ninety nineteen eclipse is an editor motivation was the first spectacular o'kielty initiative. I think theory since then we've had a series of them expanding union of black holes. And a couple of years ago, the gravitational wave could use it by black holes is the same phenomenon. The same gravity described by the same equation. But it's a variety of different Conceicao sciences old predicted by the scenery. And in, in the century one after the other one over refined. They all seem that crazy. And they turn out to be correct. One last question for you. If this was such a dynamic, and light changing scientific event in the whole theory, both theories of relativity. Why is it the nine Stein? Never won the Nobel prize for these he wanted for something. He did earlier out of this escape. Well, he won the Nobel price for the Photoelectric effect, which has nothing to do with that is something else seen from the eyes of today. Everything could have deserve the maybe four or five different overprices certainly the one for the for the nineteen effect, he got but also specialty also generate these series where very complex and in spite of patacula prediction of nineteen nineteen. Ecological complicated theory, it took a long time before the entire community, actually took it for established physics. Now it is. So and the noble committee, I would say correctly, so it's very cautious in a sense. It's not sufficient to explain something and to get one prediction right wants to see before theory works. So it waited I think double is kind of baton to somebody after the person is dead. I think now there will be no doubt. I would deserve several overprices. You, you, you deserve a price for your books there. So great to raid, cholera valley, author of reality is not what it seems and seven brief lessons, in physics, Dr Ravelli is a theoretical physicist at the X Marseille university in France. That was Carlo Ribelli recorded on science Friday in the summer of twenty seventeen. Thanks for listening. Catch you on Friday. I'm I replayed. Oh, in New York science Friday, is supported by IBM. We live in a world. That's creating a I enabled everything or world. With more IOT devices than people today technology has never been smarter. But smart only matters when you put it to work where it matters when we put smart to work, we could help save species increased crap yields and make progress, but not just for a few of us for all of us. So let's get to it. Let's put smart to work. Find out how it IBM dot com slash smart.

Stein IBM Nobel prize Savannah Georgia physicist Karl Carlo Ribelli editor X Marseille university New York Dr Ravelli France
"friday" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

03:24 min | 3 years ago

"friday" Discussed on Science Friday

"Oh, this is science Friday from WNYC studios. Talking about screaming and that's with Harold Gazulas. Professor of psychology Emory University. Let's go to phones, because his interesting comment here from was, it Galen and the Lake Tahoe? Hey there, go ahead. Well, I retired fantasy policewoman and I have been an all kinds of scary situations. And when it's really really scary really scary, I been barest, but I have to say, I hope I just like a monkey just like a monkey and I don't do it any other time. I wouldn't even imagine. But then when it comes out, I can't, I can't stop until the situation is either safer or something has changed. But I who are you trying to scream the you trying to swing? No, no, I'm fact the last time I did it wasn't even on the job. I was hiking in Malibu in the mountains. And I was talking way and totally relaxed going on trail and suddenly a snake snapped at me. Almost hit my, my foot my tennis shoe and without thinking I who. Hooted backwards down the trail. I didn't even know. I could do I hopped and hop and the snake when through the air, I landed under the shade of a tree. And I got quiet and I have no idea how I knew to do that because I had never done that in my life. Great story. Thanks for sharing that with us. Wow. Herald. Everyone's you know everybody likes creams, and I noticed that on the webpage, you had mooks famous scream painting right up there, which of course, everybody recognizes, I believe it's second. Only to the Mona Lisa in terms of being recognized by people. Can you can you be too afraid to scream? You know, you see that in people in, in movies or whatever. And then she was describing the she hooting. Is there a time when we're to something just close up our minds? Don't scream I believe that does happen. I do we know why that happens or is that not part of your research? No, no. We haven't been able to, you know that our research, focuses mostly on how people respond to screams, we play them through headphones. And then we have them work on a computer and, and answer questions about how they're perceiving screams and what they think the they're, they're associated with. But it's harder to study scream production, unlike in in, in the days when we were studying monkey vocalisations you go out into the field. You work with a group of monkeys. And you put a microphone in front of them, and you can record screams. Of course, you can't do that with human screams, very readily. Now you can't do that. And I wanna thank you for taking time to today, and I hope you know, how do you say all your screams are little? Well, I they're not. But still appreciate this opportunity. Thank you. You're welcome. I enjoyed a have one arrow Zuma's a professor of psychology at Emory University in Atlanta and. We'll we won't scream..

Professor of psychology Emory University Mona Lisa WNYC studios Lake Tahoe Harold Gazulas Galen Malibu Zuma Atlanta
"friday" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

03:11 min | 3 years ago

"friday" Discussed on Science Friday

"Friday dot com slash lemurs. And these are primates, right? We right. So I'm to see connection here. Yeah. That's that's where a lot of the interest comes in we actually possess some of the genes that the dwarf lemur has that enables it to go into hibernation now. We don't know the mechanisms. The biological mechanisms that enable the animal to do that. But we do we know that we share the, gene. So there's a lot of interest in perhaps we could trigger hibernation ourselves. Well, if we if we trigger it, we must study have to stop it. Yes. Ideally, once you know, how to turn it on. Hopefully, we'll be able to turn off. I don't know that snus some whole other round of studies. And okay. So what would you do that you could put somebody into Tupua heading torpor is that we torbert towards another way of saying hibernation. Sure. So there's a lot of things that you could probably do with it. If you if you're going in for heart surgery your surgeon wants to lower your your circulation as much as possible. And so the easiest way to do that as to lower your blood pressure, lower lower, your body temperature, and that makes surgery a lot more safe for them. There are diseases where going into a coma with a much lower body. Temperature would be really beneficial. The disease would work its way through your system. And then you could wake up. Up and ideally would be out of your system. And then, of course, Nassau's really interested in this because they could reduce the payload on the rockets if you don't have to bring tons and tons of food for the rockets deed on their way out to Saturn or Mars or wherever they're going. Then you could save a lot of pay. Stuff in your rocket. A payload? But also, you, you know, one of the biggest problems of traveling in space is radiation. We're in a sleep state. You could just be put in a cocoon of letters something. Right. And maybe survive all that radiation. Ideally, ideally, I mean, I mean the haven't set any dwarf lemurs into space. They are in danger problem you're saying that you saying the video one of the problems is it's an endangered species. You can't poke at it or experiment there. There. The Duke lemur center has set up has this captive breeding population, and they do that because a lot of the areas where these animals are are living are being deforested. So they had this captive breeding population. And you can't really poker broader, dissect these animals, so they have to be very careful about their studies. But one of the interesting points, this is a great video as they say, it's up on our website at signs prayed that comes slash lemurs. Is that when they wake up it's like they've been in the wake time, right? I know I mean, so so if the not crawling at a bit tire so people that are in comas when they wake up their muscles. The muscles have been so degraded that they have to regain. Muscle function. And that takes a long time these worth lemurs don't have any of those problems their kidneys comp- function completely and scientists don't understand how they do it. So there's a lot to be learned from from these cute adorable creatures, and you can see those cute adorable creatures up on our website at science Friday dot com slash lemurs. Luke, Luke Ruskin. Thank you. Thank you for having having another great video BJ Liederman. Composed. Our theme music, and if you missed any part of the program, we're on social media everywhere.

coma Luke Ruskin Duke lemur center Tupua Nassau
"friday" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

03:57 min | 3 years ago

"friday" Discussed on Science Friday

"That says science Friday high my replay to- inactive ingredients you've seen them on the back of that bottle of aspirin. You have at home or box of allergy medication. You're purchasing here is zoom right by them. Right. As you're looking for the dosage or list of side effects. You don't give them a second thought. Because what they're called inactive ingredients. That means. They don't do anything. Right. Well, a lot look a little bit closely at those inactive ingredients and you'll find they include things like peanut oil lactose and gluten and in fact as a new study out this week shows over ninety percent of medications have. Active ingredients that a really active that can cause allergic reactions in certain patients here to tell us what to make of all of this is one of the authors of that study, Dr Giovanni Traverso assistant professor at Brigham women's hospital hovered mid school and the department of mechanical engineering and MIT Dr traverse a welcome back to science Friday. No, thanks so much for having me. So what else is my blood pressure? Medication? Not that. Doing for me. Besides the medicine it self what what compounds kind compounds you find in these inactive ingredients. I mean, I think it's really fascinating. I mean, what what will you find that? This was sort of is something that, you know, I came across a few years ago, and you know, one of the things that we set out to do in. The study is really analyze exactly what else is in there. And you know, an average we find that about seventy five percent of tablets and capsules are actually occupied by these inactive ingredients. And I'm, you know, typically on average they're about eight other, you know, ingredients in in in that capsule and sometimes up to thirty five, and you mentioned earlier, you know, their ingredients like lactose, sometimes starch, which can be wheat derived. So hence, the potential for gluten in some instances also even peanut oil, but you know, many other, you know, they're over a thousand chemicals that can won't continues from you know, to really help make that that that capsule. So why did the pharmaceutical companies if they know this kind of stuff? I mean, they know that people are allergic to lactose, and we peanuts. Why did they do? They put them inside the pills. I, you know, I think one thing that really emphasize here is that the these inactive ingredients are actually really important. So I think by no means always adjusting that they'd be removed, and they play a critical role with respect to this ability of that tablet, or capsule, you know, the appearance potentially, you know, modulating taste or even enhancing absorption, or even, you know, preventing tamper proofing, and you know, likely the reason that we have some of these ingredients is, you know, for his talk historical reasons, where we've seen some of these work to actually facilitate the the, you know, those parameters in in in in the pills. But certainly as awareness increases, you know, it's something that I think we're all starting to appreciate hopefully, more and more. And I, you know, I think hopefully, we're getting more focus around what should be included. And can we find alternatives in some situations? And you think that there are alternatives that could be -absolutely, you know. And if you take drugs, you know, dr- drugs that are now, John. Eric, for example, members all which is used for the treatment of reflux or also treatments. You know? There are many different formulations of map result. So for example, you know, the physician like I will prescribe let's say members all twenty milligrams once a day or twice a day. But that the at that does, you know there there can be over thirty or forty different formulations of of a map result twenty milligrams and my formulation. I mean, you know, the composition of the inactive ingredients. So you one might find ones that have lower amounts of lactose or no lack those and others that may have lactose. And so, you know, certainly there are alternatives, and and, you know, for some drugs there are many alternatives for others are few, you know, sometimes when I go to the drugstore, and I have a medication limb..

Brigham women aspirin Dr Giovanni Traverso assistant professor Eric John seventy five percent ninety percent
"friday" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

03:55 min | 3 years ago

"friday" Discussed on Science Friday

"I'm John Kasich you sitting in for IRA though, forty three years ago. Bob peck, started a new job at the academy of natural sciences in Philly. The oldest natural. History institution in the US just under a month into the job. He spotted some cool looking metal boxes sitting academies hallway destined for the trash thinking these boxes might make a cool entity for his apartment. Bob, of course, snag them only to find they weren't empty boxes inside was a strange kind of collection, a collection of hair inside, these boxes were human hair, animal hair hair for mummies and hair. From get ready from thirteen US presidents Bob had stumbled on the collection of Peter Brown. A citizen scientist whose collection of hair says much about nineteenth century sciences. Does about the diversity of the stuff. Topping our heads today. Bob is the curator of art and artifacts of the academy. And he's written a book about Brown's idiosyncratic collection. It's called specimens of hair and joins me now to talk about it. Bob, welcome to science Friday. Thank you. Glad to be with you. Maybe can describe what you saw when you open these metal boxes some forty three years ago. Well, of course, it I I thought they were just empty boxes since they were in the trash, but there to my surprise where some. Albums dozens and dozens of albums actually beautifully leather bound and each page were little tufts of hair first few albums, were sheep will. And and then we got into animal hair, and then finally human hair some of which was perfectly anonymous, but I began recognizing names on some of the other sheets that caught my attention. I can imagine. We'll get those names in a moment. Given what you've found in there. Why was the academy throwing this stuff away? Well, we were in a process of moving from one place to another. There were lots of things that were being reviewed, and I think the curator's at the time felt that this was not something that really deserved scientific attention. They were mostly looking at the wool and some of the animals for and they thought well, we've got full skins of animals elsewhere. Why would we keep these scrapbooks just taking up a lot of space? And they're probably wondering what exactly can we do with here? What does this have to do with our collection? Well, exactly, remember, this was all in a sort of pre DNA era DNA was only selected in the nineteenth century, but identified in the in the nineteen fifties, and then the complete human genome wasn't sequenced until night two thousand and three. So all of this back in the nineteen. Seventies was not recognized really for the value that it is today. So this is the collection of Peter Brown. And this is a big part of the story who was Peter Brown. Peter Brown was a lawyer and Philadelphia, but very patriotic and philanthropic man, and he was trying at first to help advance the agricultural world in in America. He he was collecting sheep wool from all over the world. So that he could instruct the growers of sheep here, which breeds would be best suited to which purposes. So this one might work. Well for a blanket or sweater, this one might be good for felt hat and people hadn't really paid much attention to that until he began to do. So. Go quite sort of from one step to another thought. Well, if we can do all this with sheep wool, and he was examining the will very carefully. He had invented a little mechanism to test is strength in its size called a trick. Commoner? He was looking at it with microscope. He said if I can study this much about sheep will maybe they're things in other animal, wool and hair that could be useful to us. But. But I have to ask you though. But that that's what's so interesting about this. Because it makes sense that you would find sheep wool interesting because you can make things out of it. But elephant tail hair or raccoon whiskers. Wh what possible use could this have to to human industry? Well, that's what we might say now..

Peter Brown Bob peck US academy of natural sciences John Kasich Philly scientist America forty three years
"friday" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"friday" Discussed on Science Friday

"Jason. Hey, John happy to be here. Maybe you can just very quickly. Tell us about the story because I know it's a very convoluted story, but this case that you started following in some of the twists and turns. That take us to to the science. He is it's a very sprawling case that that literally spans the country and more than three decades. But one way to get into it is to think about it as a as beginning with one missing persons cases. So a woman of the name of Lisa growing up in southern California thought for years that she had been abandoned by her father at a young age. But because of an unrelated murder case that happened while she was in her twenties. She and police found out that that person wasn't actually her father. So you have a situation where she and police had kidnapping case that was sort of decades old. But now they have the questions of who was she and where did she come from? And what was her real name and her who was her real family? And so the quest to answer those questions in a strange meandering way lead all the way back to New Hampshire and to some other mysteries. Along the way. I'm John dean Cosker this is science Friday from WNYC studios. And we're talking with Jason moon, the host of the bear brook podcast. So Lisa this missing persons suggested to law enforcement that they use genetic testing websites the the kind that anybody can use. Maybe you can explain the process though, that police go through genetic testing in genealogy to identify someone. He is. So one thing that's really important understand is is that if you have your DNA on say, ancestry dot com or twenty three and me police don't have access to that. They can't just go in and look around and try to find suspects. So what happened was is? There's a another website called Jett match that is sort of a nonprofit, you know, sort of built by two guys at down in Florida who were just genealogy enthusiasts. And it's it allows for more sharing of of the genetic information and people will turn to jed match to run more advanced searches on their on their DNA to look for. For distant cousins, and the like and also because it allows you to compare tests from different companies. So if I tested on twenty three and me, and you John tested on ancestry dot com. Instead of one of us having to buy another kit and and spend to a tube. And wait the couple of weeks to get a results to compare each other. We could just take our data to jed match, and this was a.

John dean Cosker Lisa Jason. Hey Jason moon WNYC studios kidnapping New Hampshire murder California Jett Florida three decades
"friday" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

03:21 min | 3 years ago

"friday" Discussed on Science Friday

"Have a world now that that see ISIS thinning in the Arctic when the Arctic had a huge amount of sea-ice all the time. Nobody in their right mind went up there unless you had an icebreaker talks. Let a now you'll have a military ship or a ship full of cars being shipped across the Arctic Ocean or a ship full of Torres. And as soon as you have people up there, the does re grow in the winter to some extent, and now you can get a ship trapped and you need a sea ice forecast, and they can see ice forecasts make an actually forecast bird, migrations. Now, the birds wanna go at a particular time of the year. But they wanna go when the weather's right? They wanna ride the wind and not fight. It. And so you can actually combine knowledge of biology with knowledge of the weather to tell the wind turbine operator. Hey, there's a huge flock headed your way. Shut it down for tonight. I I have to ask and we just have a couple of minutes left, though. Angela as Richard brings up C ice melting the specter of climate change hanging over all this how much more difficult does that make your job right now? How much more difficult could it be in the near future? I think that I think that we're seeing extreme weather get worse. And we're seeing we're seeing things that that we haven't seen in the past in terms of how difficult it is is to predict. It's I don't know if it's making forecasting more difficult. I think it's it's just that the events that we're seeing are more extreme, and maybe less believable an advance for some people. But and Richard you can you can tell me if I'm wrong. But I think that I think that overall the the physics of the atmosphere fluid dynamics is not going to change unless something really bad happens, Richard. I love your thought on that little less than a minute left. Go ahead. Right, right. It works. The climate change is making it harder in the sense that if you get more rain the flood gets harder forecast because it comes faster, but they're doing a great job of it. And they can do this physics works in Israel, and you sound very enthusiastic about the future, Richard. It's fantastically bright. It's it's if we keep the investment going the payoff is very clear, the public private partnership is very clear it's moving forward. We can degrade things. But but it takes a big investment. Which is I think maybe a topic for another day, Richard Allie. He's the Evan Pugh. Professor in the department of geosciences Penn State university. Thank you so much. I appreciate it. Thank you, a real pleasure. Thanks Angela Fritz, she's atmospheric scientist and deputy weather editor for the Washington Post. Thank you. Angela thanks for having me when we come back from forecasting weather to forecasting volcanoes. What we can learn from listening to lava tubes. This is science Friday. I'm John sqi. If you've been following our winter book club, you know, volcanoes are high on the list of topics that we're nursing out about in the next few weeks. The club is tackling MK Jemison apocalyptic book the fifth season which follows a world constantly and up evil from earthquakes volcanoes. We've gotta Facebook discussion group weekly newsletter and a lot more. It's not too late to join the fun checkout. Everything you need to know on our website science, Friday dot com slash book club..

Richard Allie Arctic Ocean Arctic Angela Facebook MK Jemison Torres atmospheric scientist John sqi geosciences Penn State univers Israel Washington Post Professor weather editor
"friday" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

03:24 min | 3 years ago

"friday" Discussed on Science Friday

"Slash book club. And of course, we're going to ramp up with a big roundtable discussion that's going to be on February fifteenth right with Lucy Jones and Laurie peak. And he discussion questions, I should be rated think about give gimme my homework. Assignment share IRA? I'm actually gonna let n que Jemison answer that one four u I already alluded to this a bit. But let's just say that even though the science, and the story seems like it might be geoscience seismology vulcanology, the various apocalyptic ways that this planet could be erupting. There's another element that I think is just as worthy of discussion that I really want people to think about two on. Here's an Jemison one last time since I was dealing with a society that was responding again, and again to these immense extinction level events, you know, when I was trying to get at is is not only how do people react to that constant pressure. But how do they react to the fact that they've got a group of people who could help them. And so you're looking at things like sociology, and in group dynamics, and so forth and rolls, power dynamics. How do people behave under pressure? So yeah. Yeah. And there's this whole science to human beings in these extreme crisis scenarios, we'll be digging into how disaster has shaped society in different societies over time. I mean, there's volcano connection to Frankenstein. And that writing for example, and we'll dig into that. We'll learn a bit more about how people are researching volcanoes around the world. We have a lot of really fun stuff in store. So people who are just tuning in and say, oh, I missed the book club. Once just go a little thumbnail of what we're reading how K Jefferson's the fifth season that is a work of fantasy or maybe science fiction, depending on how you read the book. It is the first in a trilogy, by the way, and we're not going to discuss the second two books necessarily our but club yet. So if you have spoilers already, please keep them to yourself. And then everything you need to know about participating is on our website science Friday dot com slash book club. We're giving away books this weekend, and you can enter on our website random drawing, we have all sorts of fun activities planned on our website. On our airwaves in the next couple of weeks. We have a really cool piece of art that was drawn for created for us to help us sort of tie everything together. And it's going to be a seismically good time. We're all gonna meet back here February fifteenth, ROY, please don't miss it IRA. Hopefully, I'll be back in the country. I know because it's always exciting. And you know, this is an award-winning. Yeah. Oh, yeah. I forgot to mention she won the Hugo for that's not chop liver is she she following to also won the Hugo. So she was actually I think the only person to win the Hugo three consecutive years three years in a row for this series. So it's really exciting. And it's a great story. And I hope everyone enjoys it. Good point coming up. Thanks again, Christie, Christy Taylor, Sifi producer and head of our Sifi book club. When last thing before we go just a quick note as you can probably tell us I've been talking about. I'm going to be hitting off her a few weeks vacation to explore anger. What and lots of other sites and Cambodia Vietnam Thailand. So John Dan Caskey's going to be filling my shoes while away hope to be sending along a few dispatches from the road. So please take good care, John. Well, I'm gone in. Hopefully, I'll send some stuff back. You can listen to chose his director senior producer because tally afteh. Our producers are Alexa,

Jemison John Dan Caskey K Jefferson Hugo Alexa IRA Lucy Jones Laurie peak producer Sifi Cambodia Vietnam Thailand ROY director Christie Christy Taylor three years
"friday" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"friday" Discussed on Science Friday

"Science Friday dot com after the break, you've heard about all these Diane's the Kito at a Mediterranean, the paleo. But what do they mean for your metabolism? Should you be worrying more about your metabolism than the actual calories things? Well, we're gonna talk about it with David look big. He's at Harvard. You know him he's very famous guy talking about nutrition. We'll be right back after this break. This is science Friday, I replay toe if you've made dieting part of your New Year's resolutions. You are. Are facing a challenge which diet to pick the paleo the Kito the Mediterranean seems like a new one comes by every day. And some of the diets count calories some of them Kevin carbs, and a recent study in the British medical journal scientist tested out, the low carb idea in nearly two hundred patients excuse me, and they saw that reducing carbohydrates did have an effect in increasing metabolism's which metabolism which the researchers said was crucial. So why is metabolism? So important in studying diets, just one of the many questions we all have about dieting including what about caffeine in artificial sweeteners. And should we rethink our idea of the calorie count you have questions about carbs fats? What you eat affects your metabolism. Our number is eight four four seven two four two five five eight four four site talk. Or you can tweet us at sei fry. My next guest is here to walk us. Through it. All David Ludwig is an author on the J study his us. Oh, professor of nutrition at Harvard University co director of the new balance foundation obesity prevention center and Boston children's hospital..

David Ludwig Mediterranean Kevin carbs Harvard University sei fry Diane Harvard British medical journal caffeine Boston professor scientist director